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Gout: HELP
Articles by Peter L. Evans
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Peter L. Evans wrote the following 2 articles about Gout.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Gender-specific risk factors for gout: a systematic review of cohort studies. 2019

Evans, Peter L / Prior, James A / Belcher, John / Hay, Charles A / Mallen, Christian D / Roddy, Edward. ·Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. j.a.prior@keele.ac.uk. · Research and Innovation, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester University Foundation Hospital Trust, Wythenshawe, UK. ·Adv Rheumatol · Pubmed #31234907.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Though gout is more prevalent in men than women, it remains unclear whether gender influences risk factors for incident gout. We aimed to systematically review all cohort studies examining risk factors for the development of gout by gender. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception to March 2019. Risk factors for gout examined were: age, ethnicity, consumption of alcohol, meat, seafood, dairy products, purine-rich vegetables, coffee and fructose, vitamin C intake, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, metabolic syndrome, BMI, waist and chest circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, weight change, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemias, renal disease, psoriasis, hypertension, diuretic use and anti-diabetic medication. Cohort studies were included if examining (at least) one of these risk factors for gout in either gender in the general population or primary care. Sample characteristics from included articles and their reported risk estimates were described using narrative synthesis. RESULTS: Thirty-three articles were included, 20 (60.6%)directly compared risk factors by gender, 10 (30.3%) used men-only samples, 3 (9.1%) used women-only samples. Articles comparing risk across genders found similar increases in most risk factors. However, in men, metabolic syndrome (Hazard Ratio (95% CI) 1.37(1.20-1.58)) presented a risk of incident gout compared to none in women (> 50 years 1.15(0.85-1.54); ≤50 years 1.29(0.76-2.17)). Compared to men, women showed greater associated risk with higher consumption of fish and shellfish (HR (95% CI) Men: 1.02 (0.86-1.22); Women 1.36 (1.12-1.65)). CONCLUSIONS: Risk factors for developing gout did not typically differ between genders and therefore similar preventative advice can be provided. Exceptions were metabolic syndrome in men and excessive seafood consumption in women, but these singular articles need further examination and in general more research into the risk factors for gout which includes women is required.

2 Article Obesity, hypertension and diuretic use as risk factors for incident gout: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. 2018

Evans, Peter L / Prior, James A / Belcher, John / Mallen, Christian D / Hay, Charles A / Roddy, Edward. ·Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. j.a.prior@keele.ac.uk. ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #29976236.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gout treatment remains suboptimal. Identifying populations at risk of developing gout may provide opportunities for prevention. Our aim was to assess the risk of incident gout associated with obesity, hypertension and diuretic use. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective and retrospective cohort studies in adults (age ≥ 18 years) from primary care or the general population, exposed to obesity, hypertension or diuretic use and with incident gout as their outcome. RESULTS: A total of 9923 articles were identified: 14 met the inclusion criteria, 11 of which contained data suitable for pooling in the meta-analysis. Four articles were identified for obesity, 10 for hypertension and six for diuretic use, with four, nine and three articles included respectively for each meta-analysis. Gout was 2.24 times more likely to occur in individuals with body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m CONCLUSIONS: Obesity, hypertension and diuretic use are risk factors for incident gout, each more than doubling the risk compared to those without these risk factors. Patients with these risk factors should be recognised by clinicians as being at greater risk of developing gout and provided with appropriate management and treatment options.