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Gout: HELP
Articles by Xue Li
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Xue Li wrote the following 2 articles about Gout.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Serum uric acid levels and multiple health outcomes: umbrella review of evidence from observational studies, randomised controlled trials, and Mendelian randomisation studies. 2017

Li, Xue / Meng, Xiangrui / Timofeeva, Maria / Tzoulaki, Ioanna / Tsilidis, Konstantinos K / Ioannidis, John PA / Campbell, Harry / Theodoratou, Evropi. ·Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK. · Colon Cancer Genetics Group, Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, Medical Research Council Institute of Genetics & Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece. · Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. · Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. · Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. · Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK E.Theodoratou@ed.ac.uk. ·BMJ · Pubmed #28592419.

ABSTRACT:

2 Article MR-PheWAS: exploring the causal effect of SUA level on multiple disease outcomes by using genetic instruments in UK Biobank. 2018

Li, Xue / Meng, Xiangrui / Spiliopoulou, Athina / Timofeeva, Maria / Wei, Wei-Qi / Gifford, Aliya / Shen, Xia / He, Yazhou / Varley, Tim / McKeigue, Paul / Tzoulaki, Ioanna / Wright, Alan F / Joshi, Peter / Denny, Joshua C / Campbell, Harry / Theodoratou, Evropi. ·Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Centre for Population Health Sciences, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Colon Cancer Genetics Group, Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, Medical Research Council, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · West China School of Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan, China. · Public Health and Intelligence, NHS National Services Scotland, Edinburgh, UK. · Department Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina Medical School, Ioannina, Greece. · Medical Research Council Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #29437585.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate the role of serum uric acid (SUA) level in a broad spectrum of disease outcomes using data for 120‚ÄČ091 individuals from UK Biobank. METHODS: We performed a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) to identify disease outcomes associated with SUA genetic risk loci. We then implemented conventional Mendelianrandomisation (MR) analysis to investigate the causal relevance between SUA level and disease outcomes identified from PheWAS. We next applied MR Egger analysis to detect and account for potential pleiotropy, which conventional MR analysis might mistake for causality, and used the HEIDI (heterogeneity in dependent instruments) test to remove cross-phenotype associations that were likely due to genetic linkage. RESULTS: Our PheWAS identified 25 disease groups/outcomes associated with SUA genetic risk loci after multiple testing correction (P<8.57e-05). Our conventional MR analysis implicated a causal role of SUA level in three disease groups: inflammatory polyarthropathies (OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.34), hypertensive disease (OR=1.08, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.14) and disorders of metabolism (OR=1.07, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.14); and four disease outcomes: gout (OR=4.88, 95% CI 3.91 to 6.09), essential hypertension (OR=1.08, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.14), myocardial infarction (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.30) and coeliac disease (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.89). After balancing pleiotropic effects in MR Egger analysis, only gout and its encompassing disease group of inflammatory polyarthropathies were considered to be causally associated with SUA level. Our analysis highlighted a locus ( CONCLUSIONS: Elevated SUA level is convincing to cause gout and inflammatory polyarthropathies, and might act as a marker for the wider range of diseases with which it associates. Our findings support further investigation on the clinical relevance of SUA level with cardiovascular, metabolic, autoimmune and respiratory diseases.