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Gout: HELP
Articles by Christoph R. Meier
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Christoph R. Meier wrote the following 3 articles about Gout.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Association of hormone therapy and incident gout: population-based case-control study. 2015

Bruderer, Saskia G / Bodmer, Michael / Jick, Susan S / Meier, Christoph R. ·1Basel Pharmacoepidemiology Unit, Division of Clinical Pharmacy and Epidemiology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland 2Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland 3Division of General Internal Medicine, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland 4Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Public Health, Lexington, MA. ·Menopause · Pubmed #25968834.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the odds of developing incident gout in association with the use of postmenopausal estrogen-progestogen therapy, according to type, timing, duration, and route of administration of estrogen-progestogen therapy. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective population-based case-control analysis using the United Kingdom-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We identified women (aged 45 y or older) who had a first-time diagnosis of gout recorded between 1990 and 2010. We matched one female control with each case on age, general practice, calendar time, and years of active history in the database. We used multivariate conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs (adjusted for confounders). RESULTS: The adjusted OR for gout with current use of oral formulations of opposed estrogens (estrogen-progestogen) was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.56-0.86) compared with never use. Current use was associated with a decreased OR for gout in women without renal failure (adjusted OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57-0.87) and hypertension (adjusted OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44-0.87) compared with never use. Tibolone was associated with a decreased OR for gout (adjusted OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.63-0.95) compared with never use. Estrogens alone did not alter the OR for gout. CONCLUSIONS: Current use of oral opposed estrogens, but not unopposed estrogens, is associated with a decreased OR for incident gout in women without renal failure and is more pronounced in women with hypertension. Use of tibolone is associated with a decreased OR for incident gout. The decreased OR for gout may be related to the progestogen component rather than the estrogen component.

2 Article Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a decreased risk of incident gout: a population-based case-control study. 2015

Bruderer, Saskia G / Bodmer, Michael / Jick, Susan S / Meier, Christoph R. ·Basel Pharmacoepidemiology Unit, Division of Clinical Pharmacy and Epidemiology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Division of General Internal Medicine, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland. · Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Public Health, Lexington, Massachusetts, USA. · Basel Pharmacoepidemiology Unit, Division of Clinical Pharmacy and Epidemiology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Public Health, Lexington, Massachusetts, USA. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #24728333.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the risk of incident gout in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in association with diabetes duration, diabetes severity and antidiabetic drug treatment. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in patients with T2DM using the UK-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). We identified case patients aged ≥18 years with an incident diagnosis of gout between 1990 and 2012. We matched to each case patient one gout-free control patient. We used conditional logistic regression analysis to calculate adjusted ORs (adj. ORs) with 95% CIs and adjusted our analyses for important potential confounders. RESULTS: The study encompassed 7536 T2DM cases with a first-time diagnosis of gout. Compared to a diabetes duration <1 year, prolonged diabetes duration (1-3, 3-6, 7-9 and ≥10 years) was associated with decreased adj. ORs of 0.91 (95% CI 0.79 to 1.04), 0.76 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.86), 0.70 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.86), and 0.58 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.66), respectively. Compared to a reference A1C level of <7%, the risk estimates of increasing A1C levels (7.0-7.9, 8.0-8.9 and ≥9%) steadily decreased with adj. ORs of 0.79 (95% CI 0.72 to 0.86), 0.63 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.72), and 0.46 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.53), respectively. Neither use of insulin, metformin, nor sulfonylureas was associated with an altered risk of incident gout. CONCLUSIONS: Increased A1C levels, but not use of antidiabetic drugs, was associated with a decreased risk of incident gout among patients with T2DM.

3 Article Use of diuretics and risk of incident gout: a population-based case-control study. 2014

Bruderer, Saskia / Bodmer, Michael / Jick, Susan S / Meier, Christoph R. ·University of Basel and University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #24449584.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Use of diuretics has been associated with an increased risk of gout. Data on different types of diuretics are scarce. We undertook this study to investigate the association between use of loop diuretics, thiazide or thiazide-like diuretics, and potassium-sparing agents and the risk of developing incident gout. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective population-based case-control analysis using the General Practice Research Database established in the UK. We identified case patients who were diagnosed as having incident gout between 1990 and 2010. One control patient was matched to each case patient for age, sex, general practice, calendar time, and years of active history in the database. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), and we adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: We identified 91,530 incident cases of gout and the same number of matched controls. Compared to past use of diuretics from each respective drug class, adjusted ORs for current use of loop diuretics, thiazide diuretics, thiazide-like diuretics, and potassium-sparing diuretics were 2.64 (95% CI 2.47-2.83), 1.70 (95% CI 1.62-1.79), 2.30 (95% CI 1.95-2.70), and 1.06 (95% CI 0.91-1.23), respectively. Combined use of loop diuretics and thiazide diuretics was associated with the highest relative risk estimates of gout (adjusted OR 4.65 [95% CI 3.51-6.16]). Current use of calcium channel blockers or losartan slightly attenuated the risk of gout in patients who took diuretics. CONCLUSION: Use of loop diuretics, thiazide diuretics, and thiazide-like diuretics was associated with an increased risk of incident gout, although use of potassium-sparing agents was not.