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Gout: HELP
Articles by An Pan
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, An Pan wrote the following 4 articles about Gout.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Bidirectional Association between Diabetes and Gout: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. 2016

Pan, An / Teng, Gim Gee / Yuan, Jian-Min / Koh, Woon-Puay. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China. · Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore. · University Medicine Cluster, Division of Rheumatology, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore. · Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #27161168.

ABSTRACT: We aimed to prospectively investigate the bidirectional association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and gout. We analyzed follow-up data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, when self-reports of diagnosed diabetes and gout were enquired at follow-ups I and II. Individuals who participated in both follow-ups and were free of cardiovascular disease or cancer at follow-up I were included. For T2D to gout (analysis I), prevalent gout were further excluded (final n = 31,137). For gout to T2D (analysis II), prevalent diabetes were excluded (final n = 28,668). Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs). In the analysis I, the RR of diabetes to incident gout (682 cases) was 0.77 (95% CI 0.60-0.97). In the analysis II, the RR of gout to incident diabetes (2223 cases) was 1.36 (1.12-1.63), but became insignificant after adjustment for hypertension and BMI (1.00; 0.83-1.21). The gout to diabetes association was modified by BMI (Pinteraction = 0.04) and hypertension (Pinteraction = 0.007), and it was marginally significant in adults with BMI<24 while significant among non-hypertensive participants, but not in their counterparts. In conclusion, our results suggest that diabetes is associated with a lower risk of incident gout, while gout is positively related to diabetes among normal weight and non-hypertensive adults.

2 Article Cigarette Smoking and the Risk of Incident Gout in a Prospective Cohort Study. 2016

Gee Teng, Gim / Pan, An / Yuan, Jian-Min / Koh, Woon-Puay. ·National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #26714165.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Cigarette smoking is shown to reduce serum urate. However, its impact on risk of gout is unknown. We prospectively examined the relationship between cigarette smoking and gout risk in this Asian cohort. METHODS: We analyzed the data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a cohort of 63,257 Chinese ages 45-74 years at recruitment in 1993-1998. Information on cigarette smoking and other lifestyle factors was collected through in-person interviews at recruitment. This analysis included 53,213 participants who took part in either the first followup (1999-2004) and/or the second followup interviews (2006-2010). Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the relationship between cigarette smoking and gout risk. RESULTS: A total of 2,244 incident cases of physician-diagnosed gout were identified after a mean followup of 11.1 years. Among men, compared to never smokers, the risk of gout in current smokers was decreased by 27% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.73 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.63-0.84]). This risk reduction was greater in lean male smokers (HR 0.69 [95% CI 0.57-0.83]) than overweight smokers (HR 0.87 [95% CI 0.67-1.13]) (P = 0.09 for interaction). This inverse association with smoking was rapidly attenuated to become null even in former smokers who had recently quit smoking. Conversely, there was no association between smoking and gout risk in women. In a companion cross-sectional study, current smokers had significantly lower levels of serum urate than former and never smokers, and this observation was present in men and not women. CONCLUSION: Current smoking is associated with lower risk of gout in men in this Asian cohort.

3 Article Bidirectional Association between Self-Reported Hypertension and Gout: The Singapore Chinese Health Study. 2015

Pan, An / Teng, Gim Gee / Yuan, Jian-Min / Koh, Woon-Puay. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Ministry of Education Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China. · Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore, Republic of Singapore; University Medicine Cluster, Division of Rheumatology, National University Hospital and National University Health System, Singapore, Republic of Singapore. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America; Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America. · Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore, Republic of Singapore; Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26510154.

ABSTRACT: It has been hypothesized that the association between hypertension and gout is bidirectional, however, few studies have examined this in a prospective cohort. We analyzed data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study (SCHS) follow-up I (1999-2004) and II (2006-2010) interviews, when both physician-diagnosed hypertension and gout were self-reported. We included participants with data for both follow-up interviews and who were free of heart disease, stroke and cancer at follow-up I. The analysis of hypertension and risk of gout included 31,137 participants when prevalent gout cases were excluded, while the analysis of gout and risk of hypertension included 20,369 participants when prevalent hypertension cases were excluded. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The mean age at follow-up I was 60.1 (SD 7.3) years, and the average follow-up was 6.8 (SD 1.4) years. In the analysis of hypertension and risk of gout, 682 incident cases were identified. Compared to normotensive participants, hypertensive patients had an 88% increased risk of developing gout (HR 1.88; 95% CI 1.61-2.21). In the parallel analysis, 5,450 participants reported to have newly diagnosed hypertension during follow-up. Compared to participants without gout, those with gout had an 18% increased risk of developing hypertension (HR 1.18; 95% CI 1.02-1.37). The bidirectional association was stronger in normal weight adults compared to overweight/obese individuals (Pinteraction = 0.06 and 0.04, respectively). The hypertension to gout association was stronger in women compared to men (Pinteraction = 0.04), while the gout to hypertension association was evident in women but not in men (Pinteraction = 0.02). In conclusion, our results suggest that the hypertension-gout association is bidirectional in this cohort of Singapore Chinese adults. The potential interactions of the bidirectional association with obesity and sex deserve further investigations.

4 Article Food Sources of Protein and Risk of Incident Gout in the Singapore Chinese Health Study. 2015

Teng, Gim Gee / Pan, An / Yuan, Jian-Min / Koh, Woon-Puay. ·National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore, and National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Singapore. · National University of Singapore, Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, Singapore, and Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Public Health and Tongji Medical College, Wuhan, China. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, and University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, and National University of Singapore, Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, Singapore. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #25808549.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Prospective studies evaluating diet in relation to the risk of gout in Asian populations are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the consumption of dietary protein from each of its major sources and the risk of gout in a Chinese population. METHODS: We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 Chinese adults who were 45-74 years old at recruitment during the years 1993-1998. Habitual diet information was collected via a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and physician-diagnosed gout was self-reported during 2 followup interviews up to the year 2010. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), with adjustment for potential confounders, among 51,114 eligible study participants who were free of gout at baseline and responded to our followup interviews. RESULTS: A total of 2,167 participants reported physician-diagnosed gout during the followup period. The multivariate-adjusted HRs (with 95% CIs) of gout, comparing the first quartile with the fourth quartile, were as follows: 1.27 (1.12-1.44; P for trend < 0.001) for total protein, 1.27 (1.11-1.45; P for trend < 0.001) for poultry, 1.16 (1.02-1.32; P for trend = 0.006) for fish and shellfish, 0.86 (0.75-0.98; P for trend = 0.018) for soy food, and 0.83 (0.73-0.95; P for trend = 0.012) for nonsoy legumes. No statistically significant associations were found with protein intake from other sources (red meat, eggs, dairy products, grains, or nuts and seeds). CONCLUSION: In this Chinese population living in Singapore, higher total dietary protein intake from mainly poultry and fish/shellfish was associated with an increased risk of gout, while dietary intake of soy and nonsoy legumes was associated with a reduced risk of gout.