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Gout: HELP
Articles by Chong-Zhi Wang
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Chong-Zhi Wang wrote the following 2 articles about Gout.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Application of Chinese Medicine in Acute and Critical Medical Conditions. 2019

Luo, Yun / Wang, Chong-Zhi / Hesse-Fong, Julia / Lin, Jaung-Geng / Yuan, Chun-Su. ·Key Laboratory of Modern Preparation of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ministry of Education, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330004, P. R. China. · Tang Center for Herbal Medicine Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. · Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. · School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan. · Committee on Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ·Am J Chin Med · Pubmed #31505937.

ABSTRACT: Western medicine is routinely used in developed nations as well as in Eastern countries, where traditional medicine is frequently used by a selection of patients or family member as a complement to mainstream Western medicine. Chinese medicine plays an important role in the treatment of chronic diseases, especially when Western medicine is not very effective. Many published reports have shown that Chinese medicine could also be successfully used in the management of acute and critical illnesses. Chinese medicine has a holistic view of the human body, and emphasizes individualization based on body balance and mind-body interaction and employs herbal medicines and acupuncture. This review paper gives a brief overview of Chinese medicine theory and therapeutic modality and then addresses the application of Chinese medicine in the treatment of acute and critical medical conditions, including epidemics. Using this ancient therapy as a complementary medicine, the management of serious medical conditions, such as SARS, acute heart diseases, and ischemic cerebral stroke, are presented. In order to promote more widespread application of Chinese medicine, well-designed controlled clinical trials are urgently needed to prove its safety and effectiveness.

2 Article Anti-hyperuricemia effects of allopurinol are improved by Smilax riparia, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine. 2015

Wu, Xiao-Hui / Wang, Chong-Zhi / Wang, Shu-Qing / Mi, Chao / He, Yi / Zhang, Jun / Zhang, Yan-Wen / Anderson, Samantha / Yuan, Chun-Su. ·Tianjin Key Laboratory on Technologies Enabling Development of Clinical, Therapeutics and Diagnostics, College of Pharmacy, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China; Tang Center for Herbal Medicine Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. · Tang Center for Herbal Medicine Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. · Tianjin Key Laboratory on Technologies Enabling Development of Clinical, Therapeutics and Diagnostics, College of Pharmacy, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China. · College of Public Health and Communication, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China. · Tang Center for Herbal Medicine Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Electronic address: cyuan@dacc.uchicago.edu. ·J Ethnopharmacol · Pubmed #25617746.

ABSTRACT: ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The roots and rhizomes of Smilax riparia are called "Niu-Wei-Cai" in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This botanical has been used in treating the symptoms of gout and other hyperuricemic-related conditions in TCM. Allopurinol is a commonly used medication to treat hyperuricemia and its complications. In this study, we evaluated whether Smilax riparia could enhance allopurinol׳s effects by decreasing the serum uric acid level in a hyperuricemic mouse model induced by potassium oxonate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the effects of allopurinol (5mg/kg) administration alone or in combination with Smilax riparia saponins (SRS, 500 mg/kg) on the serum uric acid (SUA), serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels in a hyperuricemic mouse model. The effects of allopurinol alone or those of allopurinol plus SRS on the XOD activities were measured. Western blot analysis was used to measure the levels of mURAT1, mGLUT9 and mOTA1 in the mice. RESULTS: Compared with allopurinol alone, the combination of allopurinol and SRS significantly decreased the serum uric acid level and increased the urine uric acid level (both P<0.05), leading to the normalized serum and urine uric acid concentrations. Data on serum and urine creatinine and BUN supported these observations. The attenuation of hyperuricemia-induced renal dysfunction was linked to the inhibition of both serum and hepatic xanthine oxidase (XOD), the down-regulation of renal mURAT1 and mGLUT9, and the up-regulation of mOAT1. CONCLUSION: The anti-hyperuricemia effects of allopurinol are improved by Smilax riparia co-administration. The results were supported by the measurement of uric acid, creatinine, BUN, XOD, mURAT1, mGLUT9 and mOAT1. Our data may have a potential value in clinical practice in the treatment of gout and other hyperuricemic conditions.