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Gout: HELP
Articles from Norway
Based on 19 articles published since 2008
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These are the 19 published articles about Gout that originated from Norway during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline 2016 updated EULAR evidence-based recommendations for the management of gout. 2017

Richette, P / Doherty, M / Pascual, E / Barskova, V / Becce, F / Castañeda-Sanabria, J / Coyfish, M / Guillo, S / Jansen, T L / Janssens, H / Lioté, F / Mallen, C / Nuki, G / Perez-Ruiz, F / Pimentao, J / Punzi, L / Pywell, T / So, A / Tausche, A K / Uhlig, T / Zavada, J / Zhang, W / Tubach, F / Bardin, T. ·AP-HP, hôpital Lariboisière, service de Rhumatologie, F-75010 Paris, France; Inserm, UMR1132, Hôpital Lariboisière, F-75010 Paris, France; Universitè Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Citè, F-75205 Paris, France. · Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. · Institute of Rheumatology RAMS, Moscow, Russia. · Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. · AP-HP, Dèpartement d'Epidèmiologie et Recherche Clinique, Hôpital Bichat, Paris, France: APHP, Centre de Pharmacoèpidèmiologie, Paris, France: Univ Paris Diderot, Paris, France: INSERM UMR 1123 ECEVE, Paris, France. · Patient from Nottingham, UK, Paris. · Department of Rheumatology, VieCuri Medical Centre, Venlo, and Scientific IQ HealthCare, Radboud UMC, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands. · Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre University of Keele, Keele, UK. · Osteoarticular Research Group, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Seccion de Rheumatologia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo, Spain. · Rheumatology Unit, Clínica Coração de Jesus, Lisbon, Portugal. · Rheumatology Unit, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Service de Rhumatologie, CHUV and Universitè de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Rheumatology, University Clinic at the Technical University Dresden, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Rheumatology, Prague, and Department of Rheumatology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27457514.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: New drugs and new evidence concerning the use of established treatments have become available since the publication of the first European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of gout, in 2006. This situation has prompted a systematic review and update of the 2006 recommendations. METHODS: The EULAR task force consisted of 15 rheumatologists, 1 radiologist, 2 general practitioners, 1 research fellow, 2 patients and 3 experts in epidemiology/methodology from 12 European countries. A systematic review of the literature concerning all aspects of gout treatments was performed. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated by use of a Delphi consensus approach. RESULTS: Three overarching principles and 11 key recommendations were generated. For the treatment of flare, colchicine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral or intra-articular steroids or a combination are recommended. In patients with frequent flare and contraindications to colchicine, NSAIDs and corticosteroids, an interleukin-1 blocker should be considered. In addition to education and a non-pharmacological management approach, urate-lowering therapy (ULT) should be considered from the first presentation of the disease, and serum uric acid (SUA) levels should be maintained at<6 mg/dL (360 µmol/L) and <5 mg/dL (300 µmol/L) in those with severe gout. Allopurinol is recommended as first-line ULT and its dosage should be adjusted according to renal function. If the SUA target cannot be achieved with allopurinol, then febuxostat, a uricosuric or combining a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with a uricosuric should be considered. For patients with refractory gout, pegloticase is recommended. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations aim to inform physicians and patients about the non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments for gout and to provide the best strategies to achieve the predefined urate target to cure the disease.

2 Editorial Chasing crystals out of the body: will treat to serum urate target for gout help us get there? 2017

Singh, Jasvinder A / Uhlig, Till. ·Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Division of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28031165.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Musculoskeletal disorders and the Global Burden of Disease study. 2014

Storheim, Kjersti / Zwart, John-Anker. ·Communication and Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Disorders (FORMI), Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo, , Oslo, Norway. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #24790065.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Review [Gout - new approaches to diagnostics and treatment]. 2016

Uhlig, Till / Eskild, Tron / Hammer, Hilde Berner. ·Nasjonal kompetansetjeneste for revmatologisk rehabilitering Revmatologisk avdeling Diakonhjemmet Sykehus. · Radiologisk avdeling Diakonhjemmet Sykehus. · Revmatologisk avdeling Diakonhjemmet Sykehus. ·Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen · Pubmed #27883103.

ABSTRACT: An attack of gout is extremely painful. Recurrent attacks of arthritis in one or more joints or tendon sheaths accompanied by intense pain are typical of this commonly occurring condition. As these symptoms indicate acute inflammation due to uric acid crystal deposition, good diagnostics are essential to enable initiation of drug treatment which removes the crystals deposited in tissue.

5 Review Crystal Formation in Inflammation. 2016

Franklin, Bernardo S / Mangan, Matthew S / Latz, Eicke. ·Institute of Innate Immunity, University Hospitals, University of Bonn, Bonn 53127, Germany; email: franklin@uni-bonn.de , matthew.mangan@dzne.de , eicke.latz@uni-bonn.de. · German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Bonn 53175, Germany. · Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605. · Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491, Norway. ·Annu Rev Immunol · Pubmed #26772211.

ABSTRACT: The formation and accumulation of crystalline material in tissues is a hallmark of many metabolic and inflammatory conditions. The discovery that the phase transition of physiologically soluble substances to their crystalline forms can be detected by the immune system and activate innate immune pathways has revolutionized our understanding of how crystals cause inflammation. It is now appreciated that crystals are part of the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including gout, silicosis, asbestosis, and atherosclerosis. In this review we discuss current knowledge of the complex mechanisms of crystal formation in diseased tissues and their interplay with the nutrients, metabolites, and immune cells that account for crystal-induced inflammation.

6 Review Body mass index and the risk of gout: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies. 2014

Aune, Dagfinn / Norat, Teresa / Vatten, Lars J. ·Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway, d.aune@imperial.ac.uk. ·Eur J Nutr · Pubmed #25209031.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Greater body fatness has been associated with increased risk of gout in several studies; however, the strength of the association has differed between studies, and it is not clear whether the association differs by gender. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies to clarify the association between adiposity and risk of gout. METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched up to August 30, 2013. Summary relative risks (RRs) were calculated using a random effects model. RESULTS: Ten prospective studies of body mass index (BMI) and gout risk with 27,944 cases and 215,739 participants were included (median follow-up 10.5 years). The summary RR for a 5 unit increment was 1.55 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.44-1.66, I(2) = 67%] for all studies combined. The heterogeneity was explained by one study, which appeared to be an outlier. The summary RR per 5 BMI units was 1.62 (95% CI 1.33-1.98, I(2) = 79%) for men and 1.49 (95% CI 1.32-1.68, I(2) = 30%) for women, p(heterogeneity) = 0.72. The relative risks were 1.78, 2.67, 3.62, and 4.64 for persons with BMI 25, 30, 35, and 40 compared with persons with a BMI of 20. BMI in young adulthood, waist-to-hip ratio, and weight gain from age 21-25 to midlife were also associated with increased risk, but few studies were included in these analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Greater body mass index increases risk of gout. Further studies are needed on adiposity throughout the life course, waist-to-hip ratio, and weight changes in relation to gout as there were few studies that had published on these exposures.

7 Article Burden of gout in the Nordic region, 1990-2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. 2018

Kiadaliri, A A / Uhlig, T / Englund, M. ·a Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Orthopaedics, Clinical Epidemiology Unit , Lund University , Lund , Sweden. · b Department of Rheumatology, National Advisory Unit for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology , Diakonhjemmet Hospital , Oslo , Norway. · c Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit , Boston University School of Medicine , Boston , MA , USA. ·Scand J Rheumatol · Pubmed #29376465.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To explore the burden of gout in the Nordic region, with a population around 27 million in 2015 distributed across six countries. METHOD: We used the findings of the 2015 Global Burden of Diseases study to report prevalence and disability associated with gout in the Nordic region. RESULTS: From 1990 to 2015, the number of prevalent gout cases rose by 30% to 252 967 [95% uncertainty interval (UI) 223 478‒287 288] in the Nordic region. In 2015, gout contributed to 7982 (95% UI 5431‒10 800) years lived with disability (YLDs) in the region, an increase of 29% (95% UI 24‒35%) from 1990. While the crude YLD rate of gout increased by 12.9% (95% UI 7.8‒18.1%) between 1990 and 2015, the age-standardized YLD rate remained stable. Gout was ranked as the 63rd leading cause of total YLDs in the region in 2015, with the highest rank in men aged 55-59 years (38th leading cause of YLDs). The corresponding rank at the global level was 94. Of 195 countries studied, four Nordic countries [Greenland (2nd), Iceland (12th), Finland (14th), and Sweden (15th)] were among the top 15 countries with the highest age-standardized YLD rate of gout. CONCLUSION: The burden of gout is rising in the Nordic region. Gout's contribution to the total burden of diseases in the region is more significant than the global average. Expected increases in gout burden owing to population growth and ageing call for stronger preventive and therapeutic strategies for gout management in Nordic countries.

8 Article Brief Report: Validation of a Definition of Flare in Patients With Established Gout. 2018

Gaffo, Angelo L / Dalbeth, Nicola / Saag, Kenneth G / Singh, Jasvinder A / Rahn, Elizabeth J / Mudano, Amy S / Chen, Yi-Hsing / Lin, Ching-Tsai / Bourke, Sandra / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Hernández-Llinas, Hansel / Neogi, Tuhina / Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz / da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo / Amorim, Rodrigo B C / Uhlig, Till / Hammer, Hilde B / Eliseev, Maxim / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Cavagna, Lorenzo / McCarthy, Geraldine M / Stamp, Lisa K / Gerritsen, Martijn / Fana, Viktoria / Sivera, Francisca / Taylor, William. ·University of Alabama at Birmingham and Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Hospital General de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, and Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Research Institute of Rheumatology of Russia, Moscow, Russia. · University of the Basque Country, Cruces University Hospital, and Biocruces Health Research Institute, Vizcaya, Spain. · University and IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn, The Netherlands. · Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Hospital General Universitario Elda, Elda, Spain. · University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #29161469.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To perform external validation of a provisional definition of disease flare in patients with gout. METHODS: Five hundred nine patients with gout were enrolled in a cross-sectional study during a routine clinical care visit at 17 international sites. Data were collected to classify patients as experiencing or not experiencing a gout flare, according to a provisional definition. A local expert rheumatologist performed the final independent adjudication of gout flare status. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the diagnostic performance of gout flare definitions. RESULTS: The mean ± SD age of the patients was 57.5 ± 13.9 years, and 89% were male. The definition requiring fulfillment of at least 3 of 4 criteria (patient-defined gout flare, pain at rest score of >3 on a 0-10-point numerical rating scale, presence of at least 1 swollen joint, and presence of at least 1 warm joint) was 85% sensitive and 95% specific in confirming the presence of a gout flare, with an accuracy of 92%. The ROC area under the curve was 0.97. The definition based on a classification and regression tree algorithm (entry point, pain at rest score >3, followed by patient-defined flare "yes") was 73% sensitive and 96% specific. CONCLUSION: The definition of gout flare that requires fulfillment of at least 3 of 4 patient-reported criteria is now validated to be sensitive, specific, and accurate for gout flares, as demonstrated using an independent large international patient sample. The availability of a validated gout flare definition will improve the ascertainment of an important clinical outcome in studies of gout.

9 Article Chronic urticaria and the metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional community-based study of 11 261 patients. 2018

Shalom, G / Magen, E / Babaev, M / Tiosano, S / Vardy, D A / Linder, D / Horev, A / Saadia, A / Comaneshter, D / Agmon-Levin, N / Cohen, A D. ·Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Soroka Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel. · Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. · Leumit Health Services, Barzilai Medical Center, Medical Director of South Region, Ashkelon, Israel. · Department of Medicine 'B', Sheba medical center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Section of Biostatistics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Chief Physician's Office, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · The Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Division of Community Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28846167.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that chronic urticaria (CU) is associated with chronic, low-grade, inflammatory process. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between CU and metabolic syndrome and its components in a large community-based medical database. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of CU patients and matched controls was performed. CU was defined as eight urticaria diagnoses (with each two diagnoses registered within a period of 6 weeks) from 2002 to 2012. Data regarding the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, its components and possible complications were collected. RESULTS: The study included 11 261 patients with CU and 67 216 controls. In a univariate analysis, CU was significantly associated with higher body mass index (BMI) and a higher prevalence of obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, chronic renal failure and gout. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant association between CU and metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.1-1.2, P < 0.001) and its components - obesity (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.3, P < 0.001), diabetes (OR = 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.15, P = 0.001), hyperlipidaemia (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.2, P < 0.001) and hypertension (OR = 1.1, 95% CI 1.1-1.2, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: CU patients may have one or more undiagnosed components of metabolic syndrome despite their young age. Thus, appropriate targeted screening is advised.

10 Article Burden of musculoskeletal disorders in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, 1990-2013: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. 2017

Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar / Forouzanfar, Mohammad H / Vollset, Stein Emil / El Bcheraoui, Charbel / Daoud, Farah / Afshin, Ashkan / Charara, Raghid / Khalil, Ibrahim / Higashi, Hideki / Abd El Razek, Mohamed Magdy / Kiadaliri, Aliasghar Ahmad / Alam, Khurshid / Akseer, Nadia / Al-Hamad, Nawal / Ali, Raghib / AlMazroa, Mohammad AbdulAziz / Alomari, Mahmoud A / Al-Rabeeah, Abdullah A / Alsharif, Ubai / Altirkawi, Khalid A / Atique, Suleman / Badawi, Alaa / Barrero, Lope H / Basulaiman, Mohammed / Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad / Bedi, Neeraj / Bensenor, Isabela M / Buchbinder, Rachelle / Danawi, Hadi / Dharmaratne, Samath D / Zannad, Faiez / Farvid, Maryam S / Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad / Farzadfar, Farshad / Fischer, Florian / Gupta, Rahul / Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi / Hamidi, Samer / Horino, Masako / Hoy, Damian G / Hsairi, Mohamed / Husseini, Abdullatif / Javanbakht, Mehdi / Jonas, Jost B / Kasaeian, Amir / Khan, Ejaz Ahmad / Khubchandani, Jagdish / Knudsen, Ann Kristin / Kopec, Jacek A / Lunevicius, Raimundas / Abd El Razek, Hassan Magdy / Majeed, Azeem / Malekzadeh, Reza / Mate, Kedar / Mehari, Alem / Meltzer, Michele / Memish, Ziad A / Mirarefin, Mojde / Mohammed, Shafiu / Naheed, Aliya / Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf / Oh, In-Hwan / Park, Eun-Kee / Peprah, Emmanuel Kwame / Pourmalek, Farshad / Qorbani, Mostafa / Rafay, Anwar / Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa / Shiri, Rahman / Rahman, Sajjad Ur / Rai, Rajesh Kumar / Rana, Saleem M / Sepanlou, Sadaf G / Shaikh, Masood Ali / Shiue, Ivy / Sibai, Abla Mehio / Silva, Diego Augusto Santos / Singh, Jasvinder A / Skogen, Jens Christoffer / Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman / Ukwaja, Kingsley N / Westerman, Ronny / Yonemoto, Naohiro / Yoon, Seok-Jun / Younis, Mustafa Z / Zaidi, Zoubida / Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed / Lim, Stephen S / Wang, Haidong / Vos, Theo / Naghavi, Mohsen / Lopez, Alan D / Murray, Christopher J L / Mokdad, Ali H. ·Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Community Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Public Health Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Japan International Cooperation Agency, Lusaka, Zambia. · Ophthalmology resident in Aswan University Hospital, Aswan, Egypt. · Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Orthopedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Food and Nutrition Administration, Ministry of Health, Safat, Kuwait. · University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Saudi Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan. · Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany. · King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Public Health Agency of Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Industrial Engineering, School of Engineering, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Colombia. · Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California, USA. · David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), California, USA. · College of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Jazan, Saudi Arabia. · University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Monash Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Cabrini Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Walden University, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. · Clinical Investigation Centre INSERM (the National Institute for Health and Medical Research), Université de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard/MGH Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations, and Health Disparities, Mongan Institute for Health Policy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Endocrine and Metabolic Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany. · West Virginia Bureau for Public Health, Charleston, West Virginia, USA. · Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain. · Hamdan Bin Mohammed Smart University, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. · Nevada Division of Behavior and Public Health, Carson City, Nevada, USA. · Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Public Health Division, Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Noumea, New Caledonia. · Salah Azaiz Institute, Tunis, Tunisia. · Institute of Community and Public Health, Birzeit University, Birzeit, Palestine. · Health Economics Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK. · Department of Ophthalmology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany. · Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Population Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Health Services Academy, Islamabad, Pakistan. · Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, USA. · Department of Health Registries, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Aintree University Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. · School of Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura, Egypt. · Imperial College London, London, UK. · Digestive Disease Research Institute, Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington DC, USA. · Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · Hunger Action Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Health Systems and Policy Research Unit, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. · Institute of Public Health, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh. · Faculty of Health Sciences, Center for Research on Population and Health, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. · Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Medical Humanities and Social Medicine, College of Medicine, Kosin University, Busan, South Korea. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Noncommunicable Diseases Research Center, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran. · Contech International Health Consultants, Lahore, Pakistan. · Contech School of Public Health, Lahore, Pakistan. · Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. · Sweidi Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · Society for Health and Demographic Surveillance, Suri, India. · Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Independent Consultant, Karachi, Pakistan. · Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. · Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Alcohol and Drug Research Western Norway, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. · Department of Anesthesiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. · Outcomes Research Consortium, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria. · Federal Institute for Population Research, Wiesbaden, Germany. · German National Cohort Consortium, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea. · Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. · University Hospital, Setif, Algeria. · Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28209629.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We used findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 to report the burden of musculoskeletal disorders in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). METHODS: The burden of musculoskeletal disorders was calculated for the EMR's 22 countries between 1990 and 2013. A systematic analysis was performed on mortality and morbidity data to estimate prevalence, death, years of live lost, years lived with disability and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). RESULTS: For musculoskeletal disorders, the crude DALYs rate per 100 000 increased from 1297.1 (95% uncertainty interval (UI) 924.3-1703.4) in 1990 to 1606.0 (95% UI 1141.2-2130.4) in 2013. During 1990-2013, the total DALYs of musculoskeletal disorders increased by 105.2% in the EMR compared with a 58.0% increase in the rest of the world. The burden of musculoskeletal disorders as a proportion of total DALYs increased from 2.4% (95% UI 1.7-3.0) in 1990 to 4.7% (95% UI 3.6-5.8) in 2013. The range of point prevalence (per 1000) among the EMR countries was 28.2-136.0 for low back pain, 27.3-49.7 for neck pain, 9.7-37.3 for osteoarthritis (OA), 0.6-2.2 for rheumatoid arthritis and 0.1-0.8 for gout. Low back pain and neck pain had the highest burden in EMR countries. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a high burden of musculoskeletal disorders, with a faster increase in EMR compared with the rest of the world. The reasons for this faster increase need to be explored. Our findings call for incorporating prevention and control programmes that should include improving health data, addressing risk factors, providing evidence-based care and community programmes to increase awareness.

11 Article Performance of Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Gout in a Multicenter Study: Comparison With Monosodium Urate Monohydrate Crystal Analysis as the Gold Standard. 2017

Ogdie, Alexis / Taylor, William J / Neogi, Tuhina / Fransen, Jaap / Jansen, Tim L / Schumacher, H Ralph / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Eliseev, Maxim / McCarthy, Geraldine / Stamp, Lisa K / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Sivera, Francisca / Ea, Hang-Korng / Gerritsen, Martijn / Cagnotto, Giovanni / Cavagna, Lorenzo / Lin, Chingtsai / Chou, Yin-Yi / Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / Lima Gomes Ochtrop, Manuella / Janssen, Matthijs / Chen, Jiunn-Horng / Slot, Ole / Lazovskis, Juris / White, Douglas / Cimmino, Marco A / Uhlig, Till / Dalbeth, Nicola. ·University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · VieCuri Medical Centre, Venlo, The Netherlands, and Scientific IQ HealthCare, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Hospital General de México, Mexico City, Mexico. · Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology of Russia, Moscow, Russia. · University College Dublin and Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Otago Christchurch, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Hospital Universitario Cruces, BioCruces Health Research Institute, and Basque Country University, Barakaldo, Spain. · Hospital General Universitario de Elda, Alicante, Spain. · Université Paris Diderot, INSERM UMR 1132 and Service de Rhumatologie, Hôpital Lariboisière, AP-HP, Paris, France. · Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn, The Netherlands. · University of Pavia and IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy, and Skane University Hospital Malmö/Lund, Lund, Sweden. · University of Pavia and IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · Taichung Veterans' General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China. · University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany. · Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands. · China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China. · Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark. · Riverside Professional Centre, Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Waikato District Health Board and Waikato Clinical School, Hamilton, New Zealand. · University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #27748084.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine the performance of ultrasound (US) for the diagnosis of gout using the presence of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals as the gold standard. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Study for Updated Gout Classification Criteria (SUGAR), a large, multicenter observational cross-sectional study of consecutive subjects with at least 1 swollen joint who conceivably may have gout. All subjects underwent arthrocentesis; cases were subjects with confirmed MSU crystals. Rheumatologists or radiologists who were blinded with regard to the results of the MSU crystal analysis performed US on 1 or more clinically affected joints. US findings of interest were double contour sign, tophus, and snowstorm appearance. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine factors associated with positive US results among subjects with gout. RESULTS: US was performed in 824 subjects (416 cases and 408 controls). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for the presence of any 1 of the features were 76.9%, 84.3%, 83.3%, and 78.2%, respectively. Sensitivity was higher among subjects with a disease duration of ≥2 years and among subjects with subcutaneous nodules on examination (suspected tophus). Associations with a positive US finding included suspected clinical tophus (odds ratio [OR] 4.77 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.23-10.21]), any abnormality on plain radiography (OR 4.68 [95% CI 2.68-8.17]), and serum urate level (OR 1.31 [95% CI 1.06-1.62]). CONCLUSION: US features of MSU crystal deposition had high specificity and high PPV but more limited sensitivity for early gout. The specificity remained high in subjects with early disease and without clinical signs of tophi.

12 Article Survey Definitions of Gout for Epidemiologic Studies: Comparison With Crystal Identification as the Gold Standard. 2016

Dalbeth, Nicola / Schumacher, H Ralph / Fransen, Jaap / Neogi, Tuhina / Jansen, Tim L / Brown, Melanie / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Eliseev, Maxim / McCarthy, Geraldine / Stamp, Lisa K / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Sivera, Francisca / Ea, Hang-Korng / Gerritsen, Martijn / Scire, Carlo A / Cavagna, Lorenzo / Lin, Chingtsai / Chou, Yin-Yi / Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo / Janssen, Matthijs / Chen, Jiunn-Horng / Cimmino, Marco A / Uhlig, Till / Taylor, William J. ·University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Viecuri Medical Center, Venlo, The Netherlands. · University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. · Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Hospital General de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico. · Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology of Russia, Moscow, Russia. · Geraldine McCarthy, MD, FRCPI, University College Dublin School of Medicine and Medical Science, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Hospital Universitario Cruces & BioCruces Health Research Institute, Vizcaya, Spain. · Hospital General Universitario de Elda, Alicante, Spain. · Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR de Médecine, INSERM, UMR 1132, Hôpital Lariboisière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, and Hôpital Lariboisière, Paris, France. · Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn, The Netherlands. · Carlo A. Scire, MD, PhD, Italian Society for Rheumatology, Milan, Italy. · University and IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany. · Universidade de Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands. · China Medical University School of Medicine, Taichung, Taiwan. · University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #27014846.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To identify the best-performing survey definition of gout from items commonly available in epidemiologic studies. METHODS: Survey definitions of gout were identified from 34 epidemiologic studies contributing to the Global Urate Genetics Consortium (GUGC) genome-wide association study. Data from the Study for Updated Gout Classification Criteria (SUGAR) were randomly divided into development and test data sets. A data-driven case definition was formed using logistic regression in the development data set. This definition, along with definitions used in GUGC studies and the 2015 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) gout classification criteria were applied to the test data set, using monosodium urate crystal identification as the gold standard. RESULTS: For all tested GUGC definitions, the simple definition of "self-report of gout or urate-lowering therapy use" had the best test performance characteristics (sensitivity 82%, specificity 72%). The simple definition had similar performance to a SUGAR data-driven case definition with 5 weighted items: self-report, self-report of doctor diagnosis, colchicine use, urate-lowering therapy use, and hyperuricemia (sensitivity 87%, specificity 70%). Both of these definitions performed better than the 1977 American Rheumatism Association survey criteria (sensitivity 82%, specificity 67%). Of all tested definitions, the 2015 ACR/EULAR criteria had the best performance (sensitivity 92%, specificity 89%). CONCLUSION: A simple definition of "self-report of gout or urate-lowering therapy use" has the best test performance characteristics of existing definitions that use routinely available data. A more complex combination of features is more sensitive, but still lacks good specificity. If a more accurate case definition is required for a particular study, the 2015 ACR/EULAR gout classification criteria should be considered.

13 Article Development of Preliminary Remission Criteria for Gout Using Delphi and 1000Minds Consensus Exercises. 2016

de Lautour, Hugh / Taylor, William J / Adebajo, Ade / Alten, Rieke / Burgos-Vargas, Ruben / Chapman, Peter / Cimmino, Marco A / da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo / Day, Ric / Harrold, Leslie R / Helliwell, Philip / Janssen, Matthijs / Kerr, Gail / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Khanna, Dinesh / Khanna, Puja P / Lin, Chingtsai / Louthrenoo, Worawit / McCarthy, Geraldine / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Mikuls, Ted R / Neogi, Tuhina / Ogdie, Alexis / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Schlesinger, Naomi / Ralph Schumacher, H / Scirè, Carlo A / Singh, Jasvinder A / Sivera, Francisca / Slot, Ole / Stamp, Lisa K / Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / Terkeltaub, Robert / Uhlig, Till / van de Laar, Mart / White, Douglas / Yamanaka, Hisashi / Zeng, Xuejun / Dalbeth, Nicola. ·Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. · University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. · University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Schlosspark-Klinik, Charité, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Hospital General de México, Mexico City, Mexico. · Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Università di Genova, Genova, Italy. · Pedro Ernesto University Hospital, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · University of New South Wales and St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, and Corrona, LLC, Southborough. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands. · Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Georgetown and Howard University Hospitals, Washington, DC. · University of California School of Medicine, San Diego. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · University of Michigan and Ann Arbor VA Medical Center, Ann Arbor. · Taichung Veteran's General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Mater Misericordiae University Hospital and University College, Dublin, Ireland. · Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Hospital Universitario Cruces, OSI-EEC, and Biocruces Health Research Institute, Biscay, Spain. · Rutgers University Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey. · IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · University of Alabama at Birmingham and the Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham. · Hospital General Universitario Elda, Elda, Spain. · Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark. · University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. · University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany. · University of California San Diego VA Medical Center, La Jolla. · National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Universiteit Twente, Erschede, The Netherlands. · Waikato DHB and Waikato Clinical School, University of Auckland, Hamilton, New Zealand. · Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · University of Auckland and Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #26414176.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To establish consensus for potential remission criteria to use in clinical trials of gout. METHODS: Experts (n = 88) in gout from multiple countries were invited to participate in a web-based questionnaire study. Three rounds of Delphi consensus exercises were conducted using SurveyMonkey, followed by a discrete-choice experiment using 1000Minds software. The exercises focused on identifying domains, definitions for each domain, and the timeframe over which remission should be defined. RESULTS: There were 49 respondents (56% response) to the initial survey, with subsequent response rates ranging from 57% to 90%. Consensus was reached for the inclusion of serum urate (98% agreement), flares (96%), tophi (92%), pain (83%), and patient global assessment of disease activity (93%) as measurement domains in remission criteria. Consensus was also reached for domain definitions, including serum urate (<0.36 mm), pain (<2 on a 10-point scale), and patient global assessment (<2 on a 10-point scale), all of which should be measured at least twice over a set time interval. Consensus was not achieved in the Delphi exercise for the timeframe for remission, with equal responses for 6 months (51%) and 1 year (49%). In the discrete-choice experiment, there was a preference towards 12 months as a timeframe for remission. CONCLUSION: These consensus exercises have identified domains and provisional definitions for gout remission criteria. Based on the results of these exercises, preliminary remission criteria are proposed with domains of serum urate, acute flares, tophus, pain, and patient global assessment. These preliminary criteria now require testing in clinical data sets.

14 Article Performance of classification criteria for gout in early and established disease. 2016

Taylor, William J / Fransen, Jaap / Dalbeth, Nicola / Neogi, Tuhina / Schumacher, H Ralph / Brown, Melanie / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Eliseev, Maxim / McCarthy, Geraldine / Stamp, Lisa K / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Sivera, Francisca / Ea, Hang-Korng / Gerritsen, Martijn / Scire, Carlo / Cavagna, Lorenzo / Lin, Chingtsai / Chou, Yin-Yi / Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo / Janssen, Matthijs / Chen, Jiunn-Horng / Slot, Ole / Cimmino, Marco / Uhlig, Till / Jansen, Tim L. ·Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. · Department of Rheumatology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands. · Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · VA Medical Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital General de México, México City, México. · Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology of Russia, Moscow, Russia. · School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Department of Rheumatology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand. · Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario Cruces & BioCruces Health Research Institute, Vizcaya, Spain. · Department Reumatologia, Hospital General Universitario de Elda, Alicante, Spain. · University of Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR de Médecine, Paris, France INSERM, UMR 1132, Hôpital Lariboisière, Paris, France Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Lariboisière, Service de Rhumatologie, Centre Viggo Petersen, Pôle Appareil Locomoteur, 2, Rue Ambroise Paré, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Immunology Center (ARC), Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn, the Netherlands. · Epidemiology Unit, Italian Society for Rheumatology (SIR), Milan, Italy. · Division of Rheumatology, University and IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Taiwan, ROC. · Taichung Veterans' General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. · Department of Rheumatology, Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, the Netherlands. · School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC. · Centre of Rheumatology and Spine Disorders, Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark. · Research Laboratory and Academic Division of Clinical Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Genova, Italy. · National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Vinderen, Oslo, Norway. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #25351521.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To compare the sensitivity and specificity of different classification criteria for gout in early and established disease. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of consecutive rheumatology clinic patients with joint swelling in which gout was defined by presence or absence of monosodium urate crystals as observed by a certified examiner at presentation. Early disease was defined as patient-reported onset of symptoms of 2 years or less. RESULTS: Data from 983 patients were collected and gout was present in 509 (52%). Early disease was present in 144 gout cases and 228 non-cases. Sensitivity across criteria was better in established disease (95.3% vs 84.1%, p<0.001) and specificity was better in early disease (79.9% vs 52.5%, p<0.001). The overall best performing clinical criteria were the Rome criteria with sensitivity/specificity in early and established disease of 60.3%/84.4% and 86.4%/63.6%. Criteria not requiring synovial fluid analysis had sensitivity and specificity of less than 80% in early and established disease. CONCLUSIONS: Existing classification criteria for gout have sensitivity of over 80% in early and established disease but currently available criteria that do not require synovial fluid analysis have inadequate specificity especially later in the disease. Classification criteria for gout with better specificity are required, although the findings should be cautiously applied to non-rheumatology clinic populations.

15 Article International Consensus for ultrasound lesions in gout: results of Delphi process and web-reliability exercise. 2015

Gutierrez, Marwin / Schmidt, Wolfgang A / Thiele, Ralf G / Keen, Helen I / Kaeley, Gurjit S / Naredo, Esperanza / Iagnocco, Annamaria / Bruyn, George A / Balint, Peter V / Filippucci, Emilio / Mandl, Peter / Kane, David / Pineda, Carlos / Delle Sedie, Andrea / Hammer, Hilde Berner / Christensen, Robin / D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta / Terslev, Lene / Anonymous850830. ·Rheumatology Department, Clinica Reumatologica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy, dr.gmarwin@gmail.com. · Rheumatology Department, Immanuel Krankenhaus, Medical Centre for Rheumatology, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Medicine, Allergy/Immunology and Rheumatology Division, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA. · School of Medicine and Pharmacology Fiona Stanley Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA. · Rheumatology Department, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. · Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Specialità Mediche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome. · Rheumatology Department, MC Groep Hospitals, Lelystad, Netherlands. · 3rd Rheumatology Department, National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy, Budapest, Hungary. · Rheumatology Department, Clinica Reumatologica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy. · Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumatology Department, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Rheumatology Department, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion, Mexico City, Mexico. · Rheumatology Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Rheumatology Department, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark. · INSERM U1173, Rheumatology Department, Laboratoire d'excellence INFLAMEX, UFR Simone Veil, Versailles-Saint-Quentin University, Saint-Quentin en Yvelines, France and. · Rheumatology Department, Center for Rheumatology and Spine diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #25972391.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To produce consensus-based definitions of the US elementary lesions in gout and to test their reliability in a web-based exercise. METHODS: The process consisted of two steps. In the first step a written Delphi questionnaire was developed from a systematic literature review and expert international consensus. This collated information resulted in four statements defining US elementary lesions: double contour (DC), tophus, aggregates and erosion. The Delphi questionnaire was sent to 35 rheumatology experts in US, asking them to rate their level of agreement or disagreement with each statement. The second step tested the reliability by a web-exercise. US images of both normal and gouty elementary lesions were collected by the participants. A facilitator then constructed an electronic database of 110 images. The database was sent to the participants, who evaluated the presence/absence of US elementary lesions. A group of 20 images was displayed twice to evaluate intra-reader reliability. RESULTS: A total of 32 participants responded to the questionnaires. Good agreement (>80%) was obtained for US definitions on DC, tophus, aggregates and erosion in the Delphi exercise after three rounds. The reliability on images showed inter-reader κ values for DC, tophus, aggregates, erosion findings of 0.98, 0.71, 0.54 and 0.85, respectively. The mean intra-reader κ values were also acceptable: 0.93, 0.78, 0.65 and 0.78, respectively. CONCLUSION: This, the first consensus-based US definition of elementary lesions in gout, demonstrated good reliability overall. It constitutes an essential step in developing a core outcome measurement that permits a higher degree of homogeneity and comparability between multicentre studies.

16 Article Cross-sectional analysis of nutrition and serum uric acid in two Caucasian cohorts: the AusDiab Study and the Tromsø study. 2015

Zykova, Svetlana N / Storhaug, Hilde M / Toft, Ingrid / Chadban, Steven J / Jenssen, Trond G / White, Sarah L. ·Clinical Research Department, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038, Tromsø, Norway. svetlana.zykova@uit.no. · University of Tromsø-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. hilde-merete.storhaug@uit.no. · Clinical Research Department, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038, Tromsø, Norway. ingrid.toft@unn.no. · University of Tromsø-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. ingrid.toft@unn.no. · Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. steve.chadban@sswahs.nsw.gov.au. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. steve.chadban@sswahs.nsw.gov.au. · University of Tromsø-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. trond.g.jenssen@uit.no. · Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. trond.g.jenssen@uit.no. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. sarah.white@sydney.edu.au. ·Nutr J · Pubmed #25971955.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hyperuricemia can lead to gout, and may be a risk factor for cardiovascular events, hypertension, diabetes and renal disease. There is well-known link between gout and habitual intake of meat and seafood, however the association between hyperuricemia and micro-and macro-nutrient intake has not been established. METHODS: We studied associations between intakes of food categories, macro-and micronutrients and serum uric acid (SUA) levels in two cross-sectional surveys of Caucasian adults deriving from different food traditions: Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study 1999/00 (n=9734, age 25-91) and Tromsø Study 4 1994/95 (n = 3031, age 25-69). Dietary intake was calculated from self-administered Food Frequency Questionnaires. In some analyses we stratified according to abdominal obesity status and gender. RESULTS: In both cohorts, lower levels of SUA were found in subjects with higher consumption of carbohydrates, calcium and vitamin B2, while higher fat intake was associated with higher SUA, after adjustment for age, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, physical activity, total energy intake, use of diuretics, presence of hypertension, diabetes and gout. Among individual food items, high consumption of dairy products, high-fibre bread, cereals and fruits were associated with lower SUA in most subject groups while consumption of meat, eggs, beer and spirits, but not wine, with elevated levels. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy food choices with high intake of carbohydrates, dairy products, fiber and micronutrient-rich foods, and limited intake of fat, beer and spirits, might be recommended to prevent high SUA. Dietary factors seem to have qualitatively similar impact on SUA in obese and non-obese men and women from Australia and Norway.

17 Article Study for Updated Gout Classification Criteria: Identification of Features to Classify Gout. 2015

Taylor, William J / Fransen, Jaap / Jansen, Tim L / Dalbeth, Nicola / Schumacher, H Ralph / Brown, Melanie / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Eliseev, Maxim / McCarthy, Geraldine / Stamp, Lisa K / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Sivera, Francisca / Ea, Hang-Korng / Gerritsen, Martijn / Scire, Carlo / Cavagna, Lorenzo / Lin, Chingtsai / Chou, Yin-Yi / Tausche, Anne Kathrin / Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz / Janssen, Matthijs / Chen, Jiunn-Horng / Slot, Ole / Cimmino, Marco A / Uhlig, Till / Neogi, Tuhina. ·University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. · Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · University of Pennsylvania and VA Medical Center, Philadelphia. · Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Hospital General de México, Mexico City, Mexico. · Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology, Moscow, Russia. · University College, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Otago Christchurch, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Hospital Universitario Cruces and BioCruces Health Research Institute, Vizcaya, Spain. · Hospital General Universitario de Elda, Alicante, Spain. · University of Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR de Médecine, INSERM, UMR 1132, Hôpital Lariboisière, AP-HP, Paris, France. · Amsterdam Rheumatology Immunology Center, Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn, The Netherlands. · Italian Society for Rheumatology, Milan, Italy. · University and IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Taiwan. · Taichung Veterans' General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany. · Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands. · China Medical University and China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. · University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #25777045.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine which clinical, laboratory, and imaging features most accurately distinguished gout from non-gout. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of consecutive rheumatology clinic patients with ≥1 swollen joint or subcutaneous tophus. Gout was defined by synovial fluid or tophus aspirate microscopy by certified examiners in all patients. The sample was randomly divided into a model development (two-thirds) and test sample (one-third). Univariate and multivariate association between clinical features and monosodium urate-defined gout was determined using logistic regression modeling. Shrinkage of regression weights was performed to prevent overfitting of the final model. Latent class analysis was conducted to identify patterns of joint involvement. RESULTS: In total, 983 patients were included. Gout was present in 509 (52%). In the development sample (n = 653), the following features were selected for the final model: joint erythema (multivariate odds ratio [OR] 2.13), difficulty walking (multivariate OR 7.34), time to maximal pain <24 hours (multivariate OR 1.32), resolution by 2 weeks (multivariate OR 3.58), tophus (multivariate OR 7.29), first metatarsophalangeal (MTP1) joint ever involved (multivariate OR 2.30), location of currently tender joints in other foot/ankle (multivariate OR 2.28) or MTP1 joint (multivariate OR 2.82), serum urate level >6 mg/dl (0.36 mmoles/liter; multivariate OR 3.35), ultrasound double contour sign (multivariate OR 7.23), and radiograph erosion or cyst (multivariate OR 2.49). The final model performed adequately in the test set, with no evidence of misfit, high discrimination, and predictive ability. MTP1 joint involvement was the most common joint pattern (39.4%) in gout cases. CONCLUSION: Ten key discriminating features have been identified for further evaluation for new gout classification criteria. Ultrasound findings and degree of uricemia add discriminating value, and will significantly contribute to more accurate classification criteria.

18 Article Uric acid crystals. 2014

Lund-Iversen, Marius. ·Avdeling for patologi Oslo universitetssykehus. ·Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen · Pubmed #25492337.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Article Did The Captain only have gout? 2010

Widerøe, Tor Erik. ·Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway. tor-erik.wideroe@ntnu.no ·Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen · Pubmed #21164589.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --