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Gout: HELP
Articles from Wellington School of Medicine
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
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These are the 5 published articles about Gout that originated from Wellington School of Medicine during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Imaging as an Outcome Measure in Gout Studies: Report from the OMERACT Gout Working Group. 2015

Grainger, Rebecca / Dalbeth, Nicola / Keen, Helen / Durcan, Laura / Lawrence Edwards, N / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Diaz-Torne, Cesar / Singh, Jasvinder A / Khanna, Dinesh / Simon, Lee S / Taylor, William J. ·From the Department of Medicine, University of Otago Wellington, Wellington; Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, New Zealand; Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA; Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario Cruces and BioCruces Health Research Institute, Vizcaya; Division of Rheumatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu I Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; SDG LLC, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.R. Grainger, PhD, FRACP, Senior Lecturer, Rheumatologist, Department of Medicine, University of Otago Wellington; N. Dalbeth, MD, FRACP, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Auckland; L. Durcan, Rheumatology Fellow, MD, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital; H. Keen, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia; N.L. Edwards, MD, Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Florida; F. Perez-Ruiz, MD, Professor, Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario Cruces and BioCruces Health Research Institute; C. Diaz-Torne, PhD, Associate Professor and Rheumatologist; J.A. Singh, MBBS, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine; Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Alabama at Birmingham; D. Khanna, MD, MSc, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan; L.S. Simon, MD, Principal Advisor, SDG LLC; W.J. Taylor, PhD, FRACP, Associate Professor and Rheumatologist, Department of Medicine, University of Otago Wellington. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25641895.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The gout working group at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 12 meeting in 2014 aimed to determine which imaging modalities show the most promise for use as measurement instruments for outcomes in studies of people with chronic gout and to identify the key foci for future research about the performance of these imaging techniques with respect to the OMERACT filter 2.0. METHODS: During the gout session, a systematic literature review of the data addressing imaging modalities including plain radiography (XR), conventional computed tomography (CT), dual-energy computed tomography (DECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US) and the fulfillment of the OMERACT filter 2.0 was presented. RESULTS: The working group identified 3 relevant domains for imaging in gout studies: urate deposition (tophus burden), joint inflammation, and structural joint damage. CONCLUSION: The working group prioritized gaps in the data and identified a research agenda.

2 Article Diagnostic Arthrocentesis for Suspicion of Gout Is Safe and Well Tolerated. 2016

Taylor, William J / Fransen, Jaap / Dalbeth, Nicola / Neogi, Tuhina / Ralph Schumacher, H / Brown, Melanie / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Eliseev, Maxim / McCarthy, Geraldine / Stamp, Lisa K / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Sivera, Francisca / Ea, Hang-Korng / Gerritsen, Martijn / Scire, Carlo A / Cavagna, Lorenzo / Lin, Chingtsai / Chou, Yin-Yi / Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo / Janssen, Matthijs / Chen, Jiunn-Horng / Slot, Ole / Cimmino, Marco / Uhlig, Till / Jansen, Tim L. ·From the University of Otago, Wellington; University of Auckland, Auckland; Department of Medicine, University of Otago Christchurch, Christchurch, New Zealand; Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen; Amsterdam Rheumatology Immunology Center (ARC), Department of Rheumatology, Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn; Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, the Netherlands; Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital General de México, México City, México; Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology of Russia, Moscow, Russia; School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin; Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario Cruces and BioCruces Health Research Institute, Vizcaya; Department Reumatologia, Hospital General Universitario de Elda, Alicante, Spain; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR de Médecine; Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM), UMR 1132, Hôpital Lariboisière; Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Lariboisière, Service de Rhumatologie, Centre Viggo Petersen, Pôle Appareil Locomoteur, Paris, France; Epidemiology Unit, Italian Society for Rheumatology (SIR), Milan; Division of Rheumatology, University and IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo Foundation, Pavia; Research Laboratory and Academic Division of Clinical Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation; Taichung Veterans' General Hospital; School of Medicine, China Medical University; Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; Division of Rheumatology, Department of In ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #26628602.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of adverse events of diagnostic arthrocentesis in patients with possible gout. METHODS: Consecutive patients underwent arthrocentesis and were evaluated at 6 weeks to determine adverse events. The 95% CI were obtained by bootstrapping. RESULTS: Arthrocentesis was performed in 910 patients, and 887 (97.5%) were evaluated for adverse events. Any adverse event was observed in 12 participants (1.4%, 95% CI 0.6-2.1). There was 1 case (0.1%, 95% CI 0-0.34) of septic arthritis. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostic arthrocentesis is associated with a low frequency of adverse events. Septic arthritis rarely occurs.

3 Article An Observational Study of Gout Prevalence and Quality of Care in a National Australian General Practice Population. 2015

Robinson, Philip C / Taylor, William J / Dalbeth, Nicola. ·From the Centre for Neurogenetics and Statistical Genomics, Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland; Department of Rheumatology, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Herston, Queensland, Australia; Department of Medicine, Wellington School of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington; Bone and Joint Research Group, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.P.C. Robinson, MBChB, PhD, FRACP, Centre for Neurogenetics and Statistical Genomics, Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital; W.J. Taylor, MBChB, PhD, FRACP, Department of Medicine, Wellington School of Medicine, University of Otago; N. Dalbeth, MBChB, MD, FRACP, Bone and Joint Research Group, University of Auckland. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #26233513.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The central strategy for effective gout management is longterm urate-lowering therapy to maintain the serum urate at a level below 0.36 mmol/l. We sought to determine the prevalence of gout and the quality of care in a national Australian general practice population. METHODS: Data were from general practice point-of-care electronic records over a 5-year period (n = 1,479,449). Information was collected on patients with gout according to a validated definition. All patients who visited the same general practices over the study period formed the denominator group. We determined the estimated prevalence of gout, the frequency of allopurinol prescription, and serum urate testing, and the percentage of patients achieving a target serum urate level. RESULTS: The crude prevalence of gout in this general practice population was 1.54% (95% CI 1.52-1.56). Prevalence in men was 2.67% and in women 0.53%. Prevalence increased with age in both men and women (4.90%, 95% CI 4.82-4.99, in men > 65 yrs). Allopurinol was prescribed to 57% of patients with gout during the 5 years of the study. Only 55% of patients with gout had their serum urate tested at any time during the 5-year study period. A target serum urate concentration of < 0.36 mmol/l at any time during the 5-year study period was documented in 22.4% of all people with gout. CONCLUSION: Gout is managed poorly in Australian primary care, with low levels of allopurinol prescribing and serum urate testing. Collectively, these factors probably contribute to low achievement of serum urate targets.

4 Article A human leukocyte antigen locus haplotype confers risk for allopurinol-related adverse effects in Caucasian patients with gout. 2015

Roberts, Rebecca L / Wallace, Mary C / Harrison, Andrew / Dalbeth, Nicola / Merriman, Tony R / Stamp, Lisa K. ·Departments of aSurgical Sciences bBiochemistry, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin cWellington Regional Rheumatology Unit, Hutt Hospital, Lower Hutt dDepartment of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland eDepartment of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington fDepartment of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. ·Pharmacogenet Genomics · Pubmed #26049586.

ABSTRACT: A human leukocyte antigen haplotype comprising six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confers risk for allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome in Caucasians. The objective of the current study was to test for association of this haplotype with other, less severe adverse effects (AEs) of allopurinol therapy in a large New Zealand gout cohort. A total of 626 Caucasian and 766 Polynesian patients were genotyped for six SNPs (rs2844665, rs9263715, rs3130931, rs3130501, rs3094188, rs9469003) using TaqMan SNP assays. The CACGAC haplotype occurred at a frequency of 0.018 in Caucasians and 0.009 in Polynesians. The CACGAC haplotype occurred at a significantly higher frequency in Caucasian patients who experienced allopurinol-related AEs (13.3 vs. 1.7%, P=8.9e-06, odds ratio=8.9, 95% confidence interval 2.8-27.9), but it was not associated with overall allopurinol toxicity in Polynesians (P>0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate the potential utility of this six-SNP haplotype as a predictor of milder allopurinol AEs.

5 Article OMERACT endorsement of measures of outcome for studies of acute gout. 2014

Singh, Jasvinder A / Taylor, William J / Dalbeth, Nicola / Simon, Lee S / Sundy, John / Grainger, Rebecca / Alten, Rieke / March, Lyn / Strand, Vibeke / Wells, George / Khanna, Dinesh / McQueen, Fiona / Schlesinger, Naomi / Boonen, Annelies / Boers, Maarten / Saag, Kenneth G / Schumacher, H Ralph / Edwards, N Lawrence. ·From Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA; Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington; Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; SDG LLC, Cambridge, Massachusetts,; Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA, and Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore; Schlosspark-Klinik Teaching Hospital of the Charité, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany; University of Sydney Institute of Bone and Joint Research and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia; Stanford University Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Portolo Valley, California, USA; University of Ottawa, London, Ontario, Canada; University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; University of Auckland, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Grafton, Auckland, New Zealand; Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA; Maastricht University Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, and Caphri Research Institute, University Maastricht; VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; University of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Rheumatology, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida, USA. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #24334651.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent to which participants at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 11 meeting agree that instruments used in clinical trials to measure OMERACT core outcome domains in acute gout fulfill OMERACT filter requirements of truth, discrimination, and feasibility; and where future research efforts need to be directed. METHODS: Results of a systematic literature review and analysis of individual-level data from recent clinical studies of acute gout were presented to OMERACT participants. The information was discussed in breakout groups, and opinion was defined by subsequent voting in a plenary session. Endorsement was defined as at least 70% of participants voting in agreement with the proposition (where the denominator excluded those participants who did not vote or who voted "don't know"). RESULTS: The following measures were endorsed for use in clinical trials of acute gout: (1) 5-point Likert scale and/or visual analog scale (0 to 100 mm) to measure pain; (2) 4-point Likert scale for joint swelling; (3) 4-point Likert scale for joint tenderness; and (4) 5-point Likert scale for patient global assessment of response to treatment. Measures for the activity limitations domain were not endorsed. CONCLUSION: Measures of pain, joint swelling, joint tenderness, and patient global assessment in acute gout were endorsed at OMERACT 11. These measures should now be used in clinical trials of acute gout.