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Gout: HELP
Articles from US Eastern Zone
Based on 627 articles published since 2009
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These are the 627 published articles about Gout that originated from US Eastern Zone during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline The British Society for Rheumatology Guideline for the Management of Gout. 2017

Hui, Michelle / Carr, Alison / Cameron, Stewart / Davenport, Graham / Doherty, Michael / Forrester, Harry / Jenkins, Wendy / Jordan, Kelsey M / Mallen, Christian D / McDonald, Thomas M / Nuki, George / Pywell, Anthony / Zhang, Weiya / Roddy, Edward / Anonymous6680907. ·Department of Rheumatology, Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Derby. · Hamell1st Floor Dome Building, The Quadrant, Richmond, TW9 1DT UK. · Renal Medicine, Guy's Campus, Kings College London, London. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele. · Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham. · Rheumatology, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton. · Medicines Monitoring Unit, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee. · Institute for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh. · Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28549195.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline The British Society for Rheumatology Guideline for the Management of Gout. 2017

Hui, Michelle / Carr, Alison / Cameron, Stewart / Davenport, Graham / Doherty, Michael / Forrester, Harry / Jenkins, Wendy / Jordan, Kelsey M / Mallen, Christian D / McDonald, Thomas M / Nuki, George / Pywell, Anthony / Zhang, Weiya / Roddy, Edward / Anonymous6650907. ·Department of Rheumatology, Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Derby. · Hamell,1st Floor Dome Building, The Quadrant, Richmond TW9 1DT, UK. · Renal Medicine, Guy's Campus, Kings College London, London. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele. · Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham. · Rheumatology, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton. · Medicines Monitoring Unit, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee. · Institute for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh. · Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28549177.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Management of Acute and Recurrent Gout: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians. 2017

Qaseem, Amir / Harris, Russell P / Forciea, Mary Ann / Anonymous151117. ·From the American College of Physicians and University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #27802508.

ABSTRACT: Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on the management of gout. Methods: Using the ACP grading system, the committee based these recommendations on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials; systematic reviews; and large observational studies published between January 2010 and March 2016. Clinical outcomes evaluated included pain, joint swelling and tenderness, activities of daily living, patient global assessment, recurrence, intermediate outcomes of serum urate levels, and harms. Target Audience and Patient Population: The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians, and the target patient population includes adults with acute or recurrent gout. Recommendation 1: ACP recommends that clinicians choose corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or colchicine to treat patients with acute gout. (Grade: strong recommendation, high-quality evidence). Recommendation 2: ACP recommends that clinicians use low-dose colchicine when using colchicine to treat acute gout. (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Recommendation 3: ACP recommends against initiating long-term urate-lowering therapy in most patients after a first gout attack or in patients with infrequent attacks. (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Recommendation 4: ACP recommends that clinicians discuss benefits, harms, costs, and individual preferences with patients before initiating urate-lowering therapy, including concomitant prophylaxis, in patients with recurrent gout attacks. (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence).

4 Guideline Diagnosis of Acute Gout: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians. 2017

Qaseem, Amir / McLean, Robert M / Starkey, Melissa / Forciea, Mary Ann / Anonymous181085. ·From the American College of Physicians and University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #27802479.

ABSTRACT: Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on the diagnosis of gout. Methods: This guideline is based on a systematic review of published studies on gout diagnosis, identified using several databases, from database inception to February 2016. Evaluated outcomes included the accuracy of the test results; intermediate outcomes (results of laboratory and radiographic tests, such as serum urate and synovial fluid crystal analysis and radiographic or ultrasonography changes); clinical decision making (additional testing and pharmacologic or dietary management); short-term clinical (patient-centered) outcomes, such as pain and joint swelling and tenderness; and adverse effects of the tests. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations by using the ACP grading system, which is based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) method. Target Audience and Patient Population: The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians, and the target patient population includes adults with joint inflammation suspected to be gout. Recommendation: ACP recommends that clinicians use synovial fluid analysis when clinical judgment indicates that diagnostic testing is necessary in patients with possible acute gout. (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence).

5 Guideline Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease: diagnosis, classification, and management--A KDIGO consensus report. 2015

Eckardt, Kai-Uwe / Alper, Seth L / Antignac, Corinne / Bleyer, Anthony J / Chauveau, Dominique / Dahan, Karin / Deltas, Constantinos / Hosking, Andrew / Kmoch, Stanislav / Rampoldi, Luca / Wiesener, Michael / Wolf, Matthias T / Devuyst, Olivier / Anonymous4640822. ·Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen, Germany. · Divisions of Nephrology and Molecular and Vascular Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · INSERM U1163, Laboratory of Hereditary Kidney Diseases, Paris, France. · Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, Paris, France. · Section on Nephrology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA. · Département de Néphrologie et Transplantation d'organes, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse, France. · Centre de Génétique Humaine, Institut de Pathologie et de Génétique, Gosselies, Belgium. · Department of Biological Sciences, Molecular Medicine Research Center and Laboratory of Molecular and Medical Genetics, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus. · UKD Foundation, New York, New York, USA. · Institute for Inherited Metabolic Disorders, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Molecular Genetics of Renal Disorders Unit, Division of Genetics and Cell Biology, Dulbecco Telethon Institute c/o IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division of Pediatric Nephrology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. · Institute of Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. ·Kidney Int · Pubmed #25738250.

ABSTRACT: Rare autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding uromodulin (UMOD), hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF1B), renin (REN), and mucin-1 (MUC1). Multiple names have been proposed for these disorders, including 'Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease (MCKD) type 2', 'Familial Juvenile Hyperuricemic Nephropathy (FJHN)', or 'Uromodulin-Associated Kidney Disease (UAKD)' for UMOD-related diseases and 'MCKD type 1' for the disease caused by MUC1 mutations. The multiplicity of these terms, and the fact that cysts are not pathognomonic, creates confusion. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) proposes adoption of a new terminology for this group of diseases using the term 'Autosomal Dominant Tubulointerstitial Kidney Disease' (ADTKD) appended by a gene-based subclassification, and suggests diagnostic criteria. Implementation of these recommendations is anticipated to facilitate recognition and characterization of these monogenic diseases. A better understanding of these rare disorders may be relevant for the tubulointerstitial fibrosis component in many forms of chronic kidney disease.

6 Guideline Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for human leukocyte antigen-B genotype and allopurinol dosing. 2013

Hershfield, M S / Callaghan, J T / Tassaneeyakul, W / Mushiroda, T / Thorn, C F / Klein, T E / Lee, M T M. ·Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. ·Clin Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #23232549.

ABSTRACT: Allopurinol is the most commonly used drug for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. However, allopurinol is also one of the most common causes of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), which include drug hypersensitivity syndrome, Stevens–Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. A variant allele of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B, HLA-B*58:01, associates strongly with allopurinolinduced SCAR. We have summarized the evidence from the published literature and developed peer-reviewed guidelines for allopurinol use based on HLA-B genotype.

7 Guideline 2012 American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 2: therapy and antiinflammatory prophylaxis of acute gouty arthritis. 2012

Khanna, Dinesh / Khanna, Puja P / Fitzgerald, John D / Singh, Manjit K / Bae, Sangmee / Neogi, Tuhina / Pillinger, Michael H / Merill, Joan / Lee, Susan / Prakash, Shraddha / Kaldas, Marian / Gogia, Maneesh / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Taylor, Will / Lioté, Frédéric / Choi, Hyon / Singh, Jasvinder A / Dalbeth, Nicola / Kaplan, Sanford / Niyyar, Vandana / Jones, Danielle / Yarows, Steven A / Roessler, Blake / Kerr, Gail / King, Charles / Levy, Gerald / Furst, Daniel E / Edwards, N Lawrence / Mandell, Brian / Schumacher, H Ralph / Robbins, Mark / Wenger, Neil / Terkeltaub, Robert / Anonymous2310738. ·University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #23024029.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline 2012 American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 1: systematic nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapeutic approaches to hyperuricemia. 2012

Khanna, Dinesh / Fitzgerald, John D / Khanna, Puja P / Bae, Sangmee / Singh, Manjit K / Neogi, Tuhina / Pillinger, Michael H / Merill, Joan / Lee, Susan / Prakash, Shraddha / Kaldas, Marian / Gogia, Maneesh / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Taylor, Will / Lioté, Frédéric / Choi, Hyon / Singh, Jasvinder A / Dalbeth, Nicola / Kaplan, Sanford / Niyyar, Vandana / Jones, Danielle / Yarows, Steven A / Roessler, Blake / Kerr, Gail / King, Charles / Levy, Gerald / Furst, Daniel E / Edwards, N Lawrence / Mandell, Brian / Schumacher, H Ralph / Robbins, Mark / Wenger, Neil / Terkeltaub, Robert / Anonymous2300738. ·University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #23024028.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline 2011 Recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout and hyperuricemia. 2011

Hamburger, Max / Baraf, Herbert S B / Adamson, Thomas C / Basile, Jan / Bass, Lewis / Cole, Brent / Doghramji, Paul P / Guadagnoli, Germano A / Hamburger, Frances / Harford, Regine / Lieberman, Joseph A / Mandel, David R / Mandelbrot, Didier A / McClain, Bonny P / Mizuno, Eric / Morton, Allan H / Mount, David B / Pope, Richard S / Rosenthal, Kenneth G / Setoodeh, Katy / Skosey, John L / Edwards, N Lawrence / Anonymous4710712. ·Rheumatology Associates of Long Island, Melville, NY 11747, USA. mcapacious@aol.com ·Postgrad Med · Pubmed #22156509.

ABSTRACT: Gout is a major health problem in the United States; it affects 8.3 million people, which is approximately 4% of the adult population. Gout is most often diagnosed and managed in primary care physician practices. Primary care physicians have a significant opportunity to diagnose and manage patients with gout and improve patient outcomes. Following publication of the 2006 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) gout guidelines, significant evidence on gout has accumulated and new treatments for patients with gout have become available. It is the objective of these 2011 recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout and hyperuricemia to update the 2006 EULAR guidelines, paying special attention to the needs of primary care physicians, who manage most patients with gout. The revised 2011 recommendations are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach as an evidence-based strategy for rating quality of evidence and grading strength of recommendation in clinical practice. A total of 26 key recommendations for diagnosis (n = 10) and management (n = 16) were evaluated. Presence of tophus (proven or suspected) and response to colchicine had the highest clinical diagnostic value (likelihood ratio [LR], 15.56 [95% CI, 2.11-114.71] and LR, 4.33 [95% CI, 1.16-16.16], respectively). The key aspect of effective management of an acute gout attack is initiation of treatment within hours of onset of first symptoms. Low-dose colchicine is better tolerated than and is as effective as high-dose colchicine (number needed to treat [NNT], 5 [95% CI, 3-13] and NNT, 6 [95% CI, 3-72], respectively). For urate-lowering therapy, allopurinol in combination with probenecid was shown to be more effective than either agent alone (effect size [ES], 5.51 for combination; ES, 4.46 for probenecid; and ES, 2.80 for allopurinol). Febuxostat, also a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, has a slightly different mechanism of action and can be prescribed at unchanged doses for patients with mild-to-moderate renal or hepatic impairment. Febuxostat 40 mg versus 80 mg (NNT, 6 [95% CI, 4-11]) and 120 mg (NNT, 6 [95% CI, 3-26]) both demonstrated long-term efficacy. The target of urate-lowering therapy should be a serum uric acid level of ≤ 6 mg/dL. For patients with refractory and tophaceous gout, intravenous pegloticase is a new treatment option.

10 Editorial Editorial Commentary: Prevention and treatment of atrial fibrillation: Is hyperuricemia the next target? 2019

Black-Maier, Eric / Daubert, James P. ·Duke Center for Atrial Fibrillation, Electrophysiology Section, Division of Cardiology, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA. · Duke Center for Atrial Fibrillation, Electrophysiology Section, Division of Cardiology, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA. Electronic address: james.daubert@duke.edu. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #30057151.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Gout, Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition, and Cardiovascular Outcomes. 2018

White, William B. ·Calhoun Cardiology Center, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington. ·Circulation · Pubmed #30354393.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Editorial: Colchicine: Conventional and Contemporary Indications. 2018

Vrachatis, Dimitrios A / Giannopoulos, Georgios / Deftereos, Spyridon G. ·Department of Cardiology, "G. Gennimatas" General Hospital of Athens, 154 Mesogion ave., 115 27, Athens, Greece. · Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, CT, United States. · 2nd Department of Cardiology, Medical School, Attikon Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. ·Curr Pharm Des · Pubmed #29768995.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Treating Gout in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease: Mutual Benefit or Unintended Consequences? 2018

Givertz, Michael M. ·Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: mgivertz@bwh.harvard.edu. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #29495979.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Advances in Urate-Lowering Therapy: Time to Revisit High-Dose Febuxostat. 2017

Abeles, Aryeh M. ·Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Meriden, CT. ·Am J Ther · Pubmed #28291044.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Editorial: Do Not Let Gout Apathy Lead to Gouty Arthropathy. 2017

FitzGerald, John D / Neogi, Tuhina / Choi, Hyon K. ·University of California, Los Angeles. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28002890.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial To Treat or Not to Treat (to Target) in Gout. 2017

Neogi, Tuhina / Mikuls, Ted R. ·From Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #27802507.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial The Long and Winding Road to Clinical Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Management of Gout. 2017

McLean, Robert M. ·From Northeast Medical Group; Yale New Haven Health System; New Haven, Connecticut. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #27802506.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Editorial: The Sound and the Fury: Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Gout. 2017

Kissin, Eugene Y / Pillinger, Michael H. ·Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #27748075.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Editorial: The Ethics of Recent Gout Trials. 2016

Shmerling, Robert H. ·Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Chair, American College of Rheumatology Committee on Ethics and Conflicts of Interest. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #27110864.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Gout and Association with Erectile Dysfunction. 2015

Gelber, Allan C. ·Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. agelber@jhmi.edu. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #26429202.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Gout and crystal arthropathies. 2014

Neogi, Tuhina. ·Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, and Rheumatology, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Clin Epi Unit, Suite X200, Boston, MA 02118, USA. Electronic address: tneogi@bu.edu. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #24703355.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial Crystal deposition diseases. 2014

Choi, Hyon. ·Boston University School of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology and the Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Curr Opin Rheumatol · Pubmed #24445481.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Diagnosis of crystal-associated disease: where do we stand? 2011

Schumacher, H Ralph / Chen, Lan X / Zhang, Li Yun. ·University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. schumacr@mail.med.upenn.edu ·Bioanalysis · Pubmed #21585302.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Review Diagnostic Imaging and Management of Common Intra-articular and Peri-articular Soft Tissue Tumors and Tumorlike Conditions of the Knee. 2019

Evenski, Andrea J / Stensby, James Derek / Rosas, Samuel / Emory, Cynthia L. ·Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. · Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. · Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ·J Knee Surg · Pubmed #30449023.

ABSTRACT: Intra-articular (IA) and peri-articular (PA) tumors of the knee are frequently encountered by orthopaedic surgeons. Nonetheless, due to the possibility of great morbidity and potential mortality, it is important to recognize and differentiate between benign and malignant lesions in a timely manner. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to provide a concise, practical, and updated review of commonly encountered IA and PA tumors including intratendinous gout, synovial chondromatosis, schwannoma, pigmented villonodular synovitis, and synovial sarcoma, and a detailed description of differentiating features to include various imaging modalities.

25 Review Gout and arrhythmias: In search for causation beyond association. 2019

Giannopoulos, Georgios / Angelidis, Christos / Deftereos, Spyridon. ·Cardiology Department, Athens General Hospital "G. Gennimatas", Athens, Greece; Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Electronic address: georgios.giannopolous@yale.edu. · Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2nd Department of Cardiology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, Attikon Hospital, Athens, Greece. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #29937218.

ABSTRACT: Gout is a systemic disease, characterized by the formation and deposition of crystals in tissues (mainly in and around the joints) of individuals with elevated serum uric acid levels. Lately, a considerable number of reports relating elevated uric acid and/or gout with rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation, have been published. This review summarizes evidence linking common arrhythmias and hyperuricemia/gout and discusses questions or controversies that surround it. Overall, existing evidence may not be overwhelming, but strongly suggests a positive correlation between uric acid levels and common rhythm disorders. Needless to say that such a link - as a univariate association between the two - is to be expected, given the extensive overlap of risk factors and comorbidities of hyperuricemia/gout and arrhythmias. However, the observed associations seem to persist - in most studies - after extensive adjustment for potential confounders. Still, multivariable analyses of epidemiologically collected data cannot substitute for proof coming from basic and clinical studies. There is obviously a need for further basic research to establish a causal relationship between uric acid effects and arrhythmias, as well as translational studies and clinical trials to investigate the therapeutic implications of such a relationship. Simply put, we are fairly certain that there is association, but proof of causation is what we are still in want of.

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