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Gout: HELP
Articles from Stoke on Trent
Based on 53 articles published since 2010
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These are the 53 published articles about Gout that originated from Stoke on Trent during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Guideline The British Society for Rheumatology Guideline for the Management of Gout. 2017

Hui, Michelle / Carr, Alison / Cameron, Stewart / Davenport, Graham / Doherty, Michael / Forrester, Harry / Jenkins, Wendy / Jordan, Kelsey M / Mallen, Christian D / McDonald, Thomas M / Nuki, George / Pywell, Anthony / Zhang, Weiya / Roddy, Edward / Anonymous5550907. ·Department of Rheumatology, Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Derby. · Hamell1st Floor Dome Building, The Quadrant, Richmond, TW9 1DT UK. · Renal Medicine, Guy's Campus, Kings College London, London. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele. · Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham. · Rheumatology, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton. · Medicines Monitoring Unit, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee. · Institute for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh. · Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28549195.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline The British Society for Rheumatology Guideline for the Management of Gout. 2017

Hui, Michelle / Carr, Alison / Cameron, Stewart / Davenport, Graham / Doherty, Michael / Forrester, Harry / Jenkins, Wendy / Jordan, Kelsey M / Mallen, Christian D / McDonald, Thomas M / Nuki, George / Pywell, Anthony / Zhang, Weiya / Roddy, Edward / Anonymous5520907. ·Department of Rheumatology, Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Derby. · Hamell,1st Floor Dome Building, The Quadrant, Richmond TW9 1DT, UK. · Renal Medicine, Guy's Campus, Kings College London, London. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele. · Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham. · Rheumatology, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton. · Medicines Monitoring Unit, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee. · Institute for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh. · Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28549177.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline 2016 updated EULAR evidence-based recommendations for the management of gout. 2017

Richette, P / Doherty, M / Pascual, E / Barskova, V / Becce, F / Castañeda-Sanabria, J / Coyfish, M / Guillo, S / Jansen, T L / Janssens, H / Lioté, F / Mallen, C / Nuki, G / Perez-Ruiz, F / Pimentao, J / Punzi, L / Pywell, T / So, A / Tausche, A K / Uhlig, T / Zavada, J / Zhang, W / Tubach, F / Bardin, T. ·AP-HP, hôpital Lariboisière, service de Rhumatologie, F-75010 Paris, France; Inserm, UMR1132, Hôpital Lariboisière, F-75010 Paris, France; Universitè Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Citè, F-75205 Paris, France. · Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. · Institute of Rheumatology RAMS, Moscow, Russia. · Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. · AP-HP, Dèpartement d'Epidèmiologie et Recherche Clinique, Hôpital Bichat, Paris, France: APHP, Centre de Pharmacoèpidèmiologie, Paris, France: Univ Paris Diderot, Paris, France: INSERM UMR 1123 ECEVE, Paris, France. · Patient from Nottingham, UK, Paris. · Department of Rheumatology, VieCuri Medical Centre, Venlo, and Scientific IQ HealthCare, Radboud UMC, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands. · Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre University of Keele, Keele, UK. · Osteoarticular Research Group, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Seccion de Rheumatologia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo, Spain. · Rheumatology Unit, Clínica Coração de Jesus, Lisbon, Portugal. · Rheumatology Unit, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Service de Rhumatologie, CHUV and Universitè de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Rheumatology, University Clinic at the Technical University Dresden, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Rheumatology, Prague, and Department of Rheumatology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27457514.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: New drugs and new evidence concerning the use of established treatments have become available since the publication of the first European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of gout, in 2006. This situation has prompted a systematic review and update of the 2006 recommendations. METHODS: The EULAR task force consisted of 15 rheumatologists, 1 radiologist, 2 general practitioners, 1 research fellow, 2 patients and 3 experts in epidemiology/methodology from 12 European countries. A systematic review of the literature concerning all aspects of gout treatments was performed. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated by use of a Delphi consensus approach. RESULTS: Three overarching principles and 11 key recommendations were generated. For the treatment of flare, colchicine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral or intra-articular steroids or a combination are recommended. In patients with frequent flare and contraindications to colchicine, NSAIDs and corticosteroids, an interleukin-1 blocker should be considered. In addition to education and a non-pharmacological management approach, urate-lowering therapy (ULT) should be considered from the first presentation of the disease, and serum uric acid (SUA) levels should be maintained at<6 mg/dL (360 µmol/L) and <5 mg/dL (300 µmol/L) in those with severe gout. Allopurinol is recommended as first-line ULT and its dosage should be adjusted according to renal function. If the SUA target cannot be achieved with allopurinol, then febuxostat, a uricosuric or combining a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with a uricosuric should be considered. For patients with refractory gout, pegloticase is recommended. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations aim to inform physicians and patients about the non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments for gout and to provide the best strategies to achieve the predefined urate target to cure the disease.

4 Editorial The role of diet in serum urate concentration. 2018

Watson, Lorraine / Roddy, Edward. ·Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK l.watson@keele.ac.uk. · Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK. ·BMJ · Pubmed #30305276.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Gout - a guide for the general and acute physicians. 2017

Abhishek, Abhishek / Roddy, Edward / Doherty, Michael. ·University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK Abhishek.abhishek@nottingham.ac.uk. · Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK. · University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. ·Clin Med (Lond) · Pubmed #28148582.

ABSTRACT: Gout is the most prevalent inflammatory arthritis and affects 2.5% of the general population in the UK. It is also the only arthritis that has the potential to be cured with safe, inexpensive and well tolerated urate-lowering treatments, which reduce serum uric acid by either inhibiting xanthine oxidase - eg allopurinol, febuxostat - or by increasing the renal excretion of uric acid. Of these, xanthine oxidase inhibitors are used first line and are effective in 'curing' gout in the vast majority of patients. Gout can be diagnosed on clinical grounds in those with typical podagra. However, in those with involvement of other joints, joint aspiration is recommended to demonstrate monosodium urate crystals and exclude other causes of acute arthritis, such as septic arthritis. However, a clinical diagnosis of gout can be made if joint aspiration is not feasible. This review summarises the current understanding of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, investigations and treatment of gout.

6 Review Gout and risk of chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis: meta-analysis of observational studies. 2015

Roughley, Matthew J / Belcher, John / Mallen, Christian D / Roddy, Edward. ·School of Medicine, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. mattjroughley@gmail.com. · School of Computing and Mathematics, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. j.belcher@keele.ac.uk. · Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. c.d.mallen@keele.ac.uk. · Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. e.roddy@keele.ac.uk. ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #25889144.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: To determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis in people with gout, and the association between gout and prevalent or incident chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis. METHODS: Systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies. Data sources; MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases, hand-searched reference lists, citation history and contact with authors. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: cohort, case-control or cross-sectional studies which examined the occurrence of chronic kidney disease or nephrolithiasis amongst adults with gout (with or without a non-gout comparator group) in primary care or general population samples. Prevalence and risk estimate meta-analyses were performed using a random-effects model. RESULTS: Seventeen studies were included in the meta-analysis (chronic kidney disease n = 7, nephrolithiasis n = 8, both n = 2). Pooled prevalence estimates of chronic kidney disease stage ≥3 and self-reported lifetime nephrolithiasis in people with gout were 24% (95% confidence interval 19% to 28%) and 14% (95% CI 12% to 17%) respectively. Gout was associated with both chronic kidney disease (pooled adjusted odds ratio 2.41, 95% confidence interval 1.86 to 3.11) and self-reported lifetime nephrolithiasis (1.77, 1.43 to 2.19). CONCLUSIONS: Chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis are commonly found amongst patients with gout. Gout is independently associated with both chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis. Patients with gout should be actively screened for chronic kidney disease and its consequences.

7 Review Increased cardiovascular mortality associated with gout: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2015

Clarson, L E / Chandratre, P / Hider, S L / Belcher, J / Heneghan, C / Roddy, E / Mallen, C D. ·Keele University, Keele, UK l.clarson@keele.ac.uk. · Keele University, Keele, UK. · Oxford University, Oxford, UK. ·Eur J Prev Cardiol · Pubmed #24281251.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hyperuricaemia, the biochemical precursor to gout, has been shown to be an independent risk factor for mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD), although studies examining the clinical phenomenon of gout and risk of CVD mortality report conflicting results. This study aimed to produce a pooled estimate of risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease in patients with gout. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: Electronic bibliographic databases were searched from inception to November 2012, with results reviewed by two independent reviewers. Studies were included if they reported data on CVD mortality in adults with gout who were free of CVD at time of entry into the study. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) for this association were calculated both unadjusted and adjusted for traditional vascular risk factors. RESULTS: Six papers, including 223,448 patients, were eligible for inclusion (all (CVD) mortality n = 4, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality n = 3, and myocardial infarction mortality n = 3). Gout was associated with an excess risk of CVD mortality (unadjusted HR 1.51 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.17-1.84)) and CHD mortality (unadjusted HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.25-1.94)). After adjusting for traditional vascular risk factors, the pooled HR for both CVD mortality (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.14-1.44) and CHD mortality (HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.22-1.63) remained statistically significant, but none of the studies reported a significant association with myocardial infarction. CONCLUSIONS: Gout increases the risk of mortality from CVD and CHD, but not myocardial infarction, independently of vascular risk factors.

8 Review Epidemiology of gout. 2014

Roddy, Edward / Choi, Hyon K. ·Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK. Electronic address: e.roddy@keele.ac.uk. · Section of Rheumatology and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118, USA. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #24703341.

ABSTRACT: Gout is the most prevalent inflammatory arthritis in men. The findings of several epidemiologic studies from a diverse range of countries suggest that the prevalence of gout has risen over the past few decades. Although incidence data are scarce, data from the United States suggests that the incidence of gout is also rising. Evidence from prospective epidemiologic studies has confirmed dietary factors (animal purines, alcohol, and fructose), obesity, the metabolic syndrome, hypertension, diuretic use, and chronic kidney disease as clinically relevant risk factors for hyperuricemia and gout. Low-fat dairy products, coffee, and vitamin C seem to have a protective effect.

9 Review Gout. 2013

Roddy, Edward / Mallen, Christian D / Doherty, Michael. ·Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University, Keele ST5 5BG, UK. ·BMJ · Pubmed #24473446.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Health-related quality of life in gout: a systematic review. 2013

Chandratre, Priyanka / Roddy, Edward / Clarson, Lorna / Richardson, Jane / Hider, Samantha L / Mallen, Christian D. ·Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Keele University, Keele ST5 5BG, UK. e.roddy@keele.ac.uk. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #23934311.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To identify the instruments that have been used to measure health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in gout and assess their clinimetric properties, determine the distribution of HRQOL in gout and identify factors associated with poor HRQOL. METHODS: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsycINFO were searched from inception to October 2012. Search terms pertained to gout, health or functional status, clinimetric properties and HRQOL. Study data extraction and quality assessment were performed by two independent reviewers. RESULTS: From 474 identified studies, 22 met the inclusion criteria. Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and Short Form 36 (SF-36) were most frequently used and highest rated due to robust construct and concurrent validity, despite high floor and ceiling effects. The Gout Impact Scale had good content validity. Gout had a greater impact on physical HRQOL compared to other domains. Both gout-specific features (attack frequency and intensity, intercritical pain and number of joints involved) and comorbid disease were associated with poor HRQOL. Evidence for objective features such as tophi and serum uric acid was less robust. Limitations of existing studies include cross-sectional design, recruitment from specialist clinic settings and frequent use of generic instruments. CONCLUSION: Most studies have used the generic HAQ-DI and SF-36. Gout-specific characteristics and comorbidities contribute to poor HRQOL. There is a need for a cohort study in primary care (where most patients with gout are treated) to determine which factors predict changes in HRQOL over time. This will enable those at risk of deterioration to be identified and better targeted for treatment.

11 Review Treatment of hyperuricaemia and gout. 2013

Roddy, Edward / Doherty, Michael. ·Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, UK. e.roddy@keele.ac.uk ·Clin Med (Lond) · Pubmed #23908515.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Epidemiology of gout. 2010

Roddy, Edward / Doherty, Michael. ·Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK. e.roddy@cphc.keele.ac.uk ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #21205285.

ABSTRACT: Gout is the most prevalent form of inflammatory arthropathy. Several studies suggest that its prevalence and incidence have risen in recent decades. Numerous risk factors for the development of gout have been established, including hyperuricaemia, genetic factors, dietary factors, alcohol consumption, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, obesity, diuretic use and chronic renal disease. Osteoarthritis predisposes to local crystal deposition. Gout appears to be an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, additional to the risk conferred by its association with traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

13 Article Open-label randomised pragmatic trial (CONTACT) comparing naproxen and low-dose colchicine for the treatment of gout flares in primary care. 2020

Roddy, Edward / Clarkson, Kris / Blagojevic-Bucknall, Milica / Mehta, Rajnikant / Oppong, Raymond / Avery, Anthony / Hay, Elaine M / Heneghan, Carl / Hartshorne, Liz / Hooper, Julie / Hughes, Gemma / Jowett, Sue / Lewis, Martyn / Little, Paul / McCartney, Karen / Mahtani, Kamal R / Nunan, David / Santer, Miriam / Williams, Sam / Mallen, Christian D. ·Primary Care Centre Versus Arthritis; School of Primary, Community and Social Care, Keele University, Keele, UK e.roddy@keele.ac.uk. · Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Midland Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. · Primary Care Centre Versus Arthritis; School of Primary, Community and Social Care, Keele University, Keele, UK. · Keele Clinical Trials Unit, Keele University, Keele, UK. · Birmingham Acute Care Research/Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust/Institute of Applied Health Research (BCTU), University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Health Economics, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Division of Primary Care, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Primary Care and Population Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #31666237.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness and safety of naproxen and low-dose colchicine for treating gout flares in primary care. METHODS: This was a multicentre open-label randomised trial. Adults with a gout flare recruited from 100 general practices were randomised equally to naproxen 750 mg immediately then 250 mg every 8 hours for 7 days or low-dose colchicine 500 mcg three times per day for 4 days. The primary outcome was change in worst pain intensity in the last 24 hours (0-10 Numeric Rating Scale) from baseline measured daily over the first 7 days: mean change from baseline was compared between groups over days 1-7 by intention to treat. RESULTS: Between 29 January 2014 and 31 December 2015, we recruited 399 participants (naproxen n=200, colchicine n=199), of whom 349 (87.5%) completed primary outcome data at day 7. There was no significant between-group difference in average pain-change scores over days 1-7 (colchicine vs naproxen: mean difference -0.18; 95% CI -0.53 to 0.17; p=0.32). During days 1-7, diarrhoea (45.9% vs 20.0%; OR 3.31; 2.01 to 5.44) and headache (20.5% vs 10.7%; 1.92; 1.03 to 3.55) were more common in the colchicine group than the naproxen group but constipation was less common (4.8% vs 19.3%; 0.24; 0.11 to 0.54). CONCLUSION: We found no difference in pain intensity over 7 days between people with a gout flare randomised to either naproxen or low-dose colchicine. Naproxen caused fewer side effects supporting naproxen as first-line treatment for gout flares in primary care in the absence of contraindications. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN (69836939), clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01994226), EudraCT (2013-001354-95).

14 Article 2018 updated European League Against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis of gout. 2020

Richette, Pascal / Doherty, Michael / Pascual, Eliseo / Barskova, Victoria / Becce, Fabio / Castaneda, Johann / Coyfish, Malcolm / Guillo, Sylvie / Jansen, Tim / Janssens, Hein / Lioté, Frédéric / Mallen, Christian D / Nuki, George / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Pimentao, José / Punzi, Leonardo / Pywell, Anthony / So, Alexander K / Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / Uhlig, Till / Zavada, Jakub / Zhang, Weiya / Tubach, Florence / Bardin, Thomas. ·Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Lariboisiere Centre Viggo Petersen, Paris, France pascal.richette@aphp.fr. · Inserm UMR1132 Bioscar, Universite Paris Diderot UFR de Medecine, Paris, France. · Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · Rheumatology, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. · Institute of Rheumatology, RAMS, Moscow, Russian. · Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. · AP-HP, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Département Biostatistique Santé Publique et Information Médicale, Centre de Pharmacoépidémiologie (Cephepi), INSERM, UMR 1123 ECEVE, CIC-1421, Paris, France, Paris, France. · Nottingham, UK. · Département d'Epidémiologie et Recherche Clinique, Paris, France. · Rheumatology, VieCuri, Venlo, Netherlands. · Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Center, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Rhumatologie, Hôpital Lariboisière, Paris, France. · INSERM UMR-1132 and Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Keele University, Keele, UK. · Centre Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. · Servicio de Reumatologia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo, Spain. · Rheumatology Unit, Clínica Coração de Jesus, Lisbon, Portugal. · Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Musculoskeletal Medicine, Service de RMR, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, University Clinic Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Saxonia, Germany. · Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Rheumatology, Prague, Czech Republic, Czech Republic. · Academic Rheumatology, Nottingham University, Nottingham, UK. · Biostatistics and epidemiology, APHP, Hopital Pitié Salpetrière, Paris, France. · Rheumatology, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Paris, France. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #31167758.

ABSTRACT: Although gout is the most common inflammatory arthritis, it is still frequently misdiagnosed. New data on imaging and clinical diagnosis have become available since the first EULAR recommendations for the diagnosis of gout in 2006. This prompted a systematic review and update of the 2006 recommendations. A systematic review of the literature concerning all aspects of gout diagnosis was performed. Recommendations were formulated using a Delphi consensus approach. Eight key recommendations were generated. A search for crystals in synovial fluid or tophus aspirates is recommended in every person with suspected gout, because demonstration of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals allows a definite diagnosis of gout. There was consensus that a number of suggestive clinical features support a clinical diagnosis of gout. These are monoarticular involvement of a foot or ankle joint (especially the first metatarsophalangeal joint); previous episodes of similar acute arthritis; rapid onset of severe pain and swelling; erythema; male gender and associated cardiovascular diseases and hyperuricaemia. When crystal identification is not possible, it is recommended that any atypical presentation should be investigated by imaging, in particular with ultrasound to seek features suggestive of MSU crystal deposition (double contour sign and tophi). There was consensus that a diagnosis of gout should not be based on the presence of hyperuricaemia alone. There was also a strong recommendation that all people with gout should be systematically assessed for presence of associated comorbidities and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as well as for risk factors for chronic hyperuricaemia. Eight updated, evidence-based, expert consensus recommendations for the diagnosis of gout are proposed.

15 Article Naproxen or low-dose colchicine for gout flares in primary care? Response to: 'Open-label randomised pragmatic trial (CONTACT) comparing naproxen and low-dose colchicine for the treatment of gout flares in primary care' by Parperis 2019

Roddy, Edward / Mallen, Christian D / Anonymous5691013. ·School of Primary, Community and Social Care, Keele University, Keele, UK e.roddy@keele.ac.uk. · School of Primary, Community and Social Care, Keele University, Keele, UK. · Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Midland Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #31801739.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Article Gout, Hyperuricaemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network (G-CAN) consensus statement regarding labels and definitions of disease states of gout. 2019

Bursill, David / Taylor, William J / Terkeltaub, Robert / Abhishek, Abhishek / So, Alexander K / Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz / Gaffo, Angelo Lino / Rosenthal, Ann / Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / Reginato, Anthony / Manger, Bernhard / Sciré, Carlo / Pineda, Carlos / van Durme, Caroline / Lin, Ching-Tsai / Yin, Congcong / Albert, Daniel Arthur / Biernat-Kaluza, Edyta / Roddy, Edward / Pascual, Eliseo / Becce, Fabio / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Sivera, Francisca / Lioté, Frédéric / Schett, Georg / Nuki, George / Filippou, Georgios / McCarthy, Geraldine / da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo / Ea, Hang-Korng / Tupinambá, Helena De Almeida / Yamanaka, Hisashi / Choi, Hyon K / Mackay, James / ODell, James R / Vázquez Mellado, Janitzia / Singh, Jasvinder A / Fitzgerald, John D / Jacobsson, Lennart T H / Joosten, Leo / Harrold, Leslie R / Stamp, Lisa / Andrés, Mariano / Gutierrez, Marwin / Kuwabara, Masanari / Dehlin, Mats / Janssen, Matthijs / Doherty, Michael / Hershfield, Michael S / Pillinger, Michael / Edwards, N Lawrence / Schlesinger, Naomi / Kumar, Nitin / Slot, Ole / Ottaviani, Sebastien / Richette, Pascal / MacMullan, Paul A / Chapman, Peter T / Lipsky, Peter E / Robinson, Philip / Khanna, Puja P / Gancheva, Rada N / Grainger, Rebecca / Johnson, Richard J / Te Kampe, Ritch / Keenan, Robert T / Tedeschi, Sara K / Kim, Seoyoung / Choi, Sung Jae / Fields, Theodore R / Bardin, Thomas / Uhlig, Till / Jansen, Tim / Merriman, Tony / Pascart, Tristan / Neogi, Tuhina / Klück, Viola / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Dalbeth, Nicola. ·Department of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia davebursill@bigpond.com. · Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. · Wellington Regional Rheumatology Unit, Hutt Valley District Health Board, Lower Hutt, New Zealand. · Department of Rheumatology, UCSD/ VA Medical Center, San Diego, California, USA. · Department of Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Musculoskeletal Medicine, Service de RMR, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Internal Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. · Translational Research Unit, Clement J Zablocki VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital 'Carl Gustav Carus' of the Technical University Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, The Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. · Rheumatology and Immunology, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · Epidemiology Unit, Italian Society for Rheumatology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación Luis Guillermo Ibarra Ibarra, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Department of Immunology and Dermatology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. · Outpatient Rheumatology Clinic, Nutritional and Lifestyle Medicine Centre, ORLIK, Warsaw, Poland. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. · Departamento de Medicina Clínica, Universidad Miguel Hernández, Alicante, Spain. · Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Rheumatology Division, Cruces University Hospital, Baracaldo, Spain. · Department of Medicine, University of the Basque Country, Biscay, Spain. · Investigation Group for Arthritis, Biocruces Health Research Institute, Baracaldo, Spain. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital General Universitario Elda, Elda, Spain. · Department of Rhumatologie, Hôpital Lariboisière, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Department of Rhumatologie, INSERM UMR-1132 and Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg and Universitatsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Insititute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Hôpital Lariboisière, Paris, France. · Rheumatology, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · School of Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Section of Rheumatology and Clinical Epidemiology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · President and CEO, Aristea Therapeutics, San Diego, California, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital General de Mexico and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Medicine at School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Medicine Service, Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Division of Epidemiology at School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Department of Medicine/Rheumatology, David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. · Chief Scientific Officer, Corrona, LLC, Southborough, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medicine, Otago University, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. · Division of Musculoskeletal and Rheumatic Diseases, Instituto Nacional Rehabilitación, México City, México. · Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Toranomon Hospital, Minato-ku, Japan. · Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, VieCuri Medical Centre, Venlo, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Rheumatology/Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York City, New York, USA. · College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. · Department of Medicine, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Detroit, Michigan, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spinal Disorders, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark. · Department of Rheumatology, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, University of Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Service de Rhumatologie, Hôpital Lariboisière, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, and INSERM UMR-1132 and Université de Paris, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch, New Zealand. · CEO and CMO, AMPEL BioSolutions, LLC, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. · School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Rheumatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Clinic of Rheumatology, University Hospital 'St. Ivan Rilski', Sofia, Bulgaria. · Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand. · Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Arthritis Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Medical College, Ansan, South Korea. · Weill Cornell Medical College, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York City, New York, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, Hôpital Lariboisière, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, and INSERM UMR-1132 and Université de Paris, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Biochemistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. · Department of Rheumatology, Lille Catholic University, Saint-Philibert Hospital, Lomme, France. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #31501138.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: There is a lack of standardisation in the terminology used to describe gout. The aim of this project was to develop a consensus statement describing the recommended nomenclature for disease states of gout. METHODS: A content analysis of gout-related articles from rheumatology and general internal medicine journals published over a 5-year period identified potential disease states and the labels commonly assigned to them. Based on these findings, experts in gout were invited to participate in a Delphi exercise and face-to-face consensus meeting to reach agreement on disease state labels and definitions. RESULTS: The content analysis identified 13 unique disease states and a total of 63 unique labels. The Delphi exercise (n=76 respondents) and face-to-face meeting (n=35 attendees) established consensus agreement for eight disease state labels and definitions. The agreed labels were as follows: 'asymptomatic hyperuricaemia', 'asymptomatic monosodium urate crystal deposition', 'asymptomatic hyperuricaemia with monosodium urate crystal deposition', 'gout', 'tophaceous gout', 'erosive gout', 'first gout flare' and 'recurrent gout flares'. There was consensus agreement that the label 'gout' should be restricted to current or prior clinically evident disease caused by monosodium urate crystal deposition (gout flare, chronic gouty arthritis or subcutaneous tophus). CONCLUSION: Consensus agreement has been established for the labels and definitions of eight gout disease states, including 'gout' itself. The Gout, Hyperuricaemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network recommends the use of these labels when describing disease states of gout in research and clinical practice.

17 Article Gender-specific risk factors for gout: a systematic review of cohort studies. 2019

Evans, Peter L / Prior, James A / Belcher, John / Hay, Charles A / Mallen, Christian D / Roddy, Edward. ·Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. j.a.prior@keele.ac.uk. · Research and Innovation, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester University Foundation Hospital Trust, Wythenshawe, UK. ·Adv Rheumatol · Pubmed #31234907.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Though gout is more prevalent in men than women, it remains unclear whether gender influences risk factors for incident gout. We aimed to systematically review all cohort studies examining risk factors for the development of gout by gender. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception to March 2019. Risk factors for gout examined were: age, ethnicity, consumption of alcohol, meat, seafood, dairy products, purine-rich vegetables, coffee and fructose, vitamin C intake, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, metabolic syndrome, BMI, waist and chest circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, weight change, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemias, renal disease, psoriasis, hypertension, diuretic use and anti-diabetic medication. Cohort studies were included if examining (at least) one of these risk factors for gout in either gender in the general population or primary care. Sample characteristics from included articles and their reported risk estimates were described using narrative synthesis. RESULTS: Thirty-three articles were included, 20 (60.6%)directly compared risk factors by gender, 10 (30.3%) used men-only samples, 3 (9.1%) used women-only samples. Articles comparing risk across genders found similar increases in most risk factors. However, in men, metabolic syndrome (Hazard Ratio (95% CI) 1.37(1.20-1.58)) presented a risk of incident gout compared to none in women (> 50 years 1.15(0.85-1.54); ≤50 years 1.29(0.76-2.17)). Compared to men, women showed greater associated risk with higher consumption of fish and shellfish (HR (95% CI) Men: 1.02 (0.86-1.22); Women 1.36 (1.12-1.65)). CONCLUSIONS: Risk factors for developing gout did not typically differ between genders and therefore similar preventative advice can be provided. Exceptions were metabolic syndrome in men and excessive seafood consumption in women, but these singular articles need further examination and in general more research into the risk factors for gout which includes women is required.

18 Article Foot structure, pain and functional ability in people with gout in primary care: cross-sectional findings from the Clinical Assessment Study of the Foot. 2019

Petty, Helen R / Rathod-Mistry, Trishna / Menz, Hylton B / Roddy, Edward. ·1Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, and Keele Clinical Trials Unit, David Weatherall Building, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG UK. · 0000 0004 0415 6205 · grid.9757.c · 2School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 Australia. · 0000 0001 2342 0938 · grid.1018.8 · 3Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership NHS Trust, Haywood Hospital, Burslem, Staffordshire UK. · 0000 0004 0417 8199 · grid.413807.9 ·J Foot Ankle Res · Pubmed #30700995.

ABSTRACT: Background: Gout frequently affects the foot yet relatively little is known about the effects of gout on foot structure, pain and functional ability. This study aimed to describe the impact of gout in a UK primary care population. Methods: A cross-sectional study was nested within an observational cohort study of adults aged ≥50 years with foot pain. Participants with gout were identified through their primary care medical records and each matched on age (±2 years) and gender to four participants without gout. Differences in person-level variables (SF-12 Physical Component Score, Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index and Short Physical Performance Battery) between gout and non-gout participants were determined using regression models. Differences in foot-level variables (pain regions, skin lesions, deformities, foot posture, and non-weightbearing range of motion) were determined using multi-level regression models. All models were adjusted for body mass index. Means and probabilities with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Twenty-six participants with gout were compared to 102 participants without gout (77% male; mean age 66 years, standard deviation 11). Subtalar joint inversion and eversion and 1st metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) dorsiflexion range of motion were significantly lower in the gout participants compared to the non-gout participants. Gout participants were more likely to have mallet toes and less likely to have claw toes compared to non-gout participants. There were no statistically significant differences in person-level variables, foot posture, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, hallux valgus, pain regions, or skin lesions. Conclusions: Non-weightbearing range of motion at the subtalar joint and 1st MTPJ was reduced in people with gout. Patients with gout who present with chronic foot problems should therefore undergo appropriate clinical assessment of foot structure.

19 Article The Risk of Gout Among Patients With Sleep Apnea: A Matched Cohort Study. 2019

Blagojevic-Bucknall, Milica / Mallen, Christian / Muller, Sara / Hayward, Richard / West, Sophie / Choi, Hyon / Roddy, Edward. ·Keele University, Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Research Institute for Primary Care & Health Services, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, UK. · Newcastle University, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #30160059.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with a range of serious comorbidities. This study was undertaken to investigate whether people with OSA are more likely to develop gout, in the short and long term, compared to those without OSA. METHODS: A matched retrospective cohort study was undertaken using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Individuals age ≥18 years who received a diagnosis of OSA between 1990 and 2010 were identified and matched on age, sex, and practice with up to 4 individuals without OSA; follow-up was until the end of 2015. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for general health, lifestyle, and comorbidity characteristics. The risk of developing gout was assessed at different time points, and the body mass index (BMI) category-specific results were presented. RESULTS: The study sample included 15,879 patients with OSA and 63,296 without. The median follow-up was 5.8 years. We found that 4.9% of patients with OSA and 2.6% of patients without the disorder developed gout. The incidence rate per 1,000 person-years was 7.83 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 7.29-8.40) and 4.03 (95% CI 3.84-4.23) among those with and without OSA, respectively. The adjusted HR was 1.42 (95% CI 1.29-1.56). The risk of developing gout among OSA patients compared to those without was highest 1-2 years after the index date (HR 1.64 [95% CI 1.30-2.06]). This finding persisted among those who were overweight and obese. For those with normal BMI, the highest significant HR (2.02 [95% CI 1.13-3.62]) was observed at 2-5 years after the index date. CONCLUSION: In this study, patients with OSA continued to be at higher risk of developing gout beyond the first year following the diagnosis. Our results further indicate that peak incidences of gout vary according to BMI.

20 Article Gout, Hyperuricemia, and Crystal-Associated Disease Network Consensus Statement Regarding Labels and Definitions for Disease Elements in Gout. 2019

Bursill, David / Taylor, William J / Terkeltaub, Robert / Kuwabara, Masanari / Merriman, Tony R / Grainger, Rebecca / Pineda, Carlos / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Edwards, N Lawrence / Andrés, Mariano / Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz / Roddy, Edward / Pascart, Tristan / Lin, Ching-Tsai / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Tedeschi, Sara K / Kim, Seoyoung C / Harrold, Leslie R / McCarthy, Geraldine / Kumar, Nitin / Chapman, Peter T / Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Gutierrez, Marwin / da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo / Richette, Pascal / Pascual, Eliseo / Fisher, Mark C / Burgos-Vargas, Ruben / Robinson, Philip C / Singh, Jasvinder A / Jansen, Tim L / Saag, Kenneth G / Slot, Ole / Uhlig, Tillmann / Solomon, Daniel H / Keenan, Robert T / Scire, Carlo Alberto / Biernat-Kaluza, Edyta / Dehlin, Mats / Nuki, George / Schlesinger, Naomi / Janssen, Matthijs / Stamp, Lisa K / Sivera, Francisca / Reginato, Anthony M / Jacobsson, Lennart / Lioté, Frédéric / Ea, Hang-Korng / Rosenthal, Ann / Bardin, Thomas / Choi, Hyon K / Hershfield, Michael S / Czegley, Christine / Choi, Sung Jae / Dalbeth, Nicola. ·University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, and Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · University of Otago, Wellington, and Hutt Valley District Health Board, Lower Hutt, New Zealand. · Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California, San Diego. · Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, and University of Colorado Denver, Aurora. · University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. · Instituto Nacional Rehabilitación Luis Guillermo Ibarra Ibarra, Mexico City, Mexico. · Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville. · Hospital Universitario de Alicante and Universidad Miguel Hernández, Alicante, Spain. · State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Keele University, Keele, UK. · Lille Catholic University and Saint-Philibert Hospital, Lomme, France. · Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · University of the Basque Country, Biscay, and Cruces University Hospital and Biocruces Health Research Institute, Baracaldo, Spain. · Harvard Medical School, and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Corrona, LLC, Waltham, and University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Mater Misericordiae University Hospital and University College, Dublin, Ireland. · Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand. · University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Hospital General de México and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, Mexico. · Instituto Nacional Rehabilitación, Mexico City, Mexico. · Hôpital Lariboisière, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, and INSERM UMR-1132 and Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital Boston. · University of Queensland School of Medicine and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Herston, Queensland, Australia. · Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, and University of Alabama at Birmingham. · Viecuri Medical Centre, Venlo, The Netherlands. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark. · Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina. · University of Ferrara, Ferrara, and Italian Society for Rheumatology, Milan, Italy. · ORLIK, Warsaw, Poland. · Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. · University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey. · University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Hospital General Universitario de Elda, Alicante, Spain. · Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Medical College of Wisconsin and the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Milwaukee. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · University of California, San Diego, and Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, South Korea. · University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #29799677.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The language currently used to describe gout lacks standardization. The aim of this project was to develop a consensus statement on the labels and definitions used to describe the basic disease elements of gout. METHODS: Experts in gout (n = 130) were invited to participate in a Delphi exercise and face-to-face consensus meeting to reach consensus on the labeling and definitions for the basic disease elements of gout. Disease elements and labels in current use were derived from a content analysis of the contemporary medical literature, and the results of this analysis were used for item selection in the Delphi exercise and face-to-face consensus meeting. RESULTS: There were 51 respondents to the Delphi exercise and 30 attendees at the face-to-face meeting. Consensus agreement (≥80%) was achieved for the labels of 8 disease elements through the Delphi exercise; the remaining 3 labels reached consensus agreement through the face-to-face consensus meeting. The agreed labels were monosodium urate crystals, urate, hyperuric(a)emia, tophus, subcutaneous tophus, gout flare, intercritical gout, chronic gouty arthritis, imaging evidence of monosodium urate crystal deposition, gouty bone erosion, and podagra. Participants at the face-to-face meeting achieved consensus agreement for the definitions of all 11 elements and a recommendation that the label "chronic gout" should not be used. CONCLUSION: Consensus agreement was achieved for the labels and definitions of 11 elements representing the fundamental components of gout etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation. The Gout, Hyperuricemia, and Crystal-Associated Disease Network recommends the use of these labels when describing the basic disease elements of gout.

21 Article Risk of chronic kidney disease in patients with gout and the impact of urate lowering therapy: a population-based cohort study. 2018

Roughley, Matthew / Sultan, Alyshah Abdul / Clarson, Lorna / Muller, Sara / Whittle, Rebecca / Belcher, John / Mallen, Christian D / Roddy, Edward. ·East London NHS Foundation Trust, Trust Headquarters, 9 Alie Street, London, E1 8DE, UK. mattjroughley@gmail.com. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. · School of Computing and Mathematics, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. · Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Midland Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Haywood Hospital, Burslem, Staffordshire, ST6 7AG, UK. ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #30376864.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An association between gout and renal disease is well-recognised but few studies have examined whether gout is a risk factor for subsequent chronic kidney disease (CKD). Additionally, the impact of urate-lowering therapy (ULT) on development of CKD in gout is unclear. The objective of this study was to quantify the risk of CKD stage ≥ 3 in people with gout and the impact of ULT. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study using data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Patients with incident gout were identified from general practice medical records between 1998 and 2016 and randomly matched 1:1 to patients without a diagnosis of gout based on age, gender, available follow-up time and practice. Primary outcome was development of CKD stage ≥ 3 based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or recorded diagnosis. Absolute rates (ARs) and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox regression models. Risk of developing CKD was assessed among those prescribed ULT within 1 and 3 years of gout diagnosis. RESULTS: Patients with incident gout (n = 41,446) were matched to patients without gout. Development of CKD stage ≥ 3 was greater in the exposed group than in the unexposed group (AR 28.6 versus 15.8 per 10,000 person-years). Gout was associated with an increased risk of incident CKD (adjusted HR 1.78 95% CI 1.70 to 1.85). Those exposed to ULT had a greater risk of incident CKD, but following adjustment this was attenuated to non-significance in all analyses (except on 3-year analysis of women (adjusted HR 1.31 95% CI 1.09 to 1.59)). CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated gout to be a risk factor for incident CKD stage ≥ 3. Further research examining the mechanisms by which gout may increase risk of CKD and whether optimal use of ULT can reduce the risk or progression of CKD in gout is suggested.

22 Article Obesity, hypertension and diuretic use as risk factors for incident gout: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. 2018

Evans, Peter L / Prior, James A / Belcher, John / Mallen, Christian D / Hay, Charles A / Roddy, Edward. ·Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. j.a.prior@keele.ac.uk. ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #29976236.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gout treatment remains suboptimal. Identifying populations at risk of developing gout may provide opportunities for prevention. Our aim was to assess the risk of incident gout associated with obesity, hypertension and diuretic use. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective and retrospective cohort studies in adults (age ≥ 18 years) from primary care or the general population, exposed to obesity, hypertension or diuretic use and with incident gout as their outcome. RESULTS: A total of 9923 articles were identified: 14 met the inclusion criteria, 11 of which contained data suitable for pooling in the meta-analysis. Four articles were identified for obesity, 10 for hypertension and six for diuretic use, with four, nine and three articles included respectively for each meta-analysis. Gout was 2.24 times more likely to occur in individuals with body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m CONCLUSIONS: Obesity, hypertension and diuretic use are risk factors for incident gout, each more than doubling the risk compared to those without these risk factors. Patients with these risk factors should be recognised by clinicians as being at greater risk of developing gout and provided with appropriate management and treatment options.

23 Article Risk of fragility fracture among patients with gout and the effect of urate-lowering therapy. 2018

Sultan, Alyshah Abdul / Whittle, Rebecca / Muller, Sara / Roddy, Edward / Mallen, Christian D / Bucknall, Milica / Helliwell, Toby / Hider, Samantha / Paskins, Zoe. ·Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre (Abdul Sultan, Whittle, Muller, Roddy, Mallen, Bucknall, Helliwell, Hider, Paskins), Research Institute for Primary Care & Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK; Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre (Roddy, Hider, Paskins), Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership Trust, Stokeon-Trent, UK. · Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre (Abdul Sultan, Whittle, Muller, Roddy, Mallen, Bucknall, Helliwell, Hider, Paskins), Research Institute for Primary Care & Health Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK; Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre (Roddy, Hider, Paskins), Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership Trust, Stokeon-Trent, UK z.paskins@keele.ac.uk. ·CMAJ · Pubmed #29759964.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous studies that quantified the risk of fracture among patients with gout and assessed the potential effect of urate-lowering therapy have provided conflicting results. Our study aims to provide better estimates of risk by minimizing the effect of selection bias and confounding on the observed association. METHODS: We used data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, which records primary care consultations of patients from across the United Kingdom. We identified patients with incident gout from 1990 to 2004 and followed them up until 2015. Each patient with gout was individually matched to 4 controls on age, sex and general practice. We calculated absolute rate of fracture and hazard ratios (HRs) using Cox regression models. Among patients with gout, we assessed the impact of urate-lowering therapy on fracture, and used landmark analysis and propensity score matching to account for immortal time bias and confounding by indication. RESULTS: We identified 31 781 patients with incident gout matched to 122 961 controls. The absolute rate of fracture was similar in both cases and controls (absolute rate = 53 and 55 per 10 000 person-years, respectively) corresponding to an HR of 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.92-1.02). Our finding remained unchanged when we stratified our analysis by age and sex. We did not observe statistically significant differences in the risk of fracture among those prescribed urate-lowering therapy within 1 and 3 years after gout diagnosis. INTERPRETATION: Overall, gout was not associated with an increased risk of fracture. Urate-lowering drugs prescribed early during the course of disease had neither adverse nor beneficial effect on the long-term risk of fracture.

24 Article Comorbidity clusters in people with gout: an observational cohort study with linked medical record review. 2018

Bevis, Megan / Blagojevic-Bucknall, Milisa / Mallen, Christian / Hider, Samantha / Roddy, Edward. ·Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Research Institute for Primary Care & Health Sciences, Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. · Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Rheumatology Partnership NHS Trust, Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Haywood Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #29672754.

ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate how comorbid conditions cluster in patients with gout in a UK primary care population. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed using baseline data from a primary-care-based prospective observational cohort of people aged ⩾18 years with gout. Participants with gout were identified through primary care medical records. Factor analysis was performed to obtain distinct clusters of comorbidity variables including obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, coronary heart disease, heart failure, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cancer. Hierarchical cluster analysis of patient observations was also performed to identify homogenous subgroups of patients based on combinations of their comorbidities. Results: Four distinct comorbidity clusters (C1-C4) were identified in 1079 participants [mean (s.d.) age 65.5 years (12.5); 909 (84%) male]. Cluster C1 (n = 197, 18%) was the oldest group and had the most frequent attacks of gout; 97% had CKD. Participants in C2 (n = 393, 36%) had isolated gout with few comorbidities but drank alcohol more frequently. In cluster C3 (n = 296, 27%), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, coronary heart disease and/or CKD were prevalent, and urate-lowering therapy was prescribed more frequently than in other clusters. All patients in C4 (193, 18%) had hypertension and were more likely to be obese than other clusters. Conclusion: Four distinct comorbidity clusters were identified. People with multiple comorbidities were more likely to receive allopurinol. Tailoring of treatments depending on cluster and comorbidities should be considered.

25 Article Gout Severity, Socioeconomic Status, and Work Absence: A Cross-Sectional Study in Primary Care. 2018

Bowen-Davies, Zachary / Muller, Sara / Mallen, Christian D / Hayward, Richard A / Roddy, Edward. ·Research Institute for Primary Care & Health Sciences, Keele University, UK. · Research Institute for Primary Care & Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele UK, and Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Haywood Hospital, UK. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #29579363.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between gout severity and socioeconomic status (SES) and gout severity and work absence. METHODS: Postal questionnaires were sent to adult patients who were registered with 20 general practices and who had consultations regarding gout or had been prescribed allopurinol or colchicine in the preceding 2 years. Gout severity was defined using the following proxy measures: number of attacks, history of oligoarticular/polyarticular attacks, disease duration, and allopurinol use. SES was defined using the English index of multiple deprivation (area level) and using self-reported educational attainment (individual level). Work absence was defined as taking time off from work in the past 6 months because of gout. Adjusted odds ratios (OR RESULTS: A total of 1,184 completed questionnaires were returned. The mean age of patients was 65.6 years, and 84% were male. Not having attended further education ("further education" is defined as attendance after the statutory minimum school-leaving age of 16 years) was associated with having had ≥2 gout attacks in the last year (OR CONCLUSION: Gout severity was associated with individual-level deprivation, countering the historic and negative perception of gout as a "rich man's disease." The association of gout severity with work absence reinforces the argument for earlier urate-lowering therapy to prevent attacks from becoming frequent and debilitating.

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