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Hepatitis HELP
Based on 47,159 articles since 2006
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These are the 47159 published articles about Hepatitis that originated from Worldwide during 2006-2015.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Recommendations for the treatment of hepatitis C Polish group of HCV Experts--2015. 2015

Halota, Waldemar / Flisiak, Robert / Boroń-Kaczmarska, Anna / Juszczyk, Jacek / Pawłowska, Małgorzata / Simon, Krzysztof / Tomasiewicz, Krzysztof / Małkowski, Piotr / Anonymous1360906. · ·Przegl Epidemiol · Pubmed #26519849.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, 2015. 2015

Workowski, Kimberly A / Bolan, Gail A / Anonymous1130927. · ·MMWR Recomm Rep · Pubmed #26042815.

ABSTRACT: These guidelines for the treatment of persons who have or are at risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were updated by CDC after consultation with a group of professionals knowledgeable in the field of STDs who met in Atlanta on April 30-May 2, 2013. The information in this report updates the Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2010 (MMWR Recomm Rep 2010;59 [No. RR-12]). These updated guidelines discuss 1) alternative treatment regimens for Neisseria gonorrhoeae; 2) the use of nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis of trichomoniasis; 3) alternative treatment options for genital warts; 4) the role of Mycoplasma genitalium in urethritis/cervicitis and treatment-related implications; 5) updated HPV vaccine recommendations and counseling messages; 6) the management of persons who are transgender; 7) annual testing for hepatitis C in persons with HIV infection; 8) updated recommendations for diagnostic evaluation of urethritis; and 9) retesting to detect repeat infection. Physicians and other health-care providers can use these guidelines to assist in the prevention and treatment of STDs.

3 Guideline Mexican consensus on the diagnosis and management of hepatitis C infection. 2015

Sánchez-Ávila, Juan Francisco / Dehesa-Violante, Margarita / Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum / Bosques-Padilla, Francisco / Castillo-Barradas, Mauricio / Castro-Narro, Graciela / Cisneros-Garza, Laura / Chirino-Sprung, Ruby Ann / García-Juarez, Ignacio / Gonzalez-Huezo, Ma Saraí / Malé-Velazquez, René / Moreno-Alcántar, Rosalba / Muñoz-Espinoza, Linda / Ramos-Gómez, Mayra / Rizo-Robles, Ma Teresa / Sandoval-Salas, Ricardo / Sierra-Madero, Juan / Torres-Ibarra, María Del Rocío / Vazquez-Frias, Rodrigo / Wolpert-Barraza, Enrique / Anonymous280944 / Anonymous290944 / Anonymous300944. ·Department of Gastroenterology, INCMNSZ. Mexican Association of Hepatology. Mexico City, Mexico. · Mexican Association of Hepatology. Mexico City, Mexico. · Liver Research Unit. Medica Sur Clinic & Foundation. Mexico City, Mexico. · C. Facultad de Medicina y Hospital Universitario J.E. González. UANL, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. · Department of Gastroenterology, CMN La Raza, IMSS Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Gastroenterology, INCMNSZ. Mexico City, Mexico. · Liver Disease Clinic, Hospital San José TEC de Monterrey Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. · 8Gastroenterology, Hospital Ángeles, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Gastroenterology, INCMNSZ, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Gastroenterology, ISSEMYM, Toluca, Estado de Mexico, Mexico. · Instituto de Salud Digestiva y Hepáticas. Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital del Carmen Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital de Especialidades CMN SXXI, IMSS, Mexico City, Mexico. · Liver Unit, Hospital Universitario J.E. González. UANL Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. · Department of Gastroenterology, CMN 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE,, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Gastroenterology, CMN La Raza, IMSS. Mexican Association of Hepatology, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital de Especialidades, CMN Siglo XXI, IMSS, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Infectious Disease, INCMNSZ, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Infectious Disease, Hospital de Infectología, CMN La Raza, IMSS, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Infantil de México "Federico Gómez", SSA, Mexico City, Mexico. · Clínica Lomas Altas. Mexican Association of Gastroenterology. Mexico City, Mexico. · ·Ann Hepatol · Pubmed #25983318.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline [Joint opinion of the German Society of Gastroenterology, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS) and the German Society for Internal Medicine (DGIM) to Daclatasvir-benefit assessment according to § 35a SGB V the G-BA]. 2015

Wedemeyer, Heiner / Zeuzem, Stefan / Manns, Michael P / Anonymous6380806 / Anonymous6390806. · ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25821867.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline Solid organ transplantation from hepatitis B virus-positive donors: consensus guidelines for recipient management. 2015

Huprikar, S / Danziger-Isakov, L / Ahn, J / Naugler, S / Blumberg, E / Avery, R K / Koval, C / Lease, E D / Pillai, A / Doucette, K E / Levitsky, J / Morris, M I / Lu, K / McDermott, J K / Mone, T / Orlowski, J P / Dadhania, D M / Abbott, K / Horslen, S / Laskin, B L / Mougdil, A / Venkat, V L / Korenblat, K / Kumar, V / Grossi, P / Bloom, R D / Brown, K / Kotton, C N / Kumar, D. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. · ·Am J Transplant · Pubmed #25707744.

ABSTRACT: Use of organs from donors testing positive for hepatitis B virus (HBV) may safely expand the donor pool. The American Society of Transplantation convened a multidisciplinary expert panel that reviewed the existing literature and developed consensus recommendations for recipient management following the use of organs from HBV positive donors. Transmission risk is highest with liver donors and significantly lower with non-liver (kidney and thoracic) donors. Antiviral prophylaxis significantly reduces the rate of transmission to liver recipients from isolated HBV core antibody positive (anti-HBc+) donors. Organs from anti-HBc+ donors should be considered for all adult transplant candidates after an individualized assessment of the risks and benefits and appropriate patient consent. Indefinite antiviral prophylaxis is recommended in liver recipients with no immunity or vaccine immunity but not in liver recipients with natural immunity. Antiviral prophylaxis may be considered for up to 1 year in susceptible non-liver recipients but is not recommended in immune non-liver recipients. Although no longer the treatment of choice in patients with chronic HBV, lamivudine remains the most cost-effective choice for prophylaxis in this setting. Hepatitis B immunoglobulin is not recommended.

6 Guideline [Hepatitis C: diagnosis, anti-viral therapy, after-care. Hungarian consensus guideline]. 2015

Hunyady, Béla / Gerlei, Zsuzsanna / Gervain, Judit / Horváth, Gábor / Lengyel, Gabriella / Pár, Alajos / Rókusz, László / Szalay, Ferenc / Telegdy, László / Tornai, István / Werling, Klára / Makara, Mihály. ·Somogy Megyei Kaposi Mór Oktató Kórház Belgyógyászati Osztály Kaposvár Tallián Gy. u. 20-32. 7400 Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Pécs. · Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar Transzplantációs és Sebészeti Klinika Budapest. · Szent György Egyetemi Oktató Kórház I. Belgyógyászat és Molekuláris Diagnosztikai Laboratórium Székesfehérvár. · Szent János Kórház és Észak-budai Egyesített Kórházak Hepatológiai Szakrendelés Budapest. · Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar II. Belgyógyászati Klinika Budapest. · Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Pécs. · MH Egészségügyi Központ Honvédkórház I. Belgyógyászati Osztály Budapest. · Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Budapest. · Egyesített Szent István és Szent László Kórház Budapest. · Debreceni Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum Belgyógyászati Intézet Debrecen. ·Orv Hetil · Pubmed #25702254.

ABSTRACT: Approximately 70,000 people are infected with hepatitis C virus in Hungary, and more than half of them are not aware of their infection. From the point of infected individuals early recognition and effective treatment of related liver injury may prevent consequent advanced liver diseases and complications (liver cirrhosis, liver failure and liver cancer) and can increase work productivity and life expectancy. Furthermore, these could from prevent further spread of the virus as well as reduce substantially long term financial burden of related morbidity, as a socioeconomic aspect. Pegylated interferon + ribavirin dual therapy, which is available in Hungary since 2003, can clear the virus in 40-45% of previously not treated (naïve), and in 5-21% of previous treatment-failure patients. Addition of a direct acting first generation protease inhibitor drug (boceprevir or telaprevir) to the dual therapy increases the chance of sustained viral response to 63-75% and 59-66%, respectively. These two protease inhibitors are available and financed for a segment of Hungarian patients since May 2013. Between 2013 and February 2015, other direct acting antivirals and interferon-free combination therapies have been registered for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C with a potential efficacy over 90% and typically with a short duration of 8-12 weeks. Indication of therapy includes exclusion of contraindications to the drugs and demonstration of viral replication with consequent liver injury, i.e., inflammation and/or fibrosis in the liver. Non-invasive methods (elastography and biochemical methods) are accepted and preferred for staging liver damage (fibrosis). For initiation of treatment accurate and timely molecular biology tests are mandatory. Eligibility for treatment is a subject of individual central medical review. Due to budget limitations therapy is covered only for a proportion of patients by the National Health Insurance Fund. Priority is given to those with urgent need based on a Hungarian Priority Index system reflecting primarily the stage of liver disease, and considering also additional factors, i.e., activity and progression of liver disease, predictive factors of treatment and other special issues. Approved treatments are restricted to the most cost-effective combinations based on the cost per sustained viral response value in different patient categories with consensus between professional organizations, National Health Insurance Fund and patient organizations. More expensive therapies might be available upon co-financing by the patient or a third party. Interferon-free treatments and shorter therapy durations preferred as much as financially feasible. A separate budget is allocated to cover interferon-free treatments for the most-in-need interferon ineligible/intolerant patients, and for those who have no more interferon-based therapy option.

7 Guideline An update on the management of chronic hepatitis C: 2015 Consensus guidelines from the Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver. 2015

Myers, Robert P / Shah, Hemant / Burak, Kelly W / Cooper, Curtis / Feld, Jordan J. · ·Can J Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #25585348.

ABSTRACT: Chronic hepatitis C remains a significant medical and economic burden in Canada, affecting nearly 1% of the population. Since the last Canadian consensus conference on the management of chronic hepatitis C, major advances have occurred that warrant a review of recommended management approaches for these patients. Specifically, direct-acting antiviral agents with dramatically improved rates of virological clearance compared with standard therapy have been developed and interferon-free, all-oral antiviral regimens have been approved. In light of this new evidence, an update to the 2012 Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver consensus guidelines on the management of hepatitis C was produced. The present document reviews the epidemiology of hepatitis C in Canada, preferred diagnostic testing approaches and recommendations for the treatment of chronically infected patients with the newly approved antiviral agents, including those who have previously failed peginterferon and ribavirin-based therapy. In addition, recommendations are made regarding approaches to reducing the burden of hepatitis C in Canada.

8 Guideline American Gastroenterological Association Institute guideline on the prevention and treatment of hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive drug therapy. 2015

Reddy, K Rajender / Beavers, Kimberly L / Hammond, Sarah P / Lim, Joseph K / Falck-Ytter, Yngve T / Anonymous3120801. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina. · Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Case and VA Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #25447850.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline [Joint Statement of the German Society of Gastroenterology, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS) and the German Society for Internal Medicine (DGIM) to Simeprevir-benefit assessment according to § 35a SGB V the Federal Joint Committee]. 2014

Sarrazin, Christoph / Zeuzem, Stefan / Manns, Michael P / Anonymous4610799. · ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25621364.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline [New insights from the German guideline "hepatocellular carcinoma"]. 2014

Plentz, R R / Malek, N P / Anonymous6120796. ·Abteilung Innere Medizin I, Medizinische Universitätsklinik Tübingen. · ·Dtsch Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #25423464.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline Provision of clinical pharmacist services for individuals with chronic hepatitis C viral infection: Joint Opinion of the GI/Liver/Nutrition and Infectious Diseases Practice and Research Networks of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. 2014

Mohammad, Rima A / Bulloch, Marilyn N / Chan, Juliana / Deming, Paulina / Love, Bryan / Smith, Lisa / Dong, Betty J / GI Liver Nutrition and Infectious Diseases Practice and Research Networks of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, ?. ·Department of Clinical, Social, and Administrative Sciences, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Inpatient Pharmacy Services, University of Michigan Health System, University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · ·Pharmacotherapy · Pubmed #25359244.

ABSTRACT: The objective of this opinion paper was to identify and describe potential clinical pharmacists' services for the prevention and management of patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The goals of this paper are to guide the establishment and development of pharmacy services for patients infected with HCV and to highlight HCV research and educational opportunities. Recommendations were based on the following: a review of published data on clinical pharmacist involvement in the treatment and management of HCV-infected patients; a consensus of clinical pharmacists who provide direct patient care to HCV-infected patients and practice in different pharmacy models, including community-based and academic settings; and a review of published guidelines and literature focusing on the treatment and management of HCV infections. The recommendations provided in this opinion paper define the areas of clinical pharmacist involvement and clinical pharmacy practice in the treatment and management of patients with HCV. Clinical pharmacists can promote preventive measures and education about reducing HCV transmission, improve medication adherence, assist in monitoring clinical and adverse effects, recommend treatment strategies to minimize adverse effects and drug interactions, and facilitate medication acquisition and logistics that positively improve patient outcomes and reduce the health care system costs.

12 Guideline Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: an Italian position statement. 2014

Testino, Gianni / Burra, Patrizia / Bonino, Ferruccio / Piani, Francesco / Sumberaz, Alessandro / Peressutti, Roberto / Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea / Patussi, Valentino / Fanucchi, Tiziana / Ancarani, Ornella / De Cerce, Giovanna / Iannini, Anna Teresa / Greco, Giovanni / Mosti, Antonio / Durante, Marilena / Babocci, Paola / Quartini, Mariano / Mioni, Davide / Aricò, Sarino / Baselice, Aniello / Leone, Silvia / Lozer, Fabiola / Scafato, Emanuele / Borro, Paolo / Anonymous1270795. ·Gianni Testino, Paolo Borro, Alessandro Sumberaz, Ornella Ancarani, Regional Alcohologic Centre, Liguria Region, Alcohol Unit and Related Diseases, Department of Internal and Specialist Medicine, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST National Institute for Cancer Research, 16100 Genova, Italy. · ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25356027.

ABSTRACT: Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the "6-mo rule". Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The "Group of Italian Regions" suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups.

13 Guideline [Interpretations of diagnosis and management of chronic hepatitis B in children, young people and adults by NICE (2013)]. 2014

Wan, Mobin / Dou, Xiaoguang. · ·Zhonghua Gan Zang Bing Za Zhi · Pubmed #25350986.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline [Argentine consensus on hepatitis C 2013]. 2014

Reggiardo, María Virginia / Tanno, Federico / Mendizabal, Manuel / Galdame, Omar. · ·Acta Gastroenterol Latinoam · Pubmed #25199310.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline Latin American Association for the Study of the Liver recommendations on treatment of hepatitis C. 2014

Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum / Paraná, Raymundo / Cheinquer, Hugo / Alves de Mattos, Angelo / Gadano, Adrian / Silva, Marcelo / Pessôa, Mario G / Gomes-Ferraz, Maria L / Soza, Alejandro / Mendes-Correa, M Cassia / Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C / Dagher, Lucy / Padilla, Martín / Hernandez, Nelia / Sánchez-Avila, Juan F / Contreras, Fernando / Moraes-Coelho, Henrique S / Parise, Edison R / Bessone, Fernando / Uribe, Misael / Anonymous6060790. ·Liver Research Unit, Medica Sur Clinic & Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico. · School of Medicine, Federal University of Bahia, Gastro-Hepatologist Unit, University Bahia University Hospital, Bahia, Brazil. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Fundação Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Federal University of Health Sciences, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Liver Unit, Hospital Italiano, Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Hepatology and Liver Transplant Unit Austral University Hospital Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department of Gastroenterology. University of São Paulo School of Medicine. São Paulo, Brazil. · Federal University of São Paulo. São Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Gastroenterology, Centro de Investigación Clínica UC (CICUC), School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Santiago, Chile. · São Paulo University Medical School, Department of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Brazil. · Metropolitan Policlinic, Caracas, Venezuela. · Liver Transplant Service, Guillermo Almenara National Hospital, Lima, Peru. · Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Montevideo, Uruguay. · Hepatology and Liver Transplantation Department, National Institute of Nutrition and Medical Sciences "Salvador Zubiran", Mexico City, Mexico. · Universidad Pedro Henriquez Urena, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. · Internal Medicine of Medical School of Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · School of Medicine, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Gastroenterology, University of Rosario School of Medicine, Rosario, Argentina. · ·Ann Hepatol · Pubmed #25185535.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline Prenatal invasive procedures in women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and/or human immunodeficiency virus infections. 2014

Gagnon, Alain / Davies, Gregory / Wilson, R Douglas / Anonymous6280790 / Wilson, R Douglas / Audibert, Francois / Brock, Jo-Ann / Campagnolo, Carla / Carroll, June / Chitaya, David T / Gagnon, Alain / Johnson, Jo-Ann / MacDonald, William / Murphy-Kaulbeck, Lynn / Okun, Nanette / Pastuck, Melanie / Anonymous6290790. ·Vancouver BC.; Vancouver BC. · Kingston ON. · Calgary AB.; Calgary AB. · · Montreal QC. · Halifax NS. · London ON. · Toronto ON. · Calgary AB. · Moncton NB. · Cochrane AB. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #25184985.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review the risk of in utero infection through prenatal invasive procedures in women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. OUTCOMES: Fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. EVIDENCE: Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library using appropriate controlled vocabulary (amniocentesis, chorionic villus sampling, cordocentesis, fetal and neonatal infection) and key words (hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies from 2002 to 2012 published in English or French. (Studies from 1966 to 2002 were previously reviewed in Clinical Practice Guideline No. 123.) Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to February 2014. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. VALUES: The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Recommendations 1. For women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and/or human immunodeficiency virus, the use of non-invasive methods of prenatal risk assessment is recommended, using tests with high sensitivity and low false-positive rates, such as serum screening combined (or not) with nuchal translucency, anatomic ultrasound, and non-invasive molecular prenatal testing. (III-B) 2. For women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and/or human immunodeficiency virus undergoing an amniocentesis, every effort should be made to avoid inserting the needle through, or very close to, the placenta. (II-2B) 3. Little information is available on other prenatal diagnostic and therapeutic invasive procedures; the risks and benefits of such procedures should therefore be assessed prior to their use. (III-C) 4. The rate of neonatal hepatitis B infection attributable to amniocentesis ranges up to 1.4% in newborns of mothers positive for hepatitis B surface antigen. However, the rate of neonatal infection attributable to amniocentesis in newborns of mothers with a positive hepatitis B e antigen status may be as high as 16%. Although there is no statistically significant difference between the rates of infection in newborns exposed to amniocentesis or not exposed to amniocentesis in these two maternal populations, knowledge of the mother's hepatitis B e antigen status may be valuable in counselling women about the risks associated with amniocentesis. (II-2A) 5. Amniocentesis in women infected with hepatitis C does not appear to significantly increase the risk of vertical transmission, but women should be counselled that very few studies have properly addressed this possibility (II-2C). More research on this topic is recommended. (III-L) 6. Amniocentesis in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus on combination antiretroviral therapy does not appear to significantly increase the risk of vertical transmission, particularly if the viral load is undetectable, but women should be counselled that data on this issue is limited. (II-2B) 7. For women not on combined antiretroviral therapy, the risk of vertical transmission is increased by performing an amniocentesis. When possible, combined antiretroviral therapy should be initiated and the procedure postponed until the viral load is undetectable. Other case management should be individualized in consultation with infectious diseases specialists and obstetricians. (III-B).

17 Guideline KASL clinical practice guidelines: management of hepatitis C. 2014

Anonymous5380786. · ·Clin Mol Hepatol · Pubmed #25032178.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline Recommendations for the management of acute hepatitis B: position paper of the Italian Society for the Study of Infectious and Tropical Diseases (SIMIT). 2014

Bruno, R / Carosi, G / Coppola, N / Gaeta, G B / Puoti, M / Santantonio, T / Taliani, G / Armignacco, O / Sagnelli, E / Andreoni, M / Angarano, G / Di Perri, G / D'Offizi, G / Galli, M / Rizzardini, G / Anonymous6580791. ·Department of Infectious Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli, 5, 27100, Pavia, Italy, raffaele.bruno@unipv.it. · ·Infection · Pubmed #24997980.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To develop recommendations for the management of acute hepatitis B by the Italian Society for the Study of Infectious and Tropical Diseases. METHODS: Development of the recommendations divided into three levels of evidence according to the GRADE system: A (high), B (medium) and C (low experts opinion), together with three recommendation levels: 1 (strong), 2 (medium), 3 (weak). RESULTS: The treatment with antivirals is in selected cases the mainstay of management of severe acute hepatitis, and should be started as a matter of urgency in order to prevent death. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations are meant to provide the rationale and practical indications for the management of acute hepatitis B (AHB).

19 Guideline Screening for hepatitis B virus infection in nonpregnant adolescents and adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. 2014

LeFevre, Michael L / Anonymous2480785. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #24863637.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of antiviral treatment, the benefits of education or behavior change counseling, and the association between improvements in intermediate and clinical outcomes after antiviral therapy. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to asymptomatic, nonpregnant adolescents and adults at high risk for HBV infection (including those at high risk who were vaccinated before being screened for HBV infection). RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF concludes that persons at high risk for infection should be screened for HBV infection. (B recommendation).

20 Guideline EASL recommendations on treatment of hepatitis C 2014. 2014

Anonymous360919. · ·J Hepatol · Pubmed #24818984.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline An assessment by the Statin Liver Safety Task Force: 2014 update. 2014

Bays, Harold / Cohen, David E / Chalasani, Naga / Harrison, Stephen A / The National Lipid Association's Statin Safety Task Force, ?. ·Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center, 3288 Illinois Avenue, Louisville, KY 40213, USA. Electronic address: hbaysmd@aol.com. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA. · Brooke Army Medical Center, University of Texas Health Center San Antonio, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, San Antonio, TX, USA. · ·J Clin Lipidol · Pubmed #24793441.

ABSTRACT: In the 2006 Report of the National Lipid Association's Statin Safety Task Force, a panel of experts in hepatology published their findings on specific questions related to the liver blood testing during statin therapy. Among their recommendations was that regulatory agencies reconsider the statin-labeling recommendation at that time, which required post-statin liver enzyme testing. Since then, the Food and Drug Administration altered statin labeling such that unless clinically indicated for other reasons, after a pre-statin therapy baseline evaluation, follow-up liver enzyme testing was not uniformly required after statin initiation. This 2014 report provides an update on interim issues relevant to statins and liver safety. Some of the points discussed include the value of baseline liver enzymes before initiating statin therapy, safety of statin use in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, potential drug interactions between statins and drugs used to treat hepatitis, the use of statins in liver transplant recipients, and the use of statins in patients with autoimmune liver disease. Finally, this panel provides diagnostic and algorithmic approaches when evaluating statin-treated patients who experience elevations in liver enzymes.

22 Guideline Review article: 2014 UK consensus guidelines - hepatitis C management and direct-acting anti-viral therapy. 2014

Miller, M H / Agarwal, K / Austin, A / Brown, A / Barclay, S T / Dundas, P / Dusheiko, G M / Foster, G R / Fox, R / Hayes, P C / Leen, C / Millson, C / Ryder, S D / Tait, J / Ustianowski, A / Dillon, J F / Anonymous5840781 / Anonymous5850781 / Anonymous5860781 / Anonymous5870781 / Anonymous5880781 / Anonymous5890781. ·Gut Group, Medical Research Institute, NHS Tayside Ninewells Hospital, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK. · ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #24754233.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Therapeutic options for the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have evolved rapidly over the past two decades, with a consequent improvement in cure rates. Novel therapeutic agents are an area of great interest in the research community, with a number of these agents showing promise in the clinical setting. AIMS: To assess and present the available evidence for the use of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of HCV, updating previous guidelines. METHODS: All Phase 2 and 3 studies, as well as abstract presentations from international Hepatology meetings were identified and reviewed for suitable inclusion, based on studies of new therapies in HCV. Treatment-naïve and experienced individuals, as well as cirrhotic and co-infected individuals were included. RESULTS: Sofosbuvir, simeprevir and faldaprevir, along with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, have a role in the treatment of chronic HCV infection. The precise regimens are largely dependent on the patient characteristics, patient and physician preferences, and cost implication. CONCLUSIONS: Therapies for chronic HCV have evolved dramatically in recent years. Interferon-free regimens are now possible without compromise in the rate of sustained viral response. The decision as to which regimen is most appropriate is multifactorial, and based on efficacy, safety and cost.

23 Guideline [Diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepatitis B and D. Hungarian national consensus guideline]. 2014

Horváth, Gábor / Hunyady, Béla / Gervain, Judit / Lengyel, Gabriella / Makara, Mihály / Pár, Alajos / Szalay, Ferenc / Telegdy, László / Tornai, István. ·Budai Hepatológiai Centrum Budapest Egry József u. 1-3. 1111 Szent János Kórház és Észak-budai Egyesített Kórházak Hepatológiai Szakambulancia Budapest. · Somogy Megyei Kaposi Mór Oktató Kórház Belgyógyászati Osztály Kaposvár Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Pécs. · Szent György Egyetemi Oktató Kórház I. Belgyógyászat és Molekuláris Diagnosztikai Laboratórium Székesfehérvár. · Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar II. Belgyógyászati Klinika Budapest. · Egyesített Szent István és Szent László Kórház Budapest. · Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Pécs. · Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Budapest. · Debreceni Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum Belgyógyászati Intézet Debrecen. ·Orv Hetil · Pubmed #24631887.

ABSTRACT: Diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis B and D virus infections mean that the patient is able to maintain working capacity, increase quality of life, prevent cancer, and prolong life expectancy, while the society benefits from eliminating the chances of further transmission of the viruses, and decreasing the overall costs of serious complications. The guideline delineates the treatment algorithms for 2014, which is agreed on a consensus meeting of specialists involved in the treatment of the above diseases. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection in the Hungarian general population is 0.5-0.7%. The indications of treatment is based upon viral examinations (including viral nucleic acid determination), determinations of disease activity and stage (including biochemical, pathologic, and/or non-invasive methods), and excluding contraindications. To avoid unnecessary side effects and for cost-effective approach the guideline emphasizes the importance of quick and detailed virologic evaluations, the applicability of transient elastography as an acceptable alternative of liver biopsy in this regard, as well as the relevance of appropriate consistent follow up schedule for viral response during therapy. The first choice of therapy in chronic hepatitis B infection can be pegylated interferon for 48 weeks or continuous entecavir or tenofovir therapy. The latter two must be continued for at least 12 months after hepatitis B surface antigen seroconversion. Adefovir dipivoxil is recommended mainly in combination therapy. Lamivudine is no longer a first choice; patients currently taking lamivudine must switch if response is inadequate. Appropriate treatment of patients taking immunosuppressive medications is highly recommended. Pegylated interferon based therapy is recommended for the treatment of concomitant hepatitis D infection.

24 Guideline [Diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of hepatitis C-virus related liver disease. Hungarian national consensus guideline]. 2014

Hunyady, Béla / Gervain, Judit / Horváth, Gábor / Makara, Mihály / Pár, Alajos / Szalay, Ferenc / Telegdy, László / Tornai, István. ·Somogy Megyei Kaposi Mór Oktató Kórház Belgyógyászati Osztály Kaposvár Tallián Gyula u. 20-32. 7400 Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Pécs. · Szent György Egyetemi Oktató Kórház I. Belgyógyászat és Molekuláris Diagnosztikai Laboratórium Székesfehérvár. · Szent János Kórház és Észak-budai Egyesített Kórházak Hepatológiai Szakrendelés Budapest. · Egyesített Szent István és Szent László Kórház Budapest. · Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Pécs. · Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Budapest. · Debreceni Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum Belgyógyászati Intézet Debrecen. ·Orv Hetil · Pubmed #24631886.

ABSTRACT: Approximately 70 000 people are infected with hepatitis C virus in Hungary, more than half of whom are not aware of their infection. Early recognition and effective treatment of related liver injury may prevent consequent advanced liver diseases (liver cirrhosis and liver cancer) and its complications. In addition, it may increase work productivity and life expectancy of infected individual, and can prevent further viral transmission. Early recognition can substantially reduce the long term financial burden of related morbidity from socioeconomic point of view. Pegylated interferon + ribavirin dual therapy, which is available in Hungary since 2003, can kill the virus in 40-45% of previously not treated (naïve), and in 5-21% of previous treatment-failure patients. Addition of two direct acting first generation protease inhibitor drugs (boceprevir and telaprevir) to the dual therapy increased the chance of sustained clearance of virus to 63-75% and 59-66%, respectively. These two protease inhibitor drugs are available and financed for a segment of Hungarian patients since May 2013. Indication of therapy includes exclusion of contraindications to the drugs and demonstration of viral replication with consequent liver injury, i.e., inflammation and/or fibrosis in the liver. For initiation of treatment as well as for on-treatment decisions accurate and timely molecular biology tests are mandatory. Staging of liver damage (fibrosis) non-invasive methods (transient elastography and biochemical methods) are acceptable to avoid concerns of patients related to liver biopsy. Professional decision for treatment is balanced against budget limitations in Hungary, and priority is given to those with urgent need using a national Priority Index system reflecting stage of liver disease as well as additional factors (activity and progression of liver disease, predictive factors and other special circumstances). All naïve patients are given a first chance with dual therapy. Those with genotype 1 infection and with on-treatment or historic failure to dual therapy are eligible to receive protease inhibitor based triple therapy provided, they reach financial cutoff eligibility based on Priority Index. Duration of therapy is usually 48 weeks in genotype 1 with a response-guided potential to reduce duration for non-cirrhotic patients. Patients with non-1 genotypes are treated with dual therapy (without protease inhibitors) for a genotype and response driven duration of 16, 24, 48, or 72 week. Careful monitoring for early recognition and management of side-effects as well as viral response and potential breakthrough during protease-inhibitor therapy are recommended.

25 Guideline World Gastroenterology Organisation global guidelines: diagnosis, management and prevention of hepatitis C April 2013. 2014

Umar, Muhammed / Khan, Aamir G / Abbas, Zaigham / Arora, Sanjeev / Asifabbas, Naqvi / Elewaut, Andre / Esmat, Gamal / Foster, Graham / Fried, Michael / Goh, Khean-L / Hamama, Tul Bushra Khaar / Imawari, Michio / Isakov, Vasily / Krabshuis, Justus / LaBrecque, Douglas / Lemair, Anton / Malfertheiner, Peter / Ryder, Steve / Schiedermaier, Peter / Stimac, Davor / Tandon, Rakesh / Villamil, Federico / Zapata, Rodrigo / Ferenci, Peter / Anonymous1000773. ·Rawalpindi Medical College, Rawalpindi, Punjab, Pakistan. · ·J Clin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24504078.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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