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Hepatitis: HELP
Articles by Darius Moradpour
Based on 86 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, D. Moradpour wrote the following 86 articles about Hepatitis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Guideline [Prophylaxis, diagnosis and therapy of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection: the German guidelines on the management of HCV infection]. 2010

Sarrazin, C / Berg, T / Ross, R S / Schirmacher, P / Wedemeyer, H / Neumann, U / Schmidt, H H / Spengler, U / Wirth, S / Kessler, H H / Peck-Radosavljevic, M / Ferenci, P / Vogel, W / Moradpour, D / Heim, M / Cornberg, M / Protzer, U / Manns, M P / Fleig, W E / Dollinger, M M / Zeuzem, S. ·Medizinische Klinik I, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #20119896.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial A mouse model for hepatitis E virus infection. 2016

Gouttenoire, Jérôme / Moradpour, Darius. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address: Jerome.Gouttenoire@chuv.ch. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address: Darius.Moradpour@chuv.ch. ·J Hepatol · Pubmed #26892936.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial [Hepatitis C: 25 years of progress with still major challenges]. 2015

Moradpour, D / Frossard, J-L. · ·Rev Med Suisse · Pubmed #26502616.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial [Progress and new challenges in hepatitis C]. 2013

Moradpour, D / Frossard, J-L. · ·Rev Med Suisse · Pubmed #24066462.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial [The era of management of hepatitis c patients]. 2011

Moradpour, Darius / Hadengue, Antoine. · ·Rev Med Suisse · Pubmed #21987873.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial [Hepatitis C at a crossroads]. 2010

Moradpour, D / Dorta, G. · ·Rev Med Suisse · Pubmed #20214186.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial The promise of advanced imaging techniques for the detection of hepatitis C virus antigens in the infected liver. 2009

Wölk, Benno / Moradpour, Darius. · ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #19720281.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial New insights into hepatitis B and C virus co-infection. 2009

Brass, Volker / Moradpour, Darius. · ·J Hepatol · Pubmed #19596479.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Review Effect of hepatitis B virus on steatosis in hepatitis C virus co-infected subjects: A multi-centre study and systematic review. 2018

Goossens, N / de Vito, C / Mangia, A / Clément, S / Cenderello, G / Barrera, F / D'Ambrosio, R / Coppola, N / Zampino, R / Stanzione, M / Adinolfi, L E / Wedemeyer, H / Semmo, N / Müllhaupt, B / Semela, D / Malinverni, R / Moradpour, D / Heim, M / Trincucci, G / Rubbia-Brandt, L / Negro, F / Anonymous7760939. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. · Division of Clinical Pathology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. · Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Division of Infectious Diseases, Galliera Hospital, Genova, Italy. · Storr Liver Unit, Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney at Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy. · Department of Mental Health and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Napoli, Italy. · Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, Second University of Naples, Napoli, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine and Surgery, Second University of Naples, Napoli, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · German Center for Infectious Disease Research, Hannover-Braunschweig, Germany. · Hepatology, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Division of Gastroenterology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland. · Hôpital Neuchâtelois, Neuchâtel, Switzerland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Pathology and Immunology, Geneva University, Geneva, Switzerland. ·J Viral Hepat · Pubmed #29532619.

ABSTRACT: It remains unclear whether hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may modify the severity of viral steatosis in patients coinfected with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). We examined the influence of coinfection with HBV on prevalence of steatosis in chronic hepatitis C in a multi-centre cohort of HBV-HCV subjects, and by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. We centrally and blindly assessed steatosis prevalence and severity in a cohort of HBV-HCV coinfected subjects compared to HCV and HBV monoinfected controls and we performed a systematic review of studies addressing the prevalence of steatosis in HBV-HCV subjects compared to HCV controls. In the clinical cohort, we included 85 HBV-HCV, 69 HBV and 112 HCV subjects from 16 international centres. There was no significant difference in steatosis prevalence between the HBV-HCV and the HCV groups (33% vs 45%, P = .11). In subgroup analysis, lean HBV-HCV subjects with detectable HBV DNA had less steatosis than lean HCV subjects matched for HCV viremia (15% vs 45%, P = .02). Our literature search identified 5 additional studies included in a systematic review. Overall, prevalence of steatosis > 5% was similar in HBV-HCV infection compared to HCV (pooled odds ratio [OR] 0.91, 95% CI 0.53-1.6) although there was significant heterogeneity (I

10 Review Critical challenges and emerging opportunities in hepatitis C virus research in an era of potent antiviral therapy: Considerations for scientists and funding agencies. 2018

Bartenschlager, Ralf / Baumert, Thomas F / Bukh, Jens / Houghton, Michael / Lemon, Stanley M / Lindenbach, Brett D / Lohmann, Volker / Moradpour, Darius / Pietschmann, Thomas / Rice, Charles M / Thimme, Robert / Wakita, Takaji. ·Department of Infectious Diseases, Molecular Virology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany; Division Virus-Associated Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner Sites Heidelberg and Hannover-Braunschweig, Germany. Electronic address: Ralf.Bartenschlager@med.uni-heidelberg.de. · Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U1110, Institut de Recherche sur les Maladies Virales et Hépatiques, Strasbourg, France; Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire, Pôle Hépato-digestif, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France. · Copenhagen Hepatitis C Program (CO-HEP), Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Research Centre, Hvidovre Hospital and Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology, Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Microbiology & Immunology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Infectious Diseases, Molecular Virology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. · German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner Sites Heidelberg and Hannover-Braunschweig, Germany; Institute of Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research (a joint venture between the Medical School Hannover (MHH) and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI)), Hannover, Germany. · Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease, Center for the Study of Hepatitis C, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. · Center for Medicine, Department of Medicine II, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan. ·Virus Res · Pubmed #29477639.

ABSTRACT: The development and clinical implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Infection with any hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype can now be eliminated in more than 95% of patients with short courses of all-oral, well-tolerated drugs, even in those with advanced liver disease and liver transplant recipients. DAAs have proven so successful that some now consider HCV amenable to eradication, and continued research on the virus of little remaining medical relevance. However, given 400,000 HCV-related deaths annually important challenges remain, including identifying those who are infected, providing access to treatment and reducing its costs. Moreover, HCV infection rarely induces sterilizing immunity, and those who have been cured with DAAs remain at risk for reinfection. Thus, it is very unlikely that global eradication and elimination of the cancer risk associated with HCV infection can be achieved without a vaccine, yet research in that direction receives little attention. Further, over the past two decades HCV research has spearheaded numerous fundamental discoveries in the fields of molecular and cell biology, immunology and microbiology. It will continue to do so, given the unique opportunities afforded by the reagents and knowledge base that have been generated in the development and clinical application of DAAs. Considering these critical challenges and new opportunities, we conclude that funding for HCV research must be sustained.

11 Review None 2017

Fraga, Montserrat / Gouttenoire, Jérôme / Sahli, Roland / Moradpour, Darius. ·1 Abteilung für Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Universität Lausanne, Lausanne. · 2 Institut für Mikrobiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Universität Lausanne, Lausanne. ·Ther Umsch · Pubmed #28777052.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review A systematic review and meta-analysis of HCV clearance. 2017

Gauthiez, Emeline / Habfast-Robertson, Ines / Rüeger, Sina / Kutalik, Zoltan / Aubert, Vincent / Berg, Thomas / Cerny, Andreas / Gorgievski, Meri / George, Jacob / Heim, Markus H / Malinverni, Raffaele / Moradpour, Darius / Müllhaupt, Beat / Negro, Francesco / Semela, David / Semmo, Nasser / Villard, Jean / Bibert, Stéphanie / Bochud, Pierre-Yves / Anonymous5760898. ·Infectious Diseases Service, Department of Medicine, University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine and Department of Medical Genetics, University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Division of Immunology and Allergy, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Hepatology, Universitätsklinikum Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Epatocentro Ticino, Lugano, Switzerland. · Division of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Storr Liver Centre, Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney and Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland. · Pourtalès Hospital, Neuchâtel, Switzerland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Division of Clinical Pathology and Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. · Division of Gastroenterology, Canton Hospital, St. Gall, Switzerland. · Hepatology, Department of clinical Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Transplantation Immunology Unit, Division of Immunology and Allergy, Department Medicine and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospital and Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Liver Int · Pubmed #28261910.

ABSTRACT: While hepatitis C exemplifies the role of host genetics in infectious diseases outcomes, there is no comprehensive overview of polymorphisms influencing spontaneous and/or treatment-induced hepatitis C virus clearance. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of host polymorphisms associated with these phenotypes. Literature search was conducted using combinations of keywords in three databases. Studies were reviewed and relevant data systematically extracted for subsequent meta-analyses. Polymorphisms from candidate gene studies were tested in two cohorts of HCV-infected patients with available genomic data. The literature search yielded 8'294 citations, among which 262 studies were selected. In the meta-analysis of 27 HLA studies, the most significant associations with spontaneous hepatitis C virus clearance included DQB1*02, DQB1*03, DRB1*04 and DRB1*11. In the meta-analysis of 16 studies of KIR genes and their HLA-ligands, KIR2DS3 was associated with both spontaneous and treatment-induced clearance, and the HLA-C2 ligand with failure to spontaneously clear the virus. In a pooled analysis of 105 candidate genes and two genome-wide association studies, we observed associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms from nine genes (EIF2AK2, IFNAR2, ITPA, MBL2, MX1, OASL, SPP1, TGFB1, TNK2) with response to interferon-based therapy. Meta-analysis of 141 studies confirmed the association of IFNL3/4 polymorphisms with spontaneous and treatment-induced hepatitis C virus clearance, even in previously underpowered groups, such as hepatitis C virus genotypes 2/3-infected patients. This study may contribute to a better understanding of hepatitis C virus immunopathogenesis and highlights the complex role of host genetics in hepatitis C virus clearance.

13 Review Future landscape of hepatitis C research - Basic, translational and clinical perspectives. 2016

Moradpour, Darius / Grakoui, Arash / Manns, Michael P. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address: darius.moradpour@chuv.ch. · Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine and Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory Vaccine Center, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: arash.grakoui@emory.edu. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School, Germany; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), partner site Hannover-Braunschweig, Germany. Electronic address: manns.michael@mh-hannover.de. ·J Hepatol · Pubmed #27641984.

ABSTRACT: With the latest all-oral interferon- and ribavirin-free regimens based on direct acting antivirals against the hepatitis C virus (HCV), sustained virological response rates of >90% are achieved, which is equivalent to cure. This has become possible for all genotypes and all subgroups of patients, including many of the most difficult-to-treat populations so far. Since a prophylactic HCV vaccine is not yet available, control of HCV infection will for the time being have to rely on the use of effective and safe antiviral treatments as well as their accessibility and affordability. Different approaches may apply to different parts of the world, eradication of HCV representing a major long-term goal. Whether hepatitis C becomes the first chronic viral infection to be eradicated without a prophylactic vaccine remains to be shown. Here, we briefly summarize advances in the molecular virology of hepatitis C, highlight lessons of biological relevance that were learned through the study of HCV, and its translational and clinical implications. We have also listed selected unsolved challenges, emphasizing that HCV is a unique model and that advances in this direction may yield knowledge of broad biological significance, novel technologies and insights into related important human pathogens.

14 Review Management of viral hepatitis in patients with haematological malignancy and in patients undergoing haemopoietic stem cell transplantation: recommendations of the 5th European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5). 2016

Mallet, Vincent / van Bömmel, Florian / Doerig, Christopher / Pischke, Sven / Hermine, Olivier / Locasciulli, Anna / Cordonnier, Catherine / Berg, Thomas / Moradpour, Darius / Wedemeyer, Heiner / Ljungman, Per / Anonymous3650880. ·Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Institut Pasteur, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale Unité 1223, Paris, France; Hepatology Service, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Groupe Hospitalier Cochin Port-Royal, Paris, France. Electronic address: vincent.mallet@cch.aphp.fr. · Hepatology Section, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, First Department of Medicine, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Haematology, Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, Necker Hospital, Paris, France. · Ematologia e Trapianto di Midollo, Ospedale SanCamillo, Roma, Italia. · Haematology Department, Henri Mondor Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, and Paris-Est Créteil University, Créteil, France. · Hannover Centre for Internal Medicine, Hannover, Germany. · Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Haematology and Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. ·Lancet Infect Dis · Pubmed #27599653.

ABSTRACT: Viral hepatitis affects millions of people worldwide, and host immunity is the key determinant of patient outcome. Viral hepatitis can be life threatening in patients with haematological malignancy, including haemopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, because of the virus itself, or through a need to decrease the dose of chemotherapy. A past or currently infected haemopoietic stem cell donor could also transmit viral hepatitis. The burden of viral hepatitis in patients with haematological malignancies and the weak evidence on which previous guidelines are based has prompted the European Conference on Infection in Leukaemia (ECIL-5) to convene a group of experts in the fields of viral hepatitis and of haematological malignancy to specifically address previously unconsidered issues and grade the available quality of evidence according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America grading system. The group recommends that all patients should be screened for hepatotropic viruses before haematological treatment and that patients or haemopoietic stem cell donors with markers of past or current viral hepatitis should be assessed by an expert. Screening, vaccination, and treatment rules are reported in this Review.

15 Review Update on hepatitis E virology: Implications for clinical practice. 2016

Debing, Yannick / Moradpour, Darius / Neyts, Johan / Gouttenoire, Jérôme. ·Rega Institute for Medical Research, University of Leuven, Belgium. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address: Jerome.Gouttenoire@chuv.ch. ·J Hepatol · Pubmed #26966047.

ABSTRACT: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a positive-strand RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. The 7.2kb genome encodes three open reading frames (ORF) which are translated into (i) the ORF1 polyprotein, representing the viral replicase, (ii) the ORF2 protein, corresponding to the viral capsid, and (iii) the ORF3 protein, a small protein involved in particle secretion. Although HEV is a non-enveloped virus in bile and feces, it circulates in the bloodstream wrapped in cellular membranes. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 infect only humans and cause mainly waterborne outbreaks. HEV genotypes 3 and 4 are widely represented in the animal kingdom and are transmitted as a zoonosis mainly via contaminated meat. HEV infection is usually self-limited but may persist and cause chronic hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. Reduction of immunosuppressive treatment or antiviral therapy with ribavirin have proven effective in most patients with chronic hepatitis E but therapy failures have been reported. Alternative treatment options are needed, therefore. Infection with HEV may also cause a number of extrahepatic manifestations, especially neurologic complications. Progress in the understanding of the biology of HEV should contribute to improved control and treatment of HEV infection.

16 Review Hepatitis C virus infection and kidney transplantation in 2014: what's new? 2014

Baid-Agrawal, S / Pascual, M / Moradpour, D / Somasundaram, R / Muche, M. ·Department of Nephrology and Medical Intensive Care, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. ·Am J Transplant · Pubmed #25091274.

ABSTRACT: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains an important health problem, which is associated with deleterious consequences in kidney transplant recipients. Besides hepatic complications, several extrahepatic complications contribute to reduced patient and allograft survival in HCV-infected kidney recipients. However, HCV infection should not be considered as a contraindication for kidney transplantation because patient survival is better with transplantation than on dialysis. Treatment of HCV infection is currently interferon-alpha (IFN-α) based, which has been associated with higher renal allograft rejection rates. Therefore, antiviral treatment before transplantation is preferable. As in the nontransplant setting, IFN-free treatment regimens, because of their greater efficacy and reduced toxicity, currently represent promising and attractive therapeutic options after kidney transplantation as well. However, clinical trials will be required to closely evaluate these regimens in kidney recipients. There is also a need for prospective controlled studies to determine the optimal immunosuppressive regimens after transplantation in HCV-infected recipients. Combined kidney and liver transplantation is required in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. However, in patients with cleared HCV infection and early cirrhosis without portal hypertension, kidney transplantation alone may be considered. There is some agreement about the use of HCV-positive donors in HCV-infected recipients, although data regarding posttransplant survival rates are controversial.

17 Review [Hepatitis B and C: from molecular virology to new antiviral therapies (part 2)]. 2014

Thimme, R / Heim, M / Baumert, T F / Nassal, M / Moradpour, D. ·Klinik für Innere Medizin II, Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie, Endokrinologie und Infektiologie, Universitätsklinikum Freiburg. · Abteilung Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Universitätsspital Basel. · Inserm U1110, Forschungsinstitut für Virus- und Leberkrankheiten, Universität Strasbourg. · Abteilung Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Universitätsklinik Lausanne (CHUV). ·Dtsch Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #24691691.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review [Hepatitis B and C: From molecular virology to new antiviral therapies (part 1)]. 2014

Thimme, R / Heim, M / Baumert, T F / Nassal, M / Moradpour, D. ·Klinik für Innere Medizin II, Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie, Endokrinologie und Infektiologie, Universitätsklinikum Freiburg. · Abteilung Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Universitätsspital Basel. · Inserm U1110, Forschungsinstitut für Virus- und Leberkrankheiten, Universität Strasbourg. · Abteilung Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Universitätsklinik Lausanne (CHUV). ·Dtsch Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #24648178.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Review Hepatitis C virus proteins: from structure to function. 2013

Moradpour, Darius / Penin, François. ·Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. Darius.Moradpour@chuv.ch ·Curr Top Microbiol Immunol · Pubmed #23463199.

ABSTRACT: Great progress has been made over the past years in elucidating the structure and function of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins, most of which are now actively being pursued as antiviral targets. The structural proteins, which form the viral particle, include the core protein and the envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2. The nonstructural proteins include the p7 viroporin, the NS2 protease, the NS3-4A complex harboring protease and NTPase/RNA helicase activities, the NS4B and NS5A proteins, and the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. NS4B is a master organizer of replication complex formation while NS5A is a zinc-containing phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of HCV RNA replication versus particle production. Core to NS2 make up the assembly module while NS3 to NS5B represent the replication module (replicase). However, HCV proteins exert multiple functions during the viral life cycle, and these may be governed by different structural conformations and/or interactions with viral and/or cellular partners. Remarkably, each viral protein is anchored to intracellular membranes via specific determinants that are essential to protein function in the cell. This review summarizes current knowledge of the structure and function of the HCV proteins and highlights recent advances in the field.

20 Review Targeting mitochondria in the infection strategy of the hepatitis C virus. 2013

Quarato, Giovanni / Scrima, Rosella / Agriesti, Francesca / Moradpour, Darius / Capitanio, Nazzareno / Piccoli, Claudia. ·Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy. ·Int J Biochem Cell Biol · Pubmed #22710347.

ABSTRACT: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induces a state of oxidative stress more pronounced than that observed in many other inflammatory diseases. Here, we propose a temporal sequence of events in the HCV-infected cell whereby the primary alteration consists of a release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum, followed by uptake into mitochondria. This ensues successive mitochondrial dysfunction leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species and a progressive metabolic adaptive response. Evidence is provided for a positive feed-back mechanism between alterations of calcium and redox homeostasis. This likely involves deregulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition and induces progressive dysfunction of cellular bioenergetics. Pathogenetic implications of the model and new opportunities for therapeutic intervention are discussed. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction, adaptation and therapy.

21 Review Immunosuppression in hepatitis C virus-infected patients after kidney transplantation. 2012

Manuel, Oriol / Baid-Agrawal, Seema / Moradpour, Darius / Pascual, Manuel. ·Transplantation Center, University Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. ·Contrib Nephrol · Pubmed #22310785.

ABSTRACT: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important health problem in kidney transplant recipients with a significantly higher prevalence than in the general population. Kidney transplantation remains the treatment of choice for most HCV-infected patients with end-stage kidney disease, in spite of lower patient and graft survival as compared to HCV-negative patients. Immunosuppression likely has significant consequences on HCV replication and/or disease after transplantation. However, determining the best immunosuppressive strategies after kidney transplantation in the presence of HCV infection remains challenging. The use of induction therapy is not contraindicated, and a short-course induction may actually be beneficial in HCV-infected kidney transplant recipients. Corticosteroid withdrawal may be an acceptable option in HCV-infected patients with specific comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus or osteoporosis. The best calcineurin inhibitor to be used in HCV-infected patients remains to be determined, as there is a lack of large controlled trials addressing this particular issue. Overall, immunosuppressive regimens need to be individualized according to clinical parameters other than HCV, such as the patient's immunological risk and other comorbidities. In conclusion, there is a need for prospective controlled studies to define the optimal immunosuppressive regimen in HCV-infected kidney transplant recipients.

22 Review Nonstructural protein 3-4A: the Swiss army knife of hepatitis C virus. 2011

Morikawa, K / Lange, C M / Gouttenoire, J / Meylan, E / Brass, V / Penin, F / Moradpour, D. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. ·J Viral Hepat · Pubmed #21470343.

ABSTRACT: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3-4A (NS3-4A) is a complex composed of NS3 and its cofactor NS4A. It harbours serine protease as well as NTPase/RNA helicase activities and is essential for viral polyprotein processing, RNA replication and virion formation. Specific inhibitors of the NS3-4A protease significantly improve sustained virological response rates in patients with chronic hepatitis C when combined with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. The NS3-4A protease can also target selected cellular proteins, thereby blocking innate immune pathways and modulating growth factor signalling. Hence, NS3-4A is not only an essential component of the viral replication complex and prime target for antiviral intervention but also a key player in the persistence and pathogenesis of HCV. This review provides a concise update on the biochemical and structural aspects of NS3-4A, its role in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C and the clinical development of NS3-4A protease inhibitors.

23 Review [Viral hepatitis]. 2011

Moradpour, Darius / Blum, Hubert E. ·Service de Gastroentérologie et d'Hépatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne. darius.moradpour@chuv.ch ·Ther Umsch · Pubmed #21452137.

ABSTRACT: Viral hepatitis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatitis A and E viruses are enterally transmitted and lead to usually self-limited acute hepatitis. Hepatitis B, C and D viruses are transmitted by parenteral routes and can lead to chronic hepatitis with progression to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we briefly review current understanding and new developments in the virology and epidemiology, diagnosis, natural history, therapy and prevention of viral hepatitis.

24 Review [A primer on the management of antiviral resistance in chronic hepatitis B]. 2009

Doerig, C / Sahli, R / Telenti, A / Moradpour, D. ·Service de gastroentérologie et d'hépatologie, CHUV, 1011 Lausanne. Christopher.Doerig@chuv.ch ·Rev Med Suisse · Pubmed #19271431.

ABSTRACT: Treatment options for chronic hepatitis B have significantly expanded over the last decade. Six nucleoside or nucleotide analogs (NA) with activity against the hepatitis B virus are currently available. Prolonged NA treatment is required in many cases to maintain viral suppression, with an inherent risk of the development of antiviral resistance. The purpose of this concise review is to provide an introduction to the prevention, diagnosis and management of antiviral resistance in chronic hepatitis B.

25 Review HCV infection induces mitochondrial bioenergetic unbalance: causes and effects. 2009

Piccoli, C / Quarato, G / Ripoli, M / D'Aprile, A / Scrima, R / Cela, O / Boffoli, D / Moradpour, D / Capitanio, N. ·Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Foggia, 71100 Foggia, Italy. ·Biochim Biophys Acta · Pubmed #19094961.

ABSTRACT: Cells infected by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are characterized by endoplasmic reticulum stress, deregulation of the calcium homeostasis and unbalance of the oxido-reduction state. In this context, mitochondrial dysfunction proved to be involved and is thought to contribute to the outcome of the HCV-related disease. Here, we propose a temporal sequence of events in the HCV-infected cell whereby the primary alteration consists of a release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum, followed by uptake into mitochondria. This causes successive mitochondrial alterations comprising generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and impairment of the oxidative phosphorylation. A progressive adaptive response results in an enhancement of the glycolytic metabolism sustained by up-regulation of the hypoxia inducible factor. Pathogenetic implications of the model are discussed.

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