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Hepatitis: HELP
Articles from Hong Kong
Based on 910 articles published since 2009
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These are the 910 published articles about Hepatitis that originated from Hong Kong during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline APASL clinical practice recommendation: how to treat HCV-infected patients with renal impairment? 2019

Kanda, Tatsuo / Lau, George K K / Wei, Lai / Moriyama, Mitsuhiko / Yu, Ming-Lung / Chuang, Wang-Long / Ibrahim, Alaaeldin / Lesmana, Cosmas Rinaldi Adithya / Sollano, Jose / Kumar, Manoj / Jindal, Ankur / Sharma, Barjesh Chander / Hamid, Saeed S / Dokmeci, A Kadir / Mamun-Al-Mahtab, ? / McCaughan, Geofferey W / Wasim, Jafri / Crawford, Darrell H G / Kao, Jia-Horng / Yokosuka, Osamu / Sarin, Shiv Kumar / Omata, Masao. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Humanity and Health Medical Center, Hong Kong, SAR, China. · Peking University People's Hospital, Peking University Hepatology Institute, Beijing, China. · Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Hepatobiliary Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · GI/Liver Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Benha, Benha, Egypt. · Digestive Disease and GI Oncology Centre, Medistra Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Hepatobiliary Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. · University Santo Tomas Hospital, Manila, Philippines. · Department of Hepatology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi, India. · Department of Gastroenterology, G.B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India. · Department of Medicine, Aga Khan University and Hospital, Stadium Road, Karachi, 74800, Pakistan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Hepatology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, 1000, Bangladesh. · Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Centenary Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Woolloongabba, QLD, 4102, Australia. · National Taiwan University College of Medicine and National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan. · Yamanashi Prefectural Central Hospital, 1-1-1 Fujimi, Kofu-shi, Yamanashi, 400-8506, Japan. momata-tky@umin.ac.jp. · The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan. momata-tky@umin.ac.jp. ·Hepatol Int · Pubmed #30539517.

ABSTRACT: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and those on hemodialysis due to nosocomial infections and past blood transfusions. While a majority of HCV-infected patients with end-stage renal disease are asymptomatic, some may ultimately experience decompensated liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinoma. Administration of a combination of elbasvir/grazoprevir for 12 weeks leads to high sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in patients with HCV genotypes (GTs) 1a, 1b or 4 and stage 4 or 5 CKD. Furthermore, a combination of glecaprevir/pibrentasvir for 8-16 weeks also results in high SVR rates in patients with all HCV GTs and stage 4 or 5 CKD. However, these regimens are contraindicated in the presence of advanced decompensated cirrhosis. Although sofosbuvir and/or ribavirin are not generally recommended for HCV-infected patients with severe renal impairment, sofosbuvir-based regimens may be appropriate for those with mild renal impairment. To eliminate HCV worldwide, HCV-infected patients with renal impairment should be treated with interferon-free therapies.

2 Guideline International Liver Transplantation Society Consensus Statement on Hepatitis C Management in Liver Transplant Recipients. 2017

Terrault, Norah A / Berenguer, Marina / Strasser, Simone I / Gadano, Adrian / Lilly, Les / Samuel, Didier / Kwo, Paul Y / Agarwal, Kosh / Curry, Michael P / Fagiuoli, Stefano / Fung, James Y Y / Gane, Edward / Brown, Kimberly A / Burra, Patrizia / Charlton, Michael / Pessoa, Mario G / McCaughan, Geoff W. ·1 Hepatology and Transplant Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. 2 Liver Unit, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Universidad Valencia and CIBEREHD, Valencia, Spain. 3 Australian National Liver Transplant Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. 4 Liver Unit, Hospital Italiano, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 5 Multiorgan Transplant, University Health Network/Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 6 Hepatology, AP-HP Hôpital Paul-Brousse, Centre Hépato-Biliaire, Univ Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France. 7 Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA. 8 Institute of Liver Studies, Kings College Hospital, London, United Kingdom. 9 Liver Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. 10 Gastroenterology and Transplant Hepatology, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Begamo, Italy. 11 The Liver Transplant Center, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong. 12 New Zealand Liver Transplant Unit, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. 13 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI. 14 Multivisceral Transplant Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, Padova University Hospital, Padova, Italy. 15 Utah Intermountain Transplant and Regenerative Medicine Center, Salt Lake City, UT. 16 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil. 17 Australian National Liver Transplant Unit, Centenary Research Institute, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·Transplantation · Pubmed #28437388.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline International Liver Transplantation Society Consensus Statement on Hepatitis C Management in Liver Transplant Candidates. 2017

Terrault, Norah A / McCaughan, Geoff W / Curry, Michael P / Gane, Edward / Fagiuoli, Stefano / Fung, James Y Y / Agarwal, Kosh / Lilly, Les / Strasser, Simone I / Brown, Kimberly A / Gadano, Adrian / Kwo, Paul Y / Burra, Patrizia / Samuel, Didier / Charlton, Michael / Pessoa, Mario G / Berenguer, Marina. ·1 Hepatology and Transplant Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. 2 Australian National Liver Transplant Unit, Centenary Research Institute, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. 3 Liver Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. 4 New Zealand Liver Transplant Unit, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. 5 Gastroenterology and Transplant Hepatology, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Begamo, Italy. 6 The Liver Transplant Center, Queen Mary Hospital, High West, Hong Kong. 7 Institute of Liver Studies, Kings College Hospital, London, United Kingdom. 8 Multiorgan Transplant, University Health Network/Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 9 Australian National Liver Transplant Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. 10 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI. 11 Liver Unit, Hospital Italiano, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 12 Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA. 13 Multivisceral Transplant Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, Padova University Hospital, Padova, Italy. 14 Hepatology, AP-HP Hôpital Paul-Brousse, Centre Hépato-Biliaire, Univ Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France. 15 Utah Intermountain Transplant and Regenerative Medicine Center, Salt Lake City, UT. 16 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil. 17 Liver Unit, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Universidad Valencia and CIBEREHD, Valencia, Spain. ·Transplantation · Pubmed #28437387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline Asian-Pacific clinical practice guidelines on the management of hepatitis B: a 2015 update. 2016

Sarin, S K / Kumar, M / Lau, G K / Abbas, Z / Chan, H L Y / Chen, C J / Chen, D S / Chen, H L / Chen, P J / Chien, R N / Dokmeci, A K / Gane, Ed / Hou, J L / Jafri, W / Jia, J / Kim, J H / Lai, C L / Lee, H C / Lim, S G / Liu, C J / Locarnini, S / Al Mahtab, M / Mohamed, R / Omata, M / Park, J / Piratvisuth, T / Sharma, B C / Sollano, J / Wang, F S / Wei, L / Yuen, M F / Zheng, S S / Kao, J H. ·Department of Hepatology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi, India. shivsarin@gmail.com. · Department of Hepatology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi, India. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Humanity and Health Medical Centre, Hong Kong SAR, China. · The Institute of Translational Hepatology, Beijing, China. · Department of Hepatogastroenterlogy, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi, Pakistan. · Institute of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. · Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Liver Research Unit, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Chilung, Taiwan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · New Zealand Liver Transplant Unit, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. · Department of Infectious Diseases and Hepatology Unit, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou, China. · Department of Medicine, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan. · Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · , Seoul, Korea. · Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Internal Medicine Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore. · Research and Molecular Development, Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, Melbourne, Australia. · Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Yamanashi Hospitals (Central and Kita) Organization, 1-1-1 Fujimi, Kofu-shi, Yamanashi, 400-8506, Japan. · Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · NKC Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand. · Department of Gastroenterology, G.B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India. · Department of Medicine, University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines. · Treatment and Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Beijing 302 Hospital, Beijing, China. · Peking University Hepatology Institute, Beijing, China. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Pofulam, Hong Kong. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, 310003, Zhejiang Province, China. · Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine and Hepatitis Research Center, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Hepatol Int · Pubmed #26563120.

ABSTRACT: Worldwide, some 240 million people have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV), with the highest rates of infection in Africa and Asia. Our understanding of the natural history of HBV infection and the potential for therapy of the resultant disease is continuously improving. New data have become available since the previous APASL guidelines for management of HBV infection were published in 2012. The objective of this manuscript is to update the recommendations for the optimal management of chronic HBV infection. The 2015 guidelines were developed by a panel of Asian experts chosen by the APASL. The clinical practice guidelines are based on evidence from existing publications or, if evidence was unavailable, on the experts' personal experience and opinion after deliberations. Manuscripts and abstracts of important meetings published through January 2015 have been evaluated. This guideline covers the full spectrum of care of patients infected with hepatitis B, including new terminology, natural history, screening, vaccination, counseling, diagnosis, assessment of the stage of liver disease, the indications, timing, choice and duration of single or combination of antiviral drugs, screening for HCC, management in special situations like childhood, pregnancy, coinfections, renal impairment and pre- and post-liver transplant, and policy guidelines. However, areas of uncertainty still exist, and clinicians, patients, and public health authorities must therefore continue to make choices on the basis of the evolving evidence. The final clinical practice guidelines and recommendations are presented here, along with the relevant background information.

5 Editorial APASL HCV guidelines of virus-eradicated patients by DAA on how to monitor HCC occurrence and HBV reactivation. 2019

Kanda, Tatsuo / Lau, George K K / Wei, Lai / Moriyama, Mitsuhiko / Yu, Ming-Lung / Chuang, Wang-Long / Ibrahim, Alaaeldin / Lesmana, Cosmas Rinaldi Adithya / Sollano, Jose / Kumar, Manoj / Jindal, Ankur / Sharma, Barjesh Chander / Hamid, Saeed S / Kadir Dokmeci, A / Mamun-Al-Mahtab, ? / McCaughan, Geoffrey W / Wasim, Jafri / Crawford, Darrell H G / Kao, Jia-Horng / Ooka, Yoshihiko / Yokosuka, Osamu / Sarin, Shiv Kumar / Omata, Masao. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Humanity and Health Medical Center, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Tsinghua Changgung Hospital, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. · College of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan. · Hepatobiliary Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · GI/Liver Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Benha, Banha, Egypt. · Digestive Disease and GI Oncology Centre, Medistra Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Hepatobiliary Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. · University Santo Tomas Hospital, Manila, Philippines. · Department of Hepatology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi, India. · Department of Gastroenterology, G.B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India. · Department of Medicine, Aga Khan University and Hospital, Stadium Road, Karachi, 74800, Pakistan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Hepatology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, 1000, Bangladesh. · Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Centenary Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Woolloongabba, QLD, 4102, Australia. · National Taiwan University College of Medicine, and National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan. · Yamanashi Prefectural Central Hospital, 1-1-1 Fujimi, Kofu-shi, Yamanashi, 400-8506, Japan. momata-tky@umin.ac.jp. · The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan. momata-tky@umin.ac.jp. ·Hepatol Int · Pubmed #31541423.

ABSTRACT: In the direct-acting antiviral (DAA) era for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, sustained virological response (SVR) is very high, but close attention must be paid to the possible occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in patients with co-infection who achieved SVR in short term. HCC occurrence was more often observed in patients with previous HCC history. We found occurrence of HCC in 178 (29.6%) of 602 patients with previous HCC history (15.4 months mean follow-up post-DAA initiation) but, in contrast, in only 604 (1.3%) of 45,870 patients without previous HCC history (18.2 months mean follow-up). Thus, in these guidelines, we recommend the following: in patients with previous HCC history, surveillance at 4-month intervals for HCC by ultrasonography (US) and tumor markers should be performed. In patients without previous HCC history, surveillance at 6- to 12-month intervals for HCC including US is recommended until the long-term DAA treatment effects, especially for the resolution of liver fibrosis, are confirmed. This guideline also includes recommendations on how to follow-up patients who have been infected with both HCV and HBV. When HCV was eradicated in these HBsAg-positive patients or patients with previous HBV infection (anti-HBc and/or anti-HBs-positive), it was shown that HBV reactivation or HBV DNA reappearance was observed in 67 (41.4%) of 162 or 12 (0.9%) of 1317, respectively. For these co-infected patients, careful attention should be paid to HBV reactivation for 24 weeks post-treatment.

6 Editorial Commentary: Direct-acting antiviral regimens usher in the era of hepatitis C virus-positive donors in lung transplant. 2019

Fung, James Y Y / Hsin, Michael K Y. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China. · Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address: mkhsin@hotmail.com. ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #31256960.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Macro-efforts for the micro-elimination of hepatitis C targeting people who inject drugs. 2019

Lee, Shui-Shan / Crofts, Nick / Hung, Chien-Ching. ·Stanley Ho Centre for Emerging Infectious Diseases, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Electronic address: sslee@cuhk.edu.hk. · School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Int J Infect Dis · Pubmed #31229938.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Editorial: can hepatitis B core-related antigen be the new biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma in nucleoside analogue-treated chronic hepatitis B? 2019

Mak, Lung-Yi. ·Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #30868636.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Chronic hepatitis B and metabolic risk factors: A call for rigorous longitudinal studies. 2019

Seto, Wai-Kay. ·Department of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #30686897.

ABSTRACT: Long-term nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is effective in suppressing viral replication and reducing liver-related complications. However, HBV-related liver events can still occur in different patient sub-groups. There is emerging evidence that, similar to chronic hepatitis C virus infection, metabolic risk factors may play a role in the disease process of chronic HBV. While the mechanistic nature of metabolic-HBV interactions remains uncertain, studies in different HBV-infected populations have demonstrated that hepatic steatosis, increased body-mass index, diabetes, or a combination of different metabolic risk factors are associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis. The impact of metabolic risk factors is especially prominent in patients with quiescent virological activity, including on-treatment patients with effective viral suppression. As the proportion of on-treatment chronic HBV patients increases worldwide, longitudinal studies determining the relative risks of different metabolic parameters with respect to clinical outcomes are needed. Future studies should also determine if metabolic-directed interventions can improve disease outcomes in chronic HBV.

10 Editorial Immunoglobulin therapy and passive transfer of anti-HBc: too often forgotten. 2018

Hui, Edwin Pun. ·State Key Laboratory of Translational Oncology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. Electronic address: huipun@cuhk.edu.hk. ·Lancet Haematol · Pubmed #30290900.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Editorial: a baseline tool for predicting response to peginterferon alfa-2a in HBeAg-positive patients-same score, different outcomes. Author's Reply. 2018

Chan, Henry Lik Yuen. ·Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #30281836.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial The growing burden of liver cirrhosis: implications for preventive measures. 2018

Wong, Martin C S / Huang, Junjie. ·Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Institute of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · State Key Laboratory of Digestive Disease, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. junjie_huang@link.cuhk.edu.hk. ·Hepatol Int · Pubmed #29679258.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Hepatitis B virus infection. 2017

Janssen, Harry L A / Chan, Henry Lik Yuen / Petersen, Jorg. ·Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: harry.janssen@uhn.ca. · The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · IFI-Institute for Interdisciplinary Medicine, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. ·Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28774404.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Hepatitis B reactivation in hepatitis B and C coinfected patients treated with antiviral agents: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Chen, Guofeng / Wang, Cheng / Chen, Jing / Ji, Dong / Wang, Yudong / Wu, Vanessa / Karlberg, Johan / Lau, George. ·Beijing 302-Hong Kong Humanity and Health Hepatitis C Diagnosis and Treatment Center, Beijing, China. · Second Liver Cirrhosis Diagnosis and Treatment Center, 302 Hospital, Beijing, China. · Humanity and Health Research Centre, Hong Kong SAR, China. · State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Viral Hepatitis Research, Department of Infectious Diseases, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Humanity and Health Medical Centre, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Institute of Translational Hepatology, 302 Hospital, Beijing, China. ·Hepatology · Pubmed #28195337.

ABSTRACT: There is an increased awareness of hepatitis B (HBV) reactivation in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients coinfected with HBV treated with pan-oral direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the rate of HBV reactivation in CHC patients coinfected with overt HBV (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] positive) and occult HBV (HBsAg negative with positive HBV DNA) infection separately, treated with interferon (IFN)-based therapy to those with pan-oral DAAs. The primary outcome was HBV reactivation, and the secondary outcomes included hepatitis due to HBV reactivation, sustained virologic response (SVR) for CHC, loss of HBV DNA and HBsAg seroclearance. Although the pooled incidence rate of HBV reactivation, among CHC patients with overt HBV (n = 779), was similar among those treated with IFN-based therapy (14.5%, P < 0.001) and DAAs (12.2%, P = 0.03; P = 0.91 for heterogeneity between subgroups), it was reported to occur much earlier in those treated with DAAs (4-12 weeks during treatment) than in those treated with IFN-based therapies (most at the end of treatment and some during follow-up). Also, studies with DAA-based therapies were more likely to report incidence of hepatitis due to HBV reactivation (12.2% in DAAs vs. 0% in IFN; P = 0.009 for heterogeneity between subgroups). HBV reactivation and hepatitis due to HBV reactivation also occurred, though less frequently in CHC patients with occult HBV infection. CHC SVR was not affected by HBV reactivation (P = 0.27). CONCLUSION: HBV reactivation occurs earlier and is clinically more significant in CHC patients coinfected with overt and occult HBV who are treated with pan-oral DAAs compared with IFN-based therapy. It is therefore important to have all patients screened for evidence of overt or occult HBV infection and managed during pan-oral DAAs therapy. (Hepatology 2017;66:13-26).

15 Editorial Management of hepatitis B-related cirrhosis in the era of effective antiviral therapy. 2016

Wong, Vincent W S. ·Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · State Key Laboratory of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. ·Liver Int · Pubmed #27864872.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Hepatitis B infection in China: the stigma behind the stigmata. 2016

Liu, Ken. ·Institute of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong City, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong City, Hong Kong. · State Key Laboratory of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong City, Hong Kong. · Faculty of Medicine, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Liver Int · Pubmed #27744655.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Need to improve awareness and management of hepatitis B reactivation in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy. 2016

Yuen, Man-Fung. ·Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, China. mfyuen@hkucc.hku.hk. · State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. mfyuen@hkucc.hku.hk. ·Hepatol Int · Pubmed #26739134.

ABSTRACT: Hepatitis B reactivation in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy is not an uncommon event because of upsurge in the development of more potent and new immunosuppressive therapy (IST) including monoclonal antibodies leading to profound B cell depletion. However, this condition is still not being commonly made known to practising clinicians. More importantly, serious adverse outcomes including liver decompensation and death have been reported from time to time. This is likely related to the insufficient efforts to disseminate the knowledge or inattentive attitude from clinicians towards the need for hepatitis B virus screening before starting IST. It is of crucial importance, as these adverse outcomes are largely preventable by prophylactic or early treatment by antiviral agents. The risk of hepatitis B reactivation depends on the type and duration of the IST, patient characteristics and disease conditions. While we are eagerly waiting for a more cohesive consensual management recommendations from the different specialties who are involved in managing these patients, consolidated data are readily available for clinicians to define whether their patients would have a low or a high risk of hepatitis B reactivation. A management strategy without ambiguity should be formulated.

18 Editorial Fat and fiber: how the controlled attenuation parameter complements noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis. 2015

Wong, Grace Lai-Hung / Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun. ·Institute of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR, China, wonglaihung@cuhk.edu.hk. ·Dig Dis Sci · Pubmed #25399331.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Editorial: metabolic syndrome delays HBeAg seroclearance in Chinese patients with hepatitis B--authors' reply. 2014

Hsiang, J / Wong, G L-H / Chan, H L-Y / Wong, V W-S. ·Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; Institute of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #25229812.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Dissemination reports of health-related research. 2012

Cheung, Ivy / Collins, Richard A. ·Research Office, Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR. ·Hong Kong Med J · Pubmed #23249843.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Review Use of HBsAg quantification in the natural history and treatment of chronic hepatitis B. 2019

Mak, Lung-Yi / Seto, Wai-Kay / Fung, James / Yuen, Man-Fung. ·Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam Road 102, Hong Kong, China. · State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam Road 102, Hong Kong, China. mfyuen@hkucc.hku.hk. · State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. mfyuen@hkucc.hku.hk. ·Hepatol Int · Pubmed #31745711.

ABSTRACT: In patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection, it is important to monitor the natural history, assess treatment response, and predict the risk of liver-related complications. Quantification of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has gained wide interests since the last decade. It is secreted from hepatocytes in both hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive and HBeAg-negative phases of the disease, and can be transcribed and translated from different sources of viral genome [ccc DNA or integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA]. In untreated patients, it declines slowly through the natural course and remains stable for a long time after HBeAg seroconversion. In patients treated with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA), it also declines very slowly, even though serum hepatitis B DNA has been rendered negative. Low serum HBsAg may predict either spontaneous or treatment-induced HBsAg seroclearance, and potentially selects out HBeAg-negative patients who can safely stop NA. High serum HBsAg is associated with high risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in untreated population, and predicts treatment failure in patients receiving pegylated interferon. These potential roles of HBsAg quantification are applicable to selected populations only. There is also a need for novel markers to study the effect of emerging antiviral therapies targeting various parts of the HBV cycle to reflect their distinct mechanistic effects. Several agents measuring HBsAg levels have shown rapid and significant decline. Ongoing studies are required to demonstrate the sustainability of HBsAg suppression by these novel agents.

22 Review Emerging medical therapies for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and for alcoholic hepatitis. 2019

Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun / Singal, Ashwani K. ·Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · State Key Laboratory of Digestive Disease, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Avera Transplant Institute, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls, SD, USA. ·Transl Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #31463412.

ABSTRACT: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD) are currently the two most common liver diseases in the world. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH), a unique clinical syndrome among ALD patients has high short-term mortality. Apart from controlling the risk factor for individual respective disease, there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medical therapies for these diseases. Over the last 5-10 years, the field has extensively grown with many new targets being studied in randomized clinical trials for these diseases, with many of these drugs being tested in both the conditions. In this chapter, we will describe the novel therapeutic agents and current status of ongoing clinical trials with these agents for the treatment of NAFLD and/or AH.

23 Review Innovative strategies for the elimination of viral hepatitis at a national level: A country case series. 2019

Schröeder, Sophia E / Pedrana, Alisa / Scott, Nick / Wilson, David / Kuschel, Christian / Aufegger, Lisa / Atun, Rifat / Baptista-Leite, Ricardo / Butsashvili, Maia / El-Sayed, Manal / Getahun, Aneley / Hamid, Saeed / Hammad, Radi / 't Hoen, Ellen / Hutchinson, Sharon J / Lazarus, Jeffrey V / Lesi, Olufunmilayo / Li, Wangsheng / Binti Mohamed, Rosmawati / Olafsson, Sigurdur / Peck, Raquel / Sohn, Annette H / Sonderup, Mark / Spearman, Catherine W / Swan, Tracy / Thursz, Mark / Walker, Tim / Hellard, Margaret / Howell, Jessica. ·Burnet Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Centre for Health Policy, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. · Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Lisbon, Portugal. · Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. · Health Research Union, Tbilisi, Georgia. · Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Research Center, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. · School of Public Health and Primary Care, Fiji National University, Suva, Fiji. · Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan. · Ministry of Health and Population, Cairo, Egypt. · Global Health Unit, University Medical Centre, Groningen, the Netherlands. · Medicines Law & Policy, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK. · Health Protection Scotland, Meridian Court, Glasgow, UK. · Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria. · ZeShan Foundation, Wanchai, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine, University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · World Hepatitis Alliance, London, UK. · TREAT Asia/amfAR, Foundation for AIDS Research, Bangkok, Thailand. · Division of Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · Treatment Action Group, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Hepatology, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology and General Medicine, Calvary Mater, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. · School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. · Hepatitis Services, Department of Infectious Diseases, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Doherty Institute and Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. ·Liver Int · Pubmed #31433902.

ABSTRACT: Viral hepatitis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but has long been neglected by national and international policymakers. Recent modelling studies suggest that investing in the global elimination of viral hepatitis is feasible and cost-effective. In 2016, all 194 member states of the World Health Organization endorsed the goal to eliminate viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030, but complex systemic and social realities hamper implementation efforts. This paper presents eight case studies from a diverse range of countries that have invested in responses to viral hepatitis and adopted innovative approaches to tackle their respective epidemics. Based on an investment framework developed to build a global investment case for the elimination of viral hepatitis by 2030, national activities and key enablers are highlighted that showcase the feasibility and impact of concerted hepatitis responses across a range of settings, with different levels of available resources and infrastructural development. These case studies demonstrate the utility of taking a multipronged, public health approach to: (a) evidence-gathering and planning; (b) implementation; and (c) integration of viral hepatitis services into the Agenda for Sustainable Development. They provide models for planning, investment and implementation strategies for other countries facing similar challenges and resource constraints.

24 Review Best practices on immunomodulators and biologic agents for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease in Asia. 2019

Ooi, Choon Jin / Hilmi, Ida / Banerjee, Rupa / Chuah, Sai Wei / Ng, Siew Chien / Wei, Shu Chen / Makharia, Govind K / Pisespongsa, Pises / Chen, Min Hu / Ran, Zhi Hua / Ye, Byong Duk / Park, Dong Il / Ling, Khoon Lin / Ong, David / Ahuja, Vineet / Goh, Khean Lee / Sollano, Jose / Lim, Wee Chian / Leung, Wai Keung / Ali, Raja Affendi Raja / Wu, Deng Chyang / Ong, Evan / Mustaffa, Nazri / Limsrivilai, Julajak / Hisamatsu, Tadakazu / Yang, Suk Kyun / Ouyang, Qin / Geary, Richard / De Silva, Janaka H / Rerknimitr, Rungsun / Simadibrata, Marcellus / Abdullah, Murdani / Leong, Rupert Wl / Anonymous3131435. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. · Asian Institute of Gastroenterology, New Delhi, India. · Gleneagles Medical Centre, Singapore. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Bumrungrad International University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Division of Gastroenterology, The First University Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Gastroenterology and IBD Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, National University Hospital of Singapore, University Medicine Cluster, Singapore. · University of Malaya Specialist Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Medicine, University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · Faculty of Medicine, UKM Medical and Specialist Centres, The National University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus, Sains University, Kubang Kerian, Malaysia. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · The Third Department of Internal Medicine, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Gastroenterology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China. · Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Dalugama, Sri Lanka. · Department of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cipto Mangunkusumo National Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Gastroenterology and Liver Services, Concord Hospital, Sydney, Australia. ·Intest Res · Pubmed #31146509.

ABSTRACT: The Asia-Pacific Working Group on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was established in Cebu, Philippines, under the auspices of the Asian Pacific Association of Gastroenterology with the goal of improving IBD care in Asia. This consensus is carried out in collaboration with Asian Organization for Crohn's and Colitis. With biologic agents and biosimilars becoming more established, it is necessary to conduct a review on existing literature and establish a consensus on when and how to introduce biologic agents and biosimilars in the conjunction with conventional treatments for ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in Asia. These statements also address how pharmacogenetics influence the treatments of UC and CD and provide guidance on response monitoring and strategies to restore loss of response. Finally, the review includes statements on how to manage treatment alongside possible hepatitis B and tuberculosis infections, both common in Asia. These statements have been prepared and voted upon by members of IBD workgroup employing the modified Delphi process. These statements do not intend to be all-encompassing and future revisions are likely as new data continue to emerge.

25 Review Prevention of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission. 2019

Cheung, Ka Wang / Seto, Mimi Tin Yan / Lao, Terence Tzu-Hsi. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, 6/F, Professorial Block, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR, China. kelvincheung82@hotmail.com. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, 6/F, Professorial Block, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR, China. ·Arch Gynecol Obstet · Pubmed #31098821.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains endemic and continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality. It is a global health issue and the World Health Organization aims to eradicate HBV by 2030. Since vertical transmission accounts for the majority of chronic HBV infection, pregnancy offers an excellent opportunity to achieve complete HBV eradication by providing effective immunization of the offspring. METHODS: We reviewed recent publications identified from PubMed database using a combination of the relevant keywords for HBV, pregnancy, vertical transmission, immunoprophylaxis failure and antiviral treatment. RESULTS: We summarized the evidence of factors associated with, and measures to reduce and prevent maternal to child transmission, including the use of antiviral treatment during pregnancy to prevent immunoprophylaxis failure. Evidence suggested that highly viremia mother can be offered antenatal antiviral treatment to prevent immunoprophylaxis failure. We elaborated the viral load threshold to start maternal antiviral treatment and the importance of timely neonatal vaccination. A clinical algorithm to manage HBV carriers during pregnancy was proposed. CONCLUSION: Eradication of HBV is achievable with optimal management of HBV carriers, especially during pregnancy by interruption of vertical transmission. Routine antenatal screening and neonatal immunoprophylaxis remain the key measures to reduce the global HBV burden, and additional antenatal antiviral treatment could further minimize the chance of persistent infection in newborns.

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