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HIV Seropositivity: HELP
Articles from Utah
Based on 8 articles published since 2009
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These are the 8 published articles about HIV Seropositivity that originated from Utah during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Reproductive considerations in the setting of chronic viral illness. 2017

Hanson, Brent M / Dorais, Jessie A. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT. Electronic address: brent.hanson@hsc.utah.edu. · Department of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Utah Center for Reproductive Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT. ·Am J Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28209492.

ABSTRACT: Special considerations must be taken when patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B, or hepatitis C desire to become pregnant. Patients with chronic viral illnesses desire to have children at rates similar to the general population, and options are available to decrease both vertical transmission and viral transmission between partners. Preconception counseling or consultation with fertility specialists is imperative in patients with HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C so that reproductive goals can be addressed and optimized. In couples in which one partner has HIV, the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy or preexposure prophylaxis can significantly reduce the risk of transmission between serodiscordant partners. The use of density gradient sperm-washing techniques and intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization results in an apparent lack of transmission of HIV between partners when the male partner is HIV-positive. Vertical transmission of HIV from mother to child can be reduced by use of highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens throughout pregnancy or by cesarean delivery in the setting of high maternal viral load. Transmission of hepatitis B between partners can be eliminated by vaccinating the uninfected partner. Vertical transmission from a hepatitis B-infected mother to a child can be reduced by vaccinating neonates with the standard hepatitis B vaccine series as well as hepatitis B immune globulin. Recent data have shown the antiviral medication tenofovir to be an effective way to reduce vertical transmission in the setting of high maternal viral load or the presence of hepatitis B e antigen. There are multiple antiviral medications available to treat chronic hepatitis C, although access to these medications often is limited by cost. Similar to HIV-positive patients, in settings in which the male partner is infected with hepatitis C, density gradient sperm washing can be used before intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization to reduce transmission of hepatitis C between partners. No safe and effective method exists to reduce vertical transmission of hepatitis C once a woman becomes pregnant, highlighting the importance of treatment of hepatitis C before pregnancy.

2 Article The Role of the Primary Romantic Relationship in HIV Care Engagement Outcomes Among Young HIV-Positive Black Men Who Have Sex with Men. 2018

Tan, Judy Y / Pollack, Lance / Rebchook, Greg / Peterson, John / Huebner, David / Eke, Agatha / Johnson, Wayne / Kegeles, Susan. ·Division of Prevention Science, Department of Medicine, Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, 550 16th Street, 3rd Floor, 0886, San Francisco, CA, 94158-2549, USA. judy.tan@ucsf.edu. · Division of Prevention Science, Department of Medicine, Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, 550 16th Street, 3rd Floor, 0886, San Francisco, CA, 94158-2549, USA. · Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. · Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·AIDS Behav · Pubmed #27844296.

ABSTRACT: The primary romantic relationship plays a fundamental role in health maintenance, but little is known about its role in HIV care engagement among young Black men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV. We examined how HIV care engagement outcomes (i.e., having a primary healthcare provider, receiving HIV treatment, taking antiretroviral medication, and medication adherence) vary by partnership status (single vs. concordant-positive vs. discordant) in a sample of young Black MSM living with HIV. Results showed mixed findings. Partnership status was significantly associated with HIV care engagement, even after adjusting for individual, social, and structural factors. While partnered men were consistently more likely than their single counterparts to have a regular healthcare provider, to receive recent treatment, and to have ever taken antiretroviral medication, they were less likely to report currently receiving antiretroviral therapy. Moreover, men with a discordant partner reported better adherence compared to men with a concordant or no partner. The association between partnership status and HIV care engagement outcomes was not consistent across the stages of the HIV Care Continuum, highlighting the complexity in how and why young Black men living with HIV engage in HIV healthcare. Given the social context of HIV disease management, more research is needed to explicate underlying mechanisms involved in HIV care and treatment that differ by relational factors for young Black MSM living with HIV.

3 Article Assessing health-related resiliency in HIV+ Latin women: Preliminary psychometric findings. 2017

Jimenez-Torres, Gladys J / Wojna, Valerie / Rosario, Ernesto / Hechevarría, Rosa / Alemán-Batista, Ada M / Matos, Miriam Ríos / Madan, Alok / Skolasky, Richard L / Acevedo, Summer F. ·The Menninger Clinic, Houston, TX, United States of America. · Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States of America. · Psychology Department, Ponce School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ponce, PR, United States of America. · NeuroAIDS Research Program, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR, United States of America. · Department of Internal Medicine, Neurology Division, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR, United States of America. · Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR, United States of America. · School of Health Professions, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR, United States of America. · Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States of America. · Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #28723939.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: HIV-associated vulnerabilities-especially those linked to psychological issues-and limited mental health-treatment resources have the potential to adversely affect the health statuses of individuals. The concept of resilience has been introduced in the literature to shift the emphasis from vulnerability to protective factors. Resilience, however, is an evolving construct and is measured in various ways, though rarely among underserved, minority populations. Herein, we present the preliminary psychometric properties of a sample of HIV-seropositive Puerto Rican women, measured using a newly developed health-related resilience scale. METHODS AND DESIGN: The Resilience Scales for Children and Adolescents, an instrument with solid test construction properties, acted as a model in the development (in both English and Spanish) of the HRRS, providing the same dimensions and most of the same subscales. The present sample was nested within the Hispanic-Latino longitudinal cohort of women (HLLC), that is part of the NeuroAIDS Research Program at the University of Puerto Rico (UPR), Medical Sciences Campus (MSC). Forty-five consecutively recruited, HIV+ women from the HLLC completed a demographic survey, the HRRS, and the Beck Depression Inventory-I, Spanish version. RESULTS: The results demonstrate excellent overall internal consistency for the total HRRS score (α = 0.95). Each of the dimensional scores also evidenced acceptable internal consistency (α ≥ 0.88). All the dimensional and subscale content validity indices were above the 0.42 cut-off. Analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the HRRS total score and BDI-I-S (r(45) = -0.453, p < 0.003). CONCLUSION: Albeit preliminary in nature, the present study provides support for the HRRS as a measure to assess resilience among individuals living with chronic medical conditions. Minority populations, especially non-English speaking ones, are understudied across the field of medicine, and when efforts are made to include these patient groups, measurement is rarely tailored to their unique cultural and linguistic experiences. The HRRS is a measure that addresses these notable voids in the medical literature.

4 Article The Predominant Relationship Between Sexual Environment Characteristics and HIV-Serodiscordant Condomless Anal Sex Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM). 2016

Perry, Nicholas S / Wade Taylor, S / Elsesser, Steven / Safren, Steven A / O'Cleirigh, Conall. ·Behavioral Medicine Service, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, 1 Bowdoin Square, 7th Floor, Boston, MA, 02114, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA. · Department of Social Work, Wheelock College, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Fenway Health, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, 33124, USA. · Behavioral Medicine Service, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, 1 Bowdoin Square, 7th Floor, Boston, MA, 02114, USA. cocleirigh@mgh.harvard.edu. · Fenway Health, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. cocleirigh@mgh.harvard.edu. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. cocleirigh@mgh.harvard.edu. ·AIDS Behav · Pubmed #26395194.

ABSTRACT: In some studies, situational factors have been shown to be stronger predictors of condomless sex than individual risk factors. Cross-sectional relationships between condomless anal sex (CAS) with HIV-serodiscordant partners and risk factors across ecological levels (individual, sexual environment) were examined using a sample (N = 60) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) who reported multiple recent episodes of CAS. Negative binomial regressions were used to evaluate the association of contextual risk factors (e.g., substance use during sex, transactional sex, public sex, sex at a sex party) with recent condomless sex, controlling for demographics and mental health. Results demonstrated that sexual environment factors, particularly sex under the influence of drugs or alcohol (B = .019, p < .05), transactional sex (B = .035, p < .01), and public sex (B = .039, p < .01) explained a large proportion of the variance in CAS. Only sex at a sex party was not related to CAS (p = .39). For each additional sexual environment in which men engaged, their rates of CAS increased (B = .39, p < .01). Secondary prevention interventions that are tailored to the proximal sexual environment could be maximally effective, particularly if they address substance use and other challenging sexual situations.

5 Article Relationship Power, Sociodemographics, and Their Relative Influence on Sexual Agreements Among Gay Male Couples. 2016

Perry, Nicholas S / Huebner, David M / Baucom, Brian R / Hoff, Colleen C. ·Department of Psychology, University of Utah, Room 502, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA. nicholas.perry@psych.utah.edu. · Department of Psychology, University of Utah, Room 502, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA. · Center for Research on Gender and Sexuality, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·AIDS Behav · Pubmed #26391687.

ABSTRACT: Men who have sex with men (MSM) in primary relationships engage in condomless sex both within and outside their relationships and a majority of HIV transmission risk may actually occur within primary relationships. Sexual agreements regarding non-monogamy are a critical component to understanding HIV prevention in male couples. Relationship factors have been associated with how sexual agreements function and power is one dyadic construct likely to affect couple's maintenance of non-monogamy agreements. Multilevel modeling was used in a cross-sectional study of gay male couples (N = 566 couples) to examine associations between partners' demographic characteristics traditionally used to define relationship power, a scale of decision-making power, and outcomes related to sexual agreements, including investment, agreement breaks, and break disclosure. Results indicated that decision-making power relative to one's partner was not associated with any agreement outcome, contrary to hypotheses. However, controlling for decision-making power, demographic bases of power were variably associated with sexual agreements' functioning. Younger partners were less invested in and more frequently broke their agreements. Lower-earning partners broke their agreements more frequently, but also disclosed breaks more often. White men in white-minority relationships broke their agreement more often than their partners. Concordant HIV-positive couples were less invested in their agreements and HIV-positive men disclosed breaks more frequently. HIV prevention efforts for same-sex couples must attend to the social, developmental, and cultural influences that affect their agreements around non-monogamy.

6 Article An impacted mandibular left third molar and pericoronitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient. 2014

Kazimiroff, Julie / Zeram, Kia / Cohen, Perry / Bastidas, Jairo / Muggia, Victoria A / Polanco, Jacqueline / Kanas, Robert J. ·Dr. Kazimiroff is the director of community dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, N.Y. · Mr. Zeram is a doctoral candidate, College of Dental Medicine, Roseman University of Health Sciences, South Jordan, Utah. · Dr. Cohen is a pathologist, Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, N.Y. · Dr. Bastidas is the deputy director, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program, Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, N.Y. · Dr. Muggia is the attending physician, Section of Infectious Disease, Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, N.Y. · Dr. Polanco is the attending dentist, Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, N.Y. · Dr. Kanas was an associate professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dental Medicine, Roseman University of Health Sciences, South Jordan, Utah, when this article was written. He now is a staff dentist, Michigan Community Dental Clinics, Port Huron. Address correspondence to Dr. Kanas at rjkanas@gmail.com. ·J Am Dent Assoc · Pubmed #25359647.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Preventive health care among HIV positive women in a Utah HIV/AIDS clinic: a retrospective cohort study. 2014

Simonsen, Sara E / Kepka, Deanna / Thompson, Joan / Warner, Echo L / Snyder, Maggie / Ries, Kristen M. ·Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Division of Public Health, University of Utah, 375 Chipeta Way, Suite A, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA. sara.simonsen@utah.edu. ·BMC Womens Health · Pubmed #24592813.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite evidence that HIV positive women may suffer higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, human papillomavirus infection, and some types of cancer, the provision of preventive health services to HIV positive women is unknown. Preventive health services recommended for such women include breast, colorectal and cervical cancer screening, sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing, vaccinations, and patient counseling on a number of issues including sexual behaviors. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study utilized medical record reviews of 192 HIV positive women who were patients at the University of Utah Infectious Diseases Clinic in 2009. Medical records were reviewed for all encounters during 2009 using a standardized data collection form; data were collected on patient demographics and a variety of preventive health services. Chi squared tests were used to assess receipt of preventive health services by demographic factors, and multivariable logistic regression was used to determine predictors of receiving select services. RESULTS: The most commonly recorded preventive services included blood pressure screening, screening for Hepatitis A and B, Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis vaccination, Pneumococcal pneumonia vaccination, substance abuse screening, and mental health screening. STI testing and safe sex counseling were documented in the medical records of only 37% and 33.9% of women, respectively. Documentation of cancer screening was also low, with cervical cancer screening documented for 56.8% of women, mammography for 65% (N = 26/40) of women, and colorectal cancer screening for 10% (N = 4/40) of women, where indicated. In multivariable models, women with private health insurance were less likely to have documented STI testing (OR 0.20; 95% CI 0.08 - 0.52), and, Hispanic women were less likely to have documented safe-sex counseling (OR 0.26; 95% CI 0.07 - 0.94). CONCLUSIONS: HIV/AIDS providers should focus on the needs of all women for preventive care services, including those with fewer socio-demographic risk factors (i.e., insured, stable housing etc.). In addition, failure to provide STI testing, cancer screening, or safe sex counseling to all patients represents a missed opportunity for provision of services that are important from both a clinical and public health perspective.

8 Article The changing landscape of HIV diagnostics. 2012

Slev, Patricia. ·University of Utah, USA. ·MLO Med Lab Obs · Pubmed #23173518.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --