Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Hypersensitivity HELP
Based on 94,323 articles published since 2010
|||| 27 

These are the 94323 published articles about Hypersensitivity that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Occupational Lung Diseases. 2020

Anonymous4601190 / Cox, Christian W / Chung, Jonathan H / Ackman, Jeanne B / Berry, Mark F / Carter, Brett W / de Groot, Patricia M / Hobbs, Stephen B / Johnson, Geoffrey B / Maldonado, Fabien / McComb, Barbara L / Tong, Betty C / Walker, Christopher M / Kanne, Jeffrey P. ·Research Author, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Panel Chair, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: jonherochung@yahoo.com. · Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California; The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. · The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; American College of Chest Physicians. · Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida. · Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina; The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. · University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas. · Specialty Chair, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #32370962.

ABSTRACT: Ordering the appropriate diagnostic imaging for occupational lung disease requires a firm understanding of the relationship between occupational exposure and expected lower respiratory track manifestation. Where particular inorganic dust exposures typically lead to nodular and interstitial lung disease, other occupational exposures may lead to isolated small airway obstruction. Certain workplace exposures, like asbestos, increase the risk of malignancy, but also produce pulmonary findings that mimic malignancy. This publication aims to delineate the common and special considerations associated with occupational lung disease to assist the ordering physician in selecting the most appropriate imaging study, while still stressing the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline AGA institute and the joint task force on allergy-immunology practice parameters clinical guidelines for the management of eosinophilic esophagitis. 2020

Hirano, Ikuo / Chan, Edmond S / Rank, Matthew A / Sharaf, Rajiv N / Stollman, Neil H / Stukus, David R / Wang, Kenneth / Greenhawt, Matthew / Falck-Ytter, Yngve T / Anonymous6051199 / Anonymous6061199. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, British Columbia Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Clinical Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona and Division of Pulmonology Phoenix Children's Hospital Phoenix, Arizona. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Oakland, California. · Division of Allergy and Immunology, Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · Section of Allergy/Immunology, Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Veterans Affairs Northeast Ohio Healthcare System, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. ·Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol · Pubmed #32336462.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for the management of atopic dermatitis 2018. 2019

Katoh, Norito / Ohya, Yukihiro / Ikeda, Masanori / Ebihara, Tamotsu / Katayama, Ichiro / Saeki, Hidehisa / Shimojo, Naoki / Tanaka, Akio / Nakahara, Takeshi / Nagao, Mizuho / Hide, Michihiro / Fujita, Yuji / Fujisawa, Takao / Futamura, Masaki / Masuda, Koji / Murota, Hiroyuki / Yamamoto-Hanada, Kiwako. ·Department of Dermatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto, Japan. · Allergy Center, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pediatric Acute Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacuetical Sciences, Okayama, Japan. · Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Japan. · Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nihon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Dermatology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima, Japan. · Division of Skin Surface Sensing, Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. · Division of, Clinical Research, National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital, Tsu, Japan. · Division of, Allergy, National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital, Tsu, Japan. · Division of Pediatrics, National Hospital Organization Nagoya Medical Center, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Dermatology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan. ·J Dermatol · Pubmed #31599013.

ABSTRACT: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a disease characterized by relapsing eczema with pruritus as a primary lesion. The current strategies to treat AD in Japan from the perspective of evidence-based medicine consist of three primary measures: (i) the use of topical corticosteroids and tacrolimus ointment as the main treatment for the inflammation; (ii) topical application of emollients to treat the cutaneous barrier dysfunction; and (iii) avoidance of apparent exacerbating factors, psychological counseling and advice about daily life. The guidelines present recommendations to review clinical research articles, evaluate the balance between the advantages and disadvantages of medical activities, and optimize medical activity-related patient outcomes with respect to several important points requiring decision-making in clinical practice.

4 Guideline Recommendations for Prevention and Control of Influenza in Children, 2019-2020. 2019

Anonymous25761195. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #31477606.

ABSTRACT: This statement updates the recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics for the routine use of influenza vaccines and antiviral medications in the prevention and treatment of influenza in children during the 2019-2020 season. The American Academy of Pediatrics continues to recommend routine influenza immunization of all children without medical contraindications, starting at 6 months of age. Any licensed, recommended, age-appropriate vaccine available can be administered, without preference of one product or formulation over another. Antiviral treatment of influenza with any licensed, recommended, age-appropriate influenza antiviral medication continues to be recommended for children with suspected or confirmed influenza, particularly those who are hospitalized, have severe or progressive disease, or have underlying conditions that increase their risk of complications of influenza.

5 Guideline Management of chronic urticaria in children: a clinical guideline. 2019

Caffarelli, Carlo / Paravati, Francesco / El Hachem, Maya / Duse, Marzia / Bergamini, Marcello / Simeone, Giovanni / Barbagallo, Massimo / Bernardini, Roberto / Bottau, Paolo / Bugliaro, Filomena / Caimmi, Silvia / Chiera, Fernanda / Crisafulli, Giuseppe / De Ranieri, Cristiana / Di Mauro, Dora / Diociaiuti, Andrea / Franceschini, Fabrizio / Gola, Massimo / Licari, Amelia / Liotti, Lucia / Mastrorilli, Carla / Minasi, Domenico / Mori, Francesca / Neri, Iria / Pantaleo, Aurelia / Saretta, Francesca / Tesi, Carlo Filippo / Corsello, Giovanni / Marseglia, Gian Luigi / Villani, Alberto / Cardinale, Fabio. ·Clinica Pediatrica, Dipartimento Medicina e Chirurgia, Università di Parma, Parma, Italy. · Pediatric Unit, Maternal Infant Department, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale Crotone, Crotone, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Generalist Pediatrician, Local Health Unit of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · Primary care Pediatrician, Local Health Unit of Brindisi, Brindisi, Italy. · Pediatric Unit, Azienda di rilievo nazionale ARNAS "GARIBALDI", Catania, Italy. · Paediatric Unit, "San Giuseppe" Hospital, Empoli, Italy. · Pediatric and Neonatology Unit, Imola Hospital, Imola, BO, Italy. · FEDERASMA e Allergie Onlus - Federazione Italiana Pazienti, Prato, Italy. · Pediatric Clinic, Foundation IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · UO Allergologia, Dipartimento di Pediatria, Università di Messina, Messina, Italy. · Clinical Psychology Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Clinica Pediatrica, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · UOC Pediatria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria "Ospedali Riuniti", Ancona, Italy. · Allergological and Pediatric Dermatology Unit, AUTC and University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics, Senigallia Hospital, Senigallia, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics and Emergency, Pediatric Allergy and Pulmunology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria "Consorziale-Policlinico", Ospedale Pediatrico Giovanni XXIII, Bari, Italy. · UOC di Pediatria Azienda Ospedaliera "Bianchi-Melacrino-Morelli", Reggio Calabria, Italy. · Allergy Unit, Department of Pediatric Medicine, Anna Meyer Children's University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Clinica Pediatrica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Parma, Italy. · Pediatric Department, AAS2 Bassa Friulana-Isontina, Palmanova-Latisana, Italy. · Pediatric Allergy Unit, Department of Medicine, Udine, Italy. · Clinica Pediatrica Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · UOC di Pediatria Generale e Malattie Infettive, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics and Emergency, Pediatric Allergy and Pulmunology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria "Consorziale-Policlinico", Ospedale Pediatrico Giovanni XXIII, Bari, Italy. fabiocardinale@libero.it. ·Ital J Pediatr · Pubmed #31416456.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this guidance is to provide recommendations to clinicians and other interested parties on chronic urticaria in children. The Italian Society for Pediatrics (SIP), the Italian Society for Allergy and Immunology (SIAIP), the Italian Society for Pediatric dermatology (SIDerP) convened a multidisciplinary panel that prepared clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of chronic urticaria in childhood. Key questions on epidemiology, natural history, diagnosis, and management were developed. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated, recommendations were rated and algorithms for diagnosis and treatment were developed. The recommendations focus on identification of diseases and comorbidities, strategies to recognize triggering factors, improvement of treatment by individualized care.

6 Guideline Challenges in the diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Recommendations from the North American Consortium for Histiocytosis (NACHO). 2019

Jordan, Michael B / Allen, Carl E / Greenberg, Jay / Henry, Michael / Hermiston, Michelle L / Kumar, Ashish / Hines, Melissa / Eckstein, Olive / Ladisch, Stephan / Nichols, Kim E / Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos / Wistinghausen, Birte / McClain, Kenneth L. ·Division of Immunobiology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Division of Hematology, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC. · Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Phoenix Children's Hospital, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona. · Department of Pediatrics, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Division of Critical Care, Department of Pediatric Medicine, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. · Center for Cancer and Immunology Research, Children's National Medical Center and George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. · Division of Cancer Predisposition, Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. · Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. · Department of Global Pediatric Medicine, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. · Division of Oncology, Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC. ·Pediatr Blood Cancer · Pubmed #31339233.

ABSTRACT: Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a syndrome of pathologic immune activation, often associated with genetic defects of lymphocyte cytotoxicity. Though a distinctive constellation of features has been described for HLH, diagnosis remains challenging as patients have diverse presentations associated with a variety of triggers. We propose two concepts to clarify how HLH is diagnosed and treated: within the broader syndrome of HLH, "HLH disease" should be distinguished from "HLH disease mimics" and HLH subtypes should be categorized by specific etiologic associations, not the ambiguous dichotomy of "primary" and "secondary." We provide expert-based advice regarding the diagnosis and initiation of treatment for patients with HLH, rooted in improved understanding of its pathophysiology.

7 Guideline Prevention of Allergic Sensitization and Treatment of Cow's Milk Protein Allergy in Early Life: The Middle-East Step-Down Consensus. 2019

Vandenplas, Yvan / Al-Hussaini, Bakr / Al-Mannaei, Khaled / Al-Sunaid, Areej / Helmi Ayesh, Wafaa / El-Degeir, Manal / El-Kabbany, Nevine / Haddad, Joseph / Hashmi, Aziza / Kreishan, Furat / Tawfik, Eslam. ·KidZ Health Castle, UZ Brussel, Vrijne Unversiteit Brussel, 1090 Brussels, Belgium. yvan.vandenplas@uzbrussel.be. · Department of Paediatrics, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah 22252, Saudi Arabia. bakrhilal@yahoo.com. · Department of Paediatrics, Al Salam International Hospital, Dasma 35151, Kuwait. kmannai@hotmail.com. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, King Abdullah Specialized Children's Hospital, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia. sunaidar@ngha.med.sa. · Clinical Nutrition Department, Dubai Health Authority, PO Box 4545 Dubai, UAE. majdshahd@hotmail.com. · Department of Paediatrics, National Guard Hospital, Dammam 31412, Saudi Arabia. eldegeirma@ngha.med.sa. · Department of Paediatrics, Mediclinic Welcare Hospital, PO Box 31500 Dubai, UAE. vina_kab@yahoo.com. · Department of Paediatrics, Saint George Hospital University Medical Center, Balamand University, PO Box 166378 Beirut, Lebanon. profhadad@gmail.com. · Department of Clinical Nutrition Services, King Abdulaziz Medical City-Jeddah, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423, Saudi Arabia. ashi.a65@googlemail.com. · Department of Paediatrics, Alhakeem Furat Clinic, Amman 11942, Jordan. furatk@yahoo.com. · Department of Paediatrics, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, PO Box 51900 Abu Dhabi, UAE. elbaroudy75@yahoo.com. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #31248015.

ABSTRACT: Allergy risk has become a significant public health issue with increasing prevalence. Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for the first six months of life, but this recommendation is poorly adhered to in many parts of the world, including the Middle-East region, putting infants at risk of developing allergic sensitization and disorders. When breastfeeding is not possible or not adequate, a partially hydrolyzed whey formula (pHF-W) has shown proven benefits of preventing allergy, mainly atopic eczema, in children with a genetic risk. Therefore, besides stimulating breastfeeding, early identification of infants at risk for developing atopic disease and replacing commonly used formula based on intact cow milk protein (CMP) with a clinically proven pHF-W formula is of paramount importance for allergy prevention. If the child is affected by cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA), expert guidelines recommend extensively hydrolyzed formula (eHF), or an amino acid formula (AAF) in case of severe symptoms. The Middle-East region has a unique practice of utilizing pHF-W as a step-down between eHF or AAF and intact CMP, which could be of benefit. The region is very heterogeneous with different levels of clinical practice, and as allergic disorders may be seen by healthcare professionals of different specialties with different levels of expertise, there is a great variability in preventive and treatment approaches within the region itself. During a consensus meeting, a new approach was discussed and unanimously approved by all participants, introducing the use of pHF-W in the therapeutic management of CMPA. This novel approach could be of worldwide benefit.

8 Guideline Outpatient management and follow-up recommendations for adverse drug reactions: guidelines for posthospitalization care. 2019

Khanna, Rajan / Vaudreuil, Adam / Lake, Eden. ·Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois, USA. · Division of Dermatology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #31233575.

ABSTRACT: Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), each with their own set of characteristic symptoms and sequelae. Although guidelines for inpatient management of these conditions exist, guidelines for outpatient follow-up are lacking. Based on the existing literature, we propose guidelines for outpatient follow-up of AGEP, DRESS, and SJS/TEN.

9 Guideline European task force on atopic dermatitis position paper: treatment of parental atopic dermatitis during preconception, pregnancy and lactation period. 2019

Vestergaard, C / Wollenberg, A / Barbarot, S / Christen-Zaech, S / Deleuran, M / Spuls, P / Flohr, C / Trzeciak, M / von Kobyletzki, L / Seneschal, J / Paul, C / Bieber, T / Werfel, T / Fölster-Holst, R / Darsow, U / Gieler, U / Svensson, Å / Cork, M / Stalder, J-F / De Raeve, L / Kunz, B / Simon, D / Chernyshov, P / Hijnen, D / Gelmetti, C / Ring, J / Taieb, A / de Bruin-Weller, M / Thyssen, J P. ·Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, Germany. · Hautklinik Thalkirchner Straße, Staedtisches Klinikum Muenchen, Muenchen, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, CHU Nantes, Nantes, France. · Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Departments of Dermatology and Pediatrics, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · St. Johns Institute of Dermatology, Kings College and Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland. · Department of Dermatology, Lund University, Malmoe, Sweden. · Department of dermatology, INSERM, University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Dermatology, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse University, Toulouse, France. · Department of Dermatology and Allergology, and Christine Kühne-Center for Allergy Research and Education, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Department of Dermatology and Allergology Biederstein, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany. · Sheffield Dermatology Research, Department of Infection, Immunity & Cardiovascular Disease, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Department of Dermatology, UZ Brussel, Free University of Brussels (VUB), Brussels, Belgium. · Dermatologikum, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Dermatology, National Medical University, Kiev, Ukraine. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Pediatric Dermatology, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Milano, Italy. · Christiane-Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education (CK-Care), Davos, Switzerland. · Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #31231864.

ABSTRACT: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults, including a large number of adults of reproductive age. Several guidelines for the treatment of AD exist, yet specific recommendations for the treatment of pregnant or lactating women and for adults planning to have a child are often lacking. This position paper from the European Task force on Atopic Dermatitis (ETFAD) is based on up-to-date scientific literature on treating pregnant and lactating women as wells as adults with AD planning to have a child. It is based on the expert opinions of members of the ETFAD and on existing safety data on the proposed treatments, many of which are derived from patients with other inflammatory diseases or from transplantation medicine. For treating future parents, as well as pregnant and lactating women with AD, the use of topical treatments including moisturizers, topical corticosteroids, tacrolimus, antiseptics such as chlorhexidine, octenidine, potassium permanganate and sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is deemed to be safe. Ultraviolet (UV) therapy may also be used. Systemic treatment should be prescribed only after careful consideration. According to the opinion of the ETFAD, treatment should be restricted to systemic corticosteroids and cyclosporine A, and, in selected cases, azathioprine.

10 Guideline [GUIMIT 2019, Mexican Guideline on Immunotherapy. Guideline on the diagnosis of IgE-mediated allergic disease and immunotherapy following the ADAPTE approach]. 2019

Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée / Luna-Pech, Jorge A / Rodríguez-Pérez, Noel / Rodríguez-González, Mónica / Arias-Cruz, Alfredo / Blandón-Vijil, María Virginia / Costa-Domínguez, María Carmen / Del Río-Navarro, Blanca E / Estrada-Cardona, Alan / Navarrete-Rodríguez, Elsy Maureen / Ortega-Martell, José Antonio / Pozo-Beltrán, César Fireth / Brito-Díaz, Herson / Canseco-Raymundo, María Rosario / Castelán-Chávez, Enrique Emanuel / Domínguez-Silva, Margarita Gabriela / Escalante-Domínguez, Alberto José / Gálvez-Romero, José Luis / García-Reyes, María Guadalupe / Gómez-Vera, Javier / González-Díaz, Sandra Nora / Guerrero-Núñez, María Gracias Belinda / Hernández-Colín, Dante / Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra / Mendoza-Hernández, David Alejandro / Meneses-Sánchez, Néstor Alejandro / Mogica-Martínez, María Dolores / Moncayo-Coello, Carol Vivian / Montiel-Herrera, Manuel / O'Farril-Romanillos, Patricia / Onuma-Takane, Ernesto / Ortega-Cisneros, Margarita / Rangel-Garza, Lorena / Stone-Aguilar, Héctor / Torres-Lozano, Carlos / Venegas-Montoya, Edna / Wakida-Kusunoki, Guillermo / Macouzet-Sánchez, Carlos / Partida-Gaytán, Armando / López-García, Aída Inés / Macías-Robles, Ana Paola / Ambriz-Moreno, María Jesús / Azamar-Jácome, Amyra Ali / Báez-Loyola, Carlos / Beltrán-De Paz, Claudia Yusdivia / Caballero-López, Chrystopherson / Fernández de Córdova-Aguirre, Juan Carlos / Fernández-Soto, Roberto / Lozano-Sáenz, José Santos / Oyoqui-Flores, José Joel / Osorio-Escamilla, Roberto / Ramírez, Fernando / Rivero-Yeverino, Daniela / Orozco-Martínez, María Socorro / Rojo-Gutiérrez, María Isabel / Martínez, Eric / Medina-Ávalos, Miguel Alejandro. ·Fundación Clínica y Hospital Médica Sur, Ciudad de México. marlar1@prodigy.net.mx. ·Rev Alerg Mex · Pubmed #31200597.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In Mexico, allergen immunotherapy (AIT) and immunotherapy with hymenoptera venom (VIT) is traditionally practiced combining aspects of the European and American school. In addition, both types of extracts (European and American) are commercially available in Mexico. Moreover, for an adequate AIT/VIT a timely diagnosis is crucial. Therefore, there is a need for a widely accepted, up-to-date national immunotherapy guideline that covers diagnostic issues, indications, dosage, mechanisms, adverse effects and future expectations of AIT (GUIMIT 2019). METHOD: With nationwide groups of allergists participating, including delegates from postgraduate training-programs in Allergy/Immunology-forming, the guideline document was developed according to the ADAPTE methodology: the immunotherapy guidelines from European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology, The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology were selected as mother guidelines, as they received the highest AGREE-II score among international guidelines available; their evidence conforms the scientific basis for this document. RESULTS: GUIMIT emanates strong or weak (suggestions) recommendations about practical issues directly related to in vivo or in vitro diagnosis of IgE mediated allergic diseases and the preparation and application of AIT/VIT and its adverse effects. GUIMIT finishes with a perspective on AIT modalities for the future. All the statements were discussed and voted on until > 80 % consensus was reached. CONCLUSIONS: A wide and diverse group of AIT/VIT experts issued transculturized, evidence-based recommendations and reached consensus that might improve and standardize AIT practice in Mexico.

11 Guideline Consensus on the therapeutic management of atopic dermatitis - Brazilian Society of Dermatology. 2019

Aoki, Valeria / Lorenzini, Daniel / Orfali, Raquel Leão / Zaniboni, Mariana Colombini / Oliveira, Zilda Najjar Prado de / Rivitti-Machado, Maria Cecília / Takaoka, Roberto / Weber, Magda Blessmann / Cestari, Tania / Gontijo, Bernardo / Ramos, Andrea Machado Coelho / Silva, Claudia Marcia de Resende / Cestari, Silmara da Costa Pereira / Souto-Mayor, Silvia / Carneiro, Francisca Regina / Cerqueira, Ana Maria Mosca de / Laczynski, Cristina / Pires, Mario Cezar. ·Department of Dermatology, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Irmandade Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. · Medical Dermatology Residency Program, Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa, Hospital Sírio-Libanês, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Clinic of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Faculdade de Medicina da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Universidade do Estado do Pará, Belém, PA, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. · Dermatology Outpatient Clinic, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. ·An Bras Dermatol · Pubmed #31166406.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory and pruritic dermatosis with a multifactorial etiology, which includes skin barrier defects, immune dysfunction, and microbiome alterations. Atopic dermatitis is mediated by genetic, environmental, and psychological factors and requires therapeutic management that covers all the aspects of its complex pathogenesis. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this article is to present the experience, opinions, and recommendations of Brazilian dermatology experts regarding the therapeutic management of atopic dermatitis. METHODS: Eighteen experts from 10 university hospitals with experience in atopic dermatitis were appointed by the Brazilian Society of Dermatology to organize a consensus on the therapeutic management of atopic dermatitis. The 18 experts answered an online questionnaire with 14 questions related to the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Afterwards, they analyzed the recent international guidelines on atopic dermatitis of the American Academy of Dermatology, published in 2014, and of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, published in 2018. Consensus was defined as approval by at least 70% of the panel. RESULTS/CONCLUSION: The experts stated that the therapeutic management of atopic dermatitis is based on skin hydration, topical anti-inflammatory agents, avoidance of triggering factors, and educational programs. Systemic therapy, based on immunosuppressive agents, is only indicated for severe refractory disease and after failure of topical therapy. Early detection and treatment of secondary bacterial and viral infections is mandatory, and hospitalization may be needed to control atopic dermatitis flares. Novel target-oriented drugs such as immunobiologicals are invaluable therapeutic agents for atopic dermatitis.

12 Guideline Consensus on the diagnostic and therapeutic management of chronic spontaneous urticaria in adults - Brazilian Society of Dermatology. 2019

Criado, Paulo Ricardo / Maruta, Celina Wakisaka / Alchorne, Alice de Oliveira de Avelar / Ramos, Andréa Machado Coelho / Gontijo, Bernardo / Santos, Josemir Belo Dos / Martins, Luis Eduardo Agner Machado / Rivitti-Machado, Maria Cecília / Silvares, Maria Regina Cavariani / Pires, Mario Cezar / Souza, Patricia Karla de / Orfali, Raquel Leão / Bonamigo, Renan Rangel / Bedrikow, Roberta Buense / Criado, Roberta Fachini Jardim / Oliveira, Zilda Najjar Prado de. ·Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Department of Dermatology, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. · Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. · Centro de Ciências Médicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil. · Dermatology Service, Faculdade Evangélica de Curitiba, Curitiba, PR, Brazil. · Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Department of Dermatology and Radiotherapy, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP, Brasil. · Hospital Padre Bento de Guarulhos, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Urticaria Outpatient Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. · Dermatology Clinic, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. ·An Bras Dermatol · Pubmed #31166404.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Urticarias are frequent diseases, with 15% to 20% of the population presenting at least one acute episode in their lifetime. Urticaria are classified in acute ( ≤ 6 weeks) or chronic (> 6 weeks). They may be induced or spontaneous. OBJECTIVES: To verify the diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations in chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), according to the experience of Brazilian experts, regarding the available guidelines (international and US). METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to Brazilian experts, with questions concerning diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations for CSU in adults. RESULTS: Sixteen Brazilian experts answered the questionnaire related to diagnosis and therapy of CSU in adults and data were analyzed. Final text was written, considering the available guidelines (International and US), adapted to the medical practices in Brazil. Diagnostic work up in CSU is rarely necessary. Biopsy of skin lesion and histopathology may be indicated to rule out other diseases, such as, urticarial vasculitis. Other laboratory tests, such as complete blood count, CRP, ESR and thyroid screening. Treatment of CSU includes second-generation anti-histamines (sgAH) at licensed doses, sgAH two, three to fourfold doses (non-licensed) and omalizumab. Other drugs, such as, cyclosporine, immunomodulatory drugs and immunosuppressants may be indicated (non-licensed and with limited scientific evidence). CONCLUSIONS: Most of the Brazilian experts in this study partially agreed with the diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations of the International and US guidelines. They agreed with the use of sgAH at licensed doses. Increase in the dose to fourfold of sgAH may be suggested with restrictions, due to its non-licensed dose. Sedating anti-histamines, as suggested by the US guideline, are indicated by some of the Brazilian experts, due to its availability. Adaptations are mandatory in the treatment of CSU, due to scarce or lack of other therapeutic resources in the public health system in Brazil, such as omalizumab or cyclosporine.

13 Guideline Clinical Management of Cutaneous Adverse Events in Patients on Chemotherapy: A National Consensus Statement by the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology. 2019

Sanmartín, O / Beato, C / Suh-Oh, H Jin / Aragón, I / España, A / Majem, M / Segura, S / Gúrpide, A / Botella, R / Grávalos, C. ·Servicio de Dermatología, Instituto Valenciano de Oncología, Valencia, España. · Departamento de Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, España. · Servicio de Dermatología, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Pontevedra, Pontevedra, España. · Departamento de Oncología Médica, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Huelva, Huelva, España. · Servicio de Dermatología, Clínica Universitaria de Navarra, Pamplona, España. · Departamento de Oncología Médica, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, España. · Departamento de Oncología Médica, Clínica Universitaria de Navarra, Pamplona, España. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, España. Electronic address: rbotellaes@gmail.com. · Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Madrid, España. ·Actas Dermosifiliogr · Pubmed #31010573.

ABSTRACT: Although the arrival of new chemotherapy drugs and combinations has brought progress in terms of cancer patient survival, they entail many adverse effects that can compromise treatment, and hence prognosis, of the disease. Cytostatic agents can cause dermatological toxicity, among other side effects. The most familiar adverse effect of chemotherapy is alopecia. Although not serious, this changes the outward appearance of cancer patients. Other adverse effects include hypersensitivity and photosensitivity reactions, hand-foot syndrome, epidermal necrolysis, recall reactions, scleroderma-like reactions, Raynaud's phenomenon, eccrine squamous syringometaplasia, neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis, nail abnormalities, pigmentation changes and extravasation injuries. Onset of these adverse effects often causes dose reduction and/or delayed treatment, which can affect patient survival and quality of life. It is therefore important to prevent their occurrence and treat them promptly, which requires cooperation between medical oncologists and dermatologists. This article reviews chemotherapy-associated dermatological toxicity, along with its diagnosis and therapeutic management.

14 Guideline European consensus-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of immunoglobulin A vasculitis-the SHARE initiative. 2019

Ozen, Seza / Marks, Stephen D / Brogan, Paul / Groot, Noortje / de Graeff, Nienke / Avcin, Tadej / Bader-Meunier, Brigitte / Dolezalova, Pavla / Feldman, Brian M / Kone-Paut, Isabelle / Lahdenne, Pekka / McCann, Liza / Pilkington, Clarissa / Ravelli, Angelo / van Royen, Annet / Uziel, Yosef / Vastert, Bas / Wulffraat, Nico / Kamphuis, Sylvia / Beresford, Michael W. ·Department of Paediatrics, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. · Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, University College London Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK. · Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center, Utrecht. · Sophia Children's Hospital, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, University Children's Hospital Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Necker Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · General University Hospital and 1 Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, Bicêtre University Hospital, Paris, France. · Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Gaslini Children's Hospital, Genoa, Italy. · Meir Medical Centre, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool and Alder Hey children's NHS Foundation Trust, Members of Liverpool Health Partners, Liverpool, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #30879080.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: IgA vasculitis (IgAV, formerly known as Henoch-Schönlein purpura) is the most common cause of systemic vasculitis in childhood. To date, there are no internationally agreed, evidence-based guidelines concerning the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of IgAV in children. Accordingly, treatment regimens differ widely. The European initiative SHARE (Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe) aims to optimize care for children with rheumatic diseases. The aim therefore was to provide internationally agreed consensus recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for children with IgAV. METHODS: Recommendations were developed by a consensus process in accordance with the EULAR standard operating procedures. An extensive systematic literature review was performed, and evidence-based recommendations were extrapolated from the included papers. These were evaluated by a panel of 16 international experts via online surveys and subsequent consensus meeting, using nominal group technique. Recommendations were accepted when ⩾80% of experts agreed. RESULTS: In total, 7 recommendations for diagnosis and 19 for treatment of paediatric IgAV were accepted. Diagnostic recommendations included: appropriate use of skin and renal biopsy, renal work-up and imaging. Treatment recommendations included: the importance of appropriate analgesia and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use and non-renal indications for CS use, as well as a structured approach to treating IgAV nephritis, including appropriate use of CS and second-line agents in mild, moderate and severe disease along with use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and maintenance therapy. CONCLUSION: The SHARE initiative provides international, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of IgAV that will facilitate improvement and uniformity of care.

15 Guideline [How I explore... a suspicion of paracetamol allergy in children]. 2019

Thimmesch, M / Sciacca, M / Gadisseur, R / El Abd, K. ·Service de Pneumo-Allergologie pédiatrique, CHC Clinique de l'Espérance, Montegnée, Belgique. · Pneumo-Allergologie adulte, CHC Clinique de l'Espérance, Montegnée, Belgique. · Département de Chimie clinique, CHU Liège, Belgique. ·Rev Med Liege · Pubmed #30793564.

ABSTRACT: Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is a molecule recognized worldwide for its anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. While side effects are rare, some patients have allergic or non-allergic hypersensitivity to this molecule. Anamnesis helps to guide the diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity of the specific IgE assay for paracetamol, skin tests and other in vitro challenge tests have been poorly studied. The oral provocation test remains the gold standard to confirm the diagnosis. In case of confirmed hypersensitivity to paracetamol, it is important to search for an alternative treatment. In this article, we describe a clinical case and its management.

16 Guideline Italian Guidelines in Patch Testing - adapted from the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD). 2019

Stingeni, Luca / Bianchi, Leonardo / Hansel, Katharina / Corazza, Monica / Gallo, Rosella / Guarneri, Fabrizio / Patruno, Cataldo / Rigano, Luigi / Romita, Paolo / Pigatto, Paolo D / Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo / Anonymous2200978. ·Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy - luca.stingeni@unipg.it. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. · Section of Dermatology and Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · Dermatologic Clinic, Department of Health Sciences (DiSSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Health Sciences, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro, Italy. · R&D Department, Institute of Skin and Product Evaluation, Milan, Italy. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Biomedical Science and Human Oncology, University of Bari, Bari, Italy. · Unit of Clinical Dermatology, Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopaedic Institute, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Dermatologic Clinic, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #30717577.

ABSTRACT: Patch testing is the standard procedure used to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis. It is an in-vivo test, which reproduces the reaction to a contact allergen. This in-vivo test aims to reproduce the elicitation phase of allergic contact dermatitis and is performed applying allergens under occlusion on the skin under standardized conditions. These guidelines for the best practice in performing patch test have been developed by an Italian group of experts taking in account the Italian legislation and local pharmacological governance. Guidelines are adapted from the original article under the guidance of the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD) and on the basis of the SIDAPA guidelines.

17 Guideline [Non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy: Consensus document of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (SEGHNP), the Spanish Association of Paediatric Primary Care (AEPAP), the Spanish Society of Extra-hospital Paediatrics and Primary Health Care (SEPEAP), and the Spanish Society of Paediatric ClinicaL Immunology, Allergy, and Asthma (SEICAP)]. 2019

Espín Jaime, Beatriz / Díaz Martín, Juan J / Blesa Baviera, Luis Carlos / Claver Monzón, Ángela / Hernández Hernández, Anselmo / García Burriel, José Ignacio / Mérida, María José García / Pinto Fernández, Celia / Coronel Rodríguez, Cristóbal / Román Riechmann, Enriqueta / Ribes Koninckx, Carmen. ·Unidad de Gastroenterología, Hepatología y Nutrición Pediátrica, Unidad de Gestión Clínica de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario Infantil Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, España. Electronic address: espinj@arrakis.es. · Sección de Gastroenterología, Hepatología y Nutrición Pediátrica, Área de Gestión Clínica de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, España. · Pediatría, Centro de Salud Valencia Serrería II, Valencia, España. · Alergia Dexeus, Hospital Universitario Quirón Dexeus, Barcelona, España. · Pediatría, Centro de Salud de Tacoronte, Tacoronte, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España. · Unidad de Gastroenterología, Hepatología y Nutrición Pediátrica, Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Álvaro Cunqueiro, Vigo, Pontevedra, España. · Pediatría, Centro de Salud de Tejina, San Cristobal de la Laguna, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España. · Alergia Pediátrica, Hospital Vithas Nisa Pardo de Aravaca, Madrid, España. · Pediatra EBAP, Centro de Salud Amante Laffon, Sevilla, España. · Unidad de Gastroenterología y Nutrición, Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro-Majadahonda, Madrid, España. · Sección de Gastroenterología, Hepatología y Nutrición Pediátrica, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, España. ·An Pediatr (Barc) · Pubmed #30665859.

ABSTRACT: Non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy is a frequent disorder in paediatrics. As patients might be seen by professionals from different specialties and levels of expertise, a great variability in diagnostic procedures and disease monitoring is commonly observed. Therefore, four scientific societies involved in its management have developed a consensus document providing specific recommendations related to its prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow up.

18 Guideline None 2019

Bouillet, Laurence / Defendi, Frederica / Hardy, Gaelle / Cesbron, Jean Yves / Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle / Deroux, Alban / Mansard, Catherine / Launay, David / Gompel, Anne / Floccard, Bernard / Jaussaud, Roland / Beaudouin, Etienne / Armengol, Guillaume / Olliver, Yann / Gayet, Stephane / Du Than, Aureli / Sailler, Laurent / Guez, Stephane / Sarrat, Anne / Sorin, Lucile / de Moreuil, Claire / Pelletier, Fabien / Javaud, Nicolas / Marmion, Nicolas / Fain, Olivier / Fauré, Julien / Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal. ·Université Grenoble Alpes (UGA), service de médecine interne, CHUGA, unité Inserm 1036, Grenoble, France; Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France. Electronic address: lbouillet@chu-grenoble.fr. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Service d'immunologie, CHUGA, 38043 Grenoble, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Laboratoire de biochimie génétique et moléculaire, CHUGA, 38043 Grenoble, France. · Université Grenoble Alpes (UGA), service de médecine interne, CHUGA, unité Inserm 1036, Grenoble, France; Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Lille, université de Lille, département de médecine interne et immunologie clinique, European Reference Network on Rare Connective Tissue and Musculoskeletal Diseases Network (ReCONNET), 59000 Lille, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Université Paris Descartes, hôpitaux universitaires Cochin, hôtel-dieu Broca, Inserm U 1007, 75014 Paris, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Hôpital Edouard-Herriot, hospices civils de Lyon, département d'anesthésie-réanimation, 69000 Lyon, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHRU de Nancy et université de Lorraine, département de médecine interne immunologie clinique, 54035 Nancy, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CH Emile Durkheim, service d'allergologie, 88021 Epinal, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Rouen, service de médecine interne, 76000 Rouen, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Caen, service d'allergologie, pôle médecine de spécialité, 14033 Caen, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Hôpital de la Timone, service de médecine interne, Marseille, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Montpellier, université Montpellier, service de dermatologie, 13005 Montpellier, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Toulouse, service de médecine interne, Toulouse université, 34090 Toulouse, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Bordeaux-GH Pellegrin, service de médecine interne et post-urgences, 31059 Bordeaux, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Bordeaux, laboratoire d'immunologie et immunogénétique, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Centre hospitalier de Niort, service de médecine interne, 79000 Niort, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Brest, service de médecine interne, GETBO - EA3878, 29200 Brest, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Université de Franche-Comté, CHU de Besançon, unité de dermatologie-allergologie, Inserm 1098, 25030 Besançon, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; AP-HP, Urgences, université Paris 7, hôpital Louis-Mourier, 92700 Colombes, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Saint Pierre, médecine polyvalente Saint Louis, 97448 Saint Pierre, Réunion. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; AP-HP, Sorbonne Université, hôpital Saint-Antoine, hôpitaux universitaires de l'Est Parisien, service de médecine interne, 75012 Paris, France. ·Presse Med · Pubmed #30416009.

ABSTRACT: Bradykinin mediated angioedema (BK-AE) can be associated either with C1Inhibitor deficiency (hereditary and acquired forms), either with normal C1Inh (hereditary form and drug induced AE as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors…). In case of high clinical suspicion of BK-AE, C1Inh exploration must be done at first: C1Inh function and antigenemy as well as C4 concentration. C1Inh deficiency is significant if the tests are below 50 % of the normal values and controlled a second time. In case of C1Inh deficiency, you have to identify hereditary from acquired forms. C1q and anti-C1Inh antibody tests are useful for acquired BK-AE. SERPING1 gene screening must be done if a hereditary angioedema is suspected, even if there is no family context (de novo mutation 15 %). If a hereditary BK-AE with normal C1Inh is suspected, F12 and PLG gene screening is suitable.

19 Guideline Recommendations of the working group of the Anatomische Gesellschaft on reduction of formaldehyde exposure in anatomical curricula and institutes. 2019

Waschke, Jens / Bergmann, Martin / Bräuer, Lars / Brenner, Erich / Buchhorn, Andreas / Deutsch, Arlette / Dokter, Martin / Egu, Desalegn Tadesse / Ergün, Süleyman / Fassnacht, Ulrich / Fietz, Daniela / Gundlach, Stefanie / Heermann, Stephan / Hirt, Bernhard / Kugelmann, Daniela / Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena / Neiss, Wolfram / Nimtschke, Ute / Plendl, Johanna / Pretterklieber, Michael / Redies, Christoph / Scaal, Martin / Schmidt, Mirko H H / Schmiedl, Andreas / Schnittler, Hans-Joachim / Schomerus, Christof / Sebestény, Tamás / Spittau, Björn / Steiniger, Birte / Tschernig, Thomas / Unverzagt, Axel / Viebahn, Christoph / Voigt, Ernst / Weigner, Janet / Weyers, Imke / Winkelmann, Andreas / Winkler, Merle / Paulsen, Friedrich. ·Institute of Anatomy, Chair of Vegetative Anatomy, Medical Faculty, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: jens.waschke@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. · Institute for Functional and Clinical Anatomy, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Division of Clinical and Functional Anatomy, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Institute for Functional and Applied Anatomy, Medical University of Hanover, Hanover, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy, Chair of Vegetative Anatomy, Medical Faculty, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany. · Christian Albrecht University, Anatomical Institute, Kiel, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Department of Molecular Embryology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Anatomical Institute, Eberhard Karl University, Tübingen, Germany. · Anatomical Institute, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Institute of Anatomy I, Universität zu Köln, Cologne, Germany. · Institute for Anatomy of the C.G. Carus Medical Faculty of TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Division of Anatomy, Centre for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy I, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy II, Universität zu Köln, Cologne, Germany. · Institute for Microscopical Anatomy and Neurobiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy, University Clinics of Westphalian Wilhelm University of Münster, Münster, Germany. · Dr. Senckenberg Anatomy, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt, Main, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy, Medical University of Rostock AöR, Rostock, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Philipps University, Marburg, Lahn, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Saarland, Homburg, Saar, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy and Embryology, Center of Anatomy, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany. · Institute of Anatomy, Brandenburg Medical School, Neuruppin, Germany. · Institute for Functional and Clinical Anatomy, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: friedrich.paulsen@fau.de. ·Ann Anat · Pubmed #30393181.

ABSTRACT: The practice of human and veterinary medicine is based on the science of anatomy and dissection courses are still irreplaceable in the teaching of anatomy. Embalming is required to preserve body donors, for which process formaldehyde (FA) is the most frequently used and well characterized biocidal substance. Since January 2016, a new occupational exposure limit (OEL) for FA of 0.37mg/m

20 Guideline Diagnosis and management of NSAID-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease (N-ERD)-a EAACI position paper. 2019

Kowalski, Marek L / Agache, Ioana / Bavbek, Sevim / Bakirtas, Arzu / Blanca, Miguel / Bochenek, Grażyna / Bonini, Matteo / Heffler, Enrico / Klimek, Ludger / Laidlaw, Tanya M / Mullol, Joaquim / Niżankowska-Mogilnicka, Ewa / Park, Hae-Sim / Sanak, Marek / Sanchez-Borges, Mario / Sanchez-Garcia, Silvia / Scadding, Glenis / Taniguchi, Masami / Torres, Maria J / White, Andrew A / Wardzyńska, Aleksandra. ·Department of Immunology and Allergy, Medical University, Lodz, Poland. · Medical School Brasov, Transylvania University, Brasov, Romania. · Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Chest Diseases, School of Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey. · Department Pediatric Allergy and Asthma, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey. · Allergy Service Hospital Infanta Leonor, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Internal Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland. · National Heart and Lung Institute, Royal Brompton Hospital & Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, Personalized Medicine, Asthma and Allergy Clinic, Humanitas University, Milano, Italy. · Center for Rhinology and Allergology, Wiesbaden, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Rhinology Unit & Smell Clinic, ENT Department, Hospital Clínic, Clinical & Experimental Respiratory Immunoallergy, IDIBAPS, and CIBERES, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea. · Division of Molecular Biology and Clinical Genetics, Department of Internal Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland. · Allergy and Clinical Immunology Department, Centro Medico-Docente La Trinidad, Caracas, Venezuela. · Allergy Department, Hospital Infantil Universitario Niño Jesús, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Allergy & Rhinology, Royal National TNE Hospital, London, UK. · Clinical Research Center for Allergy and Rheumatology, Sagamihara National Hospital, Sagamihara, Japan. · Allergy Unit, Malaga Regional University Hospital-IBIMA, ARADyAL, Málaga, Spain. · Department of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California. ·Allergy · Pubmed #30216468.

ABSTRACT: NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease (N-ERD) is a chronic eosinophilic, inflammatory disorder of the respiratory tract occurring in patients with asthma and/or chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP), symptoms of which are exacerbated by NSAIDs, including aspirin. Despite some progress in understanding of the pathophysiology of the syndrome, which affects 1/10 of patients with asthma and rhinosinusitis, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. In order to provide evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of N-ERD, a panel of international experts was called by the EAACI Asthma Section. The document summarizes current knowledge on the pathophysiology and clinical presentation of N-ERD pointing at significant heterogeneity of this syndrome. Critically evaluating the usefulness of diagnostic tools available, the paper offers practical algorithm for the diagnosis of N-ERD. Recommendations for the most effective management of a patient with N-ERD stressing the potential high morbidity and severity of the underlying asthma and rhinosinusitis are discussed and proposed. Newly described sub-phenotypes and emerging sub-endotypes of N-ERD are potentially relevant for new and more specific (eg, biological) treatment modalities. Finally, the document defines major gaps in our knowledge on N-ERD and unmet needs, which should be addressed in the future.

21 Guideline EAACI position paper on how to classify cutaneous manifestations of drug hypersensitivity. 2019

Brockow, Knut / Ardern-Jones, Michael R / Mockenhaupt, Maja / Aberer, Werner / Barbaud, Annick / Caubet, Jean-Christoph / Spiewak, Radoslaw / Torres, María José / Mortz, Charlotte G. ·Department of Dermatology und Allergology Biederstein, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Southampton General Hospital, University Hospitals Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Department of Dermatoimmunology, Sir Henry Wellcome Laboratories, Clinical, Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · "Dokumentationszentrum schwerer Hautreaktionen" (dZh), Department of Dermatology, Medical Center and Medical Faculty, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Tenon Hospital (AP-HP), Sorbonne Universities, Pierre et Marie Curie University, Paris 6, France. · Pediatric Allergology Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Experimental Dermatology and Cosmetology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland. · Allergy Unit, IBIMA- Regional University Hospital of Malaga-UMA, Aradyal, Malaga, Spain. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy Center, Odense Research Center for Anaphylaxis (ORCA), Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. ·Allergy · Pubmed #30028512.

ABSTRACT: Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are common, and the skin is by far the most frequently involved organ with a broad spectrum of reaction types. The diagnosis of cutaneous DHRs (CDHR) may be difficult because of multiple differential diagnoses. A correct classification is important for the correct diagnosis and management. With these guidelines, we aim to give precise definitions and provide the background needed for doctors to correctly classify CDHR.

22 Guideline Systemic Mastocytosis, Version 2.2019, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2018

Gotlib, Jason / Gerds, Aaron T / Bose, Prithviraj / Castells, Mariana C / Deininger, Michael W / Gojo, Ivana / Gundabolu, Krishna / Hobbs, Gabriela / Jamieson, Catriona / McMahon, Brandon / Mohan, Sanjay R / Oehler, Vivian / Oh, Stephen / Padron, Eric / Pancari, Philip / Papadantonakis, Nikolaos / Pardanani, Animesh / Podoltsev, Nikolai / Rampal, Raajit / Ranheim, Erik / Rein, Lindsay / Snyder, David S / Stein, Brady L / Talpaz, Moshe / Thota, Swapna / Wadleigh, Martha / Walsh, Katherine / Bergman, Mary Anne / Sundar, Hema. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #30545997.

ABSTRACT: Mastocytosis is a group of heterogeneous disorders resulting from the clonal proliferation of abnormal mast cells and their accumulation in the skin and/or in various extracutaneous organs. Systemic mastocytosis is the most common form of mastocytosis diagnosed in adults, characterized by mast cell infiltration of one or more extracutaneous organs (with or without skin involvement). The identification of KIT D816V mutation and the emergence of novel targeted therapies have significantly improved the diagnosis and treatment of systemic mastocytosis. However, certain aspects of clinical care, particularly the diagnosis, assessment, and management of mediator-related symptoms continue to present challenges. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with systemic mastocytosis.

23 Guideline [JAPANESE GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF URTICARIA 2018]. 2018

Hide, Michihiro. ·Department of Dermatology, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University. ·Arerugi · Pubmed #30541974.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline [GUIDELINES FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS 2018]. 2018

Anonymous3780972. · ·Arerugi · Pubmed #30541970.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Recommendations for photopatch testing by the Photopatch Test Working Group of the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group (DKG). 2018

Geier, Johannes / Bauer, Andrea / Becker, Detlef / Brehler, Randolf / Breit, Reinhard / Dickel, Heinrich / Hofmann, Silke / Kapp, Alexander / Lehmann, Percy / Mahler, Vera / Molin, Sonja. ·Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK), Institute at Göttingen University Medical Center, Göttingen, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University Allergy Center, Carl Gustav Carus University Medical Center, Dresden Technical University, Dresden, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Mainz University Medical Center, Mainz, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Münster University Medical Center, Münster, Germany. · Pullach. · Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, Ruhr University Medical Center, Bochum, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Allergology and Dermatosurgery, HELIOS Medical Center of Witten/Herdecke University, Wuppertal, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Allergology und Venereology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · Department of Allergology, Paul Ehrlich Institute, Langen, Germany. · Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany. ·J Dtsch Dermatol Ges · Pubmed #30395399.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

Next