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Hypertension HELP
Based on 59,668 articles since 2006
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These are the 59668 published articles about Hypertension that originated from Worldwide during 2006-2015.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Screening for high blood pressure in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. 2015

Siu, Albert L / Anonymous2750959. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #26458123.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2007 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) reaffirmation recommendation statement on screening for high blood pressure in adults. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the diagnostic accuracy of different methods for confirming a diagnosis of hypertension after initial screening and the optimal rescreening interval for diagnosing hypertension. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to adults aged 18 years or older without known hypertension. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF recommends screening for high blood pressure in adults aged 18 years or older. (A recommendation) The USPSTF recommends obtaining measurements outside of the clinical setting for diagnostic confirmation before starting treatment.

2 Guideline [Update on Current Care Guideline: Diabetic retinopathy]. 2015

Summanen, Paula / Kallioniemi, Vuokko / Komulainen, Jorma / Eriksson, Lars / Forsvik, Heikki / Hietala, Kustaa / Tulokas, Sirkku / Von Wendt, Gunvor / Anonymous2060811. · ·Duodecim · Pubmed #26237887.

ABSTRACT: Good treatment of diabetes decreases the risk of diabetic retinopathy. The goals of the treatment are adequate glucose balance, blood pressure and prevention of metabolic syndrome. Every patient with diabetes should regularly be screened for diabetic retinopathy. Timely and efficient treatment of retinopathy significantly decreases the risk of visual impairment.

3 Guideline [PERIOPERATIVE CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH UNDERLYING ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION (CLINICAL GUIDELINES)]. 2015

Anonymous2620810 / Zabolotskikh, I B / Lebedinskii, K M / Grigor'ev, E V / Grigor'ev, S V / Gritsan, A I / Likhvantsev, V V / Mizikov, V M / Potievskaia, V I / Rudnov, V A / Subbotin, V V. · ·Anesteziol Reanimatol · Pubmed #26148370.

ABSTRACT: These clinical guidelines apply to the implementation of health care for all patients with concomitant hypertension in the perioperative period in a hospital. The guidelines specify the method of stratifying the risk of perioperative cardiac complications. We described methods for the treatment of urgent conditions with hypertension and hypertensive crises and identified the main features of the preoperative evaluation and preparation of patients with concomitant hypertension. The clinical guidelines contain recommendations on the management of intra- and postoperative period

4 Guideline [Turkish Hypertension Consensus Report]. 2015

Arıcı, Mustafa / Birdane, Alparslan / Güler, Kerim / Yıldız, Bülent Okan / Altun, Bülent / Ertürk, Şehsuvar / Aydoğdu, Sinan / Özbakkaloğlu, Mert / Ersöz, Halil Önder / Süleymanlar, Gültekin / Tükek, Tufan / Tokgözoğlu, Lale / Erdem, Yunus / Anonymous2570810 / Anonymous2580810 / Anonymous2590810 / Anonymous2600810 / Anonymous2610810. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. marici@hacettepe.edu.tr. · Department of Cardiology, Osmangazi University Faculty of Medicine, Eskişehir, Turkey. · Department of Internal Medicine, İstanbul University, İstanbul Faculty of Medicine, İstanbul, Turkey. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara. · Department of Cardiology, Türkiye Yüksek İhtisas Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. · Turkey Internal Medicine Specialists Association, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine, Trabzon, Turkey. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine, Antalya, Turkey. · Department of Cardiology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · ·Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars · Pubmed #26142798.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is a common and important public health problem in Turkey and worldwide. Recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension have been presented in many nationally and internationally agreed European and American guidelines. However, there are differences among these guidelines, and some of the recommendations are not consistent with clinical practice in our country. Consensus report preparation, with the participation of relevant associations, was considered necessary to merge recommendations by evaluating hypertension guidelines from the perspective of Turkey and to create a joint approach in the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in adults. For this purpose, it was aimed to prepare a practical text in Turkey in which all physicians dealing with hypertensive patients, from family practitioners in primary care to specialists in tertiary care, could come to agreement on common concepts, and which would be used as a basic reference guideline. Considering health care practices and sociocultural structure in Turkey, this report aimed to enhance awareness on hypertension, provide a common basis for different definitions and values as well as therapeutic options in various guidelines, and establish a practical reference guide to improve clinical practices in Turkey. This report is not a document describing hypertension in every aspect, but a reference, including basic recommendations with outlines. Care was taken to ensure that recommendations were evidence-based and valid for a majority of patients in clinical practice. However, it should be kept in mind that an approach assessment should be made on an individual basis for each patient.

5 Guideline Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary artery disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. 2015

Rosendorff, Clive / Lackland, Daniel T / Allison, Matthew / Aronow, Wilbert S / Black, Henry R / Blumenthal, Roger S / Cannon, Christopher P / de Lemos, James A / Elliott, William J / Findeiss, Laura / Gersh, Bernard J / Gore, Joel M / Levy, Daniel / Long, Janet B / O'Connor, Christopher M / O'Gara, Patrick T / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Oparil, Suzanne / White, William B / Anonymous3850808. · ·Circulation · Pubmed #25829340.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Hypertension in african americans aged 60 to 79 years: statement from the international society of hypertension in blacks. 2015

Egan, Brent M / Bland, Veita J / Brown, Angela L / Ferdinand, Keith C / Hernandez, German T / Jamerson, Kenneth A / Johnson, Wallace R / Kountz, David S / Li, Jiexiang / Osei, Kwame / Reed, James W / Saunders, Elijah. ·Board of Trustees, International Society of Hypertension in Blacks (ISHIB), Arlington, VA; Care Coordination Institute, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Greenville, SC. · ·J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) · Pubmed #25756743.

ABSTRACT: A 2014 hypertension guideline raised goal systolic blood pressure (SBP) from <140 mm Hg to <150 mm Hg for adults 60 years and older without diabetes mellitus (DM) or chronic kidney disease (CKD). The authors aimed to define the status of hypertension in black adults 60 to 79 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2012 and provide practical guidance. Black patients were more often aware and treated (P≤.005) for hypertension than whites and had higher rates of DM/CKD (P<.001), similar control to <140/<90 mm Hg with DM/CKD (P=.59), and lower control without DM/CKD (<140/<90 mm Hg and <150/<90 mm Hg, P≤.01). Limited awareness (<30%) and infrequent health care (>30% 0-1 health-care visits per year) occurred in untreated black and white hypertensive patients without DM/CKD and BP ≥140/<90 mm Hg. The literature suggests benefits of treated SBP <140 mm Hg in adults 60 to 79 years without DM/CKD. The International Society of Hypertension in Blacks recommends: (1) continuing efforts to achieve BP <140/<90 mm Hg in those with DM/CK, and (2) identifying hypertensive patients without DM/CKD and BP ≥140/<90 mm Hg and treat to an SBP <140 mm Hg in black adults 60-79 years.

7 Guideline [With evidence the recommendation level also increases]. 2015

Aumiller, Jochen / Anonymous5710805. ·, Rabenkopfstr. 9, D-81545, München, Deutschland, jochen@aumiller.org. · ·MMW Fortschr Med · Pubmed #25743986.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline Committee Opinion No. 623: Emergent therapy for acute-onset, severe hypertension during pregnancy and the postpartum period. 2015

Anonymous1320803. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #25611642.

ABSTRACT: Acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both can occur in pregnant women or women in the postpartum period. Introducing standardized, evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of adverse maternal outcomes. Individuals and institutions should have mechanisms in place to initiate the prompt administration of medication when a patient presents with a hypertensive emergency. Once the hypertensive emergency is treated, a complete and detailed evaluation of maternal and fetal well-being is needed with consideration of, among many issues, the need for subsequent pharmacotherapy and the appropriate timing of delivery.

9 Guideline (11) Children and adolescents. 2015

Anonymous3940801. · ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #25537712.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline (8) Cardiovascular disease and risk management. 2015

Anonymous3900801. · ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #25537708.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline Joint UK societies' 2014 consensus statement on renal denervation for resistant hypertension. 2015

Lobo, Melvin D / de Belder, Mark A / Cleveland, Trevor / Collier, David / Dasgupta, Indranil / Deanfield, John / Kapil, Vikas / Knight, Charles / Matson, Matthew / Moss, Jonathan / Paton, Julian F R / Poulter, Neil / Simpson, Iain / Williams, Bryan / Caulfield, Mark J / Anonymous2290988 / Anonymous2300988 / Anonymous2310988 / Anonymous2320988. ·On behalf of the British Hypertension Society Barts NIHR Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · The British Cardiovascular Society The British Cardiovascular Intervention Society Cardiothoracic Division, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, UK. · The British Society for Interventional Radiology Sheffield Vascular Institute, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHSFT, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, UK. · On behalf of the British Hypertension Society Barts NIHR Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · The Renal Association Department of Renal Medicine, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Cardiothoracic Division, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, UK The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK The British Cardiovascular Society. · The British Society for Interventional Radiology Barts NIHR Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · The British Society for Interventional Radiology Interventional Radiology Unit, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow, UK. · On behalf of the British Hypertension Society School of Physiology & Pharmacology, Bristol Cardiovascular Medical Sciences Building, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. · On behalf of the British Hypertension Society International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College, London, UK. · The British Cardiovascular Society Wessex Regional Cardiac Unit, University Hospital Southampton, UK. · On behalf of the British Hypertension Society Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University College London, London, UK. · ·Heart · Pubmed #25431461.

ABSTRACT: Resistant hypertension continues to pose a major challenge to clinicians worldwide and has serious implications for patients who are at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with this diagnosis. Pharmacological therapy for resistant hypertension follows guidelines-based regimens although there is surprisingly scant evidence for beneficial outcomes using additional drug treatment after three antihypertensives have failed to achieve target blood pressure. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of endoluminal renal denervation as an interventional technique to achieve renal nerve ablation and lower blood pressure. Although initial clinical trials of renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension demonstrated encouraging office blood pressure reduction, a large randomised control trial (Symplicity HTN-3) with a sham-control limb, failed to meet its primary efficacy end point. The trial however was subject to a number of flaws which must be taken into consideration in interpreting the final results. Moreover a substantial body of evidence from non-randomised smaller trials does suggest that renal denervation may have an important role in the management of hypertension and other disease states characterised by overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system. The Joint UK Societies does not recommend the use of renal denervation for treatment of resistant hypertension in routine clinical practice but remains committed to supporting research activity in this field. A number of research strategies are identified and much that can be improved upon to ensure better design and conduct of future randomised studies.

12 Guideline The SOMANZ Guidelines for the Management of Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy 2014. 2015

Lowe, Sandra A / Bowyer, Lucy / Lust, Karin / McMahon, Lawrence P / Morton, Mark R / North, Robyn A / Paech, Michael J / Said, Joanne M / Anonymous1070824. · ·Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol · Pubmed #25308532.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline [The new EU and US hypertension guidelines. Implication for practice]. 2014

Zidek, Walter / Anonymous920799. · ·MMW Fortschr Med · Pubmed #25543371.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline [Management of resistant hypertension. Expert consensus statement from the French Society of Hypertension, an affiliate of the French Society of Cardiology]. 2014

Denolle, Thierry / Chamontin, Bernard / Doll, Gérard / Fauvel, Jean-Pierre / Girerd, Xavier / Herpin, Daniel / Vaïsse, Bernard / Villeneuve, Frédéric / Halimi, Jean-Michel. ·Société française d'hypertension artérielle, 75012 Paris, France. Electronic address: denolle.thierry@wanadoo.fr. · Société française d'hypertension artérielle, 75012 Paris, France. ·Presse Med · Pubmed #25459067.

ABSTRACT: To improve the management of resistant hypertension, the French Society of Hypertension, an affiliate of the French Society of Cardiology, has published a set of eleven recommendations. The primary objective is to provide the most up-to-date information, based on the strongest scientific rationale and which is easily applicable to daily clinical practice for health professionals working within the French health system. Resistant hypertension is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) both on office measurements and confirmed by out-of-office measurements despite a therapeutic strategy comprising appropriate lifestyle and dietary measures and the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents including a thiazide diuretic, a renin-angiotensin system blocker (ARB or ACEI) and a calcium channel blocker, for at least four weeks, at optimal doses. Treatment compliance must be closely monitored, as most factors that are likely to affect treatment resistance (excessive dietary salt intake, alcohol, depression and drug interactions, or vasopressors). If the diagnosis of resistant hypertension is confirmed, the patient should be referred to a hypertension specialist to screen for potential target organ damage and secondary causes of hypertension. The recommended treatment regimen is a combination therapy comprising four treatment classes, including spironolactone (12.5 to 25mg/day). In the event of a contraindication or a non-response to spironolactone, or if adverse effects occur, a β-blocker, an α-blocker, or a centrally acting antihypertensive drug should be prescribed. Because renal denervation is still undergoing assessment for the treatment of hypertension, this technique should only be prescribed by a specialist hypertension clinic.

15 Guideline Identification, assessment, and management of overweight and obesity: summary of updated NICE guidance. 2014

Stegenga, Heather / Haines, Alexander / Jones, Katie / Wilding, John / Anonymous280797. ·National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London, UK. · National Clinical Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians of London, London NW1 4LE, UK Alexander.Haines@rcplondon.ac.uk. · National Clinical Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians of London, London NW1 4LE, UK. · University of Liverpool and University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, UK. · ·BMJ · Pubmed #25430558.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline [New ESH/ESC guidelines on arterial hypertension : what is new and what indications remain for renal denervation?]. 2014

Groha, P / Kufner, S / Ott, I / Schunkert, H / Anonymous1340798 / Anonymous1350798. ·Klinik für Herz- und Kreislauferkrankungen, Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Lazarettstr. 36, 80636, München, Deutschland, groha@dhm.mhn.de. · ·Herz · Pubmed #25384853.

ABSTRACT: Arterial hypertension is one of the most common diseases in the western world and one of the most important risk factors for other cardiovascular diseases. Despite widespread therapeutic options, there is still a large proportion of patients with uncontrolled hypertension. The new European guidelines on hypertension give clear lines of action for diagnosis and treatment sorted into appropriate evidence levels based on current scientific data. Such evidence is still unclear for renal denervation so that no clear recommendations can be given.

17 Guideline Consensus on the use of cyclosporine in dermatological practice. Italian Consensus Conference. 2014

Altomare, G / Ayala, F / Bardazzi, F / Bellia, G / Chimenti, S / Colombo, D / Flori, M L / Girolomoni, G / Micali, G / Parodi, A / Peris, K / Vena, G A / Anonymous2750791. ·IRCCS Galeazzi, University of Milan, Milan, Italy - giampiero.girolomoni@univr.it. · ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25213388.

ABSTRACT: Cyclosporine A (CsA) efficacy and safety have been proven in various dermatoses both in adults and in children even as long-term treatment. Over the last 25 years, Italian dermatologists have gathered relevant experience about CsA treatment for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. This paper has been developed by an Italian Consensus Conference and it is aimed at providing recommendations based on real-world clinical experience in adult patients, consistent with efficacy and safety data arising from the scientific literature. The paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the optimal therapeutic schemes for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, in terms of doses and treatment duration, according to individual characteristics and to the severity of the disease. Moreover, it overviews ideal management, taking into account pharmacological interactions, influence of comorbidities, and the most common adverse events related to CsA treatment.

18 Guideline ACCF and AHA Release Guidelines on the Management of Heart Failure. 2014

Armstrong, Carrie. · ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #25077725.

ABSTRACT: Treatment of stage A heart failure should focus on reducing modifiable risk factors, including management of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. To prevent symptomatic heart failure, ACE inhibitors and beta blockers should be used in all patients with stage B or C heart failure who have a reduced ejection fraction. Patients with stage C heart failure and fluid retention should be treated with diuretics in addition to ACE inhibitors and beta blockers.

19 Guideline Early identification and management of chronic kidney disease in adults: summary of updated NICE guidance. 2014

Carville, Serena / Wonderling, David / Stevens, Paul / Anonymous2050787. ·National Clinical Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians, London NW1 4LE, UK. · East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust, Canterbury CT1 3NG, UK pstevens@nhs.net. · ·BMJ · Pubmed #25059691.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline Children's Hospital Association consensus statements for comorbidities of childhood obesity. 2014

Estrada, Elizabeth / Eneli, Ihuoma / Hampl, Sarah / Mietus-Snyder, Michele / Mirza, Nazrat / Rhodes, Erinn / Sweeney, Brooke / Tinajero-Deck, Lydia / Woolford, Susan J / Pont, Stephen J / Anonymous870788. ·1 Division of Endocrinology, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, University of Connecticut , Hartford, CT. · ·Child Obes · Pubmed #25019404.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity and overweight affect approximately 30% of US children. Many of these children have obesity-related comorbidities, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, fatty liver disease, diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), sleep apnea, psychosocial problems, and others. These children need routine screening and, in many cases, treatment for these conditions. However, because primary care pediatric providers (PCPs) often are underequipped to deal with these comorbidities, they frequently refer these patients to subspecialists. However, as a result of the US pediatric subspecialist shortage and considering that 12.5 million children are obese, access to care by subspecialists is limited. The aim of this article is to provide accessible, user-friendly clinical consensus statements to facilitate the screening, interpretation of results, and early treatment for some of the most common childhood obesity comorbidities. METHODS: Members of the Children's Hospital Association (formerly NACHRI) FOCUS on a Fitter Future II (FFFII), a collaboration of 25 US pediatric obesity centers, used a combination of the best available evidence and collective clinical experience to develop consensus statements for pediatric obesity-related comorbidities. FFFII also surveyed the participating pediatric obesity centers regarding their current practices. RESULTS: The work group developed consensus statements for use in the evaluation and treatment of lipids, liver enzymes, and blood pressure abnormalities and PCOS in the child with overweight and obesity. The results of the FFFII survey illustrated the variability in the approach for initial evaluation and treatment as well as pattern of referrals to subspecialists among programs. CONCLUSIONS: The consensus statements presented in this article can be a useful tool for PCPs in the management and overall care of children with overweight and obesity.

21 Guideline [Cardiovascular preventive recommendations]. 2014

Maiques Galán, Antonio / Brotons Cuixart, Carlos / Villar Álvarez, Fernando / Martín Rioboó, Enrique / Banegas Banegas, José Ramón / Navarro Pérez, Jorge / Alemán Sánchez, José Juan / Lobos-Bejarano, José María / Ortega Sánchez-Pinilla, Ricardo / Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo / Gil Guillén, Vicente / Anonymous200925. ·Grupo de Prevención Cardiovascular del PAPPS. · ·Aten Primaria · Pubmed #24950627.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline Cardiac risk factors: new cholesterol and blood pressure management guidelines. 2014

Anthony, David / George, Paul / Eaton, Charles B. ·Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, 111 Brewster St., Pawtucket, RI 02903, USA. david_anthony@brown.edu · Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 222 Richmond Street, Providence, RI 02903, USA. Paul-George@Brown.edu · Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 222 Richmond Street, Providence, RI 02903, USA. Charles_Eaton@Brown.edu ·FP Essent · Pubmed #24936717.

ABSTRACT: The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines depart from low-density lipoprotein (LDL) treatment targets and recommend treating four specific patient groups with statins. Statins are the only cholesterol-lowering drugs with randomized trial evidence of benefit for preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). The groups are patients with clinical ASCVD; patients ages 40 to 75 years with diabetes and LDL of 70 to 189 mg/dL but no clinical ASCVD; patients 21 years or older with LDL levels of 190 mg/dL or higher; and patients ages 40 to 75 years with LDL of 70 to 189 mg/dL without clinical ASCVD or diabetes but with 10-year ASCVD risk of 7.5% or higher. Ten-year ASCVD risk may be calculated using the Pooled Cohort Equations. The Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) guidelines for blood pressure management recommend a blood pressure goal of less than 140/90 mm Hg for all adults except those 60 years or older. For the latter group, the JNC 8 recommends a systolic blood pressure goal of less than 150 mm Hg. In another notable change from prior guidelines, the JNC 8 recommends relaxing the systolic blood pressure goal for patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease to less than 140 mm Hg from less than 130 mm Hg.

23 Guideline Diagnosis, evaluation, and management of the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: executive summary. 2014

Magee, Laura A / Pels, Anouk / Helewa, Michael / Rey, Evelyne / von Dadelszen, Peter / Anonymous250784. ·Vancouver BC. · Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Winnipeg MB. · Montreal QC. · ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #24927294.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This executive summary presents in brief the current evidence assessed in the clinical practice guideline prepared by the Canadian Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy Working Group and published by Pregnancy Hypertension (http://www.pregnancyhypertension.org/article/S2210-7789(14)00004-X/fulltext) to provide a reasonable approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. EVIDENCE: Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in March 2012 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., pregnancy, hypertension, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy toxemias) and key words (e.g., diagnosis, evaluation, classification, prediction, prevention, prognosis, treatment, postpartum follow-up). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials, controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in French or English between January 2006 and February 2012. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to September 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. VALUES: The quality of evidence in the guideline summarized here was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (Table 1).

24 Guideline European Society of Hypertension practice guidelines for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. 2014

Parati, Gianfranco / Stergiou, George / O'Brien, Eoin / Asmar, Roland / Beilin, Lawrence / Bilo, Grzegorz / Clement, Denis / de la Sierra, Alejandro / de Leeuw, Peter / Dolan, Eamon / Fagard, Robert / Graves, John / Head, Geoffrey A / Imai, Yutaka / Kario, Kazuomi / Lurbe, Empar / Mallion, Jean-Michel / Mancia, Giuseppe / Mengden, Thomas / Myers, Martin / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Ohkubo, Takayoshi / Omboni, Stefano / Palatini, Paolo / Redon, Josep / Ruilope, Luis M / Shennan, Andrew / Staessen, Jan A / vanMontfrans, Gert / Verdecchia, Paolo / Waeber, Bernard / Wang, Jiguang / Zanchetti, Alberto / Zhang, Yuqing / Anonymous3650785. ·aAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 bAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 cAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 dAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 eAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 fAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 gAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 hAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 iAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 jAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 kAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 lAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 mAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 nAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 oAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 pAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 qAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 rAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 sAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 tAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 uAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 vAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 wAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 xAuthor affiliations a · ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #24886823.

ABSTRACT: Given the increasing use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in both clinical practice and hypertension research, a group of scientists, participating in the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability, in year 2013 published a comprehensive position paper dealing with all aspects of the technique, based on the available scientific evidence for ABPM. The present work represents an updated schematic summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, and is aimed at providing recommendations for proper use of this technique in a clinical setting by both specialists and practicing physicians. The present article details the requirements and the methodological issues to be addressed for using ABPM in clinical practice, The clinical indications for ABPM suggested by the available studies, among which white-coat phenomena, masked hypertension, and nocturnal hypertension, are outlined in detail, and the place of home measurement of blood pressure in relation to ABPM is discussed. The role of ABPM in pharmacological, epidemiological, and clinical research is also briefly mentioned. Finally, the implementation of ABPM in practice is considered in relation to the situation of different countries with regard to the reimbursement and the availability of ABPM in primary care practices, hospital clinics, and pharmacies.

25 Guideline Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease. 2014

Boodhwani, Munir / Andelfinger, Gregor / Leipsic, Jonathon / Lindsay, Thomas / McMurtry, M Sean / Therrien, Judith / Siu, Samuel C / Anonymous5200782. ·Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: mboodhwani@ottawaheart.ca. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Radiology, University of British Colombia, Vancouver, British Colombia, Canada. · Division of Vascular Surgery, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #24882528.

ABSTRACT: This Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement aims to provide succinct perspectives on key issues in the management of thoracic aortic disease (TAD). This document is not a comprehensive overview of TAD and important elements of the epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, and management of acute aortic syndromes are deliberately not discussed; readers are referred to the 2010 guidelines published by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, and other stakeholders. Rather, this document is a practical guide for clinicians managing adult patients with TAD. Topics covered include size thresholds for surgical intervention, emerging therapies, imaging modalities, medical and lifestyle management, and genetics of TAD. The primary panel consisted of experts from a variety of disciplines that are essential for comprehensive management of TAD patients. The methodology involved a focused literature review with an emphasis on updates since 2010 and the use of Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology to arrive at specific recommendations. The final document then underwent review by a secondary panel. This document aims to provide recommendations for most patients and situations. However, the ultimate judgement regarding the management of any individual patients should be made by their health care team.

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