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Hypertension HELP
Based on 64,293 articles published since 2009
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These are the 64293 published articles about Hypertension that originated from Worldwide during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline [2018 ESC/ESH Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension]. 2019

Williams, Bryan / Mancia, Giuseppe / Spiering, Wilko / Rosei, Enrico Agabiti / Azizi, Michel / Burnier, Michel / Clement, Denis L / Coca, Antonio / de Simone, Giovanni / Dominiczak, Anna / Kahan, Thomas / Mahfoud, Felix / Redon, Josep / Ruilope, Luis / Zanchetti, Alberto / Kerins, Mary / Kjeldsen, Sverre E / Kreutz, Reinhold / Laurent, Stephane / Lip, Gregory Y H / McManus, Richard / Narkiewicz, Krzysztof / Ruschitzka, Frank / Schmieder, Roland E / Shlyakhto, Evgeny / Tsioufis, Costas / Aboyans, Victor / Desormais, Ileana. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, Maple House, 1st Floor, Suite A, 149 Tottenham Court Road, W1T 7DN London, United Kingdom. bryan.williams@ucl.ac.uk. ·Kardiol Pol · Pubmed #30816983.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline Nutrients and Nutraceuticals for the Management of High Normal Blood Pressure: An Evidence-Based Consensus Document. 2019

Cicero, Arrigo F G / Grassi, Davide / Tocci, Giuliano / Galletti, Ferruccio / Borghi, Claudio / Ferri, Claudio. ·Medical and Surgical Sciences Dept, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, U.O. Medicina Interna Borghi, Via Albertoni, 15, 40138, Bologna, Italy. arrigo.cicero@unibo.it. · Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Coppito, L'Aquila, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, IS, Italy. · Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, ESH Excellence Center of Hypertension, "Federico II", University of Naples Medical School, Via S. Pansini, 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. · Medical and Surgical Sciences Dept, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, U.O. Medicina Interna Borghi, Via Albertoni, 15, 40138, Bologna, Italy. ·High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev · Pubmed #30671873.

ABSTRACT: Essential hypertension still represents the most common cardiovascular risk factor, which is responsible for the vast majority of global burden of disease, worldwide. Antihypertensive treatment aimed at lowering blood pressure (BP) levels to the recommended therapeutic targets has demonstrated to reduce risk of developing major cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal complications. Despite these evidence, overall rates of BP control are dramatically low in most European and Western countries, as well as in the so called developing countries, thus contributing to the increasingly amount of hypertension-related costs and disabilities. For these reasons, preventive strategies aimed at improving BP control rates in treated hypertensive patients and reducing high-normal BP levels in asymptomatic otherwise healthy individuals may contribute to reduce the burden of disease related to hypertension. In this view, an extensive use of nutrients and nutraceuticals has demonstrated to provide favorable effects in hypertension management and control, beyond the adoption of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. These interventions can effectively and safely reduce BP levels to targets and prevent disease progression form high-normal BP levels towards stage 1 hypertension. The present consensus document will systematically describe and critically analyze the currently available evidence in favor of the use of nutrients and nutraceuticals in those individuals with high-normal BP levels at different cardiovascular risk profile.

4 Guideline ESC Council on hypertension position document on the management of hypertensive emergencies. 2019

van den Born, Bert-Jan H / Lip, Gregory Y H / Brguljan-Hitij, Jana / Cremer, Antoine / Segura, Julian / Morales, Enrique / Mahfoud, Felix / Amraoui, Fouad / Persu, Alexandre / Kahan, Thomas / Agabiti Rosei, Enrico / de Simone, Giovanni / Gosse, Philippe / Williams, Bryan. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Hypertension Division, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Internal Medicine, Dr. Peter Držaj Hospital, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Hypertension Unit, Department of Cardiology, Hopital Saint André and University Hospital of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Hypertension Unit, Department of Nephrology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Department for Internal Medicine III, Cardiology, Angiology, and Intensive Care Medicine, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar, Germany. · Division of Cardiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, and Pole of Cardiovascular Research, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. · Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. · Clinica Medica Generale, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, and Department of Medicine, Azienda Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Hypertension Research Center, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, Naples, Italy. · University College London (UCL) and UCL Hospitals, London, UK. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother · Pubmed #30165588.

ABSTRACT: Hypertensive emergencies are those situations where very high blood pressure (BP) values are associated with acute organ damage, and therefore, require immediate, but careful, BP reduction. The type of acute organ damage is the principal determinant of: (i) the drug of choice, (ii) the target BP, and (iii) the timeframe in which BP should be lowered. Key target organs are the heart, retina, brain, kidneys, and large arteries. Patients who lack acute hypertension-mediated end organ damage do not have a hypertensive emergency and can usually be treated with oral BP-lowering agents and usually discharged after a brief period of observation.

5 Guideline [2018 ESC/ESH Guidelines for the Management of Arterial Hypertension: What's New with Regard to Our Older People?] 2018

Hoffmann, Ute / Thrun, Jan-Marc. ·Klinik für Allgemeine Innere Medizin und Geriatrie, Angiologie, Diabetologie, Endokrinologie, Nephrologie, Krankenhaus Barmherzige Brüder Regensburg. ·Dtsch Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #30508852.

ABSTRACT: In the "2018 ESC/ESH Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension" there are new blood pressure (BP) recommendations with regard to older patients based on randomized controlled trials and well-conducted meta-analyses performed during the last years.It is recommended to base the diagnosis of hypertension on repeated office BP measurements under standardized conditions and in older people in out-of-office BP measurement with ABPM and/or HBPM if logistically and economically feasible. Furthermore lying and standing BP measurements should also be considered in subsequent visits in older people to exclude orthostatic hypotension.Older people should measure their BP in upper arms by validated devices with a well readable display.In the new guidelines more attention is directed on frailty, concomitant treatments and independence influencing the likely tolerability of BP-lowering medications. In fit older patients, it is now recommended that systolic BP should be targeted to a BP range of 130 - 139 mmHg, if tolerated.Lifestyle changes are also recommended in elder patients. Preferred combination therapies are a RAS blocker with a CCB or thiazid diuretic, preferably in a "single pill". When combination therapy is used, this should be initiated at the lowest available doses in elder people.

6 Guideline Recommendations of the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians regarding caesarean sections. 2018

Wielgos, Miroslaw / Bomba-Opoń, Dorota / Breborowicz, Grzegorz H / Czajkowski, Krzysztof / Debski, Romuald / Leszczynska-Gorzelak, Bozena / Oszukowski, Przemyslaw / Radowicki, Stanislaw / Zimmer, Mariusz. ·1st Chair and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. dbomba@wum.edu.pl. ·Ginekol Pol · Pubmed #30508218.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline 2018 Practice Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology and the European Society of Hypertension. 2018

Williams, Bryan / Mancia, Giuseppe / Spiering, Wilko / Agabiti Rosei, Enrico / Azizi, Michel / Burnier, Michel / Clement, Denis / Coca, Antonio / De Simone, Giovanni / Dominiczak, Anna / Kahan, Thomas / Mahfoud, Felix / Redon, Josep / Ruilope, Luis / Zanchetti, Alberto / Kerins, Mary / Kjeldsen, Sverre / Kreutz, Reinhold / Laurent, Stéphane / Lip, Gregory Y H / McManus, Richard / Narkiewicz, Krzysztof / Ruschitzka, Frank / Schmieder, Roland / Shlyakhto, Evgeny / Tsioufis, Konstantinos / Aboyans, Victor / Desormais, Ileana. ·a University College London, London UCL , London , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · b IRCCS Instituto Auxologico Italiano , University of Milano-Bicocca , Milano , Italy. · c Department of Medicine , University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht , Netherlands. · d Universita degli Studi di Brescia Aree Disciplinari Medicina e Chirurgia , Brescia , Italy. · e Universite Paris Descartes , Paris , France. · f Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois , Lausanne , Switzerland. · g University of Gent , Gent , Belgium. · h School of Medicine , University of Barcelona , Barcelona , Spain. · i Hypertension Research Center (CIRIAPA), Department of Translational Medical Sciences , Federico II University Hospital , Napoli , Italy. · j University of Glasgow , Glasgow , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · k Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm , Sweden. · l Saarland University Hospital , Homburg , Germany. · m Servicio de Medicina Interna del Hospital Clínico de Valencia , Catedrático de Medicina de la Universidad de Valencia , Valencia , Spain. · n Hypertension Unit , Madrid , Spain. · o University of Milan , Milan , Italy. · p Dublin St. James Hospital , Dublin , Ireland. · q Department of Cardiology , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway. · r Institute for Clinical Medicine , University of Oslo , Oslo , Norway. · s Institut für Klinische Pharmakologie und Toxikologie , Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin , Berlin , Germany. · t Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou , Paris , France. · u College of Medical and Dental Sciences , University of Birmingham , Birmingham , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · v Nuffield Department of Primary Care , Nuffield , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · w Department of Hypertension and Diabetology , Medical University of Gdansk , Gdansk , Poland. · x Department of Cardiology , University of Zurich , Zurich , Switzerland. · y Abteilung für Nephrologie und Hypertensiologie , Universitätsklinikum Erlangen , Erlangen , Germany. · z Almazov Federal Heart , Blood and Endocrinology Centre , St Petersburg , Russian Federation. · aa Hippokration Hospital, First Cardiology Clinic, Medical School , National and Kapodistrian University of Athens , Athens , Greece. · ab Department of Cardiology , Dupuytren University Hospital , Limoges , France. · ac CHU de Limoges , Limoges , France. ·Blood Press · Pubmed #30380928.

ABSTRACT: These practice guidelines on the management of arterial hypertension are a concise summary of the more extensive ones prepared by the Task Force jointly appointed by the European Society of Hypertension and the European Society of Cardiology. These guidelines have been prepared on the basis of the best available evidence on all issues deserving recommendations; their role must be educational and not prescriptive or coercive for the management of individual subjects who may differ widely in their personal, medical and cultural characteristics. The members of the Task Force have participated independently in the preparation of these guidelines, drawing on their academic and clinical experience and by objective examination and interpretation of all available literature. A disclosure of their potential conflict of interest is reported on the websites of the ESH and the ESC.

8 Guideline Resistant Hypertension: Detection, Evaluation, and Management: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association. 2018

Carey, Robert M / Calhoun, David A / Bakris, George L / Brook, Robert D / Daugherty, Stacie L / Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl R / Egan, Brent M / Flack, John M / Gidding, Samuel S / Judd, Eric / Lackland, Daniel T / Laffer, Cheryl L / Newton-Cheh, Christopher / Smith, Steven M / Taler, Sandra J / Textor, Stephen C / Turan, Tanya N / White, William B / Anonymous191225. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #30354828.

ABSTRACT: Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as above-goal elevated blood pressure (BP) in a patient despite the concurrent use of 3 antihypertensive drug classes, commonly including a long-acting calcium channel blocker, a blocker of the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker), and a diuretic. The antihypertensive drugs should be administered at maximum or maximally tolerated daily doses. RH also includes patients whose BP achieves target values on ≥4 antihypertensive medications. The diagnosis of RH requires assurance of antihypertensive medication adherence and exclusion of the "white-coat effect" (office BP above goal but out-of-office BP at or below target). The importance of RH is underscored by the associated risk of adverse outcomes compared with non-RH. This article is an updated American Heart Association scientific statement on the detection, evaluation, and management of RH. Once antihypertensive medication adherence is confirmed and out-of-office BP recordings exclude a white-coat effect, evaluation includes identification of contributing lifestyle issues, detection of drugs interfering with antihypertensive medication effectiveness, screening for secondary hypertension, and assessment of target organ damage. Management of RH includes maximization of lifestyle interventions, use of long-acting thiazide-like diuretics (chlorthalidone or indapamide), addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (spironolactone or eplerenone), and, if BP remains elevated, stepwise addition of antihypertensive drugs with complementary mechanisms of action to lower BP. If BP remains uncontrolled, referral to a hypertension specialist is advised.

9 Guideline ACVIM consensus statement: Guidelines for the identification, evaluation, and management of systemic hypertension in dogs and cats. 2018

Acierno, Mark J / Brown, Scott / Coleman, Amanda E / Jepson, Rosanne E / Papich, Mark / Stepien, Rebecca L / Syme, Harriet M. ·Department of Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Midwestern University, 5715 W. Utopia Rd, Glendale Arizona 85308. · College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. · Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, London, United Kingdom. · College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. · Department of Medical Sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, Madison, Wisconsin. ·J Vet Intern Med · Pubmed #30353952.

ABSTRACT: An update to the 2007 American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) consensus statement on the identification, evaluation, and management of systemic hypertension in dogs and cats was presented at the 2017 ACVIM Forum in National Harbor, MD. The updated consensus statement is presented here. The consensus statement aims to provide guidance on appropriate diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in dogs and cats.

10 Guideline The hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: ISSHP classification, diagnosis & management recommendations for international practice. 2018

Brown, Mark A / Magee, Laura A / Kenny, Louise C / Karumanchi, S Ananth / McCarthy, Fergus P / Saito, Shigeru / Hall, David R / Warren, Charlotte E / Adoyi, Gloria / Ishaku, Salisu / Anonymous50983. ·Dept. of Renal Medicine, St. George Hospital, Sydney, Australia; Dept. of Medicine, St. George Hospital Clinical School, University of NSW, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: mbrown@unsw.edu.au. · King's College London, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, London, UK. · Faculty of Health & Life Sciences, University of Liverpool and INFANT Centre, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland. · Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · INFANT Centre, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Science for Research, University of Toyama, Japan. · Dept. of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Hospital, Tygerberg, South Africa. · Reproductive Health Program, Population Council-Washington DC, USA. · Reproductive Health Program, Population Council-Nigeria, West Africa, Nigeria. ·Pregnancy Hypertens · Pubmed #29803330.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline Hypertension Canada's 2018 Guidelines for Diagnosis, Risk Assessment, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension in Adults and Children. 2018

Nerenberg, Kara A / Zarnke, Kelly B / Leung, Alexander A / Dasgupta, Kaberi / Butalia, Sonia / McBrien, Kerry / Harris, Kevin C / Nakhla, Meranda / Cloutier, Lyne / Gelfer, Mark / Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime / Milot, Alain / Bolli, Peter / Tremblay, Guy / McLean, Donna / Padwal, Raj S / Tran, Karen C / Grover, Steven / Rabkin, Simon W / Moe, Gordon W / Howlett, Jonathan G / Lindsay, Patrice / Hill, Michael D / Sharma, Mike / Field, Thalia / Wein, Theodore H / Shoamanesh, Ashkan / Dresser, George K / Hamet, Pavel / Herman, Robert J / Burgess, Ellen / Gryn, Steven E / Grégoire, Jean C / Lewanczuk, Richard / Poirier, Luc / Campbell, Tavis S / Feldman, Ross D / Lavoie, Kim L / Tsuyuki, Ross T / Honos, George / Prebtani, Ally P H / Kline, Gregory / Schiffrin, Ernesto L / Don-Wauchope, Andrew / Tobe, Sheldon W / Gilbert, Richard E / Leiter, Lawrence A / Jones, Charlotte / Woo, Vincent / Hegele, Robert A / Selby, Peter / Pipe, Andrew / McFarlane, Philip A / Oh, Paul / Gupta, Milan / Bacon, Simon L / Kaczorowski, Janusz / Trudeau, Luc / Campbell, Norman R C / Hiremath, Swapnil / Roerecke, Michael / Arcand, Joanne / Ruzicka, Marcel / Prasad, G V Ramesh / Vallée, Michel / Edwards, Cedric / Sivapalan, Praveena / Penner, S Brian / Fournier, Anne / Benoit, Geneviève / Feber, Janusz / Dionne, Janis / Magee, Laura A / Logan, Alexander G / Côté, Anne-Marie / Rey, Evelyne / Firoz, Tabassum / Kuyper, Laura M / Gabor, Jonathan Y / Townsend, Raymond R / Rabi, Doreen M / Daskalopoulou, Stella S / Anonymous1571074. ·Division of General Internal Medicine, Departments of Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: kara.nerenberg@ucalgary.ca. · O'Brien Institute for Public Health and Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine and Centre for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, McGill University and Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, O'Brien Institute for Public Health and Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Nursing, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Quebec, Canada. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · CHU-Québec-Hopital St. Sacrement, Québec, Quebec, Canada. · Alberta Health Services and Covenant Health, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · McGill Comprehensive Health Improvement Program (CHIP), Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Vancouver Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Cardiac Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Director of Stroke, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Adjunct Faculty, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · McMaster University, Hamilton Health Sciences, Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver Stroke Program, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · McGill University, Stroke Prevention Clinic, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Faculté de Médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Université de Montréal, Institut de cardiologie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Institut National d'Excellence en Sante et Services Sociaux, Québec, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Winnipeg Regional Health Authority and the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM), Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, CIUSSS-NIM, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · CHUM, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · LifeLabs Inc, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, and Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto, Division of Endocrinology, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, UBC Southern Medical Program, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada. · University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Departments of Medicine (Division of Endocrinology) and Biochemistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Nephrology, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University Health Network, Toronto Rehab and Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, and Canadian Collaborative Research Network, Brampton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, CIUSSS-NIM, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Family and Emergency Medicine, Université de Montréal and CRCHUM, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Division of Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · University of Ottawa and the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Service de néphrologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Women and Children's Health, St Thomas' Hospital, London, and Department of Life Course Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. · Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. · CHU Sainte-Justine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Interlake-Eastern Regional Healthy Authority, Concordia Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, O'Brien Institute for Public Health and Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #29731013.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension Canada provides annually updated, evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults and children. This year, the adult and pediatric guidelines are combined in one document. The new 2018 pregnancy-specific hypertension guidelines are published separately. For 2018, 5 new guidelines are introduced, and 1 existing guideline on the blood pressure thresholds and targets in the setting of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is revised. The use of validated wrist devices for the estimation of blood pressure in individuals with large arm circumference is now included. Guidance is provided for the follow-up measurements of blood pressure, with the use of standardized methods and electronic (oscillometric) upper arm devices in individuals with hypertension, and either ambulatory blood pressure monitoring or home blood pressure monitoring in individuals with white coat effect. We specify that all individuals with hypertension should have an assessment of global cardiovascular risk to promote health behaviours that lower blood pressure. Finally, an angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor combination should be used in place of either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker in individuals with heart failure (with ejection fraction < 40%) who are symptomatic despite appropriate doses of guideline-directed heart failure therapies. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these guidelines are discussed.

12 Guideline Obesity and cardiovascular risk: a call for action from the European Society of Hypertension Working Group of Obesity, Diabetes and the High-risk Patient and European Association for the Study of Obesity: part A: mechanisms of obesity induced hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia and practice guidelines for treatment. 2018

Kotsis, Vasilios / Jordan, Jens / Micic, Dragan / Finer, Nicholas / Leitner, Deborah R / Toplak, Hermann / Tokgozoglu, Lale / Athyros, Vasilios / Elisaf, Moses / Filippatos, Theodosios D / Redon, Josep / Redon, Pau / Antza, Christina / Tsioufis, Konstantinos / Grassi, Guido / Seravalle, Gino / Coca, Antonio / Sierra, Cristina / Lurbe, Empar / Stabouli, Stella / Jelakovic, Bojan / Nilsson, Peter M. ·3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension-24 h ABPM ESH Center of Excellence, Papageorgiou Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. · Institute for Clinical Pharmacology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover, Germany. · Center for Obesity, Clinic for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Diseases of Metabolism Clinical Center of Serbia, Serbia. · National Centre for Cardiovascular Prevention and Outcomes, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London, UK. · Department of Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Cardiology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · Second Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippokration Hospital, Thessaloniki. · Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina. · Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. · INCLIVA Research Institute, University of Valencia, Valencia. · CIBERObn (CB06/03), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. · First Cardiology Clinic, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Hippokration Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Clinica Medica,School of Medicine and Surgery, Milano-Bicocca University. · IRCCS, Multimedica Sesto San Giovanni. · Cardiology Department Istituto Auxologico Italiano, S. Luca Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic of Barcelona (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona. · Pediatric Department, Consorcio Hospital General, University of Valencia, Valencia. · CIBERObn (CB06/03) Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. · 1st Department of Pediatrics, Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Nephrology, Hypertension, Dialysis and Transplantation, University Hospital Centre Zagreb,Croatia. · Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #29634663.

ABSTRACT: : Obesity is a key factor for cardiovascular diseases and complications. Obesity is associated with hypertension, dyslipidemia and type II diabetes, which are the major predictors of cardiovascular disease in the future. It predisposes for atrial fibrillation, heart failure, sudden cardiac death, renal disease and ischemic stroke that are the main causes of cardiovascular hospitalization and mortality. As obesity and the cardiovascular effects on the vessels and the heart start early in life, even from childhood, it is important for health policies to prevent obesity very early before the disease manifestation emerge. Key roles in the prevention are strategies to increase physical exercise, reduce body weight and to prevent or treat hypertension, lipids disorders and diabetes earlier and efficiently to prevent cardiovascular complications.Epidemiology and mechanisms of obesity-induced hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia will be reviewed and the role of lifestyle modification and treatment strategies in obesity will be updated and analyzed. The best treatment options for people with obesity, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia will discussed.

13 Guideline Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Management: Review of the American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2018. 2018

Chamberlain, James J / Johnson, Eric L / Leal, Sandra / Rhinehart, Andrew S / Shubrook, Jay H / Peterson, Lacie. ·St. Mark's Hospital and St. Mark's Diabetes Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (J.J.C.). · University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, North Dakota (E.L.J.). · SinfoníaRx, Tucson, Arizona (S.L.). · Glytec, Marco Island, Florida (A.S.R.). · Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Vallejo, California (J.H.S.). · Utah State University, Taylorsville, Utah (L.P.). ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #29610837.

ABSTRACT: Description: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) annually updates its Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payers, and other interested parties with evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. Methods: For the 2018 standards, the ADA Professional Practice Committee searched MEDLINE through November 2017 to add, clarify, or revise recommendations on the basis of new evidence. The committee rated the recommendations as A, B, or C depending on the quality of evidence or E for expert consensus or clinical experience. The standards were reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee of the ADA Board of Directors, which includes health care professionals, scientists, and laypersons. Feedback from the larger clinical community informed revisions. Recommendations: This synopsis focuses on guidance relating to cardiovascular disease and risk management in nonpregnant adults with diabetes. Recommendations address diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension and dyslipidemia), aspirin use, screening for and treatment of coronary heart disease, and lifestyle interventions.

14 Guideline Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Hypertension. 2018

Tay, Jam Chin / Sule, Ashish Anil / Chew, E K / Tey, Jeannie S / Lau, Titus / Lee, Simon / Lee, Sze Haur / Leong, Choon Kit / Lim, Soo Teik / Low, Lip Ping / Oh, Vernon Min Sen / Phoon, K Y / Tan, Kian Wee Kenneth / Wu, Akira / Yeo, Loo See. ·Ministry of Health, Low Cardiology Clinic, National Healthcare Group Polyclinics, National Heart Centre, National Neuroscience Institute, National University Hospital, Mission Medical Clinic, SingHealth Polyclinics, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Wu Nephrology & Medical Clinic, Singapore. ·Singapore Med J · Pubmed #29376186.

ABSTRACT: The Ministry of Health (MOH) has updated the clinical practice guidelines on hypertension to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for hypertension. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on hypertension, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

15 Guideline Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults: Synopsis of the 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Hypertension Guideline. 2018

Carey, Robert M / Whelton, Paul K / Anonymous1171001. ·University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (R.M.C.). · Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana (P.K.W.). ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #29357392.

ABSTRACT: Description: In November 2017, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) released a clinical practice guideline for the prevention, detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure (BP) in adults. This article summarizes the major recommendations. Methods: In 2014, the ACC and the AHA appointed a multidisciplinary committee to update previous reports of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. The committee reviewed literature and commissioned systematic reviews and meta-analyses on out-of-office BP monitoring, the optimal target for BP lowering, the comparative benefits and harms of different classes of antihypertensive agents, and the comparative benefits and harms of initiating therapy with a single antihypertensive agent or a combination of 2 agents. Recommendations: This article summarizes key recommendations in the following areas: BP classification, BP measurement, screening for secondary hypertension, nonpharmacologic therapy, BP thresholds and cardiac risk estimation to guide drug treatment, treatment goals (general and for patients with diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and advanced age), choice of initial drug therapy, resistant hypertension, and strategies to improve hypertension control.

16 Guideline Canadian stroke best practice recommendations: Secondary prevention of stroke, sixth edition practice guidelines, update 2017. 2018

Wein, Theodore / Lindsay, M Patrice / Côté, Robert / Foley, Norine / Berlingieri, Joseph / Bhogal, Sanjit / Bourgoin, Aline / Buck, Brian H / Cox, Jafna / Davidson, Dion / Dowlatshahi, Dar / Douketis, Jim / Falconer, John / Field, Thalia / Gioia, Laura / Gubitz, Gord / Habert, Jeffrey / Jaspers, Sharon / Lum, Cheemun / McNamara Morse, Dana / Pageau, Paul / Rafay, Mubeen / Rodgerson, Amanda / Semchuk, Bill / Sharma, Mukul / Shoamanesh, Ashkan / Tamayo, Arturo / Smitko, Elisabeth / Gladstone, David J / Anonymous801124. ·1 McGill University, Canada. · 2 Montreal General Hospital, Canada. · 3 282184 Heart and Stroke Foundation , Canada. · 4 Western University, Canada. · 6 workHORSE Consulting, London. · 5 JBN Medical Diagnostic Services, Canada. · 7 Champlain Regional Stroke Network, Canada. · 8 Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Canada. · 9 Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Canada. · 10 41694 Valley Regional Hospital , Nova Scotia, Canada. · 11 Stroke Program, Ottawa Civic Hospital, Canada. · 12 Divisions of General Internal Medicine, Hematology and Thromboembolism, 152997 McMaster University Department of Medicine , Canada. · 13 Thrombosis Canada, Canada. · 14 59140 Kelowna General Hospital , Canada. · 15 Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Canada. · 16 Department of Neurosciences, CHUM-Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Hôpital Notre Dame, Canada. · 17 Queen Elizabeth II Stroke Program, Nova Scotia, Canada. · 18 Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada. · 19 Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Canada. · 20 Department of Emergency Medicine, The 6363 University of Ottawa , Canada. · 21 Winnipeg Children's Hospital, Canada. · 22 423136 University of Manitoba , Canada. · 23 Regina Qu'Appellle Health Region, Canada. · 24 Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Canada. · 25 Brandon Regional Hospital, Manitoba, Canada. · 26 Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Hurvitz Brain Sciences Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Canada. · 27 University of Toronto Department of Medicine, Toronto, Canada. ·Int J Stroke · Pubmed #29171361.

ABSTRACT: The 2017 update of The Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations for the Secondary Prevention of Stroke is a collection of current evidence-based recommendations intended for use by clinicians across a wide range of settings. The goal is to provide guidance for the prevention of ischemic stroke recurrence through the identification and management of modifiable vascular risk factors. Recommendations include those related to diagnostic testing, diet and lifestyle, smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies, carotid artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and other cardiac conditions. Notable changes in this sixth edition include the development of core elements for delivering secondary stroke prevention services, the addition of a section on cervical artery dissection, new recommendations regarding the management of patent foramen ovale, and the removal of the recommendations on management of sleep apnea. The Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations include a range of supporting materials such as implementation resources to facilitate the adoption of evidence to practice, and related performance measures to enable monitoring of uptake and effectiveness of the recommendations. The guidelines further emphasize the need for a systems approach to stroke care, involving an interprofessional team, with access to specialists regardless of patient location, and the need to overcome geographic barriers to ensure equity in access within a universal health care system.

17 Guideline Best antihypertensive strategies to improve blood pressure control in Latin America: position of the Latin American Society of Hypertension. 2018

Coca, Antonio / López-Jaramillo, Patricio / Thomopoulos, Costas / Zanchetti, Alberto / Anonymous541128. ·Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clinic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Research Institute, Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander and Medical School, Universidad de Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia. · Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud Eugenio Espejo, Universidad Tecnológica Equinoccial, Quito, Ecuador. · Department of Cardiology, Helena Venizelou Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Istituto Auxologico Italiano, IRCCS, and Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #29120958.

ABSTRACT: : Evidence from randomized trials has shown that effective treatment with blood pressure (BP)-lowering medications reduces the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with hypertension. Therefore, hypertension control and prevention of subsequent morbidity and mortality should be achievable for all patients worldwide. However, many people in Latin America remain undiagnosed, untreated or have inadequately controlled BP, even where this is access to health systems. Barriers to hypertension control in low-income countries include difficulties in transportation to health services; inappropriate opening hours; difficulties in making clinic appointments; inaccessible healthcare facilities, lack of insurance and high treatment costs. After a review of the best recent available evidence on the efficacy and tolerability of antihypertensive drugs and strategies, the Latin American Society of Hypertension experts conclude that all major classes of BP-lowering drugs be available to hypertensive patients, because all have been shown to reduce major cardiovascular outcomes compared with placebo, and have shown to be associated with a comparable risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality when compared between classes. Within each class, no evidence whatsoever is available to show that one compound is more effective than another in outcome prevention. Therefore, the selection of individual drugs may be based mainly on the capacity of Latin American governments to obtain the lowest prices of the different molecules manufactured by companies with high production quality standards.

18 Guideline Roadmap to Achieve 25% Hypertension Control in Africa by 2025. 2018

Dzudie, Anastase / Rayner, Brian / Ojji, Dike / Schutte, Aletta E / Twagirumukiza, Marc / Damasceno, Albertino / Ba, Seringe Abdou / Kane, Abdoul / Kramoh, Euloge / Anzouan Kacou, Jean Baptiste / Onwubere, Basden / Cornick, Ruth / Sliwa, Karen / Anisiuba, Benedict / Mocumbi, Ana Olga / Ogola, Elijah / Awad, Mohamed / Nel, George / Otieno, Harun / Toure, Ali Ibrahim / Kingue, Samuel / Kengne, Andre Pascal / Perel, Pablo / Adler, Alma / Poulter, Neil / Mayosi, Bongani / Anonymous17080923. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Yaounde Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Yaounde, Cameroon; Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Hatter Institute for Cardiovascular Research in Africa, Department of Medicine, Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: aitdzudie@yahoo.com. · Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Abuja Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria; Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria. · Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART), MRC Unit for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa. · College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda; African Society of Hypertension (AfSoH) Initiative, Heymans Institute of Pharmacology, Gent University, Ghent, Belgium. · Faculty of Medicine, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique. · Le Dantec University Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal. · Service de cardiologie, Hôpital Général de Grand Yolf, Dakar, Senegal. · Institut cardiologique d'Abidjan, Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire. · Department of Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria. · Knowledge Translation Unit, University of Cape Town Lung Institute, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Hatter Institute for Cardiovascular Research in Africa, Department of Medicine, Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · National Health Institute, Maputo, Mozambique; University Eduardo Mondlane, Maputo, Mozambique. · Department of Clinical Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya. · Division of Cardiology, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan. · Pan-African Society of Cardiology (PASCAR), Cape Town, South Africa. · Section of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. · Department of Internal Medicine, Yaounde Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Yaounde, Cameroon. · Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa. · Science Advisory Unit, World Heart Federation, Geneva, Switzerland; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. ·Glob Heart · Pubmed #29042191.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Pan-African Society of Cardiology (PASCAR) has identified hypertension as the highest area of priority action to reduce heart disease and stroke on the continent. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this PASCAR roadmap on hypertension was to develop practical guidance on how to implement strategies that translate existing knowledge into effective action and improve detection, treatment and control of hypertension and cardiovascular health in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) by the year 2025. METHODS: Development of this roadmap started with the creation of a consortium of experts with leadership skills in hypertension. In 2014, experts in different fields, including physicians and nonphysicians, were invited to join. Via face-to-face meetings and teleconferences, the consortium made a situation analysis, set a goal, identified roadblocks and solutions to the management of hypertension and customized the World Heart Federation roadmap to Africa. RESULTS: Hypertension is a major crisis on the continent but very few randomized controlled trials have been conducted on its management. Also, only 25.8% of the countries have developed or adopted guidelines for management of hypertension. Other major roadblocks are either government and health-system related or health care professional or patient related. The PASCAR hypertension task force identified a 10-point action plan to be implemented by African ministries of health to achieve 25% control of hypertension in Africa by 2025. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertension affects millions of people in SSA and if left untreated, is a major cause of heart disease and stroke. Very few SSA countries have a clear hypertension policy. This PASCAR roadmap identifies practical and effective solutions that would improve detection, treatment and control of hypertension on the continent and could be implemented as is or adapted to specific national settings.

19 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous7910925 / Harvin, Howard J / Verma, Nupur / Nikolaidis, Paul / Hanley, Michael / Dogra, Vikram S / Goldfarb, Stanley / Gore, John L / Savage, Stephen J / Steigner, Michael L / Strax, Richard / Taffel, Myles T / Wong-You-Cheong, Jade J / Yoo, Don C / Remer, Erick M / Dill, Karin E / Lockhart, Mark E. ·Principal Author, Scottsdale Medical Imaging, Scottsdale, Arizona. Electronic address: h_harvin@yahoo.com. · Co-author, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. · Panel Vice Chair (Urologic), Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · Panel Vice Chair (Vascular), University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; American Society of Nephrology. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; American Urological Association. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; American Urological Association. · Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · George Washington University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia. · University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Rhode Island Medical Imaging Inc., East Providence, Rhode Island. · Specialty Chair (Urologic), Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Panel Chair (Vascular), UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts. · Panel Chair (Urologic), University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #29101991.

ABSTRACT: Renovascular hypertension is the most common type of secondary hypertension and is estimated to have a prevalence between 0.5% and 5% of the general hypertensive population, and an even higher prevalence among patients with severe hypertension and end-stage renal disease, approaching 25% in elderly dialysis patients. Investigation for renal artery stenosis is appropriate when clinical presentation suggests secondary hypertension rather than primary hypertension, when there is not another known cause of secondary hypertension, and when intervention would be carried out if a significant renal artery stenosis were identified. The primary imaging modalities used to screen for renal artery stenosis are CT, MRI, and ultrasound, with the selection of imaging dependent in part on renal function. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

20 Guideline Personalised Single-Pill Combination Therapy in Hypertensive Patients: An Update of a Practical Treatment Platform. 2017

Volpe, Massimo / Tocci, Giuliano / de la Sierra, Alejandro / Kreutz, Reinhold / Laurent, Stéphane / Manolis, Athanasios J / Tsioufis, Kostantinos. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome Sapienza, Via di Grottarossa 1035-39, 00189, Rome, Italy. massimo.volpe@uniroma1.it. · IRCCS Neuromed, Via Atinense, 18, 86077, Pozzilli, Isernia, Italy. massimo.volpe@uniroma1.it. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome Sapienza, Via di Grottarossa 1035-39, 00189, Rome, Italy. · IRCCS Neuromed, Via Atinense, 18, 86077, Pozzilli, Isernia, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Mútua Terrassa, University of Barcelona, Plaça del Doctor Robert, 5, 08221, Terrassa, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 10117, Berlin, Germany. · Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Pharmacology and INSERM U 970, European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Université Paris-Descartes and Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, 56 rue Leblanc, 75015, Paris, France. · Department of Cardiology, Asclepeion General Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Hippokration Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Vas Sofias 114, 11527, Athens, Greece. ·High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev · Pubmed #29086364.

ABSTRACT: Despite the improvements in the management of hypertension during the last three decades, it continues to be one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Effective and sustained reductions in blood pressure (BP) reduce the incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure and cardiovascular death. However, the proportion of patients who achieve the recommended BP goal (< 140/90 mmHg) is persistently low, worldwide. Poor adherence to therapy, complex therapeutic regimens, clinical inertia, drug-related adverse events and multiple risk factors or comorbidities contribute to the disparity between the potential and actual BP control rate. Previously we published a practical therapeutic platform for the treatment of hypertension based on clinical evidence, guidelines, best practice and clinical experience. This platform provides a personalised treatment approach and can be used to improve BP control and simplify treatment. It uses long-acting, effective and well-tolerated angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan, in combination with a calcium channel blocker amlodipine, and/or a thiazide diuretic hydrochlorothiazide. These drugs were selected based on the availability in most European Countries of single-pill, fixed formulations in a wide range of doses for both dual- and triple-drug combinations. The platform approach could be applied to other ARBs or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors available in single-pill, fixed-dose combinations. Here, we present an update, which takes into account the results of the recently published studies and extends the applicability of the platform to common conditions that are often neglected or poorly considered in clinical practice guidelines.

21 Guideline Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE). 2017

Lip, Gregory Y H / Coca, Antonio / Kahan, Thomas / Boriani, Giuseppe / Manolis, Antonis S / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Oto, Ali / Potpara, Tatjana S / Steffel, Jan / Marín, Francisco / de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen / de Simone, Giovanni / Tzou, Wendy S / Chiang, Chern-En / Williams, Bryan / Anonymous4830918 / Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei / Gorenek, Bulent / Fauchier, Laurent / Savelieva, Irina / Hatala, Robert / van Gelder, Isabelle / Brguljan-Hitij, Jana / Erdine, Serap / Lovic, Dragan / Kim, Young-Hoon / Salinas-Arce, Jorge / Field, Michael. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Karolinska Institutet Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital Corp, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cardiology Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy. · Third Department of Cardiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. · Department of Internal Medicine, Holbaek Hospital and Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Memorial Ankara Hospital, Heart and Health Foundation of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey. · School of Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade University, Belgrade, Serbia. · Electrophysiology and Cardiac Devices, Department of Cardiology, University Heart Center Zurich; Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB-Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Cardiology Department, Medicine School, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, via S. Pansini 5, bld # 1, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Cardiac Electrophysiology, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, UK. · Colentina University Hospital, Medicine Faculty, University of Medicine "Carol Davila"-Bucharest Romania. · Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Trousseau, Tours, France. · St George's University Of London, London, UK. · National Cardiovascular Institute, NUSCH, Bratislava, Slovak Republic. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · University Medical Centre, Hypertension Department, Hospital Dr. Peter Drzaja, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School, Head of Hypertension Department, Istanbul, Turkey. · Clinic for internal disease Intermedica, Cardiology department-Hypertension centere, Serbia. · Korea University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Clínica Delgado, Miraflores, Pérou. · University of Wisconsin, Clinical Science Center, Madison, USA. ·Europace · Pubmed #28881872.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient.

22 Guideline [Blood Pressure Measurement and Treatment Targets: Position Paper of the DHL® Task Force Scientific Statements and Guidelines]. 2017

Krämer, Bernhard K / Hausberg, Martin / Sanner, Bernd / Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina / Weil, Joachim / Weisser, Burkhard / Wenzel, Ulrich / Trenkwalder, Peter / Anonymous2980918. · ·Dtsch Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #28873492.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline for Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. 2017

Flynn, Joseph T / Kaelber, David C / Baker-Smith, Carissa M / Blowey, Douglas / Carroll, Aaron E / Daniels, Stephen R / de Ferranti, Sarah D / Dionne, Janis M / Falkner, Bonita / Flinn, Susan K / Gidding, Samuel S / Goodwin, Celeste / Leu, Michael G / Powers, Makia E / Rea, Corinna / Samuels, Joshua / Simasek, Madeline / Thaker, Vidhu V / Urbina, Elaine M / Anonymous5820916. ·Dr. Robert O. Hickman Endowed Chair in Pediatric Nephrology, Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington; joseph.flynn@seattlechildrens.org. · Departments of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, Case Western Reserve University and MetroHealth System, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Pediatric Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. · Children's Mercy Hospital, University of Missouri-Kansas City and Children's Mercy Integrated Care Solutions, Kansas City, Missouri. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado-Denver and Pediatrician in Chief, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. · Director, Preventive Cardiology Clinic, Boston Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia and British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Consultant, American Academy of Pediatrics, Washington, District of Columbia. · Cardiology Division Head, Nemours Cardiac Center, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware. · National Pediatric Blood Pressure Awareness Foundation, Prairieville, Louisiana. · Departments of Pediatrics and Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington, University of Washington Medicine and Information Technology Services, and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia. · Associate Director, General Academic Pediatric Fellowship, Staff Physician, Boston's Children's Hospital Primary Care at Longwood, Instructor, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, McGovern Medical School, University of Texas, Houston, Texas. · Pediatric Education, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Shadyside Family Medicine Residency, Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Division of Molecular Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and. · Preventive Cardiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #28827377.

ABSTRACT: These pediatric hypertension guidelines are an update to the 2004 "Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents." Significant changes in these guidelines include (1) the replacement of the term "prehypertension" with the term "elevated blood pressure," (2) new normative pediatric blood pressure (BP) tables based on normal-weight children, (3) a simplified screening table for identifying BPs needing further evaluation, (4) a simplified BP classification in adolescents ≥13 years of age that aligns with the forthcoming American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology adult BP guidelines, (5) a more limited recommendation to perform screening BP measurements only at preventive care visits, (6) streamlined recommendations on the initial evaluation and management of abnormal BPs, (7) an expanded role for ambulatory BP monitoring in the diagnosis and management of pediatric hypertension, and (8) revised recommendations on when to perform echocardiography in the evaluation of newly diagnosed hypertensive pediatric patients (generally only before medication initiation), along with a revised definition of left ventricular hypertrophy. These guidelines include 30 Key Action Statements and 27 additional recommendations derived from a comprehensive review of almost 15 000 published articles between January 2004 and July 2016. Each Key Action Statement includes level of evidence, benefit-harm relationship, and strength of recommendation. This clinical practice guideline, endorsed by the American Heart Association, is intended to foster a patient- and family-centered approach to care, reduce unnecessary and costly medical interventions, improve patient diagnoses and outcomes, support implementation, and provide direction for future research.

24 Guideline [2016 European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. The Sixth Joint Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and Other Societies on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice (constituted by representatives of 10 societies and by invited experts. Developed with the special contribution of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation]. 2017

Piepoli, Massimo F / Hoes, Arno W / Agewall, Stefan / Albus, Christian / Brotons, Carlos / Catapano, Alberico L / Cooney, Marie-Therese / Corrà, Ugo / Cosyns, Bernard / Deaton, Christi / Graham, Ian / Hall, Michael Stephen / Hobbs, F D Richard / Løchen, Maja-Lisa / Löllgen, Herbert / Marques-Vidal, Pedro / Perk, Joep / Prescott, Eva / Redon, Josep / Richter, Dimitrios J / Sattar, Naveed / Smulders, Yvo / Tiberi, Monica / van der Worp, H Bart / van Dis, Ineke / Verschuren, W M Monique. ·European Society of Cardiology (ESC). · International Society of Behavioural Medicine (ISBM). · WONCA Europe. · European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). · International Diabetes Federation European Region (IDF Europe). · International Federation of Sport Medicine (FIMS). · European Society of Hypertension (ESH). · European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). · European Stroke Organisation (ESO). · European Heart Network (EHN). ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #28714997.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Consensus Bundle on Severe Hypertension During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period. 2017

Bernstein, Peter S / Martin, James N / Barton, John R / Shields, Laurence E / Druzin, Maurice L / Scavone, Barbara M / Frost, Jennifer / Morton, Christine H / Ruhl, Catherine / Slager, Joan / Tsigas, Eleni Z / Jaffer, Sara / Menard, M Kathryn. · ·J Midwifery Womens Health · Pubmed #28697534.

ABSTRACT: Complications arising from hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are among the leading causes of preventable severe maternal morbidity and mortality. Timely and appropriate treatment has the potential to significantly reduce hypertension-related complications. To assist health care providers in achieving this goal, this patient safety bundle provides guidance to coordinate and standardize the care provided to women with severe hypertension during pregnancy and the postpartum period. This is one of several patient safety bundles developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity care setting. Similar to other bundles that have been developed and promoted by the Partnership, the hypertension safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

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