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Hypertension HELP
Based on 64,774 articles published since 2007
|||| 24 

These are the 64774 published articles about Hypertension that originated from Worldwide during 2007-2017.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline [Blood Pressure Measurement and Treatment Targets: Position Paper of the DHL® Task Force Scientific Statements and Guidelines]. 2017

Krämer, Bernhard K / Hausberg, Martin / Sanner, Bernd / Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina / Weil, Joachim / Weisser, Burkhard / Wenzel, Ulrich / Trenkwalder, Peter / Anonymous2231344. · ·Dtsch Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #28873492.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline for Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. 2017

Flynn, Joseph T / Kaelber, David C / Baker-Smith, Carissa M / Blowey, Douglas / Carroll, Aaron E / Daniels, Stephen R / de Ferranti, Sarah D / Dionne, Janis M / Falkner, Bonita / Flinn, Susan K / Gidding, Samuel S / Goodwin, Celeste / Leu, Michael G / Powers, Makia E / Rea, Corinna / Samuels, Joshua / Simasek, Madeline / Thaker, Vidhu V / Urbina, Elaine M / Anonymous1801304. ·Dr. Robert O. Hickman Endowed Chair in Pediatric Nephrology, Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington; joseph.flynn@seattlechildrens.org. · Departments of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, Case Western Reserve University and MetroHealth System, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Pediatric Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. · Children's Mercy Hospital, University of Missouri-Kansas City and Children's Mercy Integrated Care Solutions, Kansas City, Missouri. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado-Denver and Pediatrician in Chief, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. · Director, Preventive Cardiology Clinic, Boston Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia and British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Consultant, American Academy of Pediatrics, Washington, District of Columbia. · Cardiology Division Head, Nemours Cardiac Center, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware. · National Pediatric Blood Pressure Awareness Foundation, Prairieville, Louisiana. · Departments of Pediatrics and Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington, University of Washington Medicine and Information Technology Services, and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia. · Associate Director, General Academic Pediatric Fellowship, Staff Physician, Boston's Children's Hospital Primary Care at Longwood, Instructor, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, McGovern Medical School, University of Texas, Houston, Texas. · Pediatric Education, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Shadyside Family Medicine Residency, Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Division of Molecular Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and. · Preventive Cardiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #28827377.

ABSTRACT: These pediatric hypertension guidelines are an update to the 2004 "Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents." Significant changes in these guidelines include (1) the replacement of the term "prehypertension" with the term "elevated blood pressure," (2) new normative pediatric blood pressure (BP) tables based on normal-weight children, (3) a simplified screening table for identifying BPs needing further evaluation, (4) a simplified BP classification in adolescents ≥13 years of age that aligns with the forthcoming American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology adult BP guidelines, (5) a more limited recommendation to perform screening BP measurements only at preventive care visits, (6) streamlined recommendations on the initial evaluation and management of abnormal BPs, (7) an expanded role for ambulatory BP monitoring in the diagnosis and management of pediatric hypertension, and (8) revised recommendations on when to perform echocardiography in the evaluation of newly diagnosed hypertensive pediatric patients (generally only before medication initiation), along with a revised definition of left ventricular hypertrophy. These guidelines include 30 Key Action Statements and 27 additional recommendations derived from a comprehensive review of almost 15 000 published articles between January 2004 and July 2016. Each Key Action Statement includes level of evidence, benefit-harm relationship, and strength of recommendation. This clinical practice guideline, endorsed by the American Heart Association, is intended to foster a patient- and family-centered approach to care, reduce unnecessary and costly medical interventions, improve patient diagnoses and outcomes, support implementation, and provide direction for future research.

3 Guideline [2016 European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. The Sixth Joint Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and Other Societies on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice (constituted by representatives of 10 societies and by invited experts. Developed with the special contribution of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation]. 2017

Piepoli, Massimo F / Hoes, Arno W / Agewall, Stefan / Albus, Christian / Brotons, Carlos / Catapano, Alberico L / Cooney, Marie-Therese / Corrà, Ugo / Cosyns, Bernard / Deaton, Christi / Graham, Ian / Hall, Michael Stephen / Hobbs, F D Richard / Løchen, Maja-Lisa / Löllgen, Herbert / Marques-Vidal, Pedro / Perk, Joep / Prescott, Eva / Redon, Josep / Richter, Dimitrios J / Sattar, Naveed / Smulders, Yvo / Tiberi, Monica / van der Worp, H Bart / van Dis, Ineke / Verschuren, W M Monique. · · European Society of Cardiology (ESC). · International Society of Behavioural Medicine (ISBM). · WONCA Europe. · European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). · International Diabetes Federation European Region (IDF Europe). · International Federation of Sport Medicine (FIMS). · European Society of Hypertension (ESH). · European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). · European Stroke Organisation (ESO). · European Heart Network (EHN). ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #28714997.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline Hypertension Canada's 2017 Guidelines for Diagnosis, Risk Assessment, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension in Adults. 2017

Leung, Alexander A / Daskalopoulou, Stella S / Dasgupta, Kaberi / McBrien, Kerry / Butalia, Sonia / Zarnke, Kelly B / Nerenberg, Kara / Harris, Kevin C / Nakhla, Meranda / Cloutier, Lyne / Gelfer, Mark / Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime / Milot, Alain / Bolli, Peter / Tremblay, Guy / McLean, Donna / Tobe, Sheldon W / Ruzicka, Marcel / Burns, Kevin D / Vallée, Michel / Prasad, G V Ramesh / Gryn, Steven E / Feldman, Ross D / Selby, Peter / Pipe, Andrew / Schiffrin, Ernesto L / McFarlane, Philip A / Oh, Paul / Hegele, Robert A / Khara, Milan / Wilson, Thomas W / Penner, S Brian / Burgess, Ellen / Sivapalan, Praveena / Herman, Robert J / Bacon, Simon L / Rabkin, Simon W / Gilbert, Richard E / Campbell, Tavis S / Grover, Steven / Honos, George / Lindsay, Patrice / Hill, Michael D / Coutts, Shelagh B / Gubitz, Gord / Campbell, Norman R C / Moe, Gordon W / Howlett, Jonathan G / Boulanger, Jean-Martin / Prebtani, Ally / Kline, Gregory / Leiter, Lawrence A / Jones, Charlotte / Côté, Anne-Marie / Woo, Vincent / Kaczorowski, Janusz / Trudeau, Luc / Tsuyuki, Ross T / Hiremath, Swapnil / Drouin, Denis / Lavoie, Kim L / Hamet, Pavel / Grégoire, Jean C / Lewanczuk, Richard / Dresser, George K / Sharma, Mukul / Reid, Debra / Lear, Scott A / Moullec, Gregory / Gupta, Milan / Magee, Laura A / Logan, Alexander G / Dionne, Janis / Fournier, Anne / Benoit, Geneviève / Feber, Janusz / Poirier, Luc / Padwal, Raj S / Rabi, Doreen M / Anonymous1871222. ·Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: aacleung@ucalgary.ca. · Divisions of General Internal Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology and Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, McGill University, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Departments of Family Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, O'Brien Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia, Copeman Healthcare Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Quebec, Canada. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · CHU-Québec-Hopital St Sacrement, Québec, Quebec, Canada. · University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Discipline of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, Newfoundland and Labrador. · Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine and Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Division of Nephrology, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Departments of Medicine (Division of Endocrinology) and Biochemistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Vancouver Coastal Health Addiction Services, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux du Nord-de-l'Île-de-Montréal (CIUSSS-NIM), Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Vancouver Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University of Toronto, Division of Endocrinology, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Stroke, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Departments of Clinical Neurosciences and Radiology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Division of Neurology, Halifax Infirmary, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Medicine, Community Health Sciences, Physiology and Pharmacology, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Cardiac Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Charles LeMoyne Hospital Research Centre, Sherbrooke University, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. · Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of British Columbia, Southern Medical Program, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada. · Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. · University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Université de Montréal and Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM), Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Division of Internal Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Faculté de Médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Université de Montréal, Institut de cardiologie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · McMaster University, Hamilton Health Sciences Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Centre intégré de santé et de services sociaux (CISSS) de l'Outaouais, Groupes de médecine de famille (GMF) de Wakefield, Wakefield, Quebec, Canada. · Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Public Health School, University of Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, and Canadian Collaborative Research Network, Brampton, Ontario, Canada. · St George's, University of London and the St George's Hospital National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. · Service de cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Department of Pediatrics, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec et Faculté de Pharmacie, Université Laval, Québec, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Departments of Medicine, Community Health and Cardiac Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #28449828.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension Canada provides annually updated, evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension. This year, we introduce 10 new guidelines. Three previous guidelines have been revised and 5 have been removed. Previous age and frailty distinctions have been removed as considerations for when to initiate antihypertensive therapy. In the presence of macrovascular target organ damage, or in those with independent cardiovascular risk factors, antihypertensive therapy should be considered for all individuals with elevated average systolic nonautomated office blood pressure (non-AOBP) readings ≥ 140 mm Hg. For individuals with diastolic hypertension (with or without systolic hypertension), fixed-dose single-pill combinations are now recommended as an initial treatment option. Preference is given to pills containing an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker in combination with either a calcium channel blocker or diuretic. Whenever a diuretic is selected as monotherapy, longer-acting agents are preferred. In patients with established ischemic heart disease, caution should be exercised in lowering diastolic non-AOBP to ≤ 60 mm Hg, especially in the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy. After a hemorrhagic stroke, in the first 24 hours, systolic non-AOBP lowering to < 140 mm Hg is not recommended. Finally, guidance is now provided for screening, initial diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of renovascular hypertension arising from fibromuscular dysplasia. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these guidelines are discussed.

5 Guideline 2016 Consensus statement on prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in the Hong Kong population. 2017

Cheung, B My / Cheng, C H / Lau, C P / Wong, C Ky / Ma, R Cw / Chu, D Ws / Ho, D Hk / Lee, K Lf / Tse, H F / Wong, A Sp / Yan, B Py / Yan, V Wt. ·Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong. · Private practice, Hong Kong. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong. · Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, Happy Valley, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong. ·Hong Kong Med J · Pubmed #28387202.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: In Hong Kong, the prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease has increased markedly over the past few decades, and further increases are expected. In 2008, the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Task Force released a consensus statement on preventing cardiovascular disease in the Hong Kong population. The present article provides an update on these recommendations. PARTICIPANTS: A multidisciplinary group of clinicians comprising the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Task Force-10 cardiologists, an endocrinologist, and a family physician-met in September 2014 and June 2015 in Hong Kong. EVIDENCE: Guidelines from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association, the European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology, and the Eighth Joint National Committee for the Management of High Blood Pressure were reviewed. CONSENSUS PROCESS: Group members reviewed the 2008 Consensus Statement and relevant international guidelines. At the meetings, each topical recommendation of the 2008 Statement was assessed against the pooled recommendations on that topic from the international guidelines. A final recommendation on each topic was generated by consensus after discussion. CONCLUSIONS: It is recommended that a formal risk scoring system should be used for risk assessment of all adults aged 40 years or older who have at least one cardiovascular risk factor. Individuals can be classified as having a low, moderate, or high risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and appropriate interventions selected accordingly. Recommended lifestyle modifications include adopting a healthy eating pattern; maintaining a low body mass index; quitting smoking; and undertaking regular, moderate-intensity physical activity. Pharmacological interventions should be selected as appropriate after lifestyle modification.

6 Guideline Committee Opinion No. 692: Emergent Therapy for Acute-Onset, Severe Hypertension During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period. 2017

Anonymous3941172. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28333820.

ABSTRACT: Acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both can occur during the prenatal, intrapartum, or postpartum periods. Pregnant women or women in the postpartum period with acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both require urgent antihypertensive therapy. Introducing standardized, evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of adverse maternal outcomes. Individuals and institutions should have mechanisms in place to initiate the prompt administration of medication when a patient presents with a hypertensive emergency. Treatment with first-line agents should be expeditious and occur as soon as possible within 30-60 minutes of confirmed severe hypertension to reduce the risk of maternal stroke. Intravenous labetalol and hydralazine have long been considered first-line medications for the management of acute-onset, severe hypertension in pregnant women and women in the postpartum period. Although relatively less information currently exists for the use of calcium channel blockers for this clinical indication, the available evidence suggests that immediate release oral nifedipine also may be considered as a first-line therapy, particularly when intravenous access is not available. In the rare circumstance that intravenous bolus labetalol, hydralazine, or immediate release oral nifedipine fails to relieve acute-onset, severe hypertension and is given in successive appropriate doses, emergent consultation with an anesthesiologist, maternal-fetal medicine subspecialist, or critical care subspecialist to discuss second-line intervention is recommended.

7 Guideline Committee Opinion No. 692 Summary: Emergent Therapy for Acute-Onset, Severe Hypertension During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period. 2017

Anonymous3861172. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28333812.

ABSTRACT: Acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both can occur during the prenatal, intrapartum, or postpartum periods. Pregnant women or women in the postpartum period with acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both require urgent antihypertensive therapy. Introducing standardized, evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of adverse maternal outcomes. Individuals and institutions should have mechanisms in place to initiate the prompt administration of medication when a patient presents with a hypertensive emergency. Treatment with first-line agents should be expeditious and occur as soon as possible within 30-60 minutes of confirmed severe hypertension to reduce the risk of maternal stroke. Intravenous labetalol and hydralazine have long been considered first-line medications for the management of acute-onset, severe hypertension in pregnant women and women in the postpartum period. Although relatively less information currently exists for the use of calcium channel blockers for this clinical indication, the available evidence suggests that immediate release oral nifedipine also may be considered as a first-line therapy, particularly when intravenous access is not available. In the rare circumstance that intravenous bolus labetalol, hydralazine, or immediate release oral nifedipine fails to relieve acute-onset, severe hypertension and is given in successive appropriate doses, emergent consultation with an anesthesiologist, maternal-fetal medicine subspecialist, or critical care subspecialist to discuss second-line intervention is recommended.

8 Guideline ISFM Consensus Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Management of Hypertension in Cats. 2017

Taylor, Samantha S / Sparkes, Andrew H / Briscoe, Katherine / Carter, Jenny / Sala, Salva Cervantes / Jepson, Rosanne E / Reynolds, Brice S / Scansen, Brian A. ·1 International Cat Care/ISFM, Tisbury, Wiltshire SP3 6LD, UK. · 2 Animal Referral Hospital, 250 Parramatta Road, Homebush, Sydney, NSW 2140, Australia. · 3 PO Box 128209, Remuera, Auckland 1541, New Zealand. · 4 Clínica Felina Barcelona, C/Marqués de Campo Sagrado 12, Barcelona, Spain. · 5 Clinical Sciences and Services, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK. · 6 Université de Toulouse, ENVT, Toulouse, France. · 7 Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Campus Delivery 1678, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. ·J Feline Med Surg · Pubmed #28245741.

ABSTRACT: Practical relevance: Feline hypertension is a common disease in older cats that is frequently diagnosed in association with other diseases such as chronic kidney disease and hyperthyroidism (so-called secondary hypertension), although some cases of apparent primary hypertension are also reported. The clinical consequences of hypertension can be severe, related to 'target organ damage' (eye, heart and vasculature, brain and kidneys), and early diagnosis followed by appropriate therapeutic management should help reduce the morbidity associated with this condition. Clinical challenges: Despite being a common disease, routine blood pressure (BP) monitoring is generally performed infrequently, probably leading to underdiagnosis of feline hypertension in clinical practice. There is a need to: (i) ensure BP is measured as accurately as possible with a reproducible technique; (ii) identify and monitor patients at risk of developing hypertension; (iii) establish appropriate criteria for therapeutic intervention; and (iv) establish appropriate therapeutic targets. Based on current data, amlodipine besylate is the treatment of choice to manage feline hypertension and is effective in the majority of cats, but the dose needed to successfully manage hypertension varies between individuals. Some cats require long-term adjuvant therapy and, occasionally, additional therapy is necessary for emergency management of hypertensive crises. Evidence base: These Guidelines from the International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) are based on a comprehensive review of the currently available literature, and are aimed at providing practical recommendations to address the challenges of feline hypertension for veterinarians. There are many areas where more data is required which, in the future, will serve to confirm or modify some of the recommendations in these Guidelines.

9 Guideline Pharmacologic Treatment of Hypertension in Adults Aged 60 Years or Older to Higher Versus Lower Blood Pressure Targets: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians and the American Academy of Family Physicians. 2017

Qaseem, Amir / Wilt, Timothy J / Rich, Robert / Humphrey, Linda L / Frost, Jennifer / Forciea, Mary Ann / Anonymous3341152. ·From the American College of Physicians and University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Community Care of the Lower Cape Fear, Wilmington, North Carolina; Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon; and American Academy of Family Physicians, Leawood, Kansas. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #28135725.

ABSTRACT: Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) jointly developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations based on the benefits and harms of higher versus lower blood pressure targets for the treatment of hypertension in adults aged 60 years or older. Methods: This guideline is based on a systematic review of published randomized, controlled trials for primary outcomes and observational studies for harms only (identified through EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, and ClinicalTrials.gov), from database inception through January 2015. The MEDLINE search was updated through September 2016. Evaluated outcomes included all-cause mortality, morbidity and mortality related to stroke, major cardiac events (fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death), and harms. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) method. Target Audience and Patient Population: The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians, and the target patient population includes all adults aged 60 years or older with hypertension. Recommendation 1: ACP and AAFP recommend that clinicians initiate treatment in adults aged 60 years or older with systolic blood pressure persistently at or above 150 mm Hg to achieve a target systolic blood pressure of less than 150 mm Hg to reduce the risk for mortality, stroke, and cardiac events. (Grade: strong recommendation, high-quality evidence). ACP and AAFP recommend that clinicians select the treatment goals for adults aged 60 years or older based on a periodic discussion of the benefits and harms of specific blood pressure targets with the patient. Recommendation 2: ACP and AAFP recommend that clinicians consider initiating or intensifying pharmacologic treatment in adults aged 60 years or older with a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack to achieve a target systolic blood pressure of less than 140 mm Hg to reduce the risk for recurrent stroke. (Grade: weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). ACP and AAFP recommend that clinicians select the treatment goals for adults aged 60 years or older based on a periodic discussion of the benefits and harms of specific blood pressure targets with the patient. Recommendation 3: ACP and AAFP recommend that clinicians consider initiating or intensifying pharmacologic treatment in some adults aged 60 years or older at high cardiovascular risk, based on individualized assessment, to achieve a target systolic blood pressure of less than 140 mm Hg to reduce the risk for stroke or cardiac events. (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). ACP and AAFP recommend that clinicians select the treatment goals for adults aged 60 years or older based on a periodic discussion of the benefits and harms of specific blood pressure targets with the patient.

10 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 14 - Hypertensive Crisis 2016

Malachias, M V B / Barbosa, E C D / Martim, J F V / Rosito, G B A / Toledo, J Y / Passarelli, O. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819393.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 13 - Resistant Arterial Hypertension 2016

Malachias, M V B / Rodrigues, C I S / Muxfeldt, E / Salles, G F / Moreno, H / Gus, M. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819392.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 12 - Secondary Arterial Hypertension 2016

Malachias, M V B / Bortolotto, L A / Drager, L F / Borelli, F A O / Lotaif, L A D / Martins, L C. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819391.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 11 - Arterial Hypertension in the elderly 2016

Malachias, M V B / Ferreira, S / Souza, W K S B / Ribeiro, J M / Miranda, R D / Jardim, T S V. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819390.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 10 - Hypertension in Children and Adolescents 2016

Malachias, M V B / Koch, V / Colombo, Colombo / Silva, Silva / Guimarães, I C B / Nogueira, P K. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819389.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 9 - Arterial Hypertension in pregnancy 2016

Malachias, M V B / Figueiredo, C E P / Sass, N / Antonello, I C / Torloni, M R / Bortolotto, M R F L. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819388.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 8 - Hypertension and Associated Clinical Conditions 2016

Malachias, M V B / Amodeo, C / Paula, R B / Cordeiro, A C / Magalhães, L B N C / Bodanese, L C. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 7 - Pharmacological Treatment 2016

Malachias, M V B / Paulo César Veiga Jardim, P C V / Almeida, F A / Lima, E / Feitosa, G S. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819386.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 6 - Non-pharmacological treatment 2016

Malachias, M V B / Franco, R J S / Forjaz, C L M / Pierin, A M G / Gowdak, M M G / Klein, M R S T / Matsudo, V. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819385.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 5 - Therapeutic Decision and Targets 2016

Malachias, M V B / Andrea Araujo Brandão, A A / Kaiser, S / Moreira, O. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819384.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 3 - Clinical and Complementary Assessment 2016

Malachias, M V B / Neves, M F T / Mion, D / Silva, G V / Lopes, H F / Oigman, W. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819383.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 3 - Clinical and Complementary Assessment 2016

Malachias, M V B / Póvoa, R M S / Nogueira, A R / Souza, D / Costa, L S / Magalhães, M E. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819382.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 2 - Diagnosis and Classification 2016

Malachias, M V B / Gomes, M A M / Nobre, F / Alessi, A / Feitosa, A D / Coelho, E B. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819381.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 1 - Concept, Epidemiology and Primary Prevention 2016

Malachias, Mvb / Plavnik, F L / Machado, C A / Malta, D / Scala, L C N / Fuchs, S. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819380.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline UK Scleroderma Study Group (UKSSG) guidelines on the diagnosis and management of scleroderma renal crisis. 2016

Lynch, Bernadette M / Stern, Edward P / Ong, Voon / Harber, Mark / Burns, Aine / Denton, Christopher P. ·Centre for Rheumatology, Royal Free London and UCL Division of Medicine, London, UK. · Department of Renal Medicine, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Centre for Rheumatology, Royal Free London and UCL Division of Medicine, London, UK. c.denton@ucl.ac.uk. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #27749244.

ABSTRACT: The UK Scleroderma Study Group developed guidelines on the diagnosis and management of scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) based on best available evidence and clinical experience. SRC is characterised by the acute onset of severe hypertension and acute kidney injury. Current strategies to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality include identifying at risk patients to aid early diagnosis. ACE inhibitor therapy should be lifelong in all patients, regardless of whether they require renal replacement therapy. Patients with SRC may recover renal function up to 3 years after the crisis, most often within 12 to 18 months.

25 Guideline Executive Summary of the Joint Position Paper on Renal Denervation of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) and the European Society of Hypertension (ESH). 2016

Moss, Jonathan G / Belli, Anna-Maria / Coca, Antonio / Lee, Michael / Mancia, Giuseppe / Peregrin, Jan H / Redon, Josep / Reekers, Jim A / Tsioufis, Costas / Vorwerk, Dierk / Schmieder, Roland E. ·Interventional Radiology Unit, North Glasgow University Hospitals, Gartnavel General Hospital, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G12 0YN, UK. Jonathan.Moss@glasgow.ac.uk. · Department of Radiology, St George's Hospital, London, SW17 0QT, UK. · Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland. · University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy. · Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague 4, Czech Republic. · Research Institute INCLIVA, University of Valencia and CIBERObn, ISCIII, Madrid, Spain. · University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Hippokration Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Institute of Radiology, Klinikum Ingolstadt, Ingolstadt, Germany. · Nephrology and Hypertension, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. ·Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol · Pubmed #27658934.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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