Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Hypertension: HELP
Articles by Senaida Fernandez
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Senaida Fernandez wrote the following 3 articles about Hypertension.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension: cluster-randomized clinical trial main effects. 2014

Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Tobin, Jonathan N / Fernandez, Senaida / Cassells, Andrea / Diaz-Gloster, Marleny / Khalida, Chamanara / Pickering, Thomas / Schwartz, Joseph E. ·From the Division of Health and Behavior and Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Population Health, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (G.O., S.F.) · Clinical Directors Network, New York, NY (J.N.T., A.C., M.D.-G., C.K.) · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY (J.N.T.) · Center for Clinical and Translational Science, Rockefeller University, New York, NY (J.N.T.) · Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (T.P., J.E.S.) · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (J.E.S.). ·Circulation · Pubmed #24657991.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Data are limited on the implementation of evidence-based multilevel interventions targeted at blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive blacks who receive care in low-resource primary care practices. METHODS AND RESULTS: Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension is a cluster-randomized clinical trial in which 30 community health centers were randomly assigned to the intervention condition (IC) or usual care (UC). Patients at the IC sites received patient education, home BP monitoring, and monthly lifestyle counseling, whereas physicians attended monthly hypertension case rounds and received feedback on their patients' home BP readings and chart audits. Patients and physicians at the UC sites received printed patient education material and hypertension treatment guidelines, respectively. The primary outcome was BP control, and secondary outcomes were mean changes in systolic and diastolic BPs at 12 months, assessed with an automated BP device. A total of 1059 patients (mean age, 56 years; 28% men, 59% obese, and 36% with diabetes mellitus) were enrolled. The BP control rate was similar in both groups (IC=49.3% versus UC=44.5%; odds ratio, 1.21 [95% confidence interval, 0.90-1.63]; P=0.21). In prespecified subgroup analyses, the intervention was associated with greater BP control in patients without diabetes mellitus (IC=54.0% versus UC=44.7%; odds ratio, 1.45 [confidence interval, 1.02-2.06]); and small-sized community health centers (IC=51.1% versus UC=39.6%; odds ratio, 1.45 [confidence interval, 1.04-2.45]). CONCLUSIONS: A practice-based, multicomponent intervention was no better than UC in improving BP control among hypertensive blacks. Future research on the implementation of behavioral modification strategies for hypertension control in low-resource settings should focus on the development of more efficient and tailored interventions in this high-risk population. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00233220.

2 Article The Counseling Older Adults to Control Hypertension (COACH) trial: design and methodology of a group-based lifestyle intervention for hypertensive minority older adults. 2013

Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Fernandez, Senaida / Fournier, Leanne / Silver, Stephanie A / Kong, Jian / Gallagher, Sara / de la Calle, Franze / Plumhoff, Jordan / Sethi, Sheba / Choudhury, Evelyn / Teresi, Jeanne A. ·New York University School of Medicine, Department of Population Health, Center for Healthful Behavior Change, United States. Olugbenga.Ogedegbe@nyumc.org ·Contemp Clin Trials · Pubmed #23462343.

ABSTRACT: The disproportionately high prevalence of hypertension and its associated mortality and morbidity in minority older adults is a major public health concern in the United States. Despite compelling evidence supporting the beneficial effects of therapeutic lifestyle changes on blood pressure reduction, these approaches remain largely untested among minority elders in community-based settings. The Counseling Older Adults to Control Hypertension trial is a two-arm randomized controlled trial of 250 African-American and Latino seniors, 60 years and older with uncontrolled hypertension, who attend senior centers. The goal of the trial is to evaluate the effect of a therapeutic lifestyle intervention delivered via group classes and individual motivational interviewing sessions versus health education, on blood pressure reduction. The primary outcome is change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure from baseline to 12 months. The secondary outcomes are blood pressure control at 12 months; changes in levels of physical activity; body mass index; and number of daily servings of fruits and vegetables from baseline to 12 months. The intervention group will receive 12 weekly group classes followed by individual motivational interviewing sessions. The health education group will receive an individual counseling session on healthy lifestyle changes and standard hypertension education materials. Findings from this study will provide needed information on the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions delivered in senior centers. Such information is crucial in order to develop implementation strategies for translation of evidence-based lifestyle interventions to senior centers, where many minority elders spend their time, making the centers a salient point of dissemination.

3 Article The counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) Trial: baseline demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics. 2011

Fernandez, Senaida / Tobin, Jonathan N / Cassells, Andrea / Diaz-Gloster, Marleny / Kalida, Chamanara / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY, USA. ·Implement Sci · Pubmed #21884616.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Effectiveness of combined physician and patient-level interventions for blood pressure (BP) control in low-income, hypertensive African Americans with multiple co-morbid conditions remains largely untested in community-based primary care practices. Demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics of participants in the Counseling African American to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) Trial are described. CAATCH evaluates the effectiveness of a multi-level, multi-component, evidence-based intervention compared with usual care (UC) in improving BP control among poorly controlled hypertensive African Americans who receive primary care in Community Health Centers (CHCs). METHODS: Participants included 1,039 hypertensive African Americans receiving care in 30 CHCs in the New York Metropolitan area. Baseline data on participant demographic, clinical (e.g., BP, anti-hypertensive medications), psychosocial (e.g., depression, medication adherence, self-efficacy), and behavioral (e.g., exercise, diet) characteristics were gathered through direct observation, chart review, and interview. RESULTS: The sample was primarily female (71.6%), middle-aged (mean age = 56.9 ± 12.1 years), high school educated (62.4%), low-income (72.4% reporting less than $20,000/year income), and received Medicaid (35.9%) or Medicare (12.6%). Mean systolic and diastolic BP were 150.7 ± 16.7 mm Hg and 91.0 ± 10.6 mm Hg, respectively. Participants were prescribed an average of 2.5 ± 1.9 antihypertensive medications; 54.8% were on a diuretic; 33.8% were on a beta blocker; 41.9% were on calcium channel blockers; 64.8% were on angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). One-quarter (25.6%) of the sample had resistant hypertension; one-half (55.7%) reported medication non-adherence. Most (79.7%) reported one or more co-morbid medical conditions. The majority of the patients had a Charlson Co-morbidity score ≥ 2. Diabetes mellitus was common (35.8%), and moderate/severe depression was present in 16% of participants. Participants were sedentary (835.3 ± 1,644.2 Kcal burned per week), obese (59.7%), and had poor global physical health, poor eating habits, high health literacy, and good overall mental health. CONCLUSIONS: A majority of patients in the CAATCH trial exhibited adverse lifestyle behaviors, and had significant medical and psychosocial barriers to adequate BP control. Trial outcomes will shed light on the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions for BP control when implemented in real-world medical settings that serve high numbers of low-income hypertensive African-Americans with multiple co-morbidity and significant barriers to behavior change.