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Hypertension: HELP
Articles by Hua He
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Hua He wrote the following 7 articles about Hypertension.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article PK/PD modeling based on NO-ET homeostasis for improving management of sunitinib-induced hypertension in rats. 2020

Liu, Hao-Chen / Zhou, Xiao-Ting / Zheng, Yun-Si / He, Hua / Liu, Xiao-Quan. ·Center of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 210009, China. · Center of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 210009, China. huahe_cpupk@cpu.edu.cn. · Center of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 210009, China. lxq@cpu.edu.cn. ·Acta Pharmacol Sin · Pubmed #31932646.

ABSTRACT: Sunitinib is an oral small molecule multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which is currently used to treat severe cancers. Clinical research has shown that patients treated with sunitinib develop hypertension. As soon as sunitinib-induced hypertension appears, it is usual to administer anti-hypertension agent. But this treatment may cause acute blood pressure fluctuation which may lead to additional cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study is to establish a mathematical model for managing sunitinib-induced hypertension and blood pressure fluctuation. A mechanism-based PK/PD model was developed based on animal experiments. Then this model was used to perform simulations, thus to propose an anti-hypertension indication, according to which the anti-hypertension treatment might yield relative low-level AUC and fluctuation of blood pressure. The simulation results suggest that the anti-hypertension agent may yield low-level AUC and fluctuation of blood pressure when relative ET-1 level ranges from -15% to 5% and relative NO level is more than 10% compared to control group. Finally, animal experiments were conducted to verify the simulation results. Macitentan (30 mg/kg) was administered based on the above anti-hypertension indication. Compared with the untreated group, the optimized treatment significantly reduced the AUC of blood pressure; meanwhile the fluctuation of blood pressure in optimized treatment group was 70% less than that in immediate treatment group. This work provides a novel model with potential translational value for managing sunitinib-induced hypertension.

2 Article Novel risk genes and mechanisms implicated by exome sequencing of 2572 individuals with pulmonary arterial hypertension. 2019

Zhu, Na / Pauciulo, Michael W / Welch, Carrie L / Lutz, Katie A / Coleman, Anna W / Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia / Wang, Jiayao / Grimes, Joseph M / Martin, Lisa J / He, Hua / Anonymous4701174 / Shen, Yufeng / Chung, Wendy K / Nichols, William C. ·Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue MLC 7016, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Regeneron Genetics Center, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown, NY, USA. · Department of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue MLC 7016, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Bill.Nichols@cchmc.org. · Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Bill.Nichols@cchmc.org. ·Genome Med · Pubmed #31727138.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease with high mortality despite recent therapeutic advances. Pathogenic remodeling of pulmonary arterioles leads to increased pulmonary pressures, right ventricular hypertrophy, and heart failure. Mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 and other risk genes predispose to disease, but the vast majority of non-familial cases remain genetically undefined. METHODS: To identify new risk genes, we performed exome sequencing in a large cohort from the National Biological Sample and Data Repository for PAH (PAH Biobank, n = 2572). We then carried out rare deleterious variant identification followed by case-control gene-based association analyses. To control for population structure, only unrelated European cases (n = 1832) and controls (n = 12,771) were used in association tests. Empirical p values were determined by permutation analyses, and the threshold for significance defined by Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing. RESULTS: Tissue kallikrein 1 (KLK1) and gamma glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX) were identified as new candidate risk genes for idiopathic PAH (IPAH) with genome-wide significance. We note that variant carriers had later mean age of onset and relatively moderate disease phenotypes compared to bone morphogenetic receptor type 2 variant carriers. We also confirmed the genome-wide association of recently reported growth differentiation factor (GDF2) with IPAH and further implicate T-box 4 (TBX4) with child-onset PAH. CONCLUSIONS: We report robust association of novel genes KLK1 and GGCX with IPAH, accounting for ~ 0.4% and 0.9% of PAH Biobank cases, respectively. Both genes play important roles in vascular hemodynamics and inflammation but have not been implicated in PAH previously. These data suggest new genes, pathogenic mechanisms, and therapeutic targets for this lethal vasculopathy.

3 Article Comparative Effectiveness of Implementation Strategies for Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. 2018

Mills, Katherine T / Obst, Katherine M / Shen, Wei / Molina, Sandra / Zhang, Hui-Jie / He, Hua / Cooper, Lisa A / He, Jiang. ·From Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and Tulane University Translational Science Institute, New Orleans, Louisiana; Nanjing Medical University School of Public Health, Nanjing, China; The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China; and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #29277852.

ABSTRACT: Background: The prevalence of hypertension is high and is increasing worldwide, whereas the proportion of controlled hypertension is low. Purpose: To assess the comparative effectiveness of 8 implementation strategies for blood pressure (BP) control in adults with hypertension. Data Sources: Systematic searches of MEDLINE and Embase from inception to September 2017 with no language restrictions, supplemented with manual reference searches. Study Selection: Randomized controlled trials lasting at least 6 months comparing the effect of implementation strategies versus usual care on BP reduction in adults with hypertension. Data Extraction: Two investigators independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Data Synthesis: A total of 121 comparisons from 100 articles with 55 920 hypertensive patients were included. Multilevel, multicomponent strategies were most effective for systolic BP reduction, including team-based care with medication titration by a nonphysician (-7.1 mm Hg [95% CI, -8.9 to -5.2 mm Hg]), team-based care with medication titration by a physician (-6.2 mm Hg [CI, -8.1 to -4.2 mm Hg]), and multilevel strategies without team-based care (-5.0 mm Hg [CI, -8.0 to -2.0 mm Hg]). Patient-level strategies resulted in systolic BP changes of -3.9 mm Hg (CI, -5.4 to -2.3 mm Hg) for health coaching and -2.7 mm Hg (CI, -3.6 to -1.7 mm Hg) for home BP monitoring. Similar trends were seen for diastolic BP reduction. Limitation: Sparse data from low- and middle-income countries; few trials of some implementation strategies, such as provider training; and possible publication bias. Conclusion: Multilevel, multicomponent strategies, followed by patient-level strategies, are most effective for BP control in patients with hypertension and should be used to improve hypertension control. Primary Funding Source: National Institutes of Health.

4 Article Systolic Blood Pressure Reduction and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis. 2017

Bundy, Joshua D / Li, Changwei / Stuchlik, Patrick / Bu, Xiaoqing / Kelly, Tanika N / Mills, Katherine T / He, Hua / Chen, Jing / Whelton, Paul K / He, Jiang. ·Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana2Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, China. · Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana3Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. ·JAMA Cardiol · Pubmed #28564682.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Clinical trials have documented that lowering blood pressure reduces cardiovascular disease and premature deaths. However, the optimal target for reduction of systolic blood pressure (SBP) is uncertain. Objective: To assess the association of mean achieved SBP levels with the risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in adults with hypertension treated with antihypertensive therapy. Data Sources: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from inception to December 15, 2015, supplemented by manual searches of the bibliographies of retrieved articles. Study Selection: Studies included were clinical trials with random allocation to an antihypertensive medication, control, or treatment target. Studies had to have reported a difference in mean achieved SBP of 5 mm Hg or more between comparison groups. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Data were extracted from each study independently and in duplicate by at least 2 investigators according to a standardized protocol. Network meta-analysis was used to obtain pooled randomized results comparing the association of each 5-mm Hg SBP category with clinical outcomes after adjusting for baseline risk. Main Outcomes and Measures: Cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Results: Forty-two trials, including 144 220 patients, met the eligibility criteria. In general, there were linear associations between mean achieved SBP and risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality, with the lowest risk at 120 to 124 mm Hg. Randomized groups with a mean achieved SBP of 120 to 124 mm Hg had a hazard ratio (HR) for major cardiovascular disease of 0.71 (95% CI, 0.60-0.83) compared with randomized groups with a mean achieved SBP of 130 to 134 mm Hg, an HR of 0.58 (95% CI, 0.48-0.72) compared with those with a mean achieved SBP of 140 to 144 mm Hg, an HR of 0.46 (95% CI, 0.34-0.63) compared with those with a mean achieved SBP of 150 to 154 mm Hg, and an HR of 0.36 (95% CI, 0.26-0.51) compared with those with a mean achieved SBP of 160 mm Hg or more. Likewise, randomized groups with a mean achieved SBP of 120 to 124 mm Hg had an HR for all-cause mortality of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.58-0.93) compared with randomized groups with a mean achieved SBP of 130 to 134 mm Hg, an HR of 0.59 (95% CI, 0.45-0.77) compared with those with a mean achieved SBP of 140 to 144 mm Hg, an HR of 0.51 (95% CI, 0.36-0.71) compared with those with a mean achieved SBP of 150 to 154 mm Hg, and an HR of 0.47 (95% CI, 0.32-0.67) compared with those with a mean achieved SBP of 160 mm Hg or more. Conclusions and Relevance: This study suggests that reducing SBP to levels below currently recommended targets significantly reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. These findings support more intensive control of SBP among adults with hypertension.

5 Article Associations of the Serum/Glucocorticoid Regulated Kinase Genes With BP Changes and Hypertension Incidence: The Gensalt Study. 2017

Zhang, Dingding / Gu, Dongfeng / He, Jiang / Hixson, James E / Rao, Dabeeru C / Li, Changwei / He, Hua / Chen, Jichun / Huang, Jianfeng / Chen, Jing / Rice, Treva K / Chen, Shufeng / Kelly, Tanika N. ·Department of Evidence Based Medicine, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center of Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, USA. · Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; tkelly@tulane.edu. ·Am J Hypertens · Pubmed #27664953.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Single-marker and novel gene-based methods were employed to examine the associations of the serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinases (SGK) gene family with longitudinal blood pressure (BP) changes and hypertension incidence in a family-based cohort study. METHODS: Totally, 1,768 Chinese participants from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt Sensitivity (GenSalt) follow-up study were included in the current analyses. Nine BP measures were obtained at each of 3 visits during the GenSalt follow-up study. Mixed-model and Gene-based analyses were used to examine the associations of the SGK gene family with longitudinal BP phenotypes. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. RESULTS: After an average 7.2-year follow-up, 32.2% (513) of participants free of hypertension at baseline developed hypertension. Four novel SNPs in the SGK1 gene were predictive of the longitudinal BP phenotypes. The major alleles of SGK1 rs1763498 and rs114414980 conferred 2.9- and 2.5-fold increased risks of hypertension development, respectively (P = 1.0×10 CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the current study suggest that the SGK1 gene may play a role in long-term BP regulation and hypertension incidence.

6 Article Modeling Disease Progression: Angiotensin II Indirectly Inhibits Nitric Oxide Production via ADMA Accumulation in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats. 2016

Wang, Haidong / Jiang, Hao / Liu, Haochen / Zhang, Xue / Ran, Guimei / He, Hua / Liu, Xiaoquan. ·Center of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University Nanjing, China. ·Front Physiol · Pubmed #27909412.

ABSTRACT: Nitric oxide (NO) production impairment is involved in the onset and development of hypertension. Although NO production impairment in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) has been reported in a variety of researches, the time course of this progressive procedure, as well as its relationship with asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and angiotensin II (Ang II), has not been quantified. The aim of this research is to establish a mechanism-based disease progression model to assess Ang II and ADMA's inhibition of NO production in SHR's disease progression with/without ramipril's intervention. SHR were randomly divided into three groups: one disease group (

7 Article Blood Pressure Visit Intensification Study in Treatment: Trial design. 2015

Fiscella, Kevin / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / He, Hua / Carroll, Jennifer / Cassells, Andrea / Sanders, Mechelle / Khalida, Chamanara / D'Orazio, Brianna / Tobin, Jonathan N. ·Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. Electronic address: kevin_fiscella@urmc.rochester.edu. · Department of Population Health, Langone Medical Center, New York University, New York, NY. · Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA. · Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. · Clinical Directors Network (CDN), New York, NY. · Clinical Directors Network (CDN), New York, NY; Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY; The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science, New York, NY. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #26678642.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a presumption that, for patients with uncontrolled blood pressure (BP), early follow-up, that is, within 4 weeks of an elevated reading, improves BP control. However, data are lacking regarding effective interventions for increasing clinician frequency of follow-up visits and whether such interventions improve BP control. METHODS/DESIGN: Blood Pressure Visit Intensification Study in Treatment involves a multimodal approach to improving intensity of follow-up in 12 community health centers using a stepped wedge study design. DISCUSSION: The study will inform effective interventions for increasing frequency of follow-up visits among patients with uncontrolled BP and determine whether increasing follow-up frequency is associated with better BP control.