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Hypertension: HELP
Articles by Chamanara Khalida
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Chamanara Khalida wrote the following 3 articles about Hypertension.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Theoretical and Pragmatic Adaptation of the 5As Model to Patient-Centered Hypertension Counselling. 2018

Carroll, Jennifer K / Fiscella, Kevin / Cassells, Andrea / Sanders, Mechelle R / Williams, Stephen K / D'Orazio, Brianna / Holder, Tameir / Farah, Subrina / Khalida, Chamanara / Tobin, Jonathan N. · ·J Health Care Poor Underserved · Pubmed #30122677.

ABSTRACT: Patient-centered communication is a means for engaging patients in partnership. However, patient centered communication has not always been grounded in theory or in clinicians' pragmatic needs. The objective of this report is to present a practical approach to hypertension counselling that uses the 5As framework and is grounded in theory and best communication practices.

2 Article Blood Pressure Visit Intensification Study in Treatment: Trial design. 2015

Fiscella, Kevin / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / He, Hua / Carroll, Jennifer / Cassells, Andrea / Sanders, Mechelle / Khalida, Chamanara / D'Orazio, Brianna / Tobin, Jonathan N. ·Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. Electronic address: kevin_fiscella@urmc.rochester.edu. · Department of Population Health, Langone Medical Center, New York University, New York, NY. · Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA. · Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. · Clinical Directors Network (CDN), New York, NY. · Clinical Directors Network (CDN), New York, NY; Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY; The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science, New York, NY. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #26678642.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a presumption that, for patients with uncontrolled blood pressure (BP), early follow-up, that is, within 4 weeks of an elevated reading, improves BP control. However, data are lacking regarding effective interventions for increasing clinician frequency of follow-up visits and whether such interventions improve BP control. METHODS/DESIGN: Blood Pressure Visit Intensification Study in Treatment involves a multimodal approach to improving intensity of follow-up in 12 community health centers using a stepped wedge study design. DISCUSSION: The study will inform effective interventions for increasing frequency of follow-up visits among patients with uncontrolled BP and determine whether increasing follow-up frequency is associated with better BP control.

3 Article Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension: cluster-randomized clinical trial main effects. 2014

Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Tobin, Jonathan N / Fernandez, Senaida / Cassells, Andrea / Diaz-Gloster, Marleny / Khalida, Chamanara / Pickering, Thomas / Schwartz, Joseph E. ·From the Division of Health and Behavior and Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Population Health, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (G.O., S.F.) · Clinical Directors Network, New York, NY (J.N.T., A.C., M.D.-G., C.K.) · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY (J.N.T.) · Center for Clinical and Translational Science, Rockefeller University, New York, NY (J.N.T.) · Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (T.P., J.E.S.) · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (J.E.S.). ·Circulation · Pubmed #24657991.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Data are limited on the implementation of evidence-based multilevel interventions targeted at blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive blacks who receive care in low-resource primary care practices. METHODS AND RESULTS: Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension is a cluster-randomized clinical trial in which 30 community health centers were randomly assigned to the intervention condition (IC) or usual care (UC). Patients at the IC sites received patient education, home BP monitoring, and monthly lifestyle counseling, whereas physicians attended monthly hypertension case rounds and received feedback on their patients' home BP readings and chart audits. Patients and physicians at the UC sites received printed patient education material and hypertension treatment guidelines, respectively. The primary outcome was BP control, and secondary outcomes were mean changes in systolic and diastolic BPs at 12 months, assessed with an automated BP device. A total of 1059 patients (mean age, 56 years; 28% men, 59% obese, and 36% with diabetes mellitus) were enrolled. The BP control rate was similar in both groups (IC=49.3% versus UC=44.5%; odds ratio, 1.21 [95% confidence interval, 0.90-1.63]; P=0.21). In prespecified subgroup analyses, the intervention was associated with greater BP control in patients without diabetes mellitus (IC=54.0% versus UC=44.7%; odds ratio, 1.45 [confidence interval, 1.02-2.06]); and small-sized community health centers (IC=51.1% versus UC=39.6%; odds ratio, 1.45 [confidence interval, 1.04-2.45]). CONCLUSIONS: A practice-based, multicomponent intervention was no better than UC in improving BP control among hypertensive blacks. Future research on the implementation of behavioral modification strategies for hypertension control in low-resource settings should focus on the development of more efficient and tailored interventions in this high-risk population. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00233220.