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Hypertension: HELP
Articles by Kazuaki Negishi
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Kazuaki Negishi wrote the following 5 articles about Hypertension.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Back to the Future: Mitral Annular Plane Systolic Excursion on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance. 2019

Pathan, Faraz / Negishi, Kazuaki. ·Nepean Clinical School, Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Cardiology Nepean Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Charles Perkins Centre, Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: faraz.pathan@sydney.edu.au. · Nepean Clinical School, Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Charles Perkins Centre, Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #30660527.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Article Relation of Functional Status to Risk of Development of Atrial Fibrillation. 2017

Ramkumar, Satish / Yang, Hong / Wang, Ying / Nolan, Mark / Negishi, Kazuaki / Sanders, Prashanthan / Marwick, Thomas Hugh. ·Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia; School of Public Health and Preventative Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. · Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia. · University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. · Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia; School of Public Health and Preventative Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia. Electronic address: Tom.Marwick@bakeridi.edu.au. ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #27956001.

ABSTRACT: Identifying patients at risk is now important as there are demonstrable ways to alter disease progression which could potentially prevent atrial fibrillation (AF) and its complications. We sought whether impaired functional capacity was associated with risk of AF, independent of myocardial dysfunction. In this community-based study, asymptomatic participants aged ≥65 years were recruited if they had ≥1 risk factor (e.g., hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity). Participants underwent baseline echocardiography (including measurement of myocardial mechanics) and six-minute walk test. The CHARGE-AF score was used to calculate 5-year risk of developing AF. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to assess for independent risk factors for AF. A total of 607 patients (age 71 ± 5 years, men 47%) were studied at baseline and followed for at least 6 months. Patients in the higher AF risk groups were older and had increased rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease (p <0.05). Greater AF risk was associated with lower exercise capacity, independent of lower mean global longitudinal strain, global circumferential strain, greater mean E/e' ratio, indexed left atrial volume and LV mass. Multivariate linear regression confirmed association of LV and functional capacity parameters with AF risk. Although functional capacity is impaired in AF, this association precedes the onset of AF. In conclusion, poor functional status is associated with AF risk, independent of LV function.

3 Article Echocardiographic screening for non-ischaemic stage B heart failure in the community. 2016

Yang, Hong / Negishi, Kazuaki / Wang, Ying / Nolan, Mark / Saito, Makoto / Marwick, Thomas H. ·Menzies Institute for Medical Research, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. · Menzies Institute for Medical Research, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Tom.Marwick@bakeridi.edu.au. · Baker-IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia. Tom.Marwick@bakeridi.edu.au. ·Eur J Heart Fail · Pubmed #27813300.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: Incident heart failure (HF) continues to pose a common and serious problem. We sought to examine the value of echocardiographic predictors of new HF in a community-based elderly population at risk for HF, independent of and incremental to clinical evaluation. METHODS AND RESULTS: Asymptomatic patients ≥65 years old, with ≥1 HF risk factor (hypertension, type 2 diabetes, or obesity) were recruited from the community; patients with valve disease, reduced ejection fraction (EF), and atrial fibrillation (AF) were excluded. Patients underwent standard clinical evaluation including calculation of the Charlson co-morbidity score and a comprehensive echocardiography including global longitudinal strain (GLS). Functional capacity was assessed by 6 min walk test. New HF and cardiovascular death were assessed after a mean follow-up of 14 ± 4 months by three independent cardiologists using Framingham criteria. Of 410 subjects (median age 70 years; 48% men), the prevalence of stage B HF was 13% [by LV hypertrophy (LVH)], 12% (by abnormal E/e'), 33% (by impaired GLS), and 31% [by left atrial enlargement (LAE)]. New HF symptoms developed in 49, and 2 died of cardiovascular causes, giving an event rate of 104/1000 person-years. These patients were older (P = 0.012), had a higher Charlson co-morbidity score (P < 0.001), larger LV mass and left atrium, higher E/e', and lower GLS (P < 0.05). LAE, LVH, abnormal GLS, and E/e' were independent predictors of new HF. In sequential models, LV mass and GLS added incremental information to clinical parameters. GLS significantly reclassified individuals (P = 0.002), but no reclassification improvement was identified using LV mass index, E/e', and left atrial volume index. CONCLUSION: Echocardiographic assessment (especially GLS and LV mass) provides incremental value in predicting incident HF.

4 Article Prognostic Implications of LV Strain Risk Score in Asymptomatic Patients With Hypertensive Heart Disease. 2016

Saito, Makoto / Khan, Faisal / Stoklosa, Ted / Iannaccone, Andrea / Negishi, Kazuaki / Marwick, Thomas H. ·Menzies Institute for Medical Research, Hobart, Australia. · Royal Hobart Hospital, Hobart, Australia. · Menzies Institute for Medical Research, Hobart, Australia. Electronic address: tom.marwick@bakeridi.edu.au. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27344417.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study sought to investigate the associations of left ventricular (LV) strain and its serial change with major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in hypertensive heart disease, independent of and incremental to clinical and LV geometric parameters. BACKGROUND: In patients with hypertensive heart disease, MACE are associated with abnormal LV morphology, but their association with subclinical LV dysfunction is unclear. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 388 asymptomatic nonischemic patients with hypertension who had abnormal LV geometry at a baseline echocardiogram between 2005 and 2014. Global longitudinal strain (GLS) was measured using speckle tracking. Patients were followed for MACE (death and admission because of heart failure, myocardial infarction, and strokes) over median of 4 years. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the association of parameters with MACE. RESULTS: MACE (n = 72; 19%) were associated with higher prevalence of concentric hypertrophy and impaired GLS (both, p < 0.01). The association of GLS with MACE was independent of and incremental to clinical parameters and concentric hypertrophy. Echocardiographic follow-up was performed in 55 patients (median duration, 3 years); deterioration in GLS was also associated with the 10 patients experiencing MACE after the second echo. A risk score was developed using age >70, atrial fibrillation, concentric hypertrophy, and baseline GLS >-16% from the derivation cohort (C statistic, 0.71), and a separate validation cohort showed it to have good discrimination for MACE (C statistic, 0.71). CONCLUSIONS: GLS and its deterioration are associated with MACE in asymptomatic hypertensive heart disease. A risk score incorporating strain was useful for predicting risk of MACE.

5 Article Importance of Calibration Method in Central Blood Pressure for Cardiac Structural Abnormalities. 2016

Negishi, Kazuaki / Yang, Hong / Wang, Ying / Nolan, Mark T / Negishi, Tomoko / Pathan, Faraz / Marwick, Thomas H / Sharman, James E. ·Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Kazuaki.Negishi@utas.edu.au. · Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ·Am J Hypertens · Pubmed #27085076.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Central blood pressure (CBP) independently predicts cardiovascular risk, but calibration methods may affect accuracy of central systolic blood pressure (CSBP). Standard central systolic blood pressure (Stan-CSBP) from peripheral waveforms is usually derived with calibration using brachial SBP and diastolic BP (DBP). However, calibration using oscillometric mean arterial pressure (MAP) and DBP (MAP-CSBP) is purported to provide more accurate representation of true invasive CSBP. This study sought to determine which derived CSBP could more accurately discriminate cardiac structural abnormalities. METHODS: A total of 349 community-based patients with risk factors (71±5years, 161 males) had CSBP measured by brachial oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph, IEM GmbH, Stolberg, Germany) using 2 calibration methods: MAP-CSBP and Stan-CSBP. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and left atrial dilatation (LAD) were measured based on standard guidelines. RESULTS: MAP-CSBP was higher than Stan-CSBP (149±20 vs. 128±15mm Hg, P < 0.0001). Although they were modestly correlated (rho = 0.74, P < 0.001), the Bland-Altman plot demonstrated a large bias (21mm Hg) and limits of agreement (24mm Hg). In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses, MAP-CSBP significantly better discriminated LVH compared with Stan-CSBP (area under the curve (AUC) 0.66 vs. 0.59, P = 0.0063) and brachial SBP (0.62, P = 0.027). Continuous net reclassification improvement (NRI) (P < 0.001) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) (P < 0.001) corroborated superior discrimination of LVH by MAP-CSBP. Similarly, MAP-CSBP better distinguished LAD than Stan-CSBP (AUC 0.63 vs. 0.56, P = 0.005) and conventional brachial SBP (0.58, P = 0.006), whereas Stan-CSBP provided no better discrimination than conventional brachial BP (P = 0.09). CONCLUSIONS: CSBP is calibration dependent and when oscillometric MAP and DBP are used, the derived CSBP is a better discriminator for cardiac structural abnormalities.