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Hypertension: HELP
Articles by Gbenga O. Ogedegbe
Based on 103 articles published since 2010
(Why 103 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, G. Ogedegbe wrote the following 103 articles about Hypertension.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Guideline Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary artery disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. 2015

Rosendorff, Clive / Lackland, Daniel T / Allison, Matthew / Aronow, Wilbert S / Black, Henry R / Blumenthal, Roger S / Cannon, Christopher P / de Lemos, James A / Elliott, William J / Findeiss, Laura / Gersh, Bernard J / Gore, Joel M / Levy, Daniel / Long, Janet B / O'Connor, Christopher M / O'Gara, Patrick T / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Oparil, Suzanne / White, William B / Anonymous4500825. · ·Circulation · Pubmed #25829340.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline European Society of Hypertension practice guidelines for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. 2014

Parati, Gianfranco / Stergiou, George / O'Brien, Eoin / Asmar, Roland / Beilin, Lawrence / Bilo, Grzegorz / Clement, Denis / de la Sierra, Alejandro / de Leeuw, Peter / Dolan, Eamon / Fagard, Robert / Graves, John / Head, Geoffrey A / Imai, Yutaka / Kario, Kazuomi / Lurbe, Empar / Mallion, Jean-Michel / Mancia, Giuseppe / Mengden, Thomas / Myers, Martin / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Ohkubo, Takayoshi / Omboni, Stefano / Palatini, Paolo / Redon, Josep / Ruilope, Luis M / Shennan, Andrew / Staessen, Jan A / vanMontfrans, Gert / Verdecchia, Paolo / Waeber, Bernard / Wang, Jiguang / Zanchetti, Alberto / Zhang, Yuqing / Anonymous360796. ·aAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 bAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 cAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 dAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 eAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 fAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 gAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 hAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 iAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 jAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 kAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 lAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 mAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 nAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 oAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 pAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 qAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 rAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 sAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 tAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 uAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 vAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 wAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 xAuthor affiliations a ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #24886823.

ABSTRACT: Given the increasing use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in both clinical practice and hypertension research, a group of scientists, participating in the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability, in year 2013 published a comprehensive position paper dealing with all aspects of the technique, based on the available scientific evidence for ABPM. The present work represents an updated schematic summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, and is aimed at providing recommendations for proper use of this technique in a clinical setting by both specialists and practicing physicians. The present article details the requirements and the methodological issues to be addressed for using ABPM in clinical practice, The clinical indications for ABPM suggested by the available studies, among which white-coat phenomena, masked hypertension, and nocturnal hypertension, are outlined in detail, and the place of home measurement of blood pressure in relation to ABPM is discussed. The role of ABPM in pharmacological, epidemiological, and clinical research is also briefly mentioned. Finally, the implementation of ABPM in practice is considered in relation to the situation of different countries with regard to the reimbursement and the availability of ABPM in primary care practices, hospital clinics, and pharmacies.

3 Editorial Low-Dose Combination Blood Pressure Pharmacotherapy to Improve Treatment Effectiveness, Safety, and Efficiency. 2018

Huffman, Mark D / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Jaffe, Marc. ·Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Population Health, New York University, New York, New York. · Resolve to Save Lives, New York, New York. · Kaiser Permanente South, San Francisco Medical Center South, San Francisco, California. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30120460.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Unconscious bias and real-world hypertension outcomes: advancing disparities research. 2014

Ravenell, Joseph / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 227 East 30th Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY, 10016, USA, joseph.ravenell@nyumc.org. ·J Gen Intern Med · Pubmed #24710995.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Unraveling the mechanism of renin-angiotensin- aldosterone system activation and target organ damage in hypertensive blacks. 2012

Williams, Stephen K / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #22146513.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Labeling and hypertension: it is time to intervene on its negative consequences. 2010

Ogedegbe, Gbenga. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #20625073.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review Measurement of Blood Pressure in Humans: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association. 2019

Muntner, Paul / Shimbo, Daichi / Carey, Robert M / Charleston, Jeanne B / Gaillard, Trudy / Misra, Sanjay / Myers, Martin G / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Schwartz, Joseph E / Townsend, Raymond R / Urbina, Elaine M / Viera, Anthony J / White, William B / Wright, Jackson T. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #30827125.

ABSTRACT: The accurate measurement of blood pressure (BP) is essential for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. This article provides an updated American Heart Association scientific statement on BP measurement in humans. In the office setting, many oscillometric devices have been validated that allow accurate BP measurement while reducing human errors associated with the auscultatory approach. Fully automated oscillometric devices capable of taking multiple readings even without an observer being present may provide a more accurate measurement of BP than auscultation. Studies have shown substantial differences in BP when measured outside versus in the office setting. Ambulatory BP monitoring is considered the reference standard for out-of-office BP assessment, with home BP monitoring being an alternative when ambulatory BP monitoring is not available or tolerated. Compared with their counterparts with sustained normotension (ie, nonhypertensive BP levels in and outside the office setting), it is unclear whether adults with white-coat hypertension (ie, hypertensive BP levels in the office but not outside the office) have increased cardiovascular disease risk, whereas those with masked hypertension (ie, hypertensive BP levels outside the office but not in the office) are at substantially increased risk. In addition, high nighttime BP on ambulatory BP monitoring is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Both oscillometric and auscultatory methods are considered acceptable for measuring BP in children and adolescents. Regardless of the method used to measure BP, initial and ongoing training of technicians and healthcare providers and the use of validated and calibrated devices are critical for obtaining accurate BP measurements.

8 Review Hypertension Treatment in Blacks: Discussion of the U.S. Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2016

Williams, Stephen K / Ravenell, Joseph / Seyedali, Sara / Nayef, Sam / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016. Electronic address: stephen.williams@nyumc.org. · Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016. · Department of Medicine, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Jersey Shore University Medical Center, Neptune, NJ 07753. ·Prog Cardiovasc Dis · Pubmed #27693861.

ABSTRACT: Blacks are especially susceptible to hypertension (HTN) and its associated organ damage leading to adverse cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal outcomes. Accordingly, HTN is particularly significant in contributing to the black-white racial differences in health outcomes in the US. As such, in order to address these health disparities, practical clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) on how to treat HTN, specifically in blacks, are needed. This review article is a timely addition to the literature because the most recent U.S. CPG more explicitly emphasizes race into the algorithmic management of HTN. However, recent clinical research cautions that use of race as a proxy to determine therapeutic response to pharmaceutical agents may be erroneous. This review will address the implications of the use of race in the hypertension CPGs. We will review the rationale behind the introduction of race into the U.S. CPG and the level of evidence that was available to justify this introduction. Finally, we will conclude with practical considerations in the treatment of HTN in blacks.

9 Review Research Needs to Improve Hypertension Treatment and Control in African Americans. 2016

Whelton, Paul K / Einhorn, Paula T / Muntner, Paul / Appel, Lawrence J / Cushman, William C / Diez Roux, Ana V / Ferdinand, Keith C / Rahman, Mahboob / Taylor, Herman A / Ard, Jamy / Arnett, Donna K / Carter, Barry L / Davis, Barry R / Freedman, Barry I / Cooper, Lisa A / Cooper, Richard / Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice / Gavini, Nara / Go, Alan S / Hyman, David J / Kimmel, Paul L / Margolis, Karen L / Miller, Edgar R / Mills, Katherine T / Mensah, George A / Navar, Ann M / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Rakotz, Michael K / Thomas, George / Tobin, Jonathan N / Wright, Jackson T / Yoon, Sung Sug Sarah / Cutler, Jeffrey A / Anonymous7660880. ·From the Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (P.K.W., K.C.F.), and Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine (P.K.W., K.C.F.), New Orleans, LA · Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (P.T.E., P.D.-N., G.A.M., J.A.C.), and Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science (N.G., G.A.M.), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD · Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham (P.M.) · Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (L.J.A., L.A.C., E.R.M.) · Preventive Medicine Section, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, TN (W.C.C.) · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (A.V.D.R.) · Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, OH (M.R., J.T.W.) · Cardiovascular Research Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (H.A.T.) · Department of Epidemiology and Prevention (J.A.) and Department of Medicine (B.I.F., J.A.), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC · Dean's Office, University of Kentucky College of Public Health, Lexington (D.K.A.) · Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City (B.L.C.) · Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston (B.R.D.) · Department of Public Health Sciences, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL (R.C.) · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland (A.S.G.) · Department of Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (D.J.H.) · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (P.L.K.) · HealthPartners Institute, Minneapolis, MN (K.L.M.) · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (A.M.N.) · Department of Population Health, NYU School of Medicine, New York (G.O.) · American Medical Association, Chicago, IL (M.K.R.) · Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Cleveland Clinic, OH (G.T.) · Clinical Directors Network (CND) and The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science, New York (J.N.T.) · and National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD (S.S.(S.)Y.). ·Hypertension · Pubmed #27620388.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Recognition and Management of Hypertension in Older Persons: Focus on African Americans. 2015

Still, Carolyn H / Ferdinand, Keith C / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Wright, Jackson T. ·Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · Clinical Hypertension Program, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. · New York University School of Medicine, Department of Population Health, Center for Healthful Behavior Change, New York, New York. · School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. ·J Am Geriatr Soc · Pubmed #26480975.

ABSTRACT: POPULATIONS: Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effects of blood pressure (BP) reduction on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, with most of the evidence in individuals aged 60 and older. Several guidelines have recently been published on the specific management of hypertension in individuals aged 60 and older, including in high-risk groups such as African Americans. Most recommend careful evaluation, thiazide diuretics and calcium-channel blockers for initial drug therapy in most African Americans, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in those with chronic kidney disease or heart failure. Among the areas of controversy is the recommended target BP in African Americans aged 60 and older. A recent U.S. guideline recommended raising the systolic BP target from less than 140 mmHg to less than 150 mmHg in this population. This article will review the evidence and current guideline recommendations for hypertension treatment in older African Americans, including the rationale for continuing to recommend a SBP target of less than 140 mmHg in this population.

11 Review Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary artery disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. 2015

Rosendorff, Clive / Lackland, Daniel T / Allison, Matthew / Aronow, Wilbert S / Black, Henry R / Blumenthal, Roger S / Cannon, Christopher P / de Lemos, James A / Elliott, William J / Findeiss, Laura / Gersh, Bernard J / Gore, Joel M / Levy, Daniel / Long, Janet B / O'Connor, Christopher M / O'Gara, Patrick T / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Oparil, Suzanne / White, William B / Anonymous4440825. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #25828847.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Psychosocial risk factors for hypertension: an update of the literature. 2014

Cuffee, Yendelela / Ogedegbe, Chinwe / Williams, Natasha J / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Schoenthaler, Antoinette. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 227 East 30th Street, 6th floor, New York, NY, 10016, USA, Yendelela.cuffee@nyumc.org. ·Curr Hypertens Rep · Pubmed #25139781.

ABSTRACT: A growing body of research demonstrates that psychosocial factors play an important role in the development of hypertension. Previous reviews have identified several key factors (i.e., occupational stress) that contribute to the onset of hypertension; however, they are now outdated. In this review, we provide an updated synthesis of the literature from 2010 to April 2014. We identified 21 articles for inclusion in the review, of which there were six categories of psychosocial stressors: occupational stress, personality, mental health, housing instability, social support/isolation, and sleep quality. Sixteen of the studies reported an association between the psychosocial stressor and blood pressure. While several findings were consistent with previous literature, new findings regarding mediating and moderating factors underlying the psychosocial-hypertension association help to untangle inconsistencies reported in the literature. Moreover, sleep quality is a novel additional factor that should undergo further exploration. Areas for future research based on these findings are discussed.

13 Review Prevalence, determinants and systems-thinking approaches to optimal hypertension control in West Africa. 2014

Iwelunmor, Juliet / Airhihenbuwa, Collins O / Cooper, Richard / Tayo, Bamidele / Plange-Rhule, Jacob / Adanu, Richard / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 123 Huff Hall, 1206 S, Fourth St, Champaign, IL 61820, USA. jiwez@illinois.edu. ·Global Health · Pubmed #24886649.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In West Africa, hypertension, once rare, has now emerged as a critical health concern and the trajectory is upward and factors are complex. The true magnitude of hypertension in some West African countries, including in-depth knowledge of underlying risk factors is not completely understood. There is also a paucity of research on adequate systems-level approaches designed to mitigate the growing burden of hypertension in the region. AIMS: In this review, we thematically synthesize available literature pertaining to the prevalence of hypertension in West Africa and discuss factors that influence its diagnosis, treatment and control. We aimed to address the social and structural determinants influencing hypertension in the sub-region including the effects of urbanization, health infrastructure and healthcare workforce. FINDINGS: The prevalence of hypertension in West Africa has increased over the past decade and is rising rapidly with an urban-rural gradient that places higher hypertension prevalence on urban settings compared to rural settings. Overall levels of awareness of one's hypertension status remain consistently low in West African. Structural and economic determinants related to conditions of poverty such as insufficient finances have a direct impact on adherence to prescribed antihypertensive medications. Urbanization contributes to the increasing incidence of hypertension in the sub-region and available evidence indicates that inadequate health infrastructure may act as a barrier to optimal hypertension control in West Africa. CONCLUSION: Given that optimal hypertension control in West Africa depends on multiple factors that go beyond simply modifying the behaviors of the individuals alone, we conclude by discussing the potential role systems-thinking approaches can play to achieve optimal control in the sub-region. In the context of recent advances in hypertension management including new therapeutic options and innovative solutions to expand health workforce so as to meet the high demand for healthcare, the success of these strategies will rely on a new understanding of the complexity of human behaviors and interactions most aptly framed from a systems-thinking perspective.

14 Review Beyond medications and diet: alternative approaches to lowering blood pressure: a scientific statement from the american heart association. 2013

Brook, Robert D / Appel, Lawrence J / Rubenfire, Melvyn / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Bisognano, John D / Elliott, William J / Fuchs, Flavio D / Hughes, Joel W / Lackland, Daniel T / Staffileno, Beth A / Townsend, Raymond R / Rajagopalan, Sanjay / Anonymous3690756. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #23608661.

ABSTRACT: Many antihypertensive medications and lifestyle changes are proven to reduce blood pressure. Over the past few decades, numerous additional modalities have been evaluated in regard to their potential blood pressure-lowering abilities. However, these nondietary, nondrug treatments, collectively called alternative approaches, have generally undergone fewer and less rigorous trials. This American Heart Association scientific statement aims to summarize the blood pressure-lowering efficacy of several alternative approaches and to provide a class of recommendation for their implementation in clinical practice based on the available level of evidence from the published literature. Among behavioral therapies, Transcendental Meditation (Class IIB, Level of Evidence B), other meditation techniques (Class III, Level of Evidence C), yoga (Class III, Level of Evidence C), other relaxation therapies (Class III, Level of Evidence B), and biofeedback approaches (Class IIB, Level of Evidence B) generally had modest, mixed, or no consistent evidence demonstrating their efficacy. Between the noninvasive procedures and devices evaluated, device-guided breathing (Class IIA, Level of Evidence B) had greater support than acupuncture (Class III, Level of Evidence B). Exercise-based regimens, including aerobic (Class I, Level of Evidence A), dynamic resistance (Class IIA, Level of Evidence B), and isometric handgrip (Class IIB, Level of Evidence C) modalities, had relatively stronger supporting evidence. It is the consensus of the writing group that it is reasonable for all individuals with blood pressure levels >120/80 mm Hg to consider trials of alternative approaches as adjuvant methods to help lower blood pressure when clinically appropriate. A suggested management algorithm is provided, along with recommendations for prioritizing the use of the individual approaches in clinical practice based on their level of evidence for blood pressure lowering, risk-to-benefit ratio, potential ancillary health benefits, and practicality in a real-world setting. Finally, recommendations for future research priorities are outlined.

15 Review Enhancing adherence of antihypertensive regimens in hypertensive African-Americans: current and future prospects. 2012

Lewis, Lisa M / Ogedegbe, Chinwe / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, 418 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104-4217, USA. lisml@nursing.upenn.edu ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #23244358.

ABSTRACT: Patient adherence to antihypertensive medication is an important strategy for blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. However, rates of antihypertensive medication adherence among hypertensive African-Americans are unacceptably low. This article examines the current understanding of patient, clinical, provider and healthcare system factors associated with medication adherence in hypertensive African-Americans. Studies demonstrated that patient and clinical factors, such as self-efficacy and depression, are consistently associated with medication adherence in hypertensive African-Americans patients. Provider communication shows promise as a correlate of medication adherence, but more research on provider and healthcare system factors are still needed. The authors recommend that interventions targeted at increasing medication adherence among hypertensive African-Americans focus on self-efficacy. It is also imperative that clinicians screen hypertensive patients for depression and treat, if necessary.

16 Review Overcoming barriers to hypertension control in African Americans. 2012

Odedosu, Taiye / Schoenthaler, Antoinette / Vieira, Dorice L / Agyemang, Charles / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Bellevue Adult Primary Care Practice, Bellevue Hospital Center, New York, NY, USA. ·Cleve Clin J Med · Pubmed #22219234.

ABSTRACT: Barriers to blood pressure control exist at the patient, physician, and system levels. We review the current evidence for interventions that target patient- and physician-related barriers, such as patient education, home blood pressure monitoring, and computerized decision-support systems for physicians, and we emphasize the need for more studies that address the effectiveness of these interventions in African American patients.

17 Review Racism and hypertension: a review of the empirical evidence and implications for clinical practice. 2011

Brondolo, Elizabeth / Love, Erica E / Pencille, Melissa / Schoenthaler, Antoinette / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Department of Psychology, St Johns University, Jamaica, New York, USA. brondole@stjohns.edu ·Am J Hypertens · Pubmed #21331054.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite improved hypertension (HTN) awareness and treatment, racial disparities in HTN prevalence persist. An understanding of the biopsychosocial determinants of HTN is necessary to address racial disparities in the prevalence of HTN. This review examines the evidence directly and indirectly linking multiple levels of racism to HTN. METHODS: Published empirical research in EBSCO databases investigating the relationships of three levels of racism (individual/interpersonal, internalized, and institutional racism) to HTN was reviewed. RESULTS: Direct evidence linking individual/interpersonal racism to HTN diagnosis is weak. However, the relationship of individual/interpersonal racism to ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) is more consistent, with all published studies reporting a positive relationship of interpersonal racism to ABP. There is no direct evidence linking internalized racism to BP. Population-based studies provide some evidence linking institutional racism, in the forms of residential racial segregation (RRS) and incarceration, to HTN incidence. Racism shows associations to stress exposure and reactivity as well as associations to established HTN-related risk factors including obesity, low levels of physical activity and alcohol use. The effects vary by level of racism. CONCLUSIONS: Overall the findings suggest that racism may increase risk for HTN; these effects emerge more clearly for institutional racism than for individual level racism. All levels of racism may influence the prevalence of HTN via stress exposure and reactivity and by fostering conditions that undermine health behaviors, raising the barriers to lifestyle change.

18 Review Resistant hypertension and sleep apnea: pathophysiologic insights and strategic management. 2011

Williams, Stephen K / Ravenell, Joseph / Jean-Louis, Girardin / Zizi, Ferdinand / Underberg, James A / McFarlane, Samy I / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of General Internal Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10010, USA. stw2013@med.cornell.edu ·Curr Diab Rep · Pubmed #21104207.

ABSTRACT: Resistant hypertension is common among adults with hypertension affecting up to 30% of patients. The treatment of resistant hypertension is important because suboptimal blood pressure control is the leading preventable cause of death worldwide. A frequent comorbid condition in patients with resistant hypertension is obstructive sleep apnea. The pathophysiology of sleep apnea-associated hypertension is characterized by sustained adrenergic activation and volume retention often posing treatment challenges in patients with resistant hypertension. This review will address some of the epidemiologic data associating apnea with the pathogenesis of resistant hypertension. Diagnosis and management of apnea and its associated hypertension will also be considered.

19 Review Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement. 2010

Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Pickering, Thomas. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, 10010, USA. olugbenga.ogedegbe@nyumc.org ·Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #20937442.

ABSTRACT: Although the mercury sphygmomanometer is widely regarded as the gold standard for office blood pressure measurement, the ban on use of mercury devices continues to diminish their role in office and hospital settings. To date, mercury devices have largely been phased out in United States hospitals. This situation has led to the proliferation of nonmercury devices and has changed (probably forever) the preferable modality of blood pressure measurement in clinic and hospital settings. In this article, the basic techniques of blood pressure measurement and the technical issues associated with measurements in clinical practice are discussed. The devices currently available for hospital and clinic measurements and their important sources of error are presented. Practical advice is given on how the different devices and measurement techniques should be used. Blood pressure measurements in different circumstances and in special populations such as infants, children, pregnant women, elderly persons, and obese subjects are discussed.

20 Review Masked hypertension: evidence of the need to treat. 2010

Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Agyemang, Charles / Ravenell, Joseph E. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of General Internal Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 423 East 23rd Street #15-168N, New York, NY 10010, USA. Olugbenga.Ogedegbe@nyumc.org ·Curr Hypertens Rep · Pubmed #20694858.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of masked hypertension has been made easier with the widespread availability of home blood pressure monitoring devices with levels of accuracy comparable to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The negative impact of masked hypertension on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is evidenced by numerous well-designed clinic-based and population-based studies. The relationship of masked hypertension and target organ damage is also well documented. These two factors, combined with the robust evidence of reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality achieved with blood pressure treatment, makes the argument for actively identifying patients with masked hypertension and prescribing treatment similar to that for patients with sustained hypertension. In this paper, we review the evidence for the cardiovascular prognosis of masked hypertension compared with sustained hypertension, we review its impact on target organ damage, we propose an algorithm for the treatment of patients with masked hypertension, and we point out the pitfalls in adopting such an approach.

21 Review Cardiovascular disease risk reduction with sleep apnea treatment. 2010

Jean-Louis, Girardin / Brown, Clinton D / Zizi, Ferdinand / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Boutin-Foster, Carla / Gorga, Joseph / McFarlane, Samy I. ·Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, NY 11203-2098, USA. ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #20602560.

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death among adults in developed countries. An increase in prevalent cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., obesity, hypertension and diabetes) has led to a concerted effort to raise awareness of the need to use evidence-based strategies to help patients at risk of developing cardiovascular disease and to reduce their likelihood of suffering a stroke. Sleep apnea has emerged as an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic and clinical evidence has prompted the American Heart Association to issue a scientific statement describing the need to recognize sleep apnea as an important target for therapy in reducing cardiovascular disease risks. This article examines evidence supporting associations of sleep apnea with cardiovascular disease and considers evidence suggesting cardiovascular risk reductions through sleep apnea treatment. Perspectives on emerging therapeutic approaches and promising areas of clinical and experimental research are also discussed.

22 Clinical Trial The FAITH Trial: Baseline Characteristics of a Church-based Trial to Improve Blood Pressure Control in Blacks. 2015

Schoenthaler, Antoinette / Lancaster, Kristie / Midberry, Sara / Nulty, Matthew / Ige, Elizabeth / Palfrey, Amy / Kumar, Niketa / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·1. Department of Population Health, NYU School of Medicine. · 2. Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health, New York University. · 3. Department of Psychology, Saint John's University. ·Ethn Dis · Pubmed #26674992.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe the baseline characteristics of participants in the Faith-based Approaches in the Treatment of Hypertension (FAITH) Trial. DESIGN: FAITH evaluates the effectiveness of a faith-based lifestyle intervention vs health education control on blood pressure (BP) reduction among hypertensive Black adults. SETTING PARTICIPANTS AND MAIN MEASURES: Participants included 373 members of 32 Black churches in New York City. Baseline data collected included participant demographic characteristics, clinical measures (eg, blood pressure), behaviors (eg, diet, physical activity), and psychosocial factors (eg, self-efficacy, depressive symptoms). RESULTS: Participants had a mean age of 63.4 ± 11.9 years and 76% were female. About half completed at least some college (53%), 66% had an income ≥$20,000, and 42.2% were retired or on disability. Participants had a mean systolic and diastolic BP of 152.1 ± 16.8 mm Hg and 86.2 ± 12.2 mm Hg, respectively, and a mean BMI of 32 kg/m2. Hypertension (HTN) medications were taken by 95% of participants, but most (79.1%) reported non-adherence to their regimen. Participants reported consuming 3.4 ± 2.6 servings of fruits and vegetables and received 30.9% of their energy from fat. About one-third (35.9%) reported a low activity level. CONCLUSIONS: Participants in the FAITH trial exhibited several adverse clinical and behavioral characteristics at baseline. Future analyses will evaluate the effectiveness of the faith-based lifestyle intervention on changes in BP and lifestyle behaviors among hypertensive Black adults.

23 Article Association Between High Perceived Stress Over Time and Incident Hypertension in Black Adults: Findings From the Jackson Heart Study. 2019

Spruill, Tanya M / Butler, Mark J / Thomas, S Justin / Tajeu, Gabriel S / Kalinowski, Jolaade / Castañeda, Sheila F / Langford, Aisha T / Abdalla, Marwah / Blackshear, Chad / Allison, Matthew / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Sims, Mario / Shimbo, Daichi. ·Department of Population Health New York University School of Medicine New York NY. · Department of Psychiatry University of Alabama at Birmingham AL. · Department of Health Services Administration and Policy Temple University Philadelphia PA. · Graduate School of Public Health San Diego State University San Diego CA. · Department of Medicine Columbia University Medical Center New York NY. · Department of Data Science University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson MS. · Department of Family Medicine and Public Health University of California at San Diego CA. · Department of Medicine University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson MS. ·J Am Heart Assoc · Pubmed #31615321.

ABSTRACT: Background Chronic psychological stress has been associated with hypertension, but few studies have examined this relationship in blacks. We examined the association between perceived stress levels assessed annually for up to 13 years and incident hypertension in the Jackson Heart Study, a community-based cohort of blacks. Methods and Results Analyses included 1829 participants without hypertension at baseline (Exam 1, 2000-2004). Incident hypertension was defined as blood pressure≥140/90 mm Hg or antihypertensive medication use at Exam 2 (2005-2008) or Exam 3 (2009-2012). Each follow-up interval at risk of hypertension was categorized as low, moderate, or high perceived stress based on the number of annual assessments between exams in which participants reported "a lot" or "extreme" stress over the previous year (low, 0 high stress ratings; moderate, 1 high stress rating; high, ≥2 high stress ratings). During follow-up (median, 7.0 years), hypertension incidence was 48.5%. Hypertension developed in 30.6% of intervals with low perceived stress, 34.6% of intervals with moderate perceived stress, and 38.2% of intervals with high perceived stress. Age-, sex-, and time-adjusted risk ratios (95% CI) associated with moderate and high perceived stress versus low perceived stress were 1.19 (1.04-1.37) and 1.37 (1.20-1.57), respectively (

24 Article Comprehensive examination of the multilevel adverse risk and protective factors for cardiovascular disease among hypertensive African Americans. 2019

Schoenthaler, Antoinette / Fei, Kezhen / Ramos, Michelle A / Richardson, Lynne D / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Horowitz, Carol R. ·Department of Population Health, Center for Healthful Behavior Change, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Department of Population Health Sciences and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Center for Health Equity and Community Engaged Research, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Emergency Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) · Pubmed #31125186.

ABSTRACT: This paper describes the multilevel factors that contribute to hypertension disparities in 2052 hypertensive African Americans (mean age 52.9 ± 9.9 years; 66.3% female) who participated in a clinical trial. At the family level, participants reported average levels of life chaos and high social support. However, at the individual level, participants exhibited several adverse clinical and behavioral factors including poor blood pressure control (45% of population), obesity (61%), medication non-adherence (48%), smoking (32%), physical inactivity (45%), and poor diet (71%). While participants rated their provider as trustworthy, they reported high levels of discrimination in the health care system. Finally, community-level data indicate that participants reside in areas characterized by poor socio-economic and neighborhood conditions (eg, segregation). In the context of our trial, hypertensive African Americans exhibited several adverse risks and protective factors at multiple levels of influence. Future research should evaluate the impact of these factors on cardiovascular outcomes using a longitudinal design.

25 Article Implementation of clean cookstove interventions and its effects on blood pressure in low-income and middle-income countries: systematic review. 2019

Onakomaiya, Deborah / Gyamfi, Joyce / Iwelunmor, Juliet / Opeyemi, Jumoke / Oluwasanmi, Mofetoluwa / Obiezu-Umeh, Chisom / Dalton, Milena / Nwaozuru, Ucheoma / Ojo, Temitope / Vieira, Dorice / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Olopade, Christopher. ·Department of Population Health, NYU Langone Health, New York City, New York, USA. · Behavioral Science and Health Education, Saint Louis University College for Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. · College of Global Health, New York University, New York City, New York, USA. · NYU Health Science Library, NYU School of Medicine, New York City, New York, USA. · Population Health, NYU Langone Health, New York City, New York, USA. · Center for Global Health, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #31092656.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A review of the implementation outcomes of clean cookstove use, and its effects on blood pressure (BP) in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). DESIGN: Systematic review of studies that reported the effect of clean cookstove use on BP among women, and implementation science outcomes in LMICs. DATA SOURCES: We searched PubMed, Embase, INSPEC, Scielo, Cochrane Library, Global Health and Web of Science PLUS. We conducted searches in November 2017 with a repeat in May 2018. We did not restrict article publication date. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING STUDIES: We included only studies conducted in LMICs, published in English, regardless of publication year and studies that examined the use of improved or clean cookstove intervention on BP. Two authors independently screened journal article titles, abstracts and full-text articles to identify those that included the following search terms: high BP, hypertension and or household air pollution, LMICs, cookstove and implementation outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 461 non-duplicate articles identified, three randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (in Nigeria, Guatemala and Ghana) and two studies of pre-post design (in Bolivia and Nicaragua) met eligibility criteria. These articles evaluated the effect of cookstove use on BP in women. Two of the three RCTs reported a mean reduction in diastolic BP of -2.8 mm Hg (-5.0, -0.6; p=0.01) for the Nigerian study; -3.0 mm Hg; (-5.7, -0.4; p=0.02) for the Guatemalan study; while the study conducted in Ghana reported a non-significant change in BP. The pre-post studies reported a significant reduction in mean systolic BP of -5.5 mm Hg; (p=0.01) for the Bolivian study, and -5.9 mm Hg (-11.3, -0.4; p=0.05) for the Nicaraguan study. Implementation science outcomes were reported in all five studies (three reported feasibility, one reported adoption and one reported feasibility and adoption of cookstove interventions). CONCLUSION: Although this review demonstrated that there is limited evidence on the implementation of clean cookstove use in LMICs, the effects of clean cookstove on BP were significant for both systolic and diastolic BP among women. Future studies should consider standardised reporting of implementation outcomes.

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