Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Hypertension: HELP
Articles by Gbenga O. Ogedegbe
Based on 107 articles published since 2008
||||

Between 2008 and 2019, G. Ogedegbe wrote the following 107 articles about Hypertension.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Guideline Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary artery disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. 2015

Rosendorff, Clive / Lackland, Daniel T / Allison, Matthew / Aronow, Wilbert S / Black, Henry R / Blumenthal, Roger S / Cannon, Christopher P / de Lemos, James A / Elliott, William J / Findeiss, Laura / Gersh, Bernard J / Gore, Joel M / Levy, Daniel / Long, Janet B / O'Connor, Christopher M / O'Gara, Patrick T / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Oparil, Suzanne / White, William B / Anonymous4500825. · ·Circulation · Pubmed #25829340.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline European Society of Hypertension practice guidelines for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. 2014

Parati, Gianfranco / Stergiou, George / O'Brien, Eoin / Asmar, Roland / Beilin, Lawrence / Bilo, Grzegorz / Clement, Denis / de la Sierra, Alejandro / de Leeuw, Peter / Dolan, Eamon / Fagard, Robert / Graves, John / Head, Geoffrey A / Imai, Yutaka / Kario, Kazuomi / Lurbe, Empar / Mallion, Jean-Michel / Mancia, Giuseppe / Mengden, Thomas / Myers, Martin / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Ohkubo, Takayoshi / Omboni, Stefano / Palatini, Paolo / Redon, Josep / Ruilope, Luis M / Shennan, Andrew / Staessen, Jan A / vanMontfrans, Gert / Verdecchia, Paolo / Waeber, Bernard / Wang, Jiguang / Zanchetti, Alberto / Zhang, Yuqing / Anonymous350796. ·aAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 bAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 cAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 dAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 eAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 fAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 gAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 hAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 iAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 jAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 kAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 lAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 mAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 nAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 oAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 pAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 qAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 rAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 sAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 tAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 uAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 vAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 wAuthor affiliations are listed on the Journal website, http://links.lww.com/HJH/A366 xAuthor affiliations a ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #24886823.

ABSTRACT: Given the increasing use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in both clinical practice and hypertension research, a group of scientists, participating in the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability, in year 2013 published a comprehensive position paper dealing with all aspects of the technique, based on the available scientific evidence for ABPM. The present work represents an updated schematic summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, and is aimed at providing recommendations for proper use of this technique in a clinical setting by both specialists and practicing physicians. The present article details the requirements and the methodological issues to be addressed for using ABPM in clinical practice, The clinical indications for ABPM suggested by the available studies, among which white-coat phenomena, masked hypertension, and nocturnal hypertension, are outlined in detail, and the place of home measurement of blood pressure in relation to ABPM is discussed. The role of ABPM in pharmacological, epidemiological, and clinical research is also briefly mentioned. Finally, the implementation of ABPM in practice is considered in relation to the situation of different countries with regard to the reimbursement and the availability of ABPM in primary care practices, hospital clinics, and pharmacies.

3 Guideline Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring: a joint scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American Society of Hypertension, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. 2008

Pickering, Thomas G / Miller, Nancy Houston / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Krakoff, Lawrence R / Artinian, Nancy T / Goff, David / Anonymous4580602 / Anonymous4590602 / Anonymous4600602. ·American Heart Association, American Society of Hypertension,and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, Dallas, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Nurs · Pubmed #18596492.

ABSTRACT: Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) overcomes many of the limitations of traditional office blood pressure (BP) measurement and is both cheaper and easier to perform than ambulatory BP monitoring. Monitors that use the oscillometric method are currently available that are accurate, reliable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. An increasing number of patients are using them regularly to check their BP at home, but although this has been endorsed by national and international guidelines, detailed recommendations for their use have been lacking. There is a rapidly growing literature showing that measurements taken by patients at home are often lower than readings taken in the office and closer to the average BP recorded by 24-hour ambulatory monitors, which is the BP that best predicts cardiovascular risk. Because of the larger numbers of readings that can be taken by HBPM than in the office and the elimination of the white-coat effect (the increase of BP during an office visit), home readings are more reproducible than office readings and show better correlations with measures of target organ damage. In addition, prospective studies that have used multiple home readings to express the true BP have found that home BP predicts risk better than office BP (Class IIa; Level of Evidence A). This call-to-action article makes the following recommendations: (1) It is recommended that HBPM should become a routine component of BP measurement in the majority of patients with known or suspected hypertension; (2) Patients should be advised to purchase oscillometric monitors that measure BP on the upper arm with an appropriate cuff size and that have been shown to be accurate according to standard international protocols. They should be shown how to use them by their healthcare providers; (3) Two to 3 readings should be taken while the subject is resting in the seated position, both in the morning and at night, over a period of 1 week. A total of >/=12 readings are recommended for making clinical decisions; (4) HBPM is indicated in patients with newly diagnosed or suspected hypertension, in whom it may distinguish between white-coat and sustained hypertension. If the results are equivocal, ambulatory BP monitoring may help to establish the diagnosis; (5) In patients with prehypertension, HBPM may be useful for detecting masked hypertension; (6) HBPM is recommended for evaluating the response to any type of antihypertensive treatment and may improve adherence; (7) The target HBPM goal for treatment is <135/85 mm Hg or <130/80 mm Hg in high-risk patients; (8) HBPM is useful in the elderly, in whom both BP variability and the white-coat effect are increased; (9) HBPM is of value in patients with diabetes, in whom tight BP control is of paramount importance; (10) Other populations in whom HBPM may be beneficial include pregnant women, children, and patients with kidney disease; and (11) HBPM has the potential to improve the quality of care while reducing costs and should be reimbursed.

4 Guideline Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring: executive summary: a joint scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American Society Of Hypertension, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. 2008

Pickering, Thomas G / Miller, Nancy Houston / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Krakoff, Lawrence R / Artinian, Nancy T / Goff, David / Anonymous5130599 / Anonymous5140599 / Anonymous5150599. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #18497371.

ABSTRACT: Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) overcomes many of the limitations of traditional office blood pressure (BP) measurement and is both cheaper and easier to perform than ambulatory BP monitoring. Monitors that use the oscillometric method are currently available that are accurate, reliable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. An increasing number of patients are using them regularly to check their BP at home, but although this has been endorsed by national and international guidelines, detailed recommendations for their use have been lacking. There is a rapidly growing literature showing that measurements taken by patients at home are often lower than readings taken in the office and closer to the average BP recorded by 24-hour ambulatory monitors, which is the BP that best predicts cardiovascular risk. Because of the larger numbers of readings that can be taken by HBPM than in the office and the elimination of the white-coat effect (the increase of BP during an office visit), home readings are more reproducible than office readings and show better correlations with measures of target organ damage. In addition, prospective studies that have used multiple home readings to express the true BP have found that home BP predicts risk better than office BP (class IIa; level of evidence A). This call-to-action article makes the following recommendations: (1) It is recommended that HBPM should become a routine component of BP measurement in the majority of patients with known or suspected hypertension; (2) Patients should be advised to purchase oscillometric monitors that measure BP on the upper arm with an appropriate cuff size and that have been shown to be accurate according to standard international protocols. They should be shown how to use them by their healthcare providers; (3) Two to 3 readings should be taken while the subject is resting in the seated position, both in the morning and at night, over a period of 1 week. A total of >or=12 readings are recommended for making clinical decisions; (4) HBPM is indicated in patients with newly diagnosed or suspected hypertension, in whom it may distinguish between white-coat and sustained hypertension. If the results are equivocal, ambulatory BP monitoring may help to establish the diagnosis; (5) In patients with prehypertension, HBPM may be useful for detecting masked hypertension; (6) HBPM is recommended for evaluating the response to any type of antihypertensive treatment and may improve adherence; (7) The target HBPM goal for treatment is <135/85 mm Hg or <130/80 mm Hg in high-risk patients; (8) HBPM is useful in the elderly, in whom both BP variability and the white-coat effect are increased; (9) HBPM is of value in patients with diabetes, in whom tight BP control is of paramount importance; (10) Other populations in whom HBPM may be beneficial include pregnant women, children, and patients with kidney disease; and (11) HBPM has the potential to improve the quality of care while reducing costs and should be reimbursed.

5 Guideline Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring: a joint scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American Society Of Hypertension, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. 2008

Pickering, Thomas G / Miller, Nancy Houston / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Krakoff, Lawrence R / Artinian, Nancy T / Goff, David / Anonymous5160599 / Anonymous5170599 / Anonymous5180599. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #18497370.

ABSTRACT: Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) overcomes many of the limitations of traditional office blood pressure (BP) measurement and is both cheaper and easier to perform than ambulatory BP monitoring. Monitors that use the oscillometric method are currently available that are accurate, reliable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. An increasing number of patients are using them regularly to check their BP at home, but although this has been endorsed by national and international guidelines, detailed recommendations for their use have been lacking. There is a rapidly growing literature showing that measurements taken by patients at home are often lower than readings taken in the office and closer to the average BP recorded by 24-hour ambulatory monitors, which is the BP that best predicts cardiovascular risk. Because of the larger numbers of readings that can be taken by HBPM than in the office and the elimination of the white-coat effect (the increase of BP during an office visit), home readings are more reproducible than office readings and show better correlations with measures of target organ damage. In addition, prospective studies that have used multiple home readings to express the true BP have found that home BP predicts risk better than office BP (Class IIa; Level of Evidence A). This call-to-action article makes the following recommendations: (1) It is recommended that HBPM should become a routine component of BP measurement in the majority of patients with known or suspected hypertension; (2) Patients should be advised to purchase oscillometric monitors that measure BP on the upper arm with an appropriate cuff size and that have been shown to be accurate according to standard international protocols. They should be shown how to use them by their healthcare providers; (3) Two to 3 readings should be taken while the subject is resting in the seated position, both in the morning and at night, over a period of 1 week. A total of >or=12 readings are recommended for making clinical decisions; (4) HBPM is indicated in patients with newly diagnosed or suspected hypertension, in whom it may distinguish between white-coat and sustained hypertension. If the results are equivocal, ambulatory BP monitoring may help to establish the diagnosis; (5) In patients with prehypertension, HBPM may be useful for detecting masked hypertension; (6) HBPM is recommended for evaluating the response to any type of antihypertensive treatment and may improve adherence; (7) The target HBPM goal for treatment is <135/85 mm Hg or <130/80 mm Hg in high-risk patients; (8) HBPM is useful in the elderly, in whom both BP variability and the white-coat effect are increased; (9) HBPM is of value in patients with diabetes, in whom tight BP control is of paramount importance; (10) Other populations in whom HBPM may be beneficial include pregnant women, children, and patients with kidney disease; and (11) HBPM has the potential to improve the quality of care while reducing costs and should be reimbursed.

6 Editorial Low-Dose Combination Blood Pressure Pharmacotherapy to Improve Treatment Effectiveness, Safety, and Efficiency. 2018

Huffman, Mark D / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Jaffe, Marc. ·Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Population Health, New York University, New York, New York. · Resolve to Save Lives, New York, New York. · Kaiser Permanente South, San Francisco Medical Center South, San Francisco, California. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30120460.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Unconscious bias and real-world hypertension outcomes: advancing disparities research. 2014

Ravenell, Joseph / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 227 East 30th Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY, 10016, USA, joseph.ravenell@nyumc.org. ·J Gen Intern Med · Pubmed #24710995.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Unraveling the mechanism of renin-angiotensin- aldosterone system activation and target organ damage in hypertensive blacks. 2012

Williams, Stephen K / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #22146513.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Labeling and hypertension: it is time to intervene on its negative consequences. 2010

Ogedegbe, Gbenga. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #20625073.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Hypertension Treatment in Blacks: Discussion of the U.S. Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2016

Williams, Stephen K / Ravenell, Joseph / Seyedali, Sara / Nayef, Sam / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016. Electronic address: stephen.williams@nyumc.org. · Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016. · Department of Medicine, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Jersey Shore University Medical Center, Neptune, NJ 07753. ·Prog Cardiovasc Dis · Pubmed #27693861.

ABSTRACT: Blacks are especially susceptible to hypertension (HTN) and its associated organ damage leading to adverse cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal outcomes. Accordingly, HTN is particularly significant in contributing to the black-white racial differences in health outcomes in the US. As such, in order to address these health disparities, practical clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) on how to treat HTN, specifically in blacks, are needed. This review article is a timely addition to the literature because the most recent U.S. CPG more explicitly emphasizes race into the algorithmic management of HTN. However, recent clinical research cautions that use of race as a proxy to determine therapeutic response to pharmaceutical agents may be erroneous. This review will address the implications of the use of race in the hypertension CPGs. We will review the rationale behind the introduction of race into the U.S. CPG and the level of evidence that was available to justify this introduction. Finally, we will conclude with practical considerations in the treatment of HTN in blacks.

11 Review Research Needs to Improve Hypertension Treatment and Control in African Americans. 2016

Whelton, Paul K / Einhorn, Paula T / Muntner, Paul / Appel, Lawrence J / Cushman, William C / Diez Roux, Ana V / Ferdinand, Keith C / Rahman, Mahboob / Taylor, Herman A / Ard, Jamy / Arnett, Donna K / Carter, Barry L / Davis, Barry R / Freedman, Barry I / Cooper, Lisa A / Cooper, Richard / Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice / Gavini, Nara / Go, Alan S / Hyman, David J / Kimmel, Paul L / Margolis, Karen L / Miller, Edgar R / Mills, Katherine T / Mensah, George A / Navar, Ann M / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Rakotz, Michael K / Thomas, George / Tobin, Jonathan N / Wright, Jackson T / Yoon, Sung Sug Sarah / Cutler, Jeffrey A / Anonymous770881. ·From the Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (P.K.W., K.C.F.), and Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine (P.K.W., K.C.F.), New Orleans, LA · Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (P.T.E., P.D.-N., G.A.M., J.A.C.), and Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science (N.G., G.A.M.), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD · Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham (P.M.) · Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (L.J.A., L.A.C., E.R.M.) · Preventive Medicine Section, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, TN (W.C.C.) · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (A.V.D.R.) · Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, OH (M.R., J.T.W.) · Cardiovascular Research Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (H.A.T.) · Department of Epidemiology and Prevention (J.A.) and Department of Medicine (B.I.F., J.A.), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC · Dean's Office, University of Kentucky College of Public Health, Lexington (D.K.A.) · Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City (B.L.C.) · Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston (B.R.D.) · Department of Public Health Sciences, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL (R.C.) · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland (A.S.G.) · Department of Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (D.J.H.) · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (P.L.K.) · HealthPartners Institute, Minneapolis, MN (K.L.M.) · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (A.M.N.) · Department of Population Health, NYU School of Medicine, New York (G.O.) · American Medical Association, Chicago, IL (M.K.R.) · Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Cleveland Clinic, OH (G.T.) · Clinical Directors Network (CND) and The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science, New York (J.N.T.) · and National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD (S.S.(S.)Y.). ·Hypertension · Pubmed #27620388.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Recognition and Management of Hypertension in Older Persons: Focus on African Americans. 2015

Still, Carolyn H / Ferdinand, Keith C / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Wright, Jackson T. ·Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · Clinical Hypertension Program, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. · New York University School of Medicine, Department of Population Health, Center for Healthful Behavior Change, New York, New York. · School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. ·J Am Geriatr Soc · Pubmed #26480975.

ABSTRACT: POPULATIONS: Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effects of blood pressure (BP) reduction on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, with most of the evidence in individuals aged 60 and older. Several guidelines have recently been published on the specific management of hypertension in individuals aged 60 and older, including in high-risk groups such as African Americans. Most recommend careful evaluation, thiazide diuretics and calcium-channel blockers for initial drug therapy in most African Americans, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in those with chronic kidney disease or heart failure. Among the areas of controversy is the recommended target BP in African Americans aged 60 and older. A recent U.S. guideline recommended raising the systolic BP target from less than 140 mmHg to less than 150 mmHg in this population. This article will review the evidence and current guideline recommendations for hypertension treatment in older African Americans, including the rationale for continuing to recommend a SBP target of less than 140 mmHg in this population.

13 Review Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary artery disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. 2015

Rosendorff, Clive / Lackland, Daniel T / Allison, Matthew / Aronow, Wilbert S / Black, Henry R / Blumenthal, Roger S / Cannon, Christopher P / de Lemos, James A / Elliott, William J / Findeiss, Laura / Gersh, Bernard J / Gore, Joel M / Levy, Daniel / Long, Janet B / O'Connor, Christopher M / O'Gara, Patrick T / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Oparil, Suzanne / White, William B / Anonymous4440825. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #25828847.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Review Psychosocial risk factors for hypertension: an update of the literature. 2014

Cuffee, Yendelela / Ogedegbe, Chinwe / Williams, Natasha J / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Schoenthaler, Antoinette. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 227 East 30th Street, 6th floor, New York, NY, 10016, USA, Yendelela.cuffee@nyumc.org. ·Curr Hypertens Rep · Pubmed #25139781.

ABSTRACT: A growing body of research demonstrates that psychosocial factors play an important role in the development of hypertension. Previous reviews have identified several key factors (i.e., occupational stress) that contribute to the onset of hypertension; however, they are now outdated. In this review, we provide an updated synthesis of the literature from 2010 to April 2014. We identified 21 articles for inclusion in the review, of which there were six categories of psychosocial stressors: occupational stress, personality, mental health, housing instability, social support/isolation, and sleep quality. Sixteen of the studies reported an association between the psychosocial stressor and blood pressure. While several findings were consistent with previous literature, new findings regarding mediating and moderating factors underlying the psychosocial-hypertension association help to untangle inconsistencies reported in the literature. Moreover, sleep quality is a novel additional factor that should undergo further exploration. Areas for future research based on these findings are discussed.

15 Review Prevalence, determinants and systems-thinking approaches to optimal hypertension control in West Africa. 2014

Iwelunmor, Juliet / Airhihenbuwa, Collins O / Cooper, Richard / Tayo, Bamidele / Plange-Rhule, Jacob / Adanu, Richard / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 123 Huff Hall, 1206 S, Fourth St, Champaign, IL 61820, USA. jiwez@illinois.edu. ·Global Health · Pubmed #24886649.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In West Africa, hypertension, once rare, has now emerged as a critical health concern and the trajectory is upward and factors are complex. The true magnitude of hypertension in some West African countries, including in-depth knowledge of underlying risk factors is not completely understood. There is also a paucity of research on adequate systems-level approaches designed to mitigate the growing burden of hypertension in the region. AIMS: In this review, we thematically synthesize available literature pertaining to the prevalence of hypertension in West Africa and discuss factors that influence its diagnosis, treatment and control. We aimed to address the social and structural determinants influencing hypertension in the sub-region including the effects of urbanization, health infrastructure and healthcare workforce. FINDINGS: The prevalence of hypertension in West Africa has increased over the past decade and is rising rapidly with an urban-rural gradient that places higher hypertension prevalence on urban settings compared to rural settings. Overall levels of awareness of one's hypertension status remain consistently low in West African. Structural and economic determinants related to conditions of poverty such as insufficient finances have a direct impact on adherence to prescribed antihypertensive medications. Urbanization contributes to the increasing incidence of hypertension in the sub-region and available evidence indicates that inadequate health infrastructure may act as a barrier to optimal hypertension control in West Africa. CONCLUSION: Given that optimal hypertension control in West Africa depends on multiple factors that go beyond simply modifying the behaviors of the individuals alone, we conclude by discussing the potential role systems-thinking approaches can play to achieve optimal control in the sub-region. In the context of recent advances in hypertension management including new therapeutic options and innovative solutions to expand health workforce so as to meet the high demand for healthcare, the success of these strategies will rely on a new understanding of the complexity of human behaviors and interactions most aptly framed from a systems-thinking perspective.

16 Review Beyond medications and diet: alternative approaches to lowering blood pressure: a scientific statement from the american heart association. 2013

Brook, Robert D / Appel, Lawrence J / Rubenfire, Melvyn / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Bisognano, John D / Elliott, William J / Fuchs, Flavio D / Hughes, Joel W / Lackland, Daniel T / Staffileno, Beth A / Townsend, Raymond R / Rajagopalan, Sanjay / Anonymous3690756. · ·Hypertension · Pubmed #23608661.

ABSTRACT: Many antihypertensive medications and lifestyle changes are proven to reduce blood pressure. Over the past few decades, numerous additional modalities have been evaluated in regard to their potential blood pressure-lowering abilities. However, these nondietary, nondrug treatments, collectively called alternative approaches, have generally undergone fewer and less rigorous trials. This American Heart Association scientific statement aims to summarize the blood pressure-lowering efficacy of several alternative approaches and to provide a class of recommendation for their implementation in clinical practice based on the available level of evidence from the published literature. Among behavioral therapies, Transcendental Meditation (Class IIB, Level of Evidence B), other meditation techniques (Class III, Level of Evidence C), yoga (Class III, Level of Evidence C), other relaxation therapies (Class III, Level of Evidence B), and biofeedback approaches (Class IIB, Level of Evidence B) generally had modest, mixed, or no consistent evidence demonstrating their efficacy. Between the noninvasive procedures and devices evaluated, device-guided breathing (Class IIA, Level of Evidence B) had greater support than acupuncture (Class III, Level of Evidence B). Exercise-based regimens, including aerobic (Class I, Level of Evidence A), dynamic resistance (Class IIA, Level of Evidence B), and isometric handgrip (Class IIB, Level of Evidence C) modalities, had relatively stronger supporting evidence. It is the consensus of the writing group that it is reasonable for all individuals with blood pressure levels >120/80 mm Hg to consider trials of alternative approaches as adjuvant methods to help lower blood pressure when clinically appropriate. A suggested management algorithm is provided, along with recommendations for prioritizing the use of the individual approaches in clinical practice based on their level of evidence for blood pressure lowering, risk-to-benefit ratio, potential ancillary health benefits, and practicality in a real-world setting. Finally, recommendations for future research priorities are outlined.

17 Review Enhancing adherence of antihypertensive regimens in hypertensive African-Americans: current and future prospects. 2012

Lewis, Lisa M / Ogedegbe, Chinwe / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, 418 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104-4217, USA. lisml@nursing.upenn.edu ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #23244358.

ABSTRACT: Patient adherence to antihypertensive medication is an important strategy for blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. However, rates of antihypertensive medication adherence among hypertensive African-Americans are unacceptably low. This article examines the current understanding of patient, clinical, provider and healthcare system factors associated with medication adherence in hypertensive African-Americans. Studies demonstrated that patient and clinical factors, such as self-efficacy and depression, are consistently associated with medication adherence in hypertensive African-Americans patients. Provider communication shows promise as a correlate of medication adherence, but more research on provider and healthcare system factors are still needed. The authors recommend that interventions targeted at increasing medication adherence among hypertensive African-Americans focus on self-efficacy. It is also imperative that clinicians screen hypertensive patients for depression and treat, if necessary.

18 Review Overcoming barriers to hypertension control in African Americans. 2012

Odedosu, Taiye / Schoenthaler, Antoinette / Vieira, Dorice L / Agyemang, Charles / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Bellevue Adult Primary Care Practice, Bellevue Hospital Center, New York, NY, USA. ·Cleve Clin J Med · Pubmed #22219234.

ABSTRACT: Barriers to blood pressure control exist at the patient, physician, and system levels. We review the current evidence for interventions that target patient- and physician-related barriers, such as patient education, home blood pressure monitoring, and computerized decision-support systems for physicians, and we emphasize the need for more studies that address the effectiveness of these interventions in African American patients.

19 Review Racism and hypertension: a review of the empirical evidence and implications for clinical practice. 2011

Brondolo, Elizabeth / Love, Erica E / Pencille, Melissa / Schoenthaler, Antoinette / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Department of Psychology, St Johns University, Jamaica, New York, USA. brondole@stjohns.edu ·Am J Hypertens · Pubmed #21331054.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite improved hypertension (HTN) awareness and treatment, racial disparities in HTN prevalence persist. An understanding of the biopsychosocial determinants of HTN is necessary to address racial disparities in the prevalence of HTN. This review examines the evidence directly and indirectly linking multiple levels of racism to HTN. METHODS: Published empirical research in EBSCO databases investigating the relationships of three levels of racism (individual/interpersonal, internalized, and institutional racism) to HTN was reviewed. RESULTS: Direct evidence linking individual/interpersonal racism to HTN diagnosis is weak. However, the relationship of individual/interpersonal racism to ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) is more consistent, with all published studies reporting a positive relationship of interpersonal racism to ABP. There is no direct evidence linking internalized racism to BP. Population-based studies provide some evidence linking institutional racism, in the forms of residential racial segregation (RRS) and incarceration, to HTN incidence. Racism shows associations to stress exposure and reactivity as well as associations to established HTN-related risk factors including obesity, low levels of physical activity and alcohol use. The effects vary by level of racism. CONCLUSIONS: Overall the findings suggest that racism may increase risk for HTN; these effects emerge more clearly for institutional racism than for individual level racism. All levels of racism may influence the prevalence of HTN via stress exposure and reactivity and by fostering conditions that undermine health behaviors, raising the barriers to lifestyle change.

20 Review Resistant hypertension and sleep apnea: pathophysiologic insights and strategic management. 2011

Williams, Stephen K / Ravenell, Joseph / Jean-Louis, Girardin / Zizi, Ferdinand / Underberg, James A / McFarlane, Samy I / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of General Internal Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10010, USA. stw2013@med.cornell.edu ·Curr Diab Rep · Pubmed #21104207.

ABSTRACT: Resistant hypertension is common among adults with hypertension affecting up to 30% of patients. The treatment of resistant hypertension is important because suboptimal blood pressure control is the leading preventable cause of death worldwide. A frequent comorbid condition in patients with resistant hypertension is obstructive sleep apnea. The pathophysiology of sleep apnea-associated hypertension is characterized by sustained adrenergic activation and volume retention often posing treatment challenges in patients with resistant hypertension. This review will address some of the epidemiologic data associating apnea with the pathogenesis of resistant hypertension. Diagnosis and management of apnea and its associated hypertension will also be considered.

21 Review Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement. 2010

Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Pickering, Thomas. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, 10010, USA. olugbenga.ogedegbe@nyumc.org ·Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #20937442.

ABSTRACT: Although the mercury sphygmomanometer is widely regarded as the gold standard for office blood pressure measurement, the ban on use of mercury devices continues to diminish their role in office and hospital settings. To date, mercury devices have largely been phased out in United States hospitals. This situation has led to the proliferation of nonmercury devices and has changed (probably forever) the preferable modality of blood pressure measurement in clinic and hospital settings. In this article, the basic techniques of blood pressure measurement and the technical issues associated with measurements in clinical practice are discussed. The devices currently available for hospital and clinic measurements and their important sources of error are presented. Practical advice is given on how the different devices and measurement techniques should be used. Blood pressure measurements in different circumstances and in special populations such as infants, children, pregnant women, elderly persons, and obese subjects are discussed.

22 Review Masked hypertension: evidence of the need to treat. 2010

Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Agyemang, Charles / Ravenell, Joseph E. ·Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of General Internal Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 423 East 23rd Street #15-168N, New York, NY 10010, USA. Olugbenga.Ogedegbe@nyumc.org ·Curr Hypertens Rep · Pubmed #20694858.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of masked hypertension has been made easier with the widespread availability of home blood pressure monitoring devices with levels of accuracy comparable to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The negative impact of masked hypertension on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is evidenced by numerous well-designed clinic-based and population-based studies. The relationship of masked hypertension and target organ damage is also well documented. These two factors, combined with the robust evidence of reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality achieved with blood pressure treatment, makes the argument for actively identifying patients with masked hypertension and prescribing treatment similar to that for patients with sustained hypertension. In this paper, we review the evidence for the cardiovascular prognosis of masked hypertension compared with sustained hypertension, we review its impact on target organ damage, we propose an algorithm for the treatment of patients with masked hypertension, and we point out the pitfalls in adopting such an approach.

23 Review Cardiovascular disease risk reduction with sleep apnea treatment. 2010

Jean-Louis, Girardin / Brown, Clinton D / Zizi, Ferdinand / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Boutin-Foster, Carla / Gorga, Joseph / McFarlane, Samy I. ·Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, NY 11203-2098, USA. ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #20602560.

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death among adults in developed countries. An increase in prevalent cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., obesity, hypertension and diabetes) has led to a concerted effort to raise awareness of the need to use evidence-based strategies to help patients at risk of developing cardiovascular disease and to reduce their likelihood of suffering a stroke. Sleep apnea has emerged as an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic and clinical evidence has prompted the American Heart Association to issue a scientific statement describing the need to recognize sleep apnea as an important target for therapy in reducing cardiovascular disease risks. This article examines evidence supporting associations of sleep apnea with cardiovascular disease and considers evidence suggesting cardiovascular risk reductions through sleep apnea treatment. Perspectives on emerging therapeutic approaches and promising areas of clinical and experimental research are also discussed.

24 Review Strategies for implementing and sustaining therapeutic lifestyle changes as part of hypertension management in African Americans. 2009

Scisney-Matlock, Margaret / Bosworth, Hayden B / Giger, Joyce Newman / Strickland, Ora L / Harrison, R Van / Coverson, Dorothy / Shah, Nirav R / Dennison, Cheryl R / Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline M / Jones, Loretta / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Batts-Turner, Marian L / Jamerson, Kenneth A. ·Division of Acute Critical and Long-Term Care Programs, School of Nursing, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0482, USA. mscisney@umich.edu ·Postgrad Med · Pubmed #19491553.

ABSTRACT: African Americans with high blood pressure (BP) can benefit greatly from therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC) such as diet modification, physical activity, and weight management. However, they and their health care providers face many barriers in modifying health behaviors. A multidisciplinary panel synthesized the scientific data on TLC in African Americans for efficacy in improving BP control, barriers to behavioral change, and strategies to overcome those barriers. Therapeutic lifestyle change interventions should emphasize patient self-management, supported by providers, family, and the community. Interventions should be tailored to an individual's cultural heritage, beliefs, and behavioral norms. Simultaneously targeting multiple factors that impede BP control will maximize the likelihood of success. The panel cited limited progress with integrating the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan into the African American diet as an example of the need for more strategically developed interventions. Culturally sensitive instruments to assess impact will help guide improved provision of TLC in special populations. The challenge of improving BP control in African Americans and delivery of hypertension care requires changes at the health system and public policy levels. At the patient level, culturally sensitive interventions that apply the strategies described and optimize community involvement will advance TLC in African Americans with high BP.

25 Review Understanding the nature and role of spirituality in relation to medication adherence: a proposed conceptual model. 2008

Lewis, Lisa M / Ogedegbe, Gbenga. ·Family and Community Health Division, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia 19104, USA. lisaml@nursing.upenn.edu ·Holist Nurs Pract · Pubmed #18758275.

ABSTRACT: Racial disparities in hypertension prevalence and its attendant complications are well documented. Spirituality is an important component of African American beliefs and a small body of literature suggests that spirituality influences hypertension management in African Americans. This article describes a conceptual model of spirituality that may be useful for developing interventions for increasing medication adherence and decreasing blood pressure in African Americans diagnosed with hypertension.

Next