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Hypertension: HELP
Articles from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Based on 203 articles published since 2008
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These are the 203 published articles about Hypertension that originated from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9
1 Guideline 2016 European Society of Hypertension guidelines for the management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. 2016

Lurbe, Empar / Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico / Cruickshank, J Kennedy / Dominiczak, Anna / Erdine, Serap / Hirth, Asle / Invitti, Cecilia / Litwin, Mieczyslaw / Mancia, Giuseppe / Pall, Denes / Rascher, Wolfgang / Redon, Josep / Schaefer, Franz / Seeman, Tomas / Sinha, Manish / Stabouli, Stella / Webb, Nicholas J / Wühl, Elke / Zanchetti, Alberto. ·aPediatric Department, Consorcio Hospital General, University of Valencia, Valencia bCIBER Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutrición (CB06/03), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain cClinica Medica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Italy dDiabetes and Nutritional Science Division, Kings College, London eCollege of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK fCardiology Department, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey gDepartment of Pediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway hDepartment of Medical Sciences and Rehabilitation, IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy iDepartment of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension, The Children's Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, Poland jCenter of Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milano, Italy kDepartment of Medicine and Coordination Centre for Drug Development, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary lDepartment of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany mDepartment of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clinico de Valencia, University of Valencia nINCLIVA Research Institute, Valencia, Spain oDivision of Pediatric Nephrology, Center for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany pDepartment of Paediatrics, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Motol University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic qDepartment of Paediatric Nephrology, Evelina London Children's Hospital, Guys and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK r1st Department of Pediatrics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippokratio Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece sDepartment of Paediatric Nephrology and NIHR/Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, Manchester, UK tDivision of Pediatric Nephrology, ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #27467768.

ABSTRACT: Increasing prevalence of hypertension (HTN) in children and adolescents has become a significant public health issue driving a considerable amount of research. Aspects discussed in this document include advances in the definition of HTN in 16 year or older, clinical significance of isolated systolic HTN in youth, the importance of out of office and central blood pressure measurement, new risk factors for HTN, methods to assess vascular phenotypes, clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and treatment strategies among others. The recommendations of the present document synthesize a considerable amount of scientific data and clinical experience and represent the best clinical wisdom upon which physicians, nurses and families should base their decisions. In addition, as they call attention to the burden of HTN in children and adolescents, and its contribution to the current epidemic of cardiovascular disease, these guidelines should encourage public policy makers to develop a global effort to improve identification and treatment of high blood pressure among children and adolescents.

2 Editorial Editorial: Arterial Stiffness, Central Haemodynamics and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Links with Cardiovascular Risk and Effects of Drug Treatment. 2018

Katsiki, Niki / Imprialos, Konstantinos / Vlachopoulos, Charalambos. ·Second Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippocration Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. · First Department of Cardiology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Hippokration Hospital, Athens, Greece. ·Curr Vasc Pharmacol · Pubmed #29210656.

ABSTRACT: Arterial stiffness, central haemodynamics and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) have been associated with increased risk for Cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Antihypertensive, antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic drugs may affect these predictors of CV risk. Such associations should be taken into consideration when treating high-risk patients.

3 Editorial Adiponectin and Aldosterone in Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: An Intriguing Interplay. 2018

Anagnostis, Panagiotis / Katsiki, Niki / Athyros, Vasilios G / Karagiannis, Asterios. ·1 Division of Endocrinology, Police Medical Centre, Thessaloniki, Greece. · 2 Second Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippokration Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·Angiology · Pubmed #24687414.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Optimizing hypertension management in renal transplantation: a call to action. 2017

Halimi, Jean-Michel / Persu, Alexandre / Sarafidis, Pantalis A / Burnier, Michel / Abramowicz, Daniel / Sautenet, Bénédicte / Oberbauer, Rainer / Mallamaci, Francesca / London, Gérard / Rossignol, Patrick / Wuerzner, Grégoire / Watschinger, Bruno / Zoccali, Carmine / Anonymous2491019. ·aService de Néphrologie-Immunologie Clinique, CHU Tours bEA4245 François-Rabelais University, Tours cFCRIN INI-CRCT Cardiovascular and Renal Clinical Trialists, Nancy, France dPole of Cardiovascular Research, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique eDivision of Cardiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium fDepartment of Nephrology, Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece gService of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland hDepartment of Nephrology, Antwerp University Hospital iAntwerp University, Antwerp, Belgium jDepartment of Nephrology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria kCNR-IFC, Clinical Epidemiology and Pathophysiology of Hypertension and Renal Diseases Unit, Ospedali Riuniti, Reggio Calabria, Italy lManhes Hospital and FCRIN INI-CRCTC, Manhes mINSERM, Centre d'Investigations Cliniques Plurithématique 1433, UMR 1116, Université de Lorraine, CHU de Nancy, Nancy, France. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #29095226.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and fibrin clot properties: a novel pathogenetic link with cardiovascular disease? 2017

Doumas, Michael / Stavropoulos, Konstantinos / Imprialos, Konstantinos. ·a2nd Propaedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece bVA Medical Center, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, USA. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #28353546.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Important practice lessons from the SPRINT study beyond the blood pressure goal: all well known and now confirmed. 2016

Stergiou, George S / Doumas, Michael / Kollias, Anastasios / Papademetriou, Vasilios. ·Hypertension Center STRIDE-7, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: gstergi@med.uoa.gr. · Second Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Hypertension Center STRIDE-7, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Veterans Affairs, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA. ·J Am Soc Hypertens · Pubmed #27395782.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial The enigma of obesity-induced hypertension mechanisms in the youth. 2016

Kotsis, Vasilios / Grassi, Guido. ·aHypertension Center, 3rd Department of Medicine, Papageorgiou Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, GreecebClinica Medica, Department of Prevention and Clinical Medicine, University of Milano-BicoccacIstituto a Carattere Scientifico IRCCS Multimedica, Sesto San Giovanni, Milan, Italy. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #26682787.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Screening for hypertension in children and adolescents: the controversy, the research questions and a plan for action. 2015

Stergiou, George S / Vazeou, Andriani / Stabouli, Stella / Ntineri, Angeliki / Kollias, Anastasios / Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia / Kapogiannis, Anastasios / Stefanidis, Constantinos J. ·aHypertension Center STRIDE-7, Third University Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Athens bFirst Department of Pediatrics, P&A Kyriakou Children's Hospital, Athens cFirst Department of Pediatrics, Aristotle University, Hippokration Hospital, Thessaloniki dDepartment of Nephrology, Agia Sophia Children's Hospital eDepartment of Nephrology, P&A Kyriakou Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #26039528.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Transcatheter Renal Sympathetic Denervation: Chasing a Chimera or a Matter of Technological Improvements? 2015

Doumas, Michael / Athyros, Vasilios / Karagiannis, Asterios. ·Second Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·Cardiology · Pubmed #25968298.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Mental stress and cardiovascular disease: growing evidence into the complex interrelation between mind and heart. 2015

Giannoglou, George D / Koskinas, Konstantinos C. ·1st Department of Cardiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece yan@med.auth.gr. · 1st Department of Cardiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·Angiology · Pubmed #24622932.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Editorial: (Persistent elevation of blood pressure in children and adolescents is associated with arterial hypertension and premature atherosclerosis in adults. Is it possible to reverse this?). 2014

Athyros, Vasilios G / Katsiki, Niki / Karagiannis, Asterios. ·2nd Porp. Department of Internal Medicine Medical School Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Hippokration Hospital Thessaloniki Greece St. athyros@med.auth.gr. ·Curr Vasc Pharmacol · Pubmed #25322833.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Early patterns of blood pressure change and future coronary atherosclerosis. 2014

Sarafidis, Pantelis A / Bakris, George L. ·Aristotle University of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Medicine, ASH Comprehensive Hypertension Center, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. ·JAMA · Pubmed #24496535.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Editorial: interventional management of hypertension and cardiovascular disease: the beginning of a new era? 2014

Doumas, Michael. ·Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University, 126, Vas. Olgas str, 54645 Thessaloniki, Greece. michalisdoumas@yahoo.co.uk. ·Curr Vasc Pharmacol · Pubmed #23905600.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Review Hypertension in hematologic malignancies and hematopoietic cell transplantation: An emerging issue with the introduction of novel treatments. 2019

Gavriilaki, Eleni / Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia / Grigoriadis, Savas / Anyfanti, Panagiota / Douma, Stella / Anagnostopoulos, Achilles. ·Hematology Department-BMT Unit, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. Electronic address: elenicelli@yahoo.gr. · 3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Papageorgiou Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Cardiology Department, General Hospital of Veroia, Veroia, Greece. · Hematology Department-BMT Unit, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·Blood Rev · Pubmed #30898309.

ABSTRACT: Blood pressure levels are directly associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality, rendering arterial hypertension a major public health problem affecting almost 1 billion people worldwide. Several models have been used for cardiovascular risk prediction based on traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Among them, hypertension represents a factor that may be triggered by distinct pathogenetic mechanisms in specific disease populations. Accumulating evidence points towards an increased incidence of hypertension in patients with hematologic malignancies and recipients of hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, the role of hypertension in these entities remains under-reported in the relevant literature. In the complex setting of life-threatening conditions that need immediate and aggressive treatment, conditions that are common and easy to diagnose such as hypertension, may be neglected by treating physicians. However, hypertension may represent a key diagnostic and prognostic clinical finding in acute syndromes, such as thrombotic microangiopathy. Furthermore, hypertension may arise as a late effect of long-term survivors leading to increased morbidity and mortality across all age groups. Our concise review focuses on incidence, pathophysiology and management of hypertension in patients following hematopoietic cell transplantation and treatment for hematologic malignancies.

15 Review Oxidative Stress and the Kidney in the Space Environment. 2018

Pavlakou, Paraskevi / Dounousi, Evangelia / Roumeliotis, Stefanos / Eleftheriadis, Theodoros / Liakopoulos, Vassilios. ·Department of Nephrology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. pavlakoup@gmail.com. · Department of Nephrology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. evangeldou@gmail.com. · Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, School of Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54636 Thessaloniki, Greece. st_roumeliotis@hotmail.com. · Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, School of Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54636 Thessaloniki, Greece. teleftheriadis@yahoo.com. · Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, School of Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54636 Thessaloniki, Greece. liakopul@otenet.gr. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #30326648.

ABSTRACT: In space, the special conditions of hypogravity and exposure to cosmic radiation have substantial differences compared to terrestrial circumstances, and a multidimensional impact on the human body and human organ functions. Cosmic radiation provokes cellular and gene damage, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to a dysregulation in the oxidants⁻antioxidants balance, and to the inflammatory response. Other practical factors contributing to these dysregulations in space environment include increased bone resorption, impaired anabolic response, and even difficulties in detecting oxidative stress in blood and urine samples. Enhanced oxidative stress affects mitochondrial and endothelial functions, contributes to reduced natriuresis and the development of hypertension, and may play an additive role in the formation of kidney stones. Finally, the composition of urine protein excretion is significantly altered, depicting possible tubular dysfunction.

16 Review Blood pressure control in conventional hemodialysis. 2018

Georgianos, Panagiotis I / Agarwal, Rajiv. ·Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, 1st Department of Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine and Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Administration Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana. ·Semin Dial · Pubmed #30084190.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension among patients on hemodialysis is common, difficult to diagnose and often inadequately controlled. Although specific blood pressure (BP) targets in this particular population are not yet established, meta-analyses of randomized trials showed that deliberate BP-lowering with antihypertensive drugs improves clinical outcomes in hemodialysis patients. BP-lowering in these individuals should initially utilize nonpharmacological strategies aiming to control sodium and volume overload. Accordingly, restricting dietary sodium intake, eliminating intradialytic sodium gain via individualized dialysate sodium prescription, optimally assessing and managing dry-weight and providing a sufficient duration of dialysis are first-line treatment considerations to control BP. If BP remains uncontrolled despite the adequate management of volume, antihypertensive therapy is the next consideration. Contrary to nonhemodialysis populations, emerging clinical-trial evidence suggests that among those on hemodialysis, β-blockers are more effective than agents blocking the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) in reducing BP levels and protecting from serious adverse cardiovascular complications. Accordingly, β-blockade is our first-line approach in pharmacotherapy of hypertension. Long-acting calcium-channel-blockers and RAS-blockers are our next considerations, taking into account the comorbidities and the overall risk profile of each individual patient. Additional research efforts, mainly randomized trials, are clearly warranted in order to elucidate aspects of management that remain elusive in hypertensive dialysis patients.

17 Review Hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Targets and management. 2018

Pavlou, Dimitra I / Paschou, Stavroula A / Anagnostis, Panagiotis / Spartalis, Michael / Spartalis, Eleftherios / Vryonidou, Andromachi / Tentolouris, Nicholas / Siasos, Gerasimos. ·Forth Department of Internal Medicine, Hippokration Hospital, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, "Aghia Sophia" Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Unit of Reproductive Endocrinology, First Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Division of Cardiology, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Athens, Greece. · Laboratory of Experimental Surgery and Surgical Research, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Hellenic Red Cross Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Diabetes Center, First Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Laiko General Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. · First Department of Cardiology, Hippokration Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: gsiasos@med.uoa.gr. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #29704920.

ABSTRACT: Two-thirds of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have arterial hypertension. Hypertension increases the incidence of both micro- and macrovascular complications in these patients, while the co-existence of these two major risk factors leads to a four-fold increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with normotensive non-diabetic controls. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review the literature and present updated information on targets for blood pressure (BP) and on the management of hypertension in patients with T2DM. A BP target of <140/90 mmHg applies to most patients, but individualization is always important. All classes of antihypertensive drugs can be used in the management of hypertension in patients with T2DM, as long as they are effective and safe and after taking co-morbidities into account. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are the ideal choice for initial or early treatment of hypertension in patients with T2DM and albuminuria. Combination of two or more drugs seems to be inevitable as most of these patients demonstrate resistant hypertension. The combination of ACE inhibitors with ARBs should be avoided. Thiazide and thiazide-like diuretics might be beneficial, alone or in a fixed-dose combination with ACE inhibitors or ARBs. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) constitute an ideal option as a second- or third-line agent. Beta-blockers are not considered as first-line antihypertensive agents, except for those patients with heart failure or previous myocardial infarction. The addition of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists to a triple-drug therapy seems the next ideal step. Gender-specific characteristics regarding BP, T2DM and CVD should be taken into consideration, even if different recommendations do not exist yet.

18 Review Gut microbiota in kidney disease and hypertension. 2018

Antza, C / Stabouli, S / Kotsis, V. ·Hypertension Center, 3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Papageorgiou Hospital, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · 1st Department of Pediatrics, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Hypertension Center, 3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Papageorgiou Hospital, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. Electronic address: vkotsis@auth.gr. ·Pharmacol Res · Pubmed #29496593.

ABSTRACT: The human gut microbiota is being composed of more than one hundred trillion microbial cells, including aerobic and anaerobic species as well as gram-positive and negative species. Animal based evidence suggests that the change of normal gut microbiota is responsible for several clinical implications including blood pressure increase and kidney function reduction. Trimethylamine-N-Oxide, short-chain fatty acids and inflammatory factors are originated from the gut microbes and may induce changes in arteries, kidneys and blood pressure. Prebiotics and probiotics change the gut microbiota and may reduce high blood pressure and ameliorate chronic kidney disease suggesting a new treatment target in patients for the initial stages of hypertension concomitant with other life style changes such as increased physical exercise and weight reduction to reduce cardiovascular disease complications.

19 Review Heart Rate and Blood Pressure: "Connecting the Dots" in Epidemiology and Pathophysiology. 2018

Kouvas, Nikos / Tsioufis, Costas / Vogiatzakis, Nikolaos / Sanidas, Elias / Konstantinidis, Dimitrios / Kintis, Konstantinos / Dimitriadis, Kyriakos / Kakosaiou, Zoi / Tsioufis, Panagiotis / Kouremeti, Mairi / Katsiki, Niki / Tousoulis, Dimitrios. ·1 First Cardiology Clinic, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Hippokration Hospital, Athens, Greece. · 2 Department of Cardiology, LAIKO General Hospital, Athens, Greece. · 3 Second Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippokration Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·Angiology · Pubmed #29232971.

ABSTRACT: There is robust evidence from epidemiological and clinical studies showing that elevated heart rate (HR) constitutes a powerful predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with hypertension, underlining the significance of HR measurement in them. Autonomous nervous system dysfunction and atherosclerosis are important features in the pathogenesis of the untoward events. However, the relationship between HR and blood pressure (BP) is complex and differs depending on the type of BP measurement which is considered. This differentiation implicates complex physiological mechanisms and is of clinical importance regarding the divergent effect of the different types of antihypertensive agents on these parameters. The aim of this review is to summarize the current evidence on the relationship between HR and BP based on epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies.

20 Review Hypertensive complications of pregnancy: A clinical overview. 2018

Antza, C / Cifkova, R / Kotsis, V. ·Hypertension Center, 3rd Department of Medicine, Papageorgiou Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. · Charles University in Prague, Center for Cardiovascular Prevention, First Faculty of Medicine and Thomayer Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. · Hypertension Center, 3rd Department of Medicine, Papageorgiou Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. Electronic address: vkotsis@auth.gr. ·Metabolism · Pubmed #29169855.

ABSTRACT: Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are a worldwide health problem for women and their infants complicating up to 10% of pregnancies and associated with increased maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. In Europe, 2.3-3% of pregnancies are complicated by preeclampsia. Gestational diabetes, obesity, no previous or multiple births, maternal age less than 20 or greater than 35years old and thrombophilia can be some of the possible factors related to increased risk for hypertension in pregnancy. Complications of hypertension during pregnancy affect both mothers and their infants. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring helps to distinguish true hypertension from the white coat as pregnant women with office abnormal values may have normal out of office blood pressure. Imbalance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in placenta may lead to endothelial dysfunction, vasoconstriction, activation of the coagulation system, and hemolysis. Carotid intima-media thickness, pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, and arterial wall tension were found to be significantly increased in women with preeclampsia compared to normotensive pregnant women. Uterine artery Doppler and serum biomarkers can be used to evaluate the probability of hypertension and complications during pregnancy, but further research in the field is needed. Lately, micro ribonucleic acids have also been the focus of research as potential biomarkers.

21 Review Should renal color Doppler ultrasonography be a routine test in newly diagnosed hypertensive patient? 2018

Tsioufis, Costas / Andrikou, Ioannis / Pruijm, Menno / Ponte, Belén / Sarafidis, Pantelis / Koureas, Andreas / Tousoulis, Dimitrios / Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico / Mancia, Giuseppe / Burnier, Michel. ·First Cardiology Clinic, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Hippokration Hospital Athens, Greece. · Service of Nephrology and Hypertension, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne. · Service of Nephrology, Hôpital Universitaire de Genève (HUG), Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Nephrology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippokration Hospital Thessaloniki. · First Department of Radiology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Areteion University Hospital, Greece. · Clinica Medica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia. · University of Milano-Bicocca, IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #28817492.

ABSTRACT: : European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate and evaluation of urinary albumin excretion rate as routine tests in the initial evaluation and during the follow-up of all hypertensive patients. However, from a clinical point of view, renal ultrasound - a noninvasive, readily available and cheap imaging modality - could contribute to the better evaluation of a hypertensive patient by identifying common causes of secondary hypertension (HTN) originating from the kidney and more recently by detecting renal injury in severe or long-standing essential HTN by measuring renal resistive indexes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the actual evidence which could support a larger use of renal ultrasound in the work-up of patients with newly diagnosed HTN.

22 Review Is Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Indeed the Hepatic Manifestation of Metabolic Syndrome? 2018

Katsiki, Niki / Perez-Martinez, Pablo / Anagnostis, Panagiotis / Mikhailidis, Dimitri P / Karagiannis, Asterios. ·Second Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippocration Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Lipid and Atherosclerosis Unit, IMIBIC/Reina Sofia University Hospital, University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain. · CIBER Fisiopatologia Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. · First Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit of Reproductive Endocrinology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Royal Free Hospital Campus, University College London Medical School, University College London (UCL), London, United Kingdom. ·Curr Vasc Pharmacol · Pubmed #28669328.

ABSTRACT: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of central obesity, dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance and hypertension. MetS frequently co-exists with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver in the absence of alcohol abuse, viral hepatitis and other causes of chronic liver diseases. Both MetS and NAFLD are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. There are also other associations between MetS and NAFLD. In the present narrative review, we discuss the links between MetS and NAFLD in terms of prevalence, risk factors and treatment (both lifestyle interventions and drug therapy). Such associations highlight the common pathophysiological pathways of these metabolic disorders, although data for an independent association are not robust. Nevertheless, NAFLD may be regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS.

23 Review Antidiabetic Drugs as Antihypertensives: New Data on the Horizon. 2017

Mamakou, Vassiliki / Eleftheriadou, Ioanna / Katsiki, Niki / Makrilakis, Konstantinos / Tsioufis, Konstantinos / Tentolouris, Nikolaos. ·First Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Laiko General Hospital, Athens. Greece. · Second Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippocration Hospital, Thessaloniki. Greece. · First Cardiology Clinic, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Hippokration Hospital, Athens. Greece. ·Curr Vasc Pharmacol · Pubmed #29032756.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is increasing worldwide; this is stimulating more research into the optimal management of this disease. Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) remains the commonest cause of death in individuals with T2DM. Besides hyperglycaemia, an explanation for the increased mortality in this population is the increased prevalence of comorbidities, such as hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Recent population-based studies described a prevalence of hypertension >80% in patients with T2DM. In the last decade new classes of antidiabetic medications have been developed that are effective not only for the management of hyperglycaemia and but also for tailoring treatment according to individual needs and characteristics. Regulatory authorities demand the new antidiabetic medications to be examined for Cardiovascular (CV) safety. Interestingly it has been shown, mainly through CV safety trials, that some new antidiabetic medications not only have glucose lowering effects, but also Blood Pressure (BP) lowering effects, contributing to CV risk reduction. CONCLUSION: This review considers the effect of older and newer antidiabetic medications on BP in patients with T2DM.

24 Review Pregnancy in Patients With Congenital Heart Disease: A Contemporary Challenge. 2017

Ntiloudi, Despina / Zegkos, Thomas / Koutsakis, Athanasios / Giannakoulas, George / Karvounis, Haralambos. ·From the 1st Department of Cardiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·Cardiol Rev · Pubmed #28832373.

ABSTRACT: The majority of female patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) survives into childbearing age and require evidence-based counseling regarding pregnancy options. Even though most of them will have an uneventful pregnancy, they may be at high risk of cardiac, obstetric, and fetal complications. Predictive factors for these complications have been previously identified in numerous studies and with the use of specific scores [CARdiac disease in PREGnancy, Zwangerschap bij Aangeboren HARtAfwijkingen, and World Health Organization (WHO) risk stratification.] Importantly, the subtype of CHD is of vital importance for the pregnancy outcome. Considering the above, the multidisciplinary management of these pregnant patients by experts in the field of CHD is imperative.

25 Review Blood pressure in hemodialysis: targets? 2017

Georgianos, Panagiotis I / Agarwal, Rajiv. ·aDivision of Nephrology and Hypertension, 1st Department of Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece bDepartment of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine and Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Administration Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. ·Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens · Pubmed #28832356.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In the absence of 'hard' clinical-trial evidence to define optimal blood pressure (BP) targets and validate different BP measurement techniques, management of hypertension in hemodialysis is based on expert opinions. In this review, we provide a comparative evaluation of out-of-dialysis BP monitoring versus dialysis-unit BP recordings in diagnosing hypertension, guiding its management and prognosticating mortality risk. RECENT FINDINGS: Owing to their high variability and poor reproducibility, predialysis and postdialysis BP recordings provide inaccurate reflection of the actual BP load outside of dialysis. Contrary to the reverse association of peridialytic BP with mortality, elevated home and ambulatory BP provides a direct mortality signal. Out-of-dialysis BP monitoring, even when done in the clinic, is a reliable approach to manage hypertension in the dialysis unit. Whenever none of these measures are available, median intradialytic SBP can provide a better estimate of interdialytic BP levels compared with peridialytic BP measurements. SUMMARY: Although out-of-dialysis BP monitoring have better diagnostic accuracy and prognostic validity, randomized trials are needed to ascertain BP targets for managing hypertension in hemodialysis patients.

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