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Hypertension: HELP
Articles from NIH Bethesda
Based on 435 articles published since 2010
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These are the 435 published articles about Hypertension that originated from NIH Bethesda during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Guideline Enhancing Insights into Pulmonary Vascular Disease through a Precision Medicine Approach. A Joint NHLBI-Cardiovascular Medical Research and Education Fund Workshop Report. 2017

Newman, John H / Rich, Stuart / Abman, Steven H / Alexander, John H / Barnard, John / Beck, Gerald J / Benza, Raymond L / Bull, Todd M / Chan, Stephen Y / Chun, Hyung J / Doogan, Declan / Dupuis, Jocelyn / Erzurum, Serpil C / Frantz, Robert P / Geraci, Mark / Gillies, Hunter / Gladwin, Mark / Gray, Michael P / Hemnes, Anna R / Herbst, Roy S / Hernandez, Adrian F / Hill, Nicholas S / Horn, Evelyn M / Hunter, Kendall / Jing, Zhi-Cheng / Johns, Roger / Kaul, Sanjay / Kawut, Steven M / Lahm, Tim / Leopold, Jane A / Lewis, Greg D / Mathai, Stephen C / McLaughlin, Vallerie V / Michelakis, Evangelos D / Nathan, Steven D / Nichols, William / Page, Grier / Rabinovitch, Marlene / Rich, Jonathan / Rischard, Franz / Rounds, Sharon / Shah, Sanjiv J / Tapson, Victor F / Lowy, Naomi / Stockbridge, Norman / Weinmann, Gail / Xiao, Lei. ·1 Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · 2 Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · 3 Pediatric Heart and Lung Center, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. · 4 Division of Cardiology and. · 5 Department of Quantitative Health Sciences. · 6 Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Allegheny Health Network, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · 7 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and. · 8 Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · 9 Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and. · 10 Independent Consultant, Palm Coast, Florida. · 11 Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · 12 Department of Pathobiology, and. · 13 Department of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · 14 Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · 15 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana. · 16 Independent Consultant and Pharmaceutical Physician, Half Moon Bay, California. · 17 Pulmonary Hypertension Association, Silver Spring, Maryland. · 18 Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · 19 Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · 20 Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts. · 21 Division of Cardiology, Cornell University, New York, New York. · 22 College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado. · 23 FuWai Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. · 24 Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care and. · 25 Division of Cardiology and. · 26 Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · 27 Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · 28 Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · 29 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · 30 Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · 31 University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · 32 Advanced Lung Disease Program, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, Virginia. · 33 Department of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio. · 34 RTI International, Atlanta, Georgia. · 35 Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Stanford, California. · 36 Division of Cardiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. · 37 Department of Medicine and Laboratory Medicine, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · 38 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · 39 Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products, Food and Drug Administration, Office of Drug Evaluation I, Office of New Drugs, Food and Drug Administration Silver Spring, Maryland; and. · 40 Division of Lung Diseases, NHLBI, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. ·Am J Respir Crit Care Med · Pubmed #28430547.

ABSTRACT: The Division of Lung Diseases of the NHLBI and the Cardiovascular Medical Education and Research Fund held a workshop to discuss how to leverage the anticipated scientific output from the recently launched "Redefining Pulmonary Hypertension through Pulmonary Vascular Disease Phenomics" (PVDOMICS) program to develop newer approaches to pulmonary vascular disease. PVDOMICS is a collaborative, protocol-driven network to analyze all patient populations with pulmonary hypertension to define novel pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) phenotypes. Stakeholders, including basic, translational, and clinical investigators; clinicians; patient advocacy organizations; regulatory agencies; and pharmaceutical industry experts, joined to discuss the application of precision medicine to PVD clinical trials. Recommendations were generated for discussion of research priorities in line with NHLBI Strategic Vision Goals that include: (1) A national effort, involving all the stakeholders, should seek to coordinate biosamples and biodata from all funded programs to a web-based repository so that information can be shared and correlated with other research projects. Example programs sponsored by NHLBI include PVDOMICS, Pulmonary Hypertension Breakthrough Initiative, the National Biological Sample and Data Repository for PAH, and the National Precision Medicine Initiative. (2) A task force to develop a master clinical trials protocol for PVD to apply precision medicine principles to future clinical trials. Specific features include: (a) adoption of smaller clinical trials that incorporate biomarker-guided enrichment strategies, using adaptive and innovative statistical designs; and (b) development of newer endpoints that reflect well-defined and clinically meaningful changes. (3) Development of updated and systematic variables in imaging, hemodynamic, cellular, genomic, and metabolic tests that will help precisely identify individual and shared features of PVD and serve as the basis of novel phenotypes for therapeutic interventions.

3 Guideline 2014 evidence-based guideline for the management of high blood pressure in adults: report from the panel members appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8). 2014

James, Paul A / Oparil, Suzanne / Carter, Barry L / Cushman, William C / Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl / Handler, Joel / Lackland, Daniel T / LeFevre, Michael L / MacKenzie, Thomas D / Ogedegbe, Olugbenga / Smith, Sidney C / Svetkey, Laura P / Taler, Sandra J / Townsend, Raymond R / Wright, Jackson T / Narva, Andrew S / Ortiz, Eduardo. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. · Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Tennessee, Memphis. · Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland. · Kaiser Permanente, Anaheim, California. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston. · University of Missouri, Columbia. · Denver Health and Hospital Authority and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland. · at the time of the project,National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland17currently with ProVation Medical, Wolters Kluwer Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JAMA · Pubmed #24352797.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is the most common condition seen in primary care and leads to myocardial infarction, stroke, renal failure, and death if not detected early and treated appropriately. Patients want to be assured that blood pressure (BP) treatment will reduce their disease burden, while clinicians want guidance on hypertension management using the best scientific evidence. This report takes a rigorous, evidence-based approach to recommend treatment thresholds, goals, and medications in the management of hypertension in adults. Evidence was drawn from randomized controlled trials, which represent the gold standard for determining efficacy and effectiveness. Evidence quality and recommendations were graded based on their effect on important outcomes. There is strong evidence to support treating hypertensive persons aged 60 years or older to a BP goal of less than 150/90 mm Hg and hypertensive persons 30 through 59 years of age to a diastolic goal of less than 90 mm Hg; however, there is insufficient evidence in hypertensive persons younger than 60 years for a systolic goal, or in those younger than 30 years for a diastolic goal, so the panel recommends a BP of less than 140/90 mm Hg for those groups based on expert opinion. The same thresholds and goals are recommended for hypertensive adults with diabetes or nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) as for the general hypertensive population younger than 60 years. There is moderate evidence to support initiating drug treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blocker, calcium channel blocker, or thiazide-type diuretic in the nonblack hypertensive population, including those with diabetes. In the black hypertensive population, including those with diabetes, a calcium channel blocker or thiazide-type diuretic is recommended as initial therapy. There is moderate evidence to support initial or add-on antihypertensive therapy with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker in persons with CKD to improve kidney outcomes. Although this guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for the management of high BP and should meet the clinical needs of most patients, these recommendations are not a substitute for clinical judgment, and decisions about care must carefully consider and incorporate the clinical characteristics and circumstances of each individual patient.

4 Editorial Commentary: Hypertension Phenotypes: The Many Faces of a Silent Killer. 2019

Mensah, George A. ·Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. ·Ethn Dis · Pubmed #31641321.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial The preimplantation genetic testing debate continues: first the hype, then the tension, now the hypertension? 2019

Patounakis, George / Hill, Micah J. ·Reproductive Medicine Associates of Florida, IVI-RMA Global, Lake Mary, Florida; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida. · Program in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #31146887.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Tackling High Blood Pressure in Kenya and Other Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Why Now and What Can We Do? 2019

Engelgau, Michael M. ·Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: michael.engelgau@nih.gov. ·Glob Heart · Pubmed #31036304.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Blood Pressure Control-Much Has Been Achieved, Much Remains to Be Done. 2018

Fine, Lawrence J / Goff, David C / Mensah, George A. ·Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. ·JAMA Cardiol · Pubmed #29800015.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Exercise Magnetic Resonance Imaging Is a Gas. 2016

Rogers, Toby / Lederman, Robert J. ·From the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. toby.rogers@nih.gov. · From the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27940959.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Hypertension and Target Organ Damage: Don't Believe Everything You Think! 2016

Mensah, George A. ·Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; Division of Cardiovascular Sciences; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. ·Ethn Dis · Pubmed #27440965.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial SPRINT and Implications for Target Organ Protection in African Americans. 2016

Wright, Jackson T Jr / Fine, Lawrence J. ·Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Md. ·Ethn Dis · Pubmed #27440964.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial What Defines a Valuable Investment in Global Health Research? 2016

Bloomfield, Gerald S / Narayan, K M Venkat / Sampson, Uchechukwu K A / Narula, Jagat. ·Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Duke Clinical Research Institute, and Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · Emory Global Diabetes Research Center, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: jagat.narula@mountsinai.org. ·Glob Heart · Pubmed #27102017.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Power of the Cluster. 2015

Lauer, Michael S / Mensah, George A. ·From the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (M.S.L.) and the Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science (G.A.M.), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD. lauerm@nhlbi.nih.gov. · From the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (M.S.L.) and the Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science (G.A.M.), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD. ·Circulation · Pubmed #26187184.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial The Broad Spectrum of HIV-Related Cardiovascular Disease. 2015

Shah, Monica R. ·Division of Cardiovascular Sciences and the NHLBI AIDS Program, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. Electronic address: shahmr@nhlbi.nih.gov. ·JACC Heart Fail · Pubmed #26164680.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial When implausible findings emanate from high-quality studies. 2011

Sorlie, Paul D. ·Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. sorliep@mail.nih.gov ·Epidemiology · Pubmed #21642776.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Review Resistant Hypertension: A Clinical Perspective. 2019

Hannah-Shmouni, Fady / Gubbi, Sriram / Spence, J David / Stratakis, Constantine A / Koch, Christian A. ·Internal Medicine-Endocrinology, Hypertension and Metabolic Genetics, Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1109, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: fady.hannah-shmouni@nih.gov. · Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Obesity Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney diseases, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Stroke Prevention and Atherosclerosis Research Centre, Robarts Research Institute, Western University, 1400 Western Road, London, ON N6G 2V4, Canada. · Internal Medicine-Endocrinology, Hypertension and Metabolic Genetics, Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1109, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 910 Madison Avenue, Memphis, TN 38163, USA. ·Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am · Pubmed #31655778.

ABSTRACT: Resistant hypertension is a common clinical entity, defined as suboptimal blood pressure response to multiple therapies after excluding medication nonadherence and secondary forms of hypertension. Patients with resistant hypertension generally share several comorbidities. Resistant hypertension is more common in individuals of African descent. Blood pressure should be optimized using multiple strategies, including lifestyle changes and single-pill combination therapies, with the aim of reducing cardiovascular events while reducing side effects from using antihypertensive therapy. A renin/aldosterone-based diagnostic and treatment approach will help tailor therapy. The use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists or amiloride as appropriate is favored.

16 Review Pseudopheochromocytoma. 2019

Mamilla, Divya / Gonzales, Melissa K / Esler, Murray D / Pacak, Karel. ·Section on Medical Neuroendocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia; Dobney Hypertension Centre, Royal Perth Hospital Campus, University of Western Australia, Rear 50 Murray St, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. · Section on Medical Neuroendocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver NICHD, NIH, Building 10, CRC, 1E-3140, 10 Center Drive, MSC-1109, Bethesda, MD 20892-1109, USA. Electronic address: karel@mail.nih.gov. ·Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am · Pubmed #31655774.

ABSTRACT: Pseudopheochromocytoma manifests as severe, symptomatic paroxysmal hypertension without significant elevation in catecholamine and metanephrine levels and lack of evidence of tumor in the adrenal gland. The clinical manifestations are similar but not identical to those in excess circulating catecholamines. The underlying symptomatic mechanism includes augmented cardiovascular responsiveness to catecholamines alongside heightened sympathetic nervous stimulation. The psychological characteristics are probably attributed to the component of repressed emotions related to a past traumatic episode or repressive coping style. Successful management can be achieved by strong collaboration between a hypertension specialist and a psychiatrist or psychologist with expertise in cognitive-behavioral panic management.

17 Review Hypertension and Cardiovascular Mortality in Patients with Cushing Syndrome. 2019

Nieman, Lynnette K. ·Diabetes, Endocrinology and Obesity Branch, The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health, Building 10, CRC, 1 East, Room 1-3140, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1109, Bethesda, MD 20892-1109, USA. Electronic address: NiemanL@nih.gov. ·Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am · Pubmed #31655772.

ABSTRACT: Patients with Cushing syndrome have an increased mortality rate, primarily due to increased cardiovascular death, which is driven by hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia. These should be evaluated before and after active hypercortisolism, and each should be treated specifically. Antihypertensives may be chosen based on probable pathophysiology. Thus, inhibitors of the renin-angiotensinogen system are recommended. Mineralocorticoid antagonists are helpful in hypokalemic patients. Other agents are often needed to normalize blood pressure. If medical treatment of Cushing syndrome is chosen, the goal should be to normalize cortisol (or its clinical action); if this is not achieved, it is more difficult to treat comorbidities.

18 Review Postoperative Management in Patients with Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma. 2019

Mamilla, Divya / Araque, Katherine A / Brofferio, Alessandra / Gonzales, Melissa K / Sullivan, James N / Nilubol, Naris / Pacak, Karel. ·Section on Medical Neuroendocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Adult Endocrinology Department, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA. · Endocrine Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Section on Medical Neuroendocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. karel@mail.nih.gov. ·Cancers (Basel) · Pubmed #31277296.

ABSTRACT: Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs) are rare catecholamine-secreting neuroendocrine tumors of the adrenal medulla and sympathetic/parasympathetic ganglion cells, respectively. Excessive release of catecholamines leads to episodic symptoms and signs of PPGL, which include hypertension, headache, palpitations, and diaphoresis. Intraoperatively, large amounts of catecholamines are released into the bloodstream through handling and manipulation of the tumor(s). In contrast, there could also be an abrupt decline in catecholamine levels after tumor resection. Because of such binary manifestations of PPGL, patients may develop perplexing and substantially devastating cardiovascular complications during the perioperative period. These complications include hypertension, hypotension, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and cerebrovascular accident. Other complications seen in the postoperative period include fever, hypoglycemia, cortisol deficiency, urinary retention, etc. In the interest of safe patient care, such emergencies require precise diagnosis and treatment. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, and intensivists must be aware of the clinical manifestations and complications associated with a sudden increase or decrease in catecholamine levels and should work closely together to be able to provide appropriate management to minimize morbidity and mortality associated with PPGLs.

19 Review Research Gaps in Primary Pediatric Hypertension. 2019

Taylor-Zapata, Perdita / Baker-Smith, Carissa M / Burckart, Gilbert / Daniels, Stephen R / Flynn, Joseph T / Giacoia, George / Green, Dionna / Kelly, Aaron S / Khurana, Mona / Li, Jennifer S / Pratt, Charlotte / Urbina, Elaine M / Zajicek, Anne. ·Obstetric and Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, taylorpe@mail.nih.gov. · School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. · Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Immediate Office of the Commissioner, and. · Department of Pediatrics, Section of Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. · School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Obstetric and Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. · Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland. · Department of Pediatrics, Center for Pediatric Obesity Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Division of Pediatric and Maternal Health, Office of New Drugs. · Department of Pediatrics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; and. · Clinical Applications and Prevention Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and. · Heart Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Office of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #31023830.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension affects >40% of the US population and is a major contributor to cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Although less common among children and adolescents, hypertension affects 1% to 5% of all youth. The 2017 Clinical Practice Guideline for the Diagnosis and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents provided updates and strategies regarding the diagnosis and management of hypertension in youth. Despite this important information, many gaps in knowledge remain, such as the etiology, prevalence, and trends of hypertension; the utility and practicality of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; practical goals for lifestyle modification that are generalizable; the long-term end-organ impacts of hypertension in youth; and the long-term safety and efficacy of antihypertensive therapy in youth. The

20 Review Hepatic Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis. 2019

Sakiani, Sasan / Kleiner, David E / Heller, Theo / Koh, Christopher. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, 22 South Greene Street, N3W50, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address: ssakiani@som.umaryland.edu. · Laboratory of Pathology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Building 10, Room 2S235, MSC 1500, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Liver Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Building 10, Room 9B-16, MSC 1800, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Liver Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Building 10, Room 9B-16, MSC 1800, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: christopher.koh@nih.gov. ·Clin Liver Dis · Pubmed #30947876.

ABSTRACT: Cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) remains the third leading cause of death in patients with cystic fibrosis. Although most patients with CFLD present in childhood, recent studies suggest a second wave of liver disease in adulthood. There are no clear guidelines for diagnosing CFLD. Treatment options for CFLD remain limited, and while UDCA is widely used, its long-term benefit is unclear. Those who develop hepatic decompensation or uncontrolled variceal bleeding may benefit from liver transplant, either alone, or in combination with lung transplant.

21 Review Genetics of Hypertension in African Americans and Others of African Descent. 2019

Zilbermint, Mihail / Hannah-Shmouni, Fady / Stratakis, Constantine A. ·Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, BG 31 RM 2A46, 31 Center Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. mihail.zilbermint@nih.gov. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. mihail.zilbermint@nih.gov. · Johns Hopkins Community Physicians at Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA. mihail.zilbermint@nih.gov. · Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA. mihail.zilbermint@nih.gov. · Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, BG 31 RM 2A46, 31 Center Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Fady.Hannah-Shmouni@nih.gov. · Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, BG 31 RM 2A46, 31 Center Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. stratakc@cc1.nichd.nih.gov. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #30832344.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease in the United States, affecting up to one-third of adults. When compared to other ethnic or racial groups in the United States, African Americans and other people of African descent show a higher incidence of hypertension and its related comorbidities; however, the genetics of hypertension in these populations has not been studied adequately. Several genes have been identified to play a role in the genetics of hypertension. They include genes regulating the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system (RAAS), such as Sodium Channel Epithelial 1 Beta Subunit (

22 Review Blood Pressure Assessment in Adults in Clinical Practice and Clinic-Based Research: JACC Scientific Expert Panel. 2019

Muntner, Paul / Einhorn, Paula T / Cushman, William C / Whelton, Paul K / Bello, Natalie A / Drawz, Paul E / Green, Beverly B / Jones, Daniel W / Juraschek, Stephen P / Margolis, Karen L / Miller, Edgar R / Navar, Ann Marie / Ostchega, Yechiam / Rakotz, Michael K / Rosner, Bernard / Schwartz, Joseph E / Shimbo, Daichi / Stergiou, George S / Townsend, Raymond R / Williamson, Jeff D / Wright, Jackson T / Appel, Lawrence J / Anonymous8000976. ·Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. Electronic address: pmuntner@uab.edu. · Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Preventive Medicine Section, Medical Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, Tennessee. · Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Division of Renal Diseases & Hypertension, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi. · Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · HealthPartners Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina. · National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland. · American Medical Association, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, Brigham's and Women's Hospital, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York. · The Hypertension Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Hypertension Center STRIDE-7, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. · Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #30678763.

ABSTRACT: The accurate measurement of blood pressure (BP) is essential for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Restricted use of mercury devices, increased use of oscillometric devices, discrepancies between clinic and out-of-clinic BP, and concerns about measurement error with manual BP measurement techniques have resulted in uncertainty for clinicians and researchers. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the U.S. National Institutes of Health convened a working group of clinicians and researchers in October 2017 to review data on BP assessment among adults in clinical practice and clinic-based research. In this report, the authors review the topics discussed during a 2-day meeting including the current state of knowledge on BP assessment in clinical practice and clinic-based research, knowledge gaps pertaining to current BP assessment methods, research and clinical needs to improve BP assessment, and the strengths and limitations of using BP obtained in clinical practice for research and quality improvement activities.

23 Review Stroke Prevention Strategies in the Developing World. 2018

Kalkonde, Yogeshwar V / Alladi, Suvarna / Kaul, Subhash / Hachinski, Vladimir. ·From the Society for Education, Action and Research in Community Health, Gadchiroli, India (Y.V.K.). · Department of Neurology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, India (S.A.). · Department of Neurology, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, India (S.K.). · Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, Canada (V.H.). ·Stroke · Pubmed #30571438.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Review Arterial stiffness and hypertension. 2018

Oh, Young S. ·Vascular Biology and Hypertension Branch, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 8106, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA. · 0000 0001 2293 4638 · grid.279885.9 ·Clin Hypertens · Pubmed #30519485.

ABSTRACT: Measures of the functional and structural properties of blood vessels can be used to assess preclinical stage of vascular disorders. Recent experimental and population studies show that arterial stiffening precedes development of high blood pressure, and can be used to predict future cardiovascular events. Arterial stiffness was also shown to be reversible in several experimental models of various conditions. Since reversing arterial stiffness could prevent development of hypertension and other clinical conditions, understanding the biological mechanisms of arterial stiffening and investigating potential therapeutic interventions to modulate arterial stiffness are important research topics. For research and application in general clinical settings, it is an important step to develop reliable devices and a standardized arterial stiffness measurement protocol.

25 Review Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Expert Panel Report: Current Controversies and Implications for Clinical Trials. 2018

Parikh, Kishan S / Sharma, Kavita / Fiuzat, Mona / Surks, Howard K / George, Jyothis T / Honarpour, Narimon / Depre, Christopher / Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice / Nkulikiyinka, Richard / Lewis, Gregory D / Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi / O'Connor, Christopher M / Stockbridge, Norman / Califf, Robert M / Konstam, Marvin A / Januzzi, James L / Solomon, Scott D / Borlaug, Barry A / Shah, Sanjiv J / Redfield, Margaret M / Felker, G Michael. ·Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina; Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina. Electronic address: kishan.parikh@duke.edu. · Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina; Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina. · Sanofi, Bridgewater, New Jersey. · Boehringer Ingelheim Clinical Development, Ingelheim, Germany. · Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, California. · National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. · Bayer AG, Wuppertal, Germany. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, Falls Church, Virginia. · U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland. · Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina; Stanford University, Stanford, California; Verily Life Sciences, San Francisco, California. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Harvard Medical School, Wellesley, Massachusetts. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. ·JACC Heart Fail · Pubmed #30071950.

ABSTRACT: The number of persons with heart failure has continued to rise over the last several years. Approximately one-half of those living with heart failure have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, but critical unsolved questions remain across the spectrum of basic, translational, clinical, and population research in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. In this study, the authors summarize existing knowledge, persistent controversies, and gaps in evidence with regard to the understanding of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Our analysis is based on an expert panel discussion "Think Tank" meeting that included representatives from academia, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and industry.

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