Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Hypertension: HELP
Articles from NIH Bethesda
Based on 323 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 323 published articles about Hypertension that originated from NIH Bethesda during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Guideline 2014 evidence-based guideline for the management of high blood pressure in adults: report from the panel members appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8). 2014

James, Paul A / Oparil, Suzanne / Carter, Barry L / Cushman, William C / Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl / Handler, Joel / Lackland, Daniel T / LeFevre, Michael L / MacKenzie, Thomas D / Ogedegbe, Olugbenga / Smith, Sidney C / Svetkey, Laura P / Taler, Sandra J / Townsend, Raymond R / Wright, Jackson T / Narva, Andrew S / Ortiz, Eduardo. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. · Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Tennessee, Memphis. · Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland. · Kaiser Permanente, Anaheim, California. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston. · University of Missouri, Columbia. · Denver Health and Hospital Authority and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland. · at the time of the project,National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland17currently with ProVation Medical, Wolters Kluwer Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JAMA · Pubmed #24352797.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is the most common condition seen in primary care and leads to myocardial infarction, stroke, renal failure, and death if not detected early and treated appropriately. Patients want to be assured that blood pressure (BP) treatment will reduce their disease burden, while clinicians want guidance on hypertension management using the best scientific evidence. This report takes a rigorous, evidence-based approach to recommend treatment thresholds, goals, and medications in the management of hypertension in adults. Evidence was drawn from randomized controlled trials, which represent the gold standard for determining efficacy and effectiveness. Evidence quality and recommendations were graded based on their effect on important outcomes. There is strong evidence to support treating hypertensive persons aged 60 years or older to a BP goal of less than 150/90 mm Hg and hypertensive persons 30 through 59 years of age to a diastolic goal of less than 90 mm Hg; however, there is insufficient evidence in hypertensive persons younger than 60 years for a systolic goal, or in those younger than 30 years for a diastolic goal, so the panel recommends a BP of less than 140/90 mm Hg for those groups based on expert opinion. The same thresholds and goals are recommended for hypertensive adults with diabetes or nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) as for the general hypertensive population younger than 60 years. There is moderate evidence to support initiating drug treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blocker, calcium channel blocker, or thiazide-type diuretic in the nonblack hypertensive population, including those with diabetes. In the black hypertensive population, including those with diabetes, a calcium channel blocker or thiazide-type diuretic is recommended as initial therapy. There is moderate evidence to support initial or add-on antihypertensive therapy with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker in persons with CKD to improve kidney outcomes. Although this guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for the management of high BP and should meet the clinical needs of most patients, these recommendations are not a substitute for clinical judgment, and decisions about care must carefully consider and incorporate the clinical characteristics and circumstances of each individual patient.

3 Editorial Hypertension and Target Organ Damage: Don't Believe Everything You Think! 2016

Mensah, George A. ·Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; Division of Cardiovascular Sciences; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. ·Ethn Dis · Pubmed #27440965.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial SPRINT and Implications for Target Organ Protection in African Americans. 2016

Wright, Jackson T Jr / Fine, Lawrence J. ·Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Md. ·Ethn Dis · Pubmed #27440964.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial What Defines a Valuable Investment in Global Health Research? 2016

Bloomfield, Gerald S / Narayan, K M Venkat / Sampson, Uchechukwu K A / Narula, Jagat. ·Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Duke Clinical Research Institute, and Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · Emory Global Diabetes Research Center, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: jagat.narula@mountsinai.org. ·Glob Heart · Pubmed #27102017.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial When implausible findings emanate from high-quality studies. 2011

Sorlie, Paul D. ·Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. sorliep@mail.nih.gov ·Epidemiology · Pubmed #21642776.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review Should Hypertension Be Treated in Late Life to Preserve Cognitive Function? Pro Side of the Argument. 2018

Wright, Clinton B. ·From the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Rockville, MD. wright.clinton@gmail.com. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #29643177.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Review APOL1 Renal Risk Variants: Fertile Soil for HIV-Associated Nephropathy. 2017

Kopp, Jeffrey B / Heymann, Jurgen / Winkler, Cheryl A. ·Kidney Disease Section, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. Electronic address: jbkopp@nih.gov. · Kidney Disease Section, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Basic Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Leidos Biomedical Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD. ·Semin Nephrol · Pubmed #29110758.

ABSTRACT: Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) genetic variants are potent risk factors for glomerular disease, but one or more additional factors are required for expression of glomerular disease. Uncontrolled or poorly controlled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is the most potent susceptibility factor for APOL1 nephropathy that has been identified to date. APOL1 variants are associated with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), a podocyte disease, but not with HIV-immune complex disease, primarily a disease of the mesangium. The mechanism by which HIV brings out the latent glomerular disease risk remains to be defined. There are at least two classes of candidate mechanisms to explain the potent interaction between HIV-1 and APOL1. First, APOL1 variant proteins and HIV accessory proteins implicated in HIVAN may target the same or related intracellular pathways in podocytes. Recent data suggest roles for interleukin 1b and transcription factor EB. Second, features of uncontrolled HIV infection, including increased circulating factors such as interferon, may drive APOL1 gene transcription or act upon podocytes in other ways. Deeper probing of APOL1-HIV interactions may yield insights that will aid in understanding HIVAN, APOL1 nephropathy, and podocyte biology.

9 Review Recent development of risk-prediction models for incident hypertension: An updated systematic review. 2017

Sun, Dongdong / Liu, Jielin / Xiao, Lei / Liu, Ya / Wang, Zuoguang / Li, Chuang / Jin, Yongxin / Zhao, Qiong / Wen, Shaojun. ·Department of Hypertension Research, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University and Beijing Institute of Heart Lung and Blood Vessel Diseases, Beijing, China. · Beijing Lab for Cardiovascular Precision Medicine(PXM2017_014226_000037), Beijing, China. · Program Director & Medical Officer, Lung Cell and Vascular Biology Program, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Inova Campus, Falls Church, Virginia, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29084293.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hypertension is a leading global health threat and a major cardiovascular disease. Since clinical interventions are effective in delaying the disease progression from prehypertension to hypertension, diagnostic prediction models to identify patient populations at high risk for hypertension are imperative. METHODS: Both PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible reports of either prediction models or risk scores of hypertension. The study data were collected, including risk factors, statistic methods, characteristics of study design and participants, performance measurement, etc. RESULTS: From the searched literature, 26 studies reporting 48 prediction models were selected. Among them, 20 reports studied the established models using traditional risk factors, such as body mass index (BMI), age, smoking, blood pressure (BP) level, parental history of hypertension, and biochemical factors, whereas 6 reports used genetic risk score (GRS) as the prediction factor. AUC ranged from 0.64 to 0.97, and C-statistic ranged from 60% to 90%. CONCLUSIONS: The traditional models are still the predominant risk prediction models for hypertension, but recently, more models have begun to incorporate genetic factors as part of their model predictors. However, these genetic predictors need to be well selected. The current reported models have acceptable to good discrimination and calibration ability, but whether the models can be applied in clinical practice still needs more validation and adjustment.

10 Review Management of primary aldosteronism in patients with adrenal hemorrhage following adrenal vein sampling: A brief review with illustrative cases. 2017

Hannah-Shmouni, Fady / Demidowich, Andrew / Alves, Beatriz Rizkallah / Paluch, Gabriela Dockhorn / Margarita, Dionysiou / Lysikatos, Charalampos / Belyavskaya, Elena / Chang, Richard / Stratakis, Constantine A. ·Section on Endocrinology & Genetics (SEGEN), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA. · Interventional Radiology Section, Diagnostic Radiology Department, Clinical Center, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) · Pubmed #28889455.

ABSTRACT: The authors describe the clinical investigation of two cases of primary aldosteronism with adrenal hemorrhage (AH) following adrenal vein sampling. A literature review was conducted regarding the medical management of primary aldosteronism in patients with AH following adrenal vein sampling. Guidelines on the management of primary aldosteronism with AH following adrenal vein sampling are lacking. The two patients were followed with serial imaging to document resolution of AH and treated medically with excellent blood pressure response. Resolution of AH was achieved, but a repeat adrenal vein sampling was deferred given the increased morbidity risk associated with a repeat procedure.

11 Review Therapeutics for APOL1 nephropathies: putting out the fire in the podocyte. 2017

Heymann, Jurgen / Winkler, Cheryl A / Hoek, Maarten / Susztak, Katalin / Kopp, Jeffrey B. ·Kidney Disease Section, NIDDK, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Molecular Genetic Epidemiology Section, Basic Research Laboratory, Basic Science Program; Leidos Biomedical Research, Frederick National Laboratory, NCI, NIH, Frederick, MD, USA. · Merck Research Laboratories, Merck and Co., Kenilworth, NJ, USA. · Renal, Electrolyte and Hypertension Division, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. ·Nephrol Dial Transplant · Pubmed #28391347.

ABSTRACT: APOL1 nephropathies comprise a range of clinical and pathologic syndromes, which can be summarized as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, in various guises, and arterionephrosclerosis, otherwise known as hypertensive kidney diseases. Current therapies for these conditions may achieve therapeutic targets, reduction in proteinuria and control of blood pressure, respectively, but often fail to halt the progressive decline in kidney function. It appears that current therapies fail to address certain underlying critical pathologic processes that are driven, particularly in podocytes and microvascular cells, by the APOL1 renal risk genetic variants. Mechanisms hypothesized to be responsible for APOL1 variant-associated cell injury can be summarized in five domains: increased APOL1 gene expression, activation of inflammasomes, activation of protein kinase R, electrolyte flux across plasma or intracellular membranes, and altered endolysosomal trafficking associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress. We briefly review the available evidence for these five mechanisms and suggest possible novel therapeutic approaches.

12 Review Hypertension in Blacks: Unanswered Questions and Future Directions for the JHS (Jackson Heart Study). 2017

Muntner, Paul / Abdalla, Marwah / Correa, Adolfo / Griswold, Michael / Hall, John E / Jones, Daniel W / Mensah, George A / Sims, Mario / Shimbo, Daichi / Spruill, Tanya M / Tucker, Katherine L / Appel, Lawrence J. ·From the Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham (P.M.) · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Herbert and Florence Irving Medical Center, New York, NY (M.A., D.S.) · Department of Medicine, Jackson Heart Study (A.C., D.W.J., M.S.), Department of Data Science (M.G.), and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Mississippi Center for Obesity Research (J.E.H.), University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson · Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (G.A.M.) · Department of Population Health, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY (T.M.S.) · Department of Biomedical and Nutritional Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell (K.L.T.) · and Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (L.J.A.). ·Hypertension · Pubmed #28320850.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Review Building on a Legacy of Hypertension Research: Charting Our Future Together. 2017

Mensah, George A / Galis, Zorina S / Fine, Lawrence J / Garcia, Melissa E / Levy, Daniel F / Gibbons, Gary H. ·From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD. · From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD. Gary.Gibbons@nih.gov. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #27849567.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Review Research Needs to Improve Hypertension Treatment and Control in African Americans. 2016

Whelton, Paul K / Einhorn, Paula T / Muntner, Paul / Appel, Lawrence J / Cushman, William C / Diez Roux, Ana V / Ferdinand, Keith C / Rahman, Mahboob / Taylor, Herman A / Ard, Jamy / Arnett, Donna K / Carter, Barry L / Davis, Barry R / Freedman, Barry I / Cooper, Lisa A / Cooper, Richard / Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice / Gavini, Nara / Go, Alan S / Hyman, David J / Kimmel, Paul L / Margolis, Karen L / Miller, Edgar R / Mills, Katherine T / Mensah, George A / Navar, Ann M / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Rakotz, Michael K / Thomas, George / Tobin, Jonathan N / Wright, Jackson T / Yoon, Sung Sug Sarah / Cutler, Jeffrey A / Anonymous770881. ·From the Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (P.K.W., K.C.F.), and Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine (P.K.W., K.C.F.), New Orleans, LA · Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (P.T.E., P.D.-N., G.A.M., J.A.C.), and Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science (N.G., G.A.M.), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD · Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham (P.M.) · Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (L.J.A., L.A.C., E.R.M.) · Preventive Medicine Section, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, TN (W.C.C.) · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (A.V.D.R.) · Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, OH (M.R., J.T.W.) · Cardiovascular Research Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (H.A.T.) · Department of Epidemiology and Prevention (J.A.) and Department of Medicine (B.I.F., J.A.), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC · Dean's Office, University of Kentucky College of Public Health, Lexington (D.K.A.) · Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City (B.L.C.) · Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston (B.R.D.) · Department of Public Health Sciences, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL (R.C.) · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland (A.S.G.) · Department of Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (D.J.H.) · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (P.L.K.) · HealthPartners Institute, Minneapolis, MN (K.L.M.) · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (A.M.N.) · Department of Population Health, NYU School of Medicine, New York (G.O.) · American Medical Association, Chicago, IL (M.K.R.) · Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Cleveland Clinic, OH (G.T.) · Clinical Directors Network (CND) and The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science, New York (J.N.T.) · and National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD (S.S.(S.)Y.). ·Hypertension · Pubmed #27620388.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Review Trends in NHLBI-Funded Research on Sex Differences in Hypertension. 2016

Maric-Bilkan, Christine / Galis, Zorina S. ·From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, Vascular biology and Hypertension Branch, Bethesda, MD. christine.maric-bilkan@nih.gov. · From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, Vascular biology and Hypertension Branch, Bethesda, MD. ·Circ Res · Pubmed #27539972.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Review Neural modulation for hypertension and heart failure. 2016

Smith, S / Rossignol, P / Willis, S / Zannad, F / Mentz, R / Pocock, S / Bisognano, J / Nadim, Y / Geller, N / Ruble, S / Linde, C. ·The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine and Division of Cardiology, Columbus, OH, USA. Electronic address: sakima.smith@osumc.edu. · Inserm, CIC 1433, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Universite´ de Lorraine, F-CRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy, France. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine and Division of Cardiology, Columbus, OH, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA. · Medical Statistics Unit LSHTM, London, UK. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Cardiology, Rochester, NY, USA. · CVRx, Inc, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Office of Biostatistics Research, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, NHLBI, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Boston Scientific CRV, St. Paul, MN, USA. · Institution of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: cecilia.linde@ki.se. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #27085120.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension (HTN) and heart failure (HF) have a significant global impact on health, and lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in pharmacologic and device therapy for these conditions, there is a need for additional treatment modalities. Patients with sub-optimally treated HTN have increased risk for stroke, renal failure and heart failure. The outcome of HF patients remains poor despite modern pharmacological therapy and with established device therapies such as CRT and ICDs. Therefore, the potential role of neuromodulation via renal denervation, baro-reflex modulation and vagal stimulation for the treatment of resistant HTN and HF is being explored. In this manuscript, we review current evidence for neuromodulation in relation to established drug and device therapies and how these therapies may be synergistic in achieving therapy goals in patients with treatment resistant HTN and heart failure. We describe lessons learned from recent neuromodulation trials and outline strategies to improve the potential for success in future trials. This review is based on discussions between scientists, clinical trialists, and regulatory representatives at the 11th annual CardioVascular Clinical Trialist Forum in Washington, DC on December 5-7, 2014.

17 Review SPRINT Trial Results: Latest News in Hypertension Management. 2016

Cushman, William C / Whelton, Paul K / Fine, Lawrence J / Wright, Jackson T / Reboussin, David M / Johnson, Karen C / Oparil, Suzanne / Anonymous3840848. ·From Preventive Medicine Section, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, TN (W.C.C.) · Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA (P.K.W.) · Clinical Applications and Prevention Branch, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (L.J.F.) · Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (J.T.W.) · Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (D.M.R.) · Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis (K.C.J.) · Division of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham (S.O.). ·Hypertension · Pubmed #26553234.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review Interventions to Address Medical Conditions and Health-Risk Behaviors Among Persons With Serious Mental Illness: A Comprehensive Review. 2016

McGinty, Emma E / Baller, Julia / Azrin, Susan T / Juliano-Bult, Denise / Daumit, Gail L. ·Departments of Health Policy and Management and Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD; bmcginty@jhu.edu. · Departments of Health Policy and Management and Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD; · National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD; · Division of General Internal Medicine, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. ·Schizophr Bull · Pubmed #26221050.

ABSTRACT: People with serious mental illness (SMI) have mortality rates 2 to 3 times higher than the overall US population, largely due to cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and diabetes mellitus and other conditions, such as HIV/AIDS, is heightened in this group. Based on the recommendations of a National Institute of Mental Health stakeholder meeting, we conducted a comprehensive review examining the strength of the evidence surrounding interventions to address major medical conditions and health-risk behaviors among persons with SMI. Peer-reviewed studies were identified using 4 major research databases. Randomized controlled trials and observational studies testing interventions to address medical conditions and risk behaviors among persons with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder between January 2000 and June 2014 were included. Information was abstracted from each study by 2 trained reviewers, who also rated study quality using a standard tool. Following individual study review, the quality of the evidence (high, medium, low) and the effectiveness of various interventions were synthesized. 108 studies were included. The majority of studies examined interventions to address overweight/obesity (n = 80). The strength of the evidence was high for 4 interventions: metformin and behavioral interventions had beneficial effects on weight loss; and bupropion and varenicline reduced tobacco smoking. The strength of the evidence was low for most other interventions reviewed. Future studies should test long-term interventions to cardiovascular risk factors and health-risk behaviors. In addition, future research should study implementation strategies to effectively translate efficacious interventions into real-world settings.

19 Review Cardiometabolic Health in African Immigrants to the United States: A Call to Re-examine Research on African-descent populations. 2015

Commodore-Mensah, Yvonne / Himmelfarb, Cheryl Dennison / Agyemang, Charles / Sumner, Anne E. ·1. School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · 2. Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · 3. Diabetes, Endocrinology and Obesity Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. ·Ethn Dis · Pubmed #26675140.

ABSTRACT: In the 20th century, Africans in Sub-Saharan Africa had lower rates of cardiometabolic disease than Africans who migrated. However, in the 21st century, beyond infectious diseases, the triple epidemics of obesity, diabetes and hypertension have taken hold in Africa. Therefore, Africans are acquiring these chronic diseases at different rates and different intensity prior to migration. To ensure optimal care and health outcomes, the United States practice of grouping all African-descent populations into the "Black/African American" category without regard to country of origin masks socioeconomic and cultural differences and needs re-evaluation. Overall, research on African-descent populations would benefit from a shift from a racial to an ethnic perspective. To demonstrate the value of disaggregating data on African-descent populations, the epidemiologic transition, social, economic, and health characteristics of African immigrants are presented.

20 Review Cushing's syndrome: update on signs, symptoms and biochemical screening. 2015

Nieman, Lynnette K. ·The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentNational Institutes of Health, Building 10, CRC, 1 East, Rm 1-3140, 10 Center Dr, MSC 1109, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1109, USA NiemanL@nih.gov. ·Eur J Endocrinol · Pubmed #26156970.

ABSTRACT: Endogenous pathologic hypercortisolism, or Cushing's syndrome, is associated with poor quality of life, morbidity, and increased mortality. Early diagnosis may mitigate against this natural history of the disorder. The clinical presentation of Cushing's syndrome varies, in part related to the extent and duration of cortisol excess. When hypercortisolism is severe, its signs and symptoms are unmistakable. However, most of the signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome are common in the general population (e.g., hypertension and weight gain) and not all are present in every patient. In addition to classical features of glucocorticoid excess, such as proximal muscle weakness and wide purple striae, patients may present with the associated comorbidities that are caused by hypercortisolism. These include cardiovascular disease, thromboembolic disease, psychiatric and cognitive deficits, and infections. As a result, internists and generalists must consider Cushing's syndrome as a cause, and endocrinologists should search for and treat these comorbidities. Recommended tests to screen for Cushing's syndrome include 1  mg dexamethasone suppression, urine free cortisol, and late night salivary cortisol. These may be slightly elevated in patients with physiologic hypercortisolism, which should be excluded, along with exogenous glucocorticoid use. Each screening test has caveats and the choice of tests should be individualized based on each patient's characteristics and lifestyle. The objective of this review is to update the readership on the clinical and biochemical features of Cushing's syndrome that are useful when evaluating patients for this diagnosis.

21 Review Renal denervation therapy for hypertension: pathways for moving development forward. 2015

White, William B / Galis, Zorina S / Henegar, Jeffrey / Kandzari, David E / Victor, Ronald / Sica, Domenic / Townsend, Raymond R / Turner, J Rick / Virmani, Renu / Mauri, Laura. ·Division of Hypertension and Clinical Pharmacology, Calhoun Cardiology Center, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA. Electronic address: wwhite@uchc.edu. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA. · Piedmont Heart Institute, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, VA, USA. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Clinical Communications, Quintiles, Durham, NC, USA. · CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. · Harvard Clinical Research Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. ·J Am Soc Hypertens · Pubmed #25979410.

ABSTRACT: This scientific statement provides a summary of presentations and discussions at a cardiovascular Think Tank co-sponsored by the American Society of Hypertension (ASH), the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) held in North Bethesda, Maryland, on June 26, 2014. Studies of device therapies for the treatment of hypertension are requested by regulators to evaluate their safety and efficacy during their development programs. Think Tank participants thought that important considerations in undertaking such studies were: (1) Preclinical assessment: how likely it is that both efficacy and safety data indicating benefit in humans will be obtained, and/or whether a plausible mechanism of action for efficacy can be identified; (2) Early human trial(s): the ability to determine that the device has an acceptable benefit-to-risk balance for its use in the intended patient population and without the influence of drug therapy during a short-term follow-up period; and (3) Pivotal Phase III trial(s): the ability to prove the effectiveness of the device in a broad population in which the trial can be made as non-confounded as possible while still allowing for the determination for benefits when added to antihypertensive therapies.

22 Review Screening for cardiovascular risk factors in adults with serious mental illness: a review of the evidence. 2015

Baller, Julia B / McGinty, Emma E / Azrin, Susan T / Juliano-Bult, Denise / Daumit, Gail L. ·Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 N Broadway St., Room 405, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. jballer@jhu.edu. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 N Broadway St., Room 405, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. emcginty@jhu.edu. · National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 7145 MSC 9631, Rockville, MD, 20852, USA. Susan.Azrin@nih.gov. · National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 7145 MSC 9631, Rockville, MD, 20852, USA. Djuliano@mail.nih.gov. · Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 2024 E Monument St, Suite 2-620, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. gdaumit@jhmi.edu. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #25885367.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Adults with serious mental illness have a mortality rate two to three times higher than the overall US population, much of which is due to somatic conditions, especially cardiovascular disease. Given the disproportionately high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in the population with SMI, screening for these conditions is an important first step for timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. This comprehensive literature review summarizes screening rates for cardiovascular risk factors in the population with serious mental illness. METHODS: Relevant articles published between 2000 and 2013 were identified using the EMBASE, PsychInfo, PubMed, SCOPUS and Web of Science databases. We reviewed 10 studies measuring screening rates for obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension in the population with serious mental illness. Two reviewers independently extracted information on screening rates, study population, and study setting. RESULTS: Rates of screening varied considerably by time period, study population, and data source for all medical conditions. For example, rates of lipid testing for antipsychotic users ranged from 6% to 85%. For some conditions, rates of screening were consistently high. For example, screening rates for hypertension ranged from 79% - 88%. CONCLUSIONS: There is considerable variation in screening of cardiovascular risk factors in the population with serious mental illness, with significant need for improvement in some study populations and settings. Implementation of standard screening protocols triggered by diagnosis of serious mental illness or antipsychotic use may be promising avenues for ensuring timely diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors in this population.

23 Review Dietary sodium reduction does not affect circulating glucose concentrations in fasting children or adults: findings from a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2015

Patel, Sheena M / Cobb, Paul / Saydah, Sharon / Zhang, Xuanping / de Jesus, Janet M / Cogswell, Mary E. ·Divisions of Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Atlanta, GA; and Isp7@cdc.gov. · Divisions of Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention and. · Diabetes Translation, CDC, Atlanta, GA; · NIH, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD. ·J Nutr · Pubmed #25733466.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although evidence shows that reduced sodium intake lowers blood pressure, some studies suggest that sodium reduction may adversely affect insulin resistance and glucose tolerance. OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to assess the effects of sodium reduction on glucose tolerance, evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the relevant scientific literature, and provide direction for future research. METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science through August 2014. Both randomized and nonrandomized intervention trials were included in our meta-analyses. The effects of sodium reduction on glucose tolerance were evaluated in 37 articles, but because of a lack of comparable data, 8 trials were excluded from the meta-analyses. RESULTS: Participants were 10-79 y old, either primarily healthy or with hypertension. In meta-analyses of 20 randomized, crossover trials (n = 504 participants) and 9 nonrandomized crossover trials (n = 337), circulating glucose concentrations of fasting participants were not affected by reduction in sodium intake. In contrast, in meta-analyses of 19 of the 20 randomized, crossover trials (n = 494), fasting insulin concentrations were 9.53 pmol/L higher (95% CI: 5.04, 14.02 pmol/L higher) with sodium reduction. In 9 nonrandomized trials (n = 337), fasting insulin did not differ with reduced sodium intake. Results differed little when the analyses were restricted to studies with a low risk of bias and duration of ≥7 d. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis revealed no evidence that, in trials with a short intervention and large reductions in sodium, circulating glucose concentrations differed between groups. Recommendations for future studies include extending intervention durations, ensuring comparability of groups at baseline through randomization, and assessing sodium intakes relevant to population sodium reduction. In addition, analyses on other metabolic variables were limited because of the number of trials reporting these outcomes and lack of consistency across measures, suggesting a need for comparable measures of glucose tolerance across studies.

24 Review Global burden of atrial fibrillation in developed and developing nations. 2014

Chugh, Sumeet S / Roth, Gregory A / Gillum, Richard F / Mensah, George A. ·Cedars Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: sumeet.chugh@cshs.org. · Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Seattle, WA, USA; Division of Cardiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Medicine, Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. · Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science (CTRIS), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·Glob Heart · Pubmed #25432121.

ABSTRACT: Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder in the world, with major public health impact especially due to increased risk of stroke and hospitalizations. The recently published results on epidemiology of atrial fibrillation from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study confirm the existence of a significant and progressive worldwide increase in the burden of atrial fibrillation. However, there appears to be regional variation in both the burden of atrial fibrillation and availability of epidemiological data regarding this condition. In this review, the authors identify issues that are unique to the developed versus developing regions and outline a road map for possible approaches to surveillance, management, and prevention of atrial fibrillation at the global level.

25 Review Pre-eclampsia part 1: current understanding of its pathophysiology. 2014

Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn / Chaemsaithong, Piya / Yeo, Lami / Romero, Roberto. ·Perinatology Research Branch, Program for Perinatal Research and Obstetrics, Division of Intramural Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA and 3990 John R Street, Detroit, MI 48201, USA. ·Nat Rev Nephrol · Pubmed #25003615.

ABSTRACT: Pre-eclampsia is characterized by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria at ≥20 weeks of gestation. In the absence of proteinuria, hypertension together with evidence of systemic disease (such as thrombocytopenia or elevated levels of liver transaminases) is required for diagnosis. This multisystemic disorder targets several organs, including the kidneys, liver and brain, and is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Glomeruloendotheliosis is considered to be a characteristic lesion of pre-eclampsia, but can also occur in healthy pregnant women. The placenta has an essential role in development of this disorder. Pathogenetic mechanisms implicated in pre-eclampsia include defective deep placentation, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, autoantibodies to type-1 angiotensin II receptor, platelet and thrombin activation, intravascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and the presence of an antiangiogenic state, among which an imbalance of angiogenesis has emerged as one of the most important factors. However, this imbalance is not specific to pre-eclampsia, as it also occurs in intrauterine growth restriction, fetal death, spontaneous preterm labour and maternal floor infarction (massive perivillous fibrin deposition). The severity and timing of the angiogenic imbalance, together with maternal susceptibility, might determine the clinical presentation of pre-eclampsia. This Review discusses the diagnosis, classification, clinical manifestations and putative pathogenetic mechanisms of pre-eclampsia.

Next