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Hypertension: HELP
Articles from University of Sydney
Based on 349 articles published since 2008
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These are the 349 published articles about Hypertension that originated from University of Sydney during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14
1 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for the management of hypertension in the community a statement by the American Society of Hypertension and the International Society of Hypertension. 2014

Weber, Michael A / Schiffrin, Ernesto L / White, William B / Mann, Samuel / Lindholm, Lars H / Kenerson, John G / Flack, John M / Carter, Barry L / Materson, Barry J / Ram, C Venkata S / Cohen, Debbie L / Cadet, Jean-Claude / Jean-Charles, Roger R / Taler, Sandra / Kountz, David / Townsend, Raymond / Chalmers, John / Ramirez, Agustin J / Bakris, George L / Wang, Jiguang / Schutte, Aletta E / Bisognano, John D / Touyz, Rhian M / Sica, Dominic / Harrap, Stephen B. ·aState University of New York, Downstate College of Medicine, Brooklyn, New York, USA bDepartment of Medicine, Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Canada cCalhoun Cardiology Center, University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut dDepartment of Medicine, Weil Cornell College of Medicine, New York, New York, USA eDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umea, Sweden fCardiovascular Associates, Virginia Beach, Virginia gDepartment of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan hDepartment of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa iDepartment of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA jMediCiti Institutions, Hyderabad, India kDepartment of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA lState University School of Medicine mHypertension Center of Haiti, Port-au-Prince, Haiti nDepartment of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota oJersey Shore University Medical Center, Neptune, New Jersey pHypertension Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA qGeorge Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia rArterial Hypertension and Metabolic Unit, University Hospital, Favaloro Foundation, Buenos Aires, Argentina sASH Comprehensive Hypertension Center, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA tThe Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China uHypertension in Africa Research Team, North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa vDepartment of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA wInstitute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, UK xVirginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA yDepartment of Physiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #24270181.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Defining Hypertension - A Storm Across the Pacific. 2018

Jennings, Garry L R. ·Sydney Health Partners, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Baker Heart & Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; National Heart Foundation, Australia. Electronic address: garry.jennings@sydney.edu.au. ·Heart Lung Circ · Pubmed #29602492.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Guidelines under fire again! 2017

Chalmers, John. ·The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney and the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #28657973.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Guidelines Under Fire Again! 2017

Chalmers, John. ·From the The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; and The Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. chalmers@georgeinstitute.org.au. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #28652466.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Combination Pills for Treatment of High Blood Pressure: Cost-effectiveness in The Asia Pacific Region. 2017

Atkins, Emily R / Lung, Thomas / Redfern, Julie. ·The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Heart Lung Circ · Pubmed #28241926.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial South Africa's salt reduction strategy: Are we on track, and what lies ahead? 2016

Webster, J / Crickmore, C / Charlton, K / Steyn, K / Wentzel-Viljoen, E / Naidoo, P. ·Food Policy Division, George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. jwebster@georgeinstitute.org.au. ·S Afr Med J · Pubmed #28112084.

ABSTRACT: On 2 September 2016, 25 local and international participants from various sectors met in Cape Town to take stock of South Africa (SA)'s progress in salt reduction and develop a roadmap for action. SA is centre stage on salt reduction globally, being the first country to mandate salt reduction across a wide range of processed foods. Excessive salt intake contributed by processed foods and discretionary sources motivated SA to implement a public awareness campaign in parallel with legislation to reduce salt intake to the World Health Organization target of 5 g per day. Five priority areas were identified for continued action on salt reduction, including obtaining research funds for continued monitoring and compliance of salt reduction targets. Determining the contribution of foods eaten out of home to total salt intake and implementing strategies to address this sector were also highlighted as key actions. Lastly, implementing the next stage of the Salt Watch awareness campaign to change.

7 Editorial Accumulating Evidence of Benefits From Intensive Blood Pressure Lowering: Are We There Yet? 2016

Rodgers, Anthony / Salam, Abdul. ·From The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. arodgers@georgeinstitute.org. · From The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #27456519.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Comparative Superiority of ACE Inhibitors Over Angiotensin Receptor Blockers for People With CKD: Does It Matter? 2016

Mavridis, Dimitris / Palmer, Suetonia C / Strippoli, Giovanni F M. ·University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. Electronic address: dmavridi@cc.uoi.gr. · University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. · The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Diaverum, Lund, Sweden; University of Bari, Bari, Italy; The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, Australia. ·Am J Kidney Dis · Pubmed #27091011.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Pragmatic Trials for Noncommunicable Diseases: Relieving Constraints. 2016

Patel, Anushka / Webster, Ruth. ·The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·PLoS Med · Pubmed #27022969.

ABSTRACT: In this month's editorial, PLOS Medicine Editorial Board member Anushka Patel and Ruth Webster discuss how applying rules for drug efficacy trials can impede pragmatic trials of interventions for noncommunicable diseases.

10 Editorial Redefining Blood-Pressure Targets--SPRINT Starts the Marathon. 2015

Perkovic, Vlado / Rodgers, Anthony. ·From the George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #26551394.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Blood pressure control after a stroke: a continuing challenge! 2015

Chalmers, John. ·aThe George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney bRoyal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #26431190.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Blood Pressure Genetics Just Don't Add Up. 2015

Harrap, Stephen B / Morris, Brian J. ·Department of Physiology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (S.B.H.) and School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia (B.J.M.). s.harrap@unimelb.edu.au. · Department of Physiology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (S.B.H.) and School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia (B.J.M.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Genet · Pubmed #26286727.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Brain-stem microRNAs implicated in hypertension. 2015

Morris, Brian J / Dampney, Roger A L. ·Discipline of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia brian.morris@sydney.edu.au. · Discipline of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Physiol Genomics · Pubmed #26242934.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Can blood pressure-lowering therapy reduce the risk of cognitive decline in the elderly? 2015

Chalmers, John. ·aThe George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney bThe Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #26203969.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial The social gradient of taking a family history. 2015

Ingles, Jodie / Burns, Charlotte. ·Agnes Ginges Centre for Molecular Cardiology, Centenary Institute, Sydney, Australia Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Australia j.ingles@centenary.org.au. · Agnes Ginges Centre for Molecular Cardiology, Centenary Institute, Sydney, Australia Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Australia. ·Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs · Pubmed #25406471.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Are the effects of telmisartan more marked in hypertensive patients? 2014

Chalmers, John. ·The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #24781511.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Blood pressure management in the 21st century: maximizing gains and minimizing waste. 2013

Rahimi, Kazem / Macmahon, Stephen. ·George Institute for Global Health (K.R., S.M.) and Department of Cardiovascular Medicine (K.R.), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK · Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Cardiology, Oxford, UK (K.R.) · and the George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Australia (S.M.). ·Circulation · Pubmed #24190954.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Blood-pressure-related disease is a global health priority. 2008

Macmahon, Stephen / Alderman, Michael H / Lindholm, Lars H / Liu, Lisheng / Sanchez, Ramiro A / Seedat, Yackoob K. ·George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. smacmahon@george.org.au ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #18806633.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Review Does induction of labour in nulliparous hypertensive women result in vaginal birth? - A descriptive study utilising birth registry data. 2018

Thornton, Charlene Eliza / Dahlen, Hannah Grace / Hennessy, Annemarie. ·Flinders University, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: charlene.thornton@flinderswesternsydney.edu.au. · Western Sydney University, School of Nursing and Midwifery, NSW, Australia. · Western Sydney University, School of Medicine, NSW, Australia. ·Pregnancy Hypertens · Pubmed #29674193.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Induction of labour (IOL) is a common procedure yet we have little information on the efficacy of the process for women with a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP). OBJECTIVE: To describe the birth type and associated factors in nulliparous HDP women undergoing an induction of labour. STUDY DESIGN: Statutorily collected datasets on every birth and hospital admission which occurred in the state of NSW Australia between the years 2000-2011 were analysed. Hypertensive women were compared to normotensive women. RESULTS: Of the nulliparous women, 9.9% had a HDP. IOL for HDP women were 56.2% in a cohort of 447 558 women. The AOR for a woman with a HDP undergoing an IOL resulting in a vaginal delivery when compared to a normotensive woman is 0.86 (95% CI 0.83-0.88). Prior to 33 weeks, the lowest perinatal mortality rates (PMR) are seen in women who undergo elective caesarean section (C/S). For women with preeclampsia (PE), lower PMR are seen in women who undergo IOL. CONCLUSION: For women with PE and SPE, IOL resulted in lower rates of vaginal delivery than spontaneous labour when compared to normotensive women who also underwent IOL. Women with PE at ≥33 weeks who underwent IOL had the lowest PMR.

20 Review Maternal obesity increases the risk of metabolic disease and impacts renal health in offspring. 2018

Glastras, Sarah J / Chen, Hui / Pollock, Carol A / Saad, Sonia. ·Department of Medicine, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia sarah.glastras@sydney.edu.au. · Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia. · School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney, Australia. · Department of Medicine, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·Biosci Rep · Pubmed #29483369.

ABSTRACT: Obesity, together with insulin resistance, promotes multiple metabolic abnormalities and is strongly associated with an increased risk of chronic disease including type 2 diabetes (T2D), hypertension, cardiovascular disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The incidence of obesity continues to rise in astronomical proportions throughout the world and affects all the different stages of the lifespan. Importantly, the proportion of women of reproductive age who are overweight or obese is increasing at an alarming rate and has potential ramifications for offspring health and disease risk. Evidence suggests a strong link between the intrauterine environment and disease programming. The current review will describe the importance of the intrauterine environment in the development of metabolic disease, including kidney disease. It will detail the known mechanisms of fetal programming, including the role of epigenetic modulation. The evidence for the role of maternal obesity in the developmental programming of CKD is derived mostly from our rodent models which will be described. The clinical implication of such findings will also be discussed.

21 Review The association between consistent licorice ingestion, hypertension and hypokalaemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Penninkilampi, R / Eslick, E M / Eslick, G D. ·The Whiteley-Martin Research Centre, Discipline of Surgery, The University of Sydney, Nepean Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Hum Hypertens · Pubmed #28660884.

ABSTRACT: There have been numerous case reports of severe adverse events including deaths following chronic licorice ingestion. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of chronic ingestion of licorice on blood pressure, plasma potassium, plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone. A search of MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, DARE, CINAHL and Current Contents Connect was performed from inception through to 26 April 2017. Trials that included a treatment group ingesting a product containing at least 100 mg of glycyrrhizic acid daily were selected. Pooled mean changes from baseline with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, plasma potassium, plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone using a random effects model. An assessment of dose-response was also undertaken. A total of 18 studies (n=337) were included in the meta-analysis. There was a statistically significant increase in mean systolic blood pressure (5.45 mm Hg, 95% CI 3.51-7.39) and diastolic blood pressure (3.19 mm Hg, 95% CI 0.10-6.29) after chronic ingestion of a product containing glycyrrhizic acid. Plasma potassium (-0.33 mmol l

22 Review Efficacy and Safety of Quarter-Dose Blood Pressure-Lowering Agents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. 2017

Bennett, Alexander / Chow, Clara K / Chou, Michael / Dehbi, Hakim-Moulay / Webster, Ruth / Salam, Abdul / Patel, Anushka / Neal, Bruce / Peiris, David / Thakkar, Jay / Chalmers, John / Nelson, Mark / Reid, Christopher / Hillis, Graham S / Woodward, Mark / Hilmer, Sarah / Usherwood, Tim / Thom, Simon / Rodgers, Anthony. ·From the George Institute for Global Health (A.B., C.K.C., R.W., A.S., A.P., B.N., D.P., J.T., J.C., M.W., A.R.) and Charles Perkins Centre (C.K.C., B.N.), University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia · Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (C.K.C., J.T.) · The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (S.H., T.U., A.R.) · The University of Western Australia, Perth (G.S.H.) · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (M.C.) · Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, University College London, United Kingdom (H.-M.D.) · Imperial College, London, United Kingdom (B.N., S.T.) · Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia (M.N.) · Curtin University, Perth, Australia (C.R.) · and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (A.P., B.N.). ·Hypertension · Pubmed #28584013.

ABSTRACT: There is a critical need for blood pressure-lowering strategies that have greater efficacy and minimal side effects. Low-dose combinations hold promise in this regard, but there are few data on very-low-dose therapy. We, therefore, conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials with at least one quarter-dose and one placebo and standard-dose monotherapy arm. A search was conducted of Medline, Embase, Cochrane Registry, Food and Drug Administration, and European Medicinal Agency websites. Data on blood pressure and adverse events were pooled using a fixed-effect model, and bias was assessed using Cochrane risk of bias. The review included 42 trials involving 20 284 participants. Thirty-six comparisons evaluated quarter-dose with placebo and indicated a blood pressure reduction of -4.7/-2.4 mm Hg (

23 Review The science of salt: A regularly updated systematic review of salt and health outcomes (December 2015-March 2016). 2017

Wong, Michelle M Y / Arcand, JoAnne / Leung, Alexander A / Thout, Sudhir Raj / Campbell, Norm R C / Webster, Jacqui. ·Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · The George Institute for Global Health India, Hyderabad, India. · Department of Medicine, Physiology and Pharmacology and Community Health Sciences, O'Brien Institute for Public Health and Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) · Pubmed #28266792.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise studies on dietary salt relating to health outcomes that were published from December 2015 to March 2016. The search strategy was adapted from a previous systematic review on dietary salt and health. Overall, 13 studies were included in the review: one study assessed cardiovascular events, nine studies assessed prevalence or incidence of blood pressure or hypertension, one study assessed kidney disease, and two studies assessed other health outcomes (obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease). Four studies were selected for detailed appraisal and commentary. One study met the minimum methodologic criteria and found an increased risk associated with lower sodium intake in patients with heart failure. All other studies identified in this review demonstrated positive associations between dietary salt and adverse health outcomes.

24 Review The Science of Salt: A regularly updated systematic review of the implementation of salt reduction interventions (March-August 2016). 2017

Santos, Joseph Alvin / Trieu, Kathy / Raj, Thout Sudhir / Arcand, JoAnne / Johnson, Claire / Webster, Jacqui / McLean, Rachael. ·The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · The George Institute for Global Health India, Hyderabad, India. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa Ontario, Canada. · Departments of Preventive & Social Medicine/Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. ·J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) · Pubmed #28247592.

ABSTRACT: This review aims to identify, summarize, and appraise studies reporting on the implementation of salt reduction interventions that were published between March and August 2016. Overall, 40 studies were included: four studies evaluated the impact of salt reduction interventions, while 36 studies were identified as relevant to the design, assessment, and implementation of salt reduction strategies. Detailed appraisal and commentary were undertaken on the four studies that measured the impact of the interventions. Among them, different evaluation approaches were adopted; however, all demonstrated positive health outcomes relating to dietary salt reduction. Three of the four studies measured sodium in breads and provided consistent evidence that sodium reduction in breads is feasible and different intervention options are available. None of the studies were conducted in low- or lower middle-income countries, which stresses the need for more resources and research support for the implementation of salt reduction interventions in these countries.

25 Review Population-level interventions in government jurisdictions for dietary sodium reduction: a Cochrane Review. 2017

Barberio, Amanda M / Sumar, Nureen / Trieu, Kathy / Lorenzetti, Diane L / Tarasuk, Valerie / Webster, Jacqui / Campbell, Norman R C / McLaren, Lindsay. ·Department of Community Health Sciences. · Department of Family Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Food Policy, George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · Department of Nutritional Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. ·Int J Epidemiol · Pubmed #28204481.

ABSTRACT: Background: Worldwide, excessive salt consumption is common and is a leading cause of high blood pressure. Our objectives were to assess the overall and differential impact (by social and economic indicators) of population-level interventions for dietary sodium reduction in government jurisdictions worldwide. Methods: This is a Cochrane systematic review. We searched nine peer-reviewed databases, seven grey literature resources and contacted national programme leaders. We appraised studies using an adapted version of the Cochrane risk of bias tool. To assess impact, we computed the mean change in salt intake (g/day) from before to after intervention. Results: Fifteen initiatives met the inclusion criteria and 10 provided sufficient data for quantitative analysis of impact. Of these, five showed a mean decrease in salt intake from before to after intervention including: China, Finland (Kuopio area), France, Ireland and the UK. When the sample was constrained to the seven initiatives that were multicomponent and incorporated activities of a structural nature (e.g. procurement policy), most (4/7) showed a mean decrease in salt intake. A reduction in salt intake was more apparent among men than women. There was insufficient information to assess differential impact by other social and economic axes. Although many initiatives had methodological strengths, all scored as having a high risk of bias reflecting the observational design. Study heterogeneity was high, reflecting different contexts and initiative characteristics. Conclusions: Population-level dietary sodium reduction initiatives have the potential to reduce dietary salt intake, especially if they are multicomponent and incorporate intervention activities of a structural nature. It is important to consider data infrastructure to permit monitoring of these initiatives.

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