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Hypertension: HELP
Articles from University of Sydney
Based on 439 articles published since 2010
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These are the 439 published articles about Hypertension that originated from University of Sydney during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18
1 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for the management of hypertension in the community a statement by the American Society of Hypertension and the International Society of Hypertension. 2014

Weber, Michael A / Schiffrin, Ernesto L / White, William B / Mann, Samuel / Lindholm, Lars H / Kenerson, John G / Flack, John M / Carter, Barry L / Materson, Barry J / Ram, C Venkata S / Cohen, Debbie L / Cadet, Jean-Claude / Jean-Charles, Roger R / Taler, Sandra / Kountz, David / Townsend, Raymond / Chalmers, John / Ramirez, Agustin J / Bakris, George L / Wang, Jiguang / Schutte, Aletta E / Bisognano, John D / Touyz, Rhian M / Sica, Dominic / Harrap, Stephen B. ·aState University of New York, Downstate College of Medicine, Brooklyn, New York, USA bDepartment of Medicine, Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Canada cCalhoun Cardiology Center, University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut dDepartment of Medicine, Weil Cornell College of Medicine, New York, New York, USA eDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umea, Sweden fCardiovascular Associates, Virginia Beach, Virginia gDepartment of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan hDepartment of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa iDepartment of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA jMediCiti Institutions, Hyderabad, India kDepartment of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA lState University School of Medicine mHypertension Center of Haiti, Port-au-Prince, Haiti nDepartment of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota oJersey Shore University Medical Center, Neptune, New Jersey pHypertension Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA qGeorge Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia rArterial Hypertension and Metabolic Unit, University Hospital, Favaloro Foundation, Buenos Aires, Argentina sASH Comprehensive Hypertension Center, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA tThe Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China uHypertension in Africa Research Team, North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa vDepartment of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA wInstitute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, UK xVirginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA yDepartment of Physiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #24270181.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Back to the Future: Mitral Annular Plane Systolic Excursion on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance. 2019

Pathan, Faraz / Negishi, Kazuaki. ·Nepean Clinical School, Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Cardiology Nepean Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Charles Perkins Centre, Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: faraz.pathan@sydney.edu.au. · Nepean Clinical School, Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Charles Perkins Centre, Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #30660527.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Understanding the Complex Roles of Substance P in the Diseased Heart. 2018

Levick, Scott P. ·Kolling Institute for Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: scott.levick@sydney.edu.au. ·Heart Lung Circ · Pubmed #30262153.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Defining Hypertension - A Storm Across the Pacific. 2018

Jennings, Garry L R. ·Sydney Health Partners, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Baker Heart & Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; National Heart Foundation, Australia. Electronic address: garry.jennings@sydney.edu.au. ·Heart Lung Circ · Pubmed #29602492.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Blood Pressure Genome-Wide Association Studies, Missing Heritability, and Omnigenics. 2017

Morris, Brian J. ·From the Basic and Clinical Genomics Laboratory, Department of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. brian.morris@sydney.edu.au. ·Circ Cardiovasc Genet · Pubmed #29030405.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Guidelines under fire again! 2017

Chalmers, John. ·The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney and the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #28657973.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Guidelines Under Fire Again! 2017

Chalmers, John. ·From the The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; and The Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. chalmers@georgeinstitute.org.au. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #28652466.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Gene Team in Blood Pressure Genetics. 2017

Morris, Brian J. ·From the Basic & Clinical Genomics Laboratory, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. brian.morris@sydney.edu.au. ·Circ Cardiovasc Genet · Pubmed #28506961.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Combination Pills for Treatment of High Blood Pressure: Cost-effectiveness in The Asia Pacific Region. 2017

Atkins, Emily R / Lung, Thomas / Redfern, Julie. ·The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Heart Lung Circ · Pubmed #28241926.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial South Africa's salt reduction strategy: Are we on track, and what lies ahead? 2016

Webster, J / Crickmore, C / Charlton, K / Steyn, K / Wentzel-Viljoen, E / Naidoo, P. ·Food Policy Division, George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. jwebster@georgeinstitute.org.au. ·S Afr Med J · Pubmed #28112084.

ABSTRACT: On 2 September 2016, 25 local and international participants from various sectors met in Cape Town to take stock of South Africa (SA)'s progress in salt reduction and develop a roadmap for action. SA is centre stage on salt reduction globally, being the first country to mandate salt reduction across a wide range of processed foods. Excessive salt intake contributed by processed foods and discretionary sources motivated SA to implement a public awareness campaign in parallel with legislation to reduce salt intake to the World Health Organization target of 5 g per day. Five priority areas were identified for continued action on salt reduction, including obtaining research funds for continued monitoring and compliance of salt reduction targets. Determining the contribution of foods eaten out of home to total salt intake and implementing strategies to address this sector were also highlighted as key actions. Lastly, implementing the next stage of the Salt Watch awareness campaign to change.

11 Editorial Accumulating Evidence of Benefits From Intensive Blood Pressure Lowering: Are We There Yet? 2016

Rodgers, Anthony / Salam, Abdul. ·From The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. arodgers@georgeinstitute.org. · From The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #27456519.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Comparative Superiority of ACE Inhibitors Over Angiotensin Receptor Blockers for People With CKD: Does It Matter? 2016

Mavridis, Dimitris / Palmer, Suetonia C / Strippoli, Giovanni F M. ·University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. Electronic address: dmavridi@cc.uoi.gr. · University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. · The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Diaverum, Lund, Sweden; University of Bari, Bari, Italy; The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, Australia. ·Am J Kidney Dis · Pubmed #27091011.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Pragmatic Trials for Noncommunicable Diseases: Relieving Constraints. 2016

Patel, Anushka / Webster, Ruth. ·The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·PLoS Med · Pubmed #27022969.

ABSTRACT: In this month's editorial, PLOS Medicine Editorial Board member Anushka Patel and Ruth Webster discuss how applying rules for drug efficacy trials can impede pragmatic trials of interventions for noncommunicable diseases.

14 Editorial Redefining Blood-Pressure Targets--SPRINT Starts the Marathon. 2015

Perkovic, Vlado / Rodgers, Anthony. ·From the George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #26551394.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Blood pressure control after a stroke: a continuing challenge! 2015

Chalmers, John. ·aThe George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney bRoyal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #26431190.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Blood Pressure Genetics Just Don't Add Up. 2015

Harrap, Stephen B / Morris, Brian J. ·Department of Physiology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (S.B.H.) and School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia (B.J.M.). s.harrap@unimelb.edu.au. · Department of Physiology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (S.B.H.) and School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia (B.J.M.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Genet · Pubmed #26286727.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Brain-stem microRNAs implicated in hypertension. 2015

Morris, Brian J / Dampney, Roger A L. ·Discipline of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia brian.morris@sydney.edu.au. · Discipline of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Physiol Genomics · Pubmed #26242934.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Can blood pressure-lowering therapy reduce the risk of cognitive decline in the elderly? 2015

Chalmers, John. ·aThe George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney bThe Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #26203969.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial The social gradient of taking a family history. 2015

Ingles, Jodie / Burns, Charlotte. ·Agnes Ginges Centre for Molecular Cardiology, Centenary Institute, Sydney, Australia Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Australia j.ingles@centenary.org.au. · Agnes Ginges Centre for Molecular Cardiology, Centenary Institute, Sydney, Australia Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Australia. ·Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs · Pubmed #25406471.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Are the effects of telmisartan more marked in hypertensive patients? 2014

Chalmers, John. ·The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #24781511.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Blood pressure management in the 21st century: maximizing gains and minimizing waste. 2013

Rahimi, Kazem / Macmahon, Stephen. ·George Institute for Global Health (K.R., S.M.) and Department of Cardiovascular Medicine (K.R.), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK · Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Cardiology, Oxford, UK (K.R.) · and the George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Australia (S.M.). ·Circulation · Pubmed #24190954.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Review Renal Artery Denervation in Resistant Hypertension: The Good, The Bad and The Future. 2020

Al Raisi, Sara I / Pouliopoulos, Jim / Swinnen, John / Thiagalingam, Aravinda / Kovoor, Pramesh. ·Department of Cardiology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Vascular Surgery, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Cardiology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: pramesh.kovoor@sydney.edu.au. ·Heart Lung Circ · Pubmed #31327701.

ABSTRACT: Early studies of renal artery denervation (RAD) demonstrated efficacy in treating resistant hypertension patients with significant reduction in office blood pressure (BP). This resulted in a growing enthusiasm in the field and a rapid evolution of technology with expanding procedural indications. However, the first randomised sham-controlled trial, Symplicity HTN-3, failed to demonstrate a significant difference in BP reduction between the RAD and the sham control arm, which subsequently led to a major reduction in the clinical application of this procedure. Additionally, the results generated further interest into understanding the mechanism and factors affecting procedural success and identifying the limitations within the field. Many lessons were learned from Symplicity HTN-3 trial, and with recent evidence emerging for RAD in hypertension treatment, the field continues to be refined.

23 Review The Potential of mHealth Applications in Improving Resistant Hypertension Self-Assessment, Treatment and Control. 2019

Santo, Karla / Redfern, Julie. ·Academic Research Organization, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. karla.santo@einstein.br. · Westmead Applied Research Centre, Westmead Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. karla.santo@einstein.br. · Cardiovascular Division, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia. karla.santo@einstein.br. · Westmead Applied Research Centre, Westmead Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Cardiovascular Division, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia. ·Curr Hypertens Rep · Pubmed #31598792.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the evidence supporting the use of mobile health (mHealth) apps to improve resistant hypertension self-assessment, treatment and control. RECENT FINDINGS: mHealth apps have been used to directly measure blood pressure (BP) levels, either using the oscillometric method with automated inflatable cuffs or using pulse wave signals detected by smartphone technology without the need for cuffs. These app-based BP monitors tend to over or underestimate BP levels when compared to a gold standard aneroid sphygmomanometer. However, the differences in BP measurements are within the acceptable range of 5 mmHg pre-defined by the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol Revision 2010. mHealth apps are also used as tools to support physicians in improving hypertension treatment. App-based clinical decision support systems are innovative solutions, in which patient information is entered in the app and management algorithms provide recommendations for hypertension treatment. The use of these apps has been shown to be feasible and easily integrated into the workflow of healthcare professionals, and, therefore particularly useful in resource-limited settings. In addition, apps can be used to improve hypertension control by facilitating regular BP monitoring, communication between patients and health professionals, and patient education; as well as by reinforcing behaviours through reminders, including medication-taking and appointment reminders. Several studies provided evidence supporting the use of apps for hypertension control. Although some of the results are promising, there is still limited evidence on the benefits of using such mHealth tools, as these studies are relatively small and with a short-term duration. Recent research has shown that mHealth apps can be beneficial in terms of improving hypertension self-assessment, treatment and control, being especially useful to help differentiate and manage true and pseudo-resistant hypertension. However, future research, including large-scale randomised clinical trials with user-centred design, is crucial to further evaluate the potential scalability and effectiveness of such mHealth apps in the resistant hypertension context.

24 Review Going Beyond the Guidelines in Individualising the Use of Antihypertensive Drugs in Older Patients. 2019

Scott, Ian A / Hilmer, Sarah N / Le Couteur, David G. ·Internal Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Road, Brisbane, QLD, 4102, Australia. ian.scott@health.qld.gov.au. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ian.scott@health.qld.gov.au. · Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Reserve Road, St Leonards, NSW, 2065, Australia. · Sydney Medical School and Kolling Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Concord Hospital, Hospital Road, Concord, NSW, 2139, Australia. ·Drugs Aging · Pubmed #31175614.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is commonly diagnosed in older patients, with increasing cardiovascular (CV) risk as systolic blood pressure (BP) increases. Maximising CV risk reduction must be reconciled with minimising the risk of treatment-related harms and burden, especially among frail, multi-morbid and older old patients who have been excluded from most randomised trials. Contemporary clinical guidelines, based on such trials, differ in their recommendations as to threshold levels warranting treatment with antihypertensive drugs (AHDs) and target levels that should be achieved. In optimising AHD prescribing in older patients, we propose the following decision framework: decide therapeutic goals in accordance with patient characteristics and preferences; estimate absolute CV risk; measure and profile BP accurately in ways that account for lability in BP levels and minimise error in BP measurement; determine threshold and target BP levels likely to confer net benefit, taking into account age, co-morbidities, frailty and cognitive function; and consider situations that warrant AHD deprescribing on the basis of potential current or future harm. In applying this framework to older persons, and based on a review of relevant randomised trials and observational studies, individuals most likely to benefit from treating systolic BP to no less than 130 mmHg are those of any age who are fit and have high baseline systolic BP (≥ 160 mmHg); high CV risk, i.e. established CV disease or risk of CV events exceeding 20% at 10 years; previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack; heart failure; and stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease with proteinuria. Individuals most likely to be harmed from treating BP to target systolic < 140 mmHg are those who have no CV disease and aged over 80 years; moderate to severe frailty, cognitive impairment or functional limitations; labile BP and/or history of orthostatic hypotension, syncope and falls; or life expectancy < 12 months. Treatment should never be so intense as to reduce diastolic BP to < 60 mmHg in any older person. At a time when guidelines are calling for less conservative management of hypertension in all age groups, we contend that a more temperate approach, such as that offered here and based on the totality of available evidence, may assist in maximising net benefit in older patients.

25 Review Improving medical care and prevention in adults with congenital heart disease-reflections on a global problem-part II: infective endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension and aortopathy. 2018

Neidenbach, Rhoia / Niwa, Koichiro / Oto, Oeztekin / Oechslin, Erwin / Aboulhosn, Jamil / Celermajer, David / Schelling, Joerg / Pieper, Lars / Sanftenberg, Linda / Oberhoffer, Renate / de Haan, Fokko / Weyand, Michael / Achenbach, Stephan / Schlensak, Christian / Lossnitzer, Dirk / Nagdyman, Nicole / von Kodolitsch, Yskert / Kallfelz, Hans-Carlo / Pittrow, David / Bauer, Ulrike M M / Ewert, Peter / Meinertz, Thomas / Kaemmerer, Harald. ·Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease, German Heart Center Munich, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Dokuz Eylul University Hospital air Esref Cad, İzmir, Turkey. · Toronto Congenital Cardiac Centre for Adults, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto General Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, CA, Canada. · Ahmanson/UCLA Adult Congenital Heart Disease Center, Los Angeles, USA. · Central Clinical School Heart Research Institute C39 - Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Institute of General Practice and Family Medicine, University Hospital of Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany. · Behavioral Epidemiology, Institute for Clinical Psychology und Psychotherapy, Technical University Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Preventive Pediatrics, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany. · Cardiological Clinic Solingen, Solingen, Germany. · Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Clinic for Thorax-, Heart- and Vessel Surgery, German Heart Competence Center, Tübingen, Germany. · Medical Clinic I, University Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany. · University Heart Center Hamburg, University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinic for Pediatric Cardiology und Intensive medicine, Medical School Hannover, Hannover, Germany. · Institute for Clinical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty, Technical University Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany. · Competence Network Congenital Heart Defects, Berlin, Germany. ·Cardiovasc Diagn Ther · Pubmed #30740319.

ABSTRACT: Despite relevant residua and sequels, follow-up care of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) is too often not performed by/in specialized and/or certified physicians or centers although major problems in the long-term course may develop. The most relevant encompass heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, heart valve disorders, pulmonary vascular disease, infective endocarditis (IE), aortopathy and non-cardiac comorbidities. The present publication emphasizes current data on IE, pulmonary and pulmonary arterial hypertension and aortopathy in ACHD and underlines the deep need of an experienced follow-up care by specialized and/or certified physicians or centers, as treatment regimens from acquired heart disease can not be necessarily transmitted to CHD. Moreover, the need of primary and secondary medical prevention becomes increasingly important in order to reduce the burden of disease as well as the socioeconomic burden and costs in this particular patient group.

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