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Hypertension: HELP
Articles from West Midlands
Based on 282 articles published since 2008
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These are the 282 published articles about Hypertension that originated from West Midlands during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12
1 Guideline ESC Council on hypertension position document on the management of hypertensive emergencies. 2019

van den Born, Bert-Jan H / Lip, Gregory Y H / Brguljan-Hitij, Jana / Cremer, Antoine / Segura, Julian / Morales, Enrique / Mahfoud, Felix / Amraoui, Fouad / Persu, Alexandre / Kahan, Thomas / Agabiti Rosei, Enrico / de Simone, Giovanni / Gosse, Philippe / Williams, Bryan. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Hypertension Division, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Internal Medicine, Dr. Peter Držaj Hospital, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Hypertension Unit, Department of Cardiology, Hopital Saint André and University Hospital of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Hypertension Unit, Department of Nephrology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Department for Internal Medicine III, Cardiology, Angiology, and Intensive Care Medicine, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar, Germany. · Division of Cardiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, and Pole of Cardiovascular Research, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. · Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. · Clinica Medica Generale, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, and Department of Medicine, Azienda Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Hypertension Research Center, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, Naples, Italy. · University College London (UCL) and UCL Hospitals, London, UK. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother · Pubmed #30165588.

ABSTRACT: Hypertensive emergencies are those situations where very high blood pressure (BP) values are associated with acute organ damage, and therefore, require immediate, but careful, BP reduction. The type of acute organ damage is the principal determinant of: (i) the drug of choice, (ii) the target BP, and (iii) the timeframe in which BP should be lowered. Key target organs are the heart, retina, brain, kidneys, and large arteries. Patients who lack acute hypertension-mediated end organ damage do not have a hypertensive emergency and can usually be treated with oral BP-lowering agents and usually discharged after a brief period of observation.

2 Guideline 2018 Practice Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology and the European Society of Hypertension. 2018

Williams, Bryan / Mancia, Giuseppe / Spiering, Wilko / Agabiti Rosei, Enrico / Azizi, Michel / Burnier, Michel / Clement, Denis / Coca, Antonio / De Simone, Giovanni / Dominiczak, Anna / Kahan, Thomas / Mahfoud, Felix / Redon, Josep / Ruilope, Luis / Zanchetti, Alberto / Kerins, Mary / Kjeldsen, Sverre / Kreutz, Reinhold / Laurent, Stéphane / Lip, Gregory Y H / McManus, Richard / Narkiewicz, Krzysztof / Ruschitzka, Frank / Schmieder, Roland / Shlyakhto, Evgeny / Tsioufis, Konstantinos / Aboyans, Victor / Desormais, Ileana. ·a University College London, London UCL , London , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · b IRCCS Instituto Auxologico Italiano , University of Milano-Bicocca , Milano , Italy. · c Department of Medicine , University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht , Netherlands. · d Universita degli Studi di Brescia Aree Disciplinari Medicina e Chirurgia , Brescia , Italy. · e Universite Paris Descartes , Paris , France. · f Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois , Lausanne , Switzerland. · g University of Gent , Gent , Belgium. · h School of Medicine , University of Barcelona , Barcelona , Spain. · i Hypertension Research Center (CIRIAPA), Department of Translational Medical Sciences , Federico II University Hospital , Napoli , Italy. · j University of Glasgow , Glasgow , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · k Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm , Sweden. · l Saarland University Hospital , Homburg , Germany. · m Servicio de Medicina Interna del Hospital Clínico de Valencia , Catedrático de Medicina de la Universidad de Valencia , Valencia , Spain. · n Hypertension Unit , Madrid , Spain. · o University of Milan , Milan , Italy. · p Dublin St. James Hospital , Dublin , Ireland. · q Department of Cardiology , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway. · r Institute for Clinical Medicine , University of Oslo , Oslo , Norway. · s Institut für Klinische Pharmakologie und Toxikologie , Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin , Berlin , Germany. · t Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou , Paris , France. · u College of Medical and Dental Sciences , University of Birmingham , Birmingham , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · v Nuffield Department of Primary Care , Nuffield , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · w Department of Hypertension and Diabetology , Medical University of Gdansk , Gdansk , Poland. · x Department of Cardiology , University of Zurich , Zurich , Switzerland. · y Abteilung für Nephrologie und Hypertensiologie , Universitätsklinikum Erlangen , Erlangen , Germany. · z Almazov Federal Heart , Blood and Endocrinology Centre , St Petersburg , Russian Federation. · aa Hippokration Hospital, First Cardiology Clinic, Medical School , National and Kapodistrian University of Athens , Athens , Greece. · ab Department of Cardiology , Dupuytren University Hospital , Limoges , France. · ac CHU de Limoges , Limoges , France. ·Blood Press · Pubmed #30380928.

ABSTRACT: These practice guidelines on the management of arterial hypertension are a concise summary of the more extensive ones prepared by the Task Force jointly appointed by the European Society of Hypertension and the European Society of Cardiology. These guidelines have been prepared on the basis of the best available evidence on all issues deserving recommendations; their role must be educational and not prescriptive or coercive for the management of individual subjects who may differ widely in their personal, medical and cultural characteristics. The members of the Task Force have participated independently in the preparation of these guidelines, drawing on their academic and clinical experience and by objective examination and interpretation of all available literature. A disclosure of their potential conflict of interest is reported on the websites of the ESH and the ESC.

3 Guideline Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE). 2017

Lip, Gregory Y H / Coca, Antonio / Kahan, Thomas / Boriani, Giuseppe / Manolis, Antonis S / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Oto, Ali / Potpara, Tatjana S / Steffel, Jan / Marín, Francisco / de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen / de Simone, Giovanni / Tzou, Wendy S / Chiang, Chern-En / Williams, Bryan / Anonymous4830918 / Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei / Gorenek, Bulent / Fauchier, Laurent / Savelieva, Irina / Hatala, Robert / van Gelder, Isabelle / Brguljan-Hitij, Jana / Erdine, Serap / Lovic, Dragan / Kim, Young-Hoon / Salinas-Arce, Jorge / Field, Michael. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Karolinska Institutet Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital Corp, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cardiology Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy. · Third Department of Cardiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. · Department of Internal Medicine, Holbaek Hospital and Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Memorial Ankara Hospital, Heart and Health Foundation of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey. · School of Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade University, Belgrade, Serbia. · Electrophysiology and Cardiac Devices, Department of Cardiology, University Heart Center Zurich; Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB-Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Cardiology Department, Medicine School, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, via S. Pansini 5, bld # 1, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Cardiac Electrophysiology, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, UK. · Colentina University Hospital, Medicine Faculty, University of Medicine "Carol Davila"-Bucharest Romania. · Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Trousseau, Tours, France. · St George's University Of London, London, UK. · National Cardiovascular Institute, NUSCH, Bratislava, Slovak Republic. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · University Medical Centre, Hypertension Department, Hospital Dr. Peter Drzaja, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School, Head of Hypertension Department, Istanbul, Turkey. · Clinic for internal disease Intermedica, Cardiology department-Hypertension centere, Serbia. · Korea University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Clínica Delgado, Miraflores, Pérou. · University of Wisconsin, Clinical Science Center, Madison, USA. ·Europace · Pubmed #28881872.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient.

4 Guideline Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: executive summary of a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE). 2017

Lip, Gregory Y H / Coca, Antonio / Kahan, Thomas / Boriani, Giuseppe / Manolis, Antonis S / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Oto, Ali / Potpara, Tatjana S / Steffel, Jan / Marín, Francisco / de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen / de Simone, Giovanni / Tzou, Wendy S / En Chiang, Chern / Williams, Bryan. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University of Birmingham, UK. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, c/Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital Corp, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cardiology Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy. · Third Department of Cardiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. · Department of Internal Medicine, Holbaek Hospital and Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Memorial Ankara Hospital; Heart and Health Foundation of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey. · School of Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, Belgrade University, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Cardiology, Electrophysiology and Cardiac Devices, University Heart Center Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB-Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Cardiology Department, Medicine School, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, via S. Pansini 5, bld # 1, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Cardiac Electrophysiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Cardiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, UK. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother · Pubmed #28541499.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in HTN patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), CAD, or HF. In addition, high doses of thiazide diuretics commonly used to treat HTN, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on HTN and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment on the care of a specific patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all individual factors presented. This is an executive summary of the full document co-published by EHRA in EP-Europace.

5 Guideline Joint UK societies' 2014 consensus statement on renal denervation for resistant hypertension. 2015

Lobo, Melvin D / de Belder, Mark A / Cleveland, Trevor / Collier, David / Dasgupta, Indranil / Deanfield, John / Kapil, Vikas / Knight, Charles / Matson, Matthew / Moss, Jonathan / Paton, Julian F R / Poulter, Neil / Simpson, Iain / Williams, Bryan / Caulfield, Mark J / Anonymous61006 / Anonymous71006 / Anonymous81006 / Anonymous91006. ·On behalf of the British Hypertension Society Barts NIHR Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · The British Cardiovascular Society The British Cardiovascular Intervention Society Cardiothoracic Division, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, UK. · The British Society for Interventional Radiology Sheffield Vascular Institute, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHSFT, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, UK. · On behalf of the British Hypertension Society Barts NIHR Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · The Renal Association Department of Renal Medicine, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Cardiothoracic Division, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, UK The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK The British Cardiovascular Society. · The British Society for Interventional Radiology Barts NIHR Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · The British Society for Interventional Radiology Interventional Radiology Unit, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow, UK. · On behalf of the British Hypertension Society School of Physiology & Pharmacology, Bristol Cardiovascular Medical Sciences Building, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. · On behalf of the British Hypertension Society International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College, London, UK. · The British Cardiovascular Society Wessex Regional Cardiac Unit, University Hospital Southampton, UK. · On behalf of the British Hypertension Society Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University College London, London, UK. ·Heart · Pubmed #25431461.

ABSTRACT: Resistant hypertension continues to pose a major challenge to clinicians worldwide and has serious implications for patients who are at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with this diagnosis. Pharmacological therapy for resistant hypertension follows guidelines-based regimens although there is surprisingly scant evidence for beneficial outcomes using additional drug treatment after three antihypertensives have failed to achieve target blood pressure. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of endoluminal renal denervation as an interventional technique to achieve renal nerve ablation and lower blood pressure. Although initial clinical trials of renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension demonstrated encouraging office blood pressure reduction, a large randomised control trial (Symplicity HTN-3) with a sham-control limb, failed to meet its primary efficacy end point. The trial however was subject to a number of flaws which must be taken into consideration in interpreting the final results. Moreover a substantial body of evidence from non-randomised smaller trials does suggest that renal denervation may have an important role in the management of hypertension and other disease states characterised by overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system. The Joint UK Societies does not recommend the use of renal denervation for treatment of resistant hypertension in routine clinical practice but remains committed to supporting research activity in this field. A number of research strategies are identified and much that can be improved upon to ensure better design and conduct of future randomised studies.

6 Guideline 2013 Practice guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC): ESH/ESC Task Force for the Management of Arterial Hypertension. 2013

Anonymous5020771. ·aCentro di Fisiologia Clinica e Ipertensione, Università Milano-Bicocca; IRCSS, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milano, Italy bHypertension and Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Unit, KU Leuven University, Leuven, Belgium cDepartment of Hypertension and Diabetology, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland dUniversity of Valencia INCLIVA Research Institute and CIBERobn, Madrid, Spain eUniversity of Milan, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy fKlinik fur Innere Medizin III, Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar, Germany gGeneral Practice and Family Healthcare, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium hCentre for Cardiovascular Prevention, Charles University Medical School I and Thomayer Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic iDepartment of Public Health, University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium jCollege of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK kCardioangiology with CCU, Department of Translational Medical Science, Federico II University Hospital, Naples, Italy lUniversity Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands mDepartment of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linkoping, Linkoping, Sweden nCentre for Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham and SWBH NHS Trust, Birmingham, UK oDepartment of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Munster, Germany pDepartment of Cardiology, University of Oslo, Ullevaal Hospital, Oslo, Norway qDepartment of Pharmacology and INSERM U970, European Hospital Georges Pompidou, Paris, France rCardiology Department, Asklepeion General Hospital, Athens, Greece sDepartment of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Scania University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden tHypertension Unit, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain uNephrology and Hypertension, University Hospital, Erlangen, Germany vCardiology Practice, Ostlandske Hjertesenter, Moss, Norway wNuffield Department of Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK xHeart Health Centre, North Estonia Medical Centre, Tallinn ·J Hypertens · Pubmed #24107724.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial The dangerous combination of atrial fibrillation and hypertension: An urgent need to handle complexity. 2018

Proietti, Marco. ·IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche "Mario Negri", Milan, Italy; Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Sapienza-University of Rome, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: marco.proietti@uniroma1.it. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #29407084.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Renal function after new treatment with renin-angiotensin system blockers. 2017

Valente, Marie / Bhandari, Sunil. ·Birmingham Clinical Trials Unit, Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Renal Medicine, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospital NHS Trust and Hull York Medical School, Kingston upon Hull HU32JZ, UK. ·BMJ · Pubmed #28279951.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial SPRINTing towards trials of blood pressure reduction to reduce CKD progression? 2016

Moody, William E / Ferro, Charles J / Townend, Jonathan N. ·Birmingham Cardio-Renal Research Group, University of Birmingham, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK. ·Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes · Pubmed #29474719.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Hypertension: Trajectories of Risk Factors in Yet Another Manifestation of Hypertensive Target Organ Damage. 2016

Lip, Gregory Y H. ·From the University of Birmingham Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, United Kingdom; and Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. g.y.h.lip@bham.ac.uk. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #27402920.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Post myocardial infarction and atrial fibrillation: Thromboprophylaxis and risk stratification using the CHA2DS2-VASc score. 2014

Lau, Yee Cheng / Lip, Gregory Y H. ·University of Birmingham Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom; Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, University, Aalborg, Denmark. g.y.h.lip@bham.ac.uk. ·Cardiol J · Pubmed #25472850.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Of hammers and screws: renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition to prevent atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension. 2014

Kirchhof, Paulus / Fabritz, Larissa. ·University of Birmingham Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences and SWBH NHS Trust, Birmingham, UK. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #24566798.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Review Magnitude and pattern of hypertension in the Niger Delta: a systematic review and meta-analysis of community-based studies. 2018

Ezejimofor, Martinsixtus / Uthman, Olalekan / Chen, Yen-Fu / Ezejimofor, Benedeth / Ezeabasili, Aloysius / Stranges, Saverio / Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin. ·Division of Health Sciences, University of Warwick Medical School, Coventry, UK. · British Association of Dermatologists, Willan House, Fitzroy Square, London, UK. · Warwick-Centre for Applied Health Research and Delivery, Division of health Sciences, University of Warwick Medical School, Coventry, UK. · School of the Built Environment, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester, UK. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Population Health, Luxembourg Institute of Health, Strassen, Luxembourg. · Northumbria University, Department of Mathematics and Information sciences, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. · University of the Witwatersrand, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Johannesburg, South Africa. ·J Glob Health · Pubmed #29899980.

ABSTRACT: Background: Emerging evidence found that health inequality in the Niger Delta region in Nigeria has continued to worsen due to epidemiological and environmental risks transitions. This study aims to provide an up-to-date review and the secular trends of hypertension prevalence in Niger Delta. Methods: We systematically searched databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, African index Medicus and African Journal online from inception to December 30, 2016 for population-based studies providing prevalence estimates of hypertension in the Niger Delta. Eligible studies were included in a random-effect meta-analysis of prevalence and secular trend. The review was reported according to MOOSE guideline. Results: Overall, 34 eligible studies comprising of data on 32715 participants with mean-age of 38.43 ± 2.0 years were identified and included in the meta-analysis. The pooled result showed that across study settings, the prevalence of hypertension in rural population tended to be higher than those in urban areas, 32.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 25.13-39.28) vs 24.07% (95% CI 18.13-30.58), however, the difference did not reach a statistical significant level, ( Conclusions: This study found evidence that hypertension is a major public health issue in the Niger Delta communities suggesting a positive relationship between socio-economic and lifestyle factors. Improved surveillance and care, as well as better management of the underlying risk factors, primarily undetected or uncontrolled high blood pressure, remains an important public health priority.

14 Review Uterotonic agents for preventing postpartum haemorrhage: a network meta-analysis. 2018

Gallos, Ioannis D / Williams, Helen M / Price, Malcolm J / Merriel, Abi / Gee, Harold / Lissauer, David / Moorthy, Vidhya / Tobias, Aurelio / Deeks, Jonathan J / Widmer, Mariana / Tunçalp, Özge / Gülmezoglu, Ahmet Metin / Hofmeyr, G Justus / Coomarasamy, Arri. ·Tommy's National Centre for Miscarriage Research, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, C/o Academic Unit, 3rd Floor, Birmingham Women's Hospital Foundation Trust, Mindelsohn Way, Birmingham, UK, B15 2TG. ·Cochrane Database Syst Rev · Pubmed #29693726.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Prophylactic uterotonic drugs can prevent PPH, and are routinely recommended. There are several uterotonic drugs for preventing PPH but it is still debatable which drug is best. OBJECTIVES: To identify the most effective uterotonic drug(s) to prevent PPH, and generate a ranking according to their effectiveness and side-effect profile. SEARCH METHODS: We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (1 June 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for unpublished trial reports (30 June 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled comparisons or cluster trials of effectiveness or side-effects of uterotonic drugs for preventing PPH.Quasi-randomised trials and cross-over trials are not eligible for inclusion in this review. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least three review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We estimated the relative effects and rankings for preventing PPH ≥ 500 mL and PPH ≥ 1000 mL as primary outcomes. We performed pairwise meta-analyses and network meta-analysis to determine the relative effects and rankings of all available drugs. We stratified our primary outcomes according to mode of birth, prior risk of PPH, healthcare setting, dosage, regimen and route of drug administration, to detect subgroup effects.The absolute risks in the oxytocin are based on meta-analyses of proportions from the studies included in this review and the risks in the intervention groups were based on the assumed risk in the oxytocin group and the relative effects of the interventions. MAIN RESULTS: This network meta-analysis included 140 randomised trials with data from 88,947 women. There are two large ongoing studies. The trials were mostly carried out in hospital settings and recruited women who were predominantly more than 37 weeks of gestation having a vaginal birth. The majority of trials were assessed to have uncertain risk of bias due to poor reporting of study design. This primarily impacted on our confidence in comparisons involving carbetocin trials more than other uterotonics.The three most effective drugs for prevention of PPH ≥ 500 mL were ergometrine plus oxytocin combination, carbetocin, and misoprostol plus oxytocin combination. These three options were more effective at preventing PPH ≥ 500 mL compared with oxytocin, the drug currently recommended by the WHO (ergometrine plus oxytocin risk ratio (RR) 0.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 0.83), moderate-quality evidence; carbetocin RR 0.72 (95% CI 0.52 to 1.00), very low-quality evidence; misoprostol plus oxytocin RR 0.73 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.90), moderate-quality evidence). Based on these results, about 10.5% women given oxytocin would experience a PPH of ≥ 500 mL compared with 7.2% given ergometrine plus oxytocin combination, 7.6% given carbetocin, and 7.7% given misoprostol plus oxytocin. Oxytocin was ranked fourth with close to 0% cumulative probability of being ranked in the top three for PPH ≥ 500 mL.The outcomes and rankings for the outcome of PPH ≥ 1000 mL were similar to those of PPH ≥ 500 mL. with the evidence for ergometrine plus oxytocin combination being more effective than oxytocin (RR 0.77 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.95), high-quality evidence) being more certain than that for carbetocin (RR 0.70 (95% CI 0.38 to 1.28), low-quality evidence), or misoprostol plus oxytocin combination (RR 0.90 (95% CI 0.72 to 1.14), moderate-quality evidence)There were no meaningful differences between all drugs for maternal deaths or severe morbidity as these outcomes were so rare in the included randomised trials.Two combination regimens had the poorest rankings for side-effects. Specifically, the ergometrine plus oxytocin combination had the higher risk for vomiting (RR 3.10 (95% CI 2.11 to 4.56), high-quality evidence; 1.9% versus 0.6%) and hypertension [RR 1.77 (95% CI 0.55 to 5.66), low-quality evidence; 1.2% versus 0.7%), while the misoprostol plus oxytocin combination had the higher risk for fever (RR 3.18 (95% CI 2.22 to 4.55), moderate-quality evidence; 11.4% versus 3.6%) when compared with oxytocin. Carbetocin had similar risk for side-effects compared with oxytocin although the quality evidence was very low for vomiting and for fever, and was low for hypertension. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Ergometrine plus oxytocin combination, carbetocin, and misoprostol plus oxytocin combination were more effective for preventing PPH ≥ 500 mL than the current standard oxytocin. Ergometrine plus oxytocin combination was more effective for preventing PPH ≥ 1000 mL than oxytocin. Misoprostol plus oxytocin combination evidence is less consistent and may relate to different routes and doses of misoprostol used in the studies. Carbetocin had the most favourable side-effect profile amongst the top three options; however, most carbetocin trials were small and at high risk of bias.Amongst the 11 ongoing studies listed in this review there are two key studies that will inform a future update of this review. The first is a WHO-led multi-centre study comparing the effectiveness of a room temperature stable carbetocin versus oxytocin (administered intramuscularly) for preventing PPH in women having a vaginal birth. The trial includes around 30,000 women from 10 countries. The other is a UK-based trial recruiting more than 6000 women to a three-arm trial comparing carbetocin, oxytocin and ergometrine plus oxytocin combination. Both trials are expected to report in 2018.Consultation with our consumer group demonstrated the need for more research into PPH outcomes identified as priorities for women and their families, such as women's views regarding the drugs used, clinical signs of excessive blood loss, neonatal unit admissions and breastfeeding at discharge. To date, trials have rarely investigated these outcomes. Consumers also considered the side-effects of uterotonic drugs to be important but these were often not reported. A forthcoming set of core outcomes relating to PPH will identify outcomes to prioritise in trial reporting and will inform futures updates of this review. We urge all trialists to consider measuring these outcomes for each drug in all future randomised trials. Lastly, future evidence synthesis research could compare the effects of different dosages and routes of administration for the most effective drugs.

15 Review Chronic Physiological Effects of Swim Training Interventions in Non-Elite Swimmers: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2018

Lahart, Ian M / Metsios, George S. ·Faculty of Education Health and Wellbeing, University of Wolverhampton, Walsall Campus, Gorway Road, Walsall, WS13BD, UK. · Faculty of Education Health and Wellbeing, University of Wolverhampton, Walsall Campus, Gorway Road, Walsall, WS13BD, UK. g.metsios@wlv.ac.uk. ·Sports Med · Pubmed #29086218.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Swimming is a popular and potentially health-enhancing exercise, but has received less scientific attention compared with other exercise modes. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine the chronic (long-term) effect of pool swim training on physiological outcomes in non-elite or non-competitive swimming participants. DESIGN: This study was a systematic review with a meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: We searched the electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE and CENTRAL from inception to March 2017. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: The eligibility criteria included randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials and controlled trials of chronic (long-term) swimming interventions in non-elite or non-competitive swimming participants, with a physiological outcome measure. RESULTS: Our search of 6712 records revealed 29 eligible studies. Swimming had a significant and clinically meaningful effect on maximal oxygen uptake compared with the control in an analysis including multiple populations (mean difference 6.32 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval 4.33-8.31), and subgroup analyses of healthy children/adolescents (mean difference 7.93 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval 3.31-12.55) and those with asthma (mean difference 9.67 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval 5.84-13.51) and healthy adults (mean difference 5.87 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval 2.93-8.81). Swimming also resulted in significant improvements in other cardiorespiratory fitness-related outcomes such as maximal minute ventilation (mean difference 0.61 L/min; 95% confidence interval 0.17-1.05), submaximal exercise performance (standardised mean difference 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.14-1.13) and total exercise test time (mean difference 4.27 min; 95% confidence interval 2.11-6.42). Compared with the control, swimming had significant favourable effects on body mass (mean difference - 2.90 kg, 95% confidence interval - 5.02 to - 0.78), body fat percentage in multiple populations (mean difference - 1.92%; 95% confidence interval - 3.25 to - 0.60) and healthy children/adolescents (mean difference - 1.92%; 95% confidence interval - 4.64 to - 0.80) and lean mass (mean difference 1.96 kg; 95% confidence interval 0.21-3.71), but negative effects on waist circumference in a pooled analysis of two studies involving adults with hypertension (mean difference 4.03 cm; 95% confidence interval 2.58-5.49). Regarding lung function, significant effects of swimming vs. the control were found only for peak expiratory volume in analyses including children/adolescents combined with healthy adults (mean difference 58.74 L/min; 95% confidence interval 29.70-87.78) and children/adolescents with asthma alone (mean difference 63.49 L/min; 95% confidence interval 25.01-101.97). Based on limited data, swimming had similar effects to other exercise modes, except for higher post-intervention body mass index values with swimming vs. running in healthy adults (mean difference 1.18 kg/m CONCLUSIONS: Swimming may offer robust beneficial effects on cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition across multiple populations and effects may be comparable to other exercise modes. Future randomised controlled trials are required to establish the effectiveness of swimming on physiological outcomes in healthy populations and those with non-communicable disease.

16 Review Sleep and Cardio-Metabolic Disease. 2017

Cappuccio, Francesco P / Miller, Michelle A. ·Warwick Medical School, Division of Health Sciences, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK. f.p.cappuccio@warwick.ac.uk. · University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Clifford Bridge Road, Coventry, CV2 2DX, UK. f.p.cappuccio@warwick.ac.uk. · Warwick Medical School, Division of Health Sciences, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK. ·Curr Cardiol Rep · Pubmed #28929340.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarises and discusses the epidemiological evidence suggesting a causal relationship between sleep duration and cardio-metabolic risk and outcomes in population. RECENT FINDINGS: Sleep duration is affected by a variety of cultural, social, psychological, behavioural, pathophysiological and environmental influences. Changes in modern society-like longer working hours, more shift-work, 24/7 availability of commodities and 24-h global connectivity-have been associated with a gradual reduction in sleep duration and sleeping patterns across westernised populations. We review the evidence of an association between sleep disturbances and the development of cardio-metabolic risk and disease and discuss the implications for causality of these associations. Prolonged curtailment of sleep duration is a risk factor for the development of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke and may contribute, in the long-term, to premature death.

17 Review Self-monitoring of blood pressure in hypertension: A systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis. 2017

Tucker, Katherine L / Sheppard, James P / Stevens, Richard / Bosworth, Hayden B / Bove, Alfred / Bray, Emma P / Earle, Kenneth / George, Johnson / Godwin, Marshall / Green, Beverly B / Hebert, Paul / Hobbs, F D Richard / Kantola, Ilkka / Kerry, Sally M / Leiva, Alfonso / Magid, David J / Mant, Jonathan / Margolis, Karen L / McKinstry, Brian / McLaughlin, Mary Ann / Omboni, Stefano / Ogedegbe, Olugbenga / Parati, Gianfranco / Qamar, Nashat / Tabaei, Bahman P / Varis, Juha / Verberk, Willem J / Wakefield, Bonnie J / McManus, Richard J. ·Nuffield Department of Primary Care, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VAMC, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America. · Cardiology, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America. · School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom. · Thomas Addison Diabetes Unit, St. George's NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom. · Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Australia. · Family Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. · Department of Health Services, University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. · Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland. · Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. · Primary Care Research Unit of Mallorca, Baleares Health Services-IbSalut, Mallorca, Spain. · Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, United States of America. · Primary Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America. · Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, New York, New York, United States of America. · Clinical Research Unit, Italian Institute of Telemedicine, Varese, Italy. · Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, Langone School of Medicine, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America. · Department of Cardiovascular, Neural and Metabolic Sciences, IRCCS, San Luca Hospital, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy. · Primary Care Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom. · Division of Prevention and Primary Care, New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, New York, New York, United States of America. · Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht and Departments of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. · Department of Veterans (VA) Health Services Research and Development Centre for Comprehensive Access and Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Iowa City VA Medical Centre, University of Iowa, Iowa, United States of America. ·PLoS Med · Pubmed #28926573.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Self-monitoring of blood pressure (BP) appears to reduce BP in hypertension but important questions remain regarding effective implementation and which groups may benefit most. This individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis was performed to better understand the effectiveness of BP self-monitoring to lower BP and control hypertension. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomised trials comparing self-monitoring to no self-monitoring in hypertensive patients (June 2016). Two reviewers independently assessed articles for eligibility and the authors of eligible trials were approached requesting IPD. Of 2,846 articles in the initial search, 36 were eligible. IPD were provided from 25 trials, including 1 unpublished study. Data for the primary outcomes-change in mean clinic or ambulatory BP and proportion controlled below target at 12 months-were available from 15/19 possible studies (7,138/8,292 [86%] of randomised participants). Overall, self-monitoring was associated with reduced clinic systolic blood pressure (sBP) compared to usual care at 12 months (-3.2 mmHg, [95% CI -4.9, -1.6 mmHg]). However, this effect was strongly influenced by the intensity of co-intervention ranging from no effect with self-monitoring alone (-1.0 mmHg [-3.3, 1.2]), to a 6.1 mmHg (-9.0, -3.2) reduction when monitoring was combined with intensive support. Self-monitoring was most effective in those with fewer antihypertensive medications and higher baseline sBP up to 170 mmHg. No differences in efficacy were seen by sex or by most comorbidities. Ambulatory BP data at 12 months were available from 4 trials (1,478 patients), which assessed self-monitoring with little or no co-intervention. There was no association between self-monitoring and either lower clinic or ambulatory sBP in this group (clinic -0.2 mmHg [-2.2, 1.8]; ambulatory 1.1 mmHg [-0.3, 2.5]). Results for diastolic blood pressure (dBP) were similar. The main limitation of this work was that significant heterogeneity remained. This was at least in part due to different inclusion criteria, self-monitoring regimes, and target BPs in included studies. CONCLUSIONS: Self-monitoring alone is not associated with lower BP or better control, but in conjunction with co-interventions (including systematic medication titration by doctors, pharmacists, or patients; education; or lifestyle counselling) leads to clinically significant BP reduction which persists for at least 12 months. The implementation of self-monitoring in hypertension should be accompanied by such co-interventions.

18 Review Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension. 2017

Dzeshka, Mikhail S / Shantsila, Alena / Shantsila, Eduard / Lip, Gregory Y H. ·From the Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom (M.S.D., A.S., E.S., G.Y.H.L.) · Grodno State Medical University, Belarus (M.S.D.) · and Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmark (G.Y.H.L.). ·Hypertension · Pubmed #28893897.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Review WNK Signaling Inhibitors as Potential Antihypertensive Drugs. 2017

AlAmri, Mubarak A / Kadri, Hachemi / Dhiani, Binar A / Mahmood, Shumail / Elzwawi, Abdulrahman / Mehellou, Youcef. ·School of Pharmacy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. · School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF10 3NB, UK. ·ChemMedChem · Pubmed #28881465.

ABSTRACT: Since the discovery of WNK mutations that cause an inherited form of hypertension in humans, there has been increasing interest in targeting WNK signaling as a novel strategy for modulating blood pressure. This notion is now supported by numerous mouse models with impaired WNK signaling that exhibit reduced blood pressure. Biochemical analyses of the various protein components that make up this signaling pathway have identified a number of plausible molecular targets that are amenable to targeting by small molecules. To date, a selection of small-molecule WNK signaling inhibitors have been identified and have shown promise in suppressing the activity of WNK signaling in cells and in animals. In this Minireview, we briefly discuss the WNK signaling pathway and provide an overview of the various druggable targets within this cascade, as well as the different WNK signaling inhibitors discovered to date.

20 Review Diagnosis and management of resistant hypertension. 2017

Sheppard, James P / Martin, Una / McManus, Richard J. ·Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Institute of Clinical Sciences Birmingham, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. ·Heart · Pubmed #28663366.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Review A Systematic Review of the Prevalence and Types of Adverse Events in Interfacility Critical Care Transfers by Paramedics. 2017

Alabdali, Abdullah / Fisher, Joanne D / Trivedy, Chetan / Lilford, Richard J. ·Warwick Medical School, Coventry, UK. Electronic address: a.alabdali@warwick.ac.uk. · Senior Research Fellow, Health sciences, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. · Honorary Associate Clinical Professor, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. · Pro-Dean (Research), Professor of Public Health, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. ·Air Med J · Pubmed #28499680.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate if paramedics can safely transfer interfacility critically ill adult patients and to determine the prevalence and types of adverse events when paramedics lead interfacility critical care transfers. METHODS: MEDLINE, Web of Science, Embase, and CINAHL databases were searched from 1990 up to February 2016. Eligibility criteria were adult patients (16 years and over), interfacility transfer (between two health care facilities), quantitative or qualitative description of adverse events, and a paramedic as the primary care provider or the sole health care provider. RESULTS: Seven publications had paramedics as the sole health care provider conducting interfacility critical care transfers. All seven studies were observational studies published in the English language. The study duration ranged from 14 months to 10 years. The frequency of adverse events seen by paramedics in interfacility transfers ranges from 5.1% to 18%. CONCLUSION: There is a gap in literature on the safety and adverse events in interfacility transfers by paramedics. The prevalence of in-transit adverse events is well established; however, because the published literature is lacking longitudinal monitoring of patients and only reporting in-transit events, we believe that further research in this area might provide the basis of paramedics safety in interfacility transfers.

22 Review Hypertension in dialysis patients: a consensus document by the European Renal and Cardiovascular Medicine (EURECA-m) working group of the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) and the Hypertension and the Kidney working group of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH). 2017

Sarafidis, Pantelis A / Persu, Alexandre / Agarwal, Rajiv / Burnier, Michel / de Leeuw, Peter / Ferro, Charles J / Halimi, Jean-Michel / Heine, Gunnar H / Jadoul, Michel / Jarraya, Faical / Kanbay, Mehmet / Mallamaci, Francesca / Mark, Patrick B / Ortiz, Alberto / Parati, Gianfranco / Pontremoli, Roberto / Rossignol, Patrick / Ruilope, Luis / Van der Niepen, Patricia / Vanholder, Raymond / Verhaar, Marianne C / Wiecek, Andrzej / Wuerzner, Gregoire / London, Gérard M / Zoccali, Carmine. ·Department of Nephrology, Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Pole of Cardiovascular Research, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, and Division of Cardiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine and Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Administration Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA. · Service of Nephrology and Hypertension, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht and Zuyderland Medical Center, Geleen/Heerlen, The Netherlands. · Department of Renal Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. · Service de Néphrologie-Immunologie Clinique, Hôpital Bretonneau, François-Rabelais University, Tours, France. · Saarland University Medical Center, Internal Medicine IV-Nephrology and Hypertension, Homburg, Germany. · Division of Nephrology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Nephrology, Sfax University Hospital and Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Sfax University, Sfax, Tunisia. · Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Koc University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey. · CNR-IFC, Clinical Epidemiology and Pathophysiology of Hypertension and Renal Diseases Unit, Ospedali Riuniti, Reggio Calabria, Italy. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · IIS-Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, School of Medicine, University Autonoma of Madrid, FRIAT and REDINREN, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Cardiovascular, Neural, and Metabolic Sciences, San Luca Hospital, Istituto Auxologico Italiano and Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy. · Università degli Studi and IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino-IST, Genova, Italy. · INSERM, Centre d'Investigations Cliniques Plurithématique 1433, UMR 1116, Université de Lorraine, CHRU de Nancy, F-CRIN INI-CRCT Cardiovascular and Renal Clinical Trialists, and Association Lorraine de Traitement de l'Insuffisance Rénale, Nancy, France. · Hypertension Unit & Institute of Research i?+?12, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel - VUB, Brussels, Belgium. · Nephrology Section, Department of Internal Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Gent, Belgium. · Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Nephrology, Transplantation and Internal Medicine, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland. · Manhes Hospital and FCRIN INI-CRCTC, Manhes, France. ·Nephrol Dial Transplant · Pubmed #28340239.

ABSTRACT: In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) treated with haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, hypertension is common and often poorly controlled. Blood pressure (BP) recordings obtained before or after haemodialysis display a J- or U-shaped association with cardiovascular events and survival, but this most likely reflects the low accuracy of these measurements and the peculiar haemodynamic setting related to dialysis treatment. Elevated BP detected by home or ambulatory BP monitoring is clearly associated with shorter survival. Sodium and volume excess is the prominent mechanism of hypertension in dialysis patients, but other pathways, such as arterial stiffness, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, endothelial dysfunction, sleep apnoea and the use of erythropoietin-stimulating agents may also be involved. Non-pharmacologic interventions targeting sodium and volume excess are fundamental for hypertension control in this population. If BP remains elevated after appropriate treatment of sodium and volume excess, the use of antihypertensive agents is necessary. Drug treatment in the dialysis population should take into consideration the patient's comorbidities and specific characteristics of each agent, such as dialysability. This document is an overview of the diagnosis, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of hypertension in patients on dialysis, aiming to offer the renal physician practical recommendations based on current knowledge and expert opinion and to highlight areas for future research.

23 Review Hypertension and Atrial Fibrillation: An Intimate Association of Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Outcomes. 2017

Dzeshka, Mikhail S / Shahid, Farhan / Shantsila, Alena / Lip, Gregory Y H. ·University of Birmingham Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Grodno State Medical University, Grodno, Belarus. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. ·Am J Hypertens · Pubmed #28338788.

ABSTRACT: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent sustained arrhythmia found in clinical practice. AF rarely exists as a single entity but rather as part of a diverse clinical spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, related to structural and electrical remodeling within the left atrium, leading to AF onset, perpetuation, and progression. Due to the high overall prevalence within the AF population arterial hypertension plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of AF and its complications. Fibroblast proliferation, apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, gap junction remodeling, accumulation of collagen both in atrial and ventricular myocardium all accompany ageing-related structural remodeling with impact on electrical activity. The presence of hypertension also stimulates oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic activation, which further drives the remodeling process in AF. Importantly, both hypertension and AF independently increase the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, e.g., stroke and myocardial infarction. Given that both AF and hypertension often present with limited on patient wellbeing, treatment may be delayed resulting in development of complications as the first clinical manifestation of the disease. Antithrombotic prevention in AF combined with strict blood pressure control is of primary importance, since stroke risk and bleeding risk are both greater with underlying hypertension.

24 Review Protective effects of nebivolol from oxidative stress to prevent hypertension-related target organ damage. 2017

Coats, A / Jain, S. ·University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. · Research and Clinical Services, SPRIM Asia Pacific Pvt Ltd, Singapore, Singapore. ·J Hum Hypertens · Pubmed #28252041.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is one of the leading risk factors for morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases and renal impairment. It also leads to target organ damage (TOD), which worsens organ function and the patient's clinical status. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative stress may contribute significantly to TOD in patients with hypertension. NO (nitric oxide) is a paracrine factor derived from endothelial cells that has been shown to alleviate ROS-mediated oxidative damage. Nebivolol is a third-generation β-blocker with vasodilator activity, both actions contributing to decreased blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Its vasodilatory function is mediated by the endothelial l-arginine NO pathway. Nebivolol increases the bioavailability of NO in the vasculature. Its efficacy and safety profile is comparable to other commonly used antihypertensive agents. In this article, we review the current literature to understand TOD secondary to oxidative stress in patients with hypertension and the role of nebivolol in its prevention. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which nebivolol reduces ROS-mediated TOD will not only help in the development of targeted therapies but may also improve health outcomes in hypertensive patients.

25 Review Malignant Hypertension Revisited-Does This Still Exist? 2017

Shantsila, Alena / Lip, Gregory Y H. ·University of Birmingham Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. ·Am J Hypertens · Pubmed #28200072.

ABSTRACT: Malignant or accelerated hypertension is the most severe form of hypertension, defined clinically by very high blood pressure (diastolic above 130 mm Hg) accompanied by bilateral retinal hemorrhages and/or exudates, with or without papilledema. The aim of this review is to discuss if malignant hypertension still poses a clinically relevant entity and to highlight the diagnostic challenges of this form of hypertension. The substantial improvement in prognosis in patients with malignant hypertension over the last decades is well documented, but there is no strong evidence to suggest a significant change in its incidence. In fact, with the growing population and improving life expectancy, malignant hypertension is likely to become even more prevalent worldwide, especially in the developing countries with less advanced health care services. Despite simple diagnostic criteria of malignant hypertension, the diagnoses may be difficult in many patients. Malignant hypertension patients often have the diagnosis established only when the target organ damage occur. Furthermore, retrospective diagnosis is problematic, as malignant hypertensive retinopathy gradually resolves over a relatively short period of time, while persistent target organ damage will, however, lead to the development of complications and much poorer prognosis than in nonmalignant hypertension patients. Certainly, malignant hypertension still poses a clinically relevant and challenging form of hypertension and its possibility should be always considered during the assessment of patients with poorly controlled hypertension.

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