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Hypertension: HELP
Articles from West Midlands
Based on 617 articles published since 2009
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These are the 617 published articles about Hypertension that originated from West Midlands during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline ESC Council on hypertension position document on the management of hypertensive emergencies. 2019

van den Born, Bert-Jan H / Lip, Gregory Y H / Brguljan-Hitij, Jana / Cremer, Antoine / Segura, Julian / Morales, Enrique / Mahfoud, Felix / Amraoui, Fouad / Persu, Alexandre / Kahan, Thomas / Agabiti Rosei, Enrico / de Simone, Giovanni / Gosse, Philippe / Williams, Bryan. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Hypertension Division, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Internal Medicine, Dr. Peter Držaj Hospital, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Hypertension Unit, Department of Cardiology, Hopital Saint André and University Hospital of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Hypertension Unit, Department of Nephrology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Department for Internal Medicine III, Cardiology, Angiology, and Intensive Care Medicine, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar, Germany. · Division of Cardiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, and Pole of Cardiovascular Research, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. · Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. · Clinica Medica Generale, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, and Department of Medicine, Azienda Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Hypertension Research Center, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, Naples, Italy. · University College London (UCL) and UCL Hospitals, London, UK. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother · Pubmed #30165588.

ABSTRACT: Hypertensive emergencies are those situations where very high blood pressure (BP) values are associated with acute organ damage, and therefore, require immediate, but careful, BP reduction. The type of acute organ damage is the principal determinant of: (i) the drug of choice, (ii) the target BP, and (iii) the timeframe in which BP should be lowered. Key target organs are the heart, retina, brain, kidneys, and large arteries. Patients who lack acute hypertension-mediated end organ damage do not have a hypertensive emergency and can usually be treated with oral BP-lowering agents and usually discharged after a brief period of observation.

2 Guideline 2018 Practice Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology and the European Society of Hypertension. 2018

Williams, Bryan / Mancia, Giuseppe / Spiering, Wilko / Agabiti Rosei, Enrico / Azizi, Michel / Burnier, Michel / Clement, Denis / Coca, Antonio / De Simone, Giovanni / Dominiczak, Anna / Kahan, Thomas / Mahfoud, Felix / Redon, Josep / Ruilope, Luis / Zanchetti, Alberto / Kerins, Mary / Kjeldsen, Sverre / Kreutz, Reinhold / Laurent, Stéphane / Lip, Gregory Y H / McManus, Richard / Narkiewicz, Krzysztof / Ruschitzka, Frank / Schmieder, Roland / Shlyakhto, Evgeny / Tsioufis, Konstantinos / Aboyans, Victor / Desormais, Ileana. ·a University College London, London UCL , London , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · b IRCCS Instituto Auxologico Italiano , University of Milano-Bicocca , Milano , Italy. · c Department of Medicine , University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht , Netherlands. · d Universita degli Studi di Brescia Aree Disciplinari Medicina e Chirurgia , Brescia , Italy. · e Universite Paris Descartes , Paris , France. · f Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois , Lausanne , Switzerland. · g University of Gent , Gent , Belgium. · h School of Medicine , University of Barcelona , Barcelona , Spain. · i Hypertension Research Center (CIRIAPA), Department of Translational Medical Sciences , Federico II University Hospital , Napoli , Italy. · j University of Glasgow , Glasgow , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · k Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm , Sweden. · l Saarland University Hospital , Homburg , Germany. · m Servicio de Medicina Interna del Hospital Clínico de Valencia , Catedrático de Medicina de la Universidad de Valencia , Valencia , Spain. · n Hypertension Unit , Madrid , Spain. · o University of Milan , Milan , Italy. · p Dublin St. James Hospital , Dublin , Ireland. · q Department of Cardiology , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway. · r Institute for Clinical Medicine , University of Oslo , Oslo , Norway. · s Institut für Klinische Pharmakologie und Toxikologie , Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin , Berlin , Germany. · t Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou , Paris , France. · u College of Medical and Dental Sciences , University of Birmingham , Birmingham , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · v Nuffield Department of Primary Care , Nuffield , United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · w Department of Hypertension and Diabetology , Medical University of Gdansk , Gdansk , Poland. · x Department of Cardiology , University of Zurich , Zurich , Switzerland. · y Abteilung für Nephrologie und Hypertensiologie , Universitätsklinikum Erlangen , Erlangen , Germany. · z Almazov Federal Heart , Blood and Endocrinology Centre , St Petersburg , Russian Federation. · aa Hippokration Hospital, First Cardiology Clinic, Medical School , National and Kapodistrian University of Athens , Athens , Greece. · ab Department of Cardiology , Dupuytren University Hospital , Limoges , France. · ac CHU de Limoges , Limoges , France. ·Blood Press · Pubmed #30380928.

ABSTRACT: These practice guidelines on the management of arterial hypertension are a concise summary of the more extensive ones prepared by the Task Force jointly appointed by the European Society of Hypertension and the European Society of Cardiology. These guidelines have been prepared on the basis of the best available evidence on all issues deserving recommendations; their role must be educational and not prescriptive or coercive for the management of individual subjects who may differ widely in their personal, medical and cultural characteristics. The members of the Task Force have participated independently in the preparation of these guidelines, drawing on their academic and clinical experience and by objective examination and interpretation of all available literature. A disclosure of their potential conflict of interest is reported on the websites of the ESH and the ESC.

3 Guideline European headache federation guideline on idiopathic intracranial hypertension. 2018

Hoffmann, Jan / Mollan, Susan P / Paemeleire, Koen / Lampl, Christian / Jensen, Rigmor H / Sinclair, Alexandra J. ·Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Wellcome Foundation Building, Denmark Hill Campus, King's College London, London, SE5 9PJ, UK. jan.hoffmann@kcl.ac.uk. · Birmingham Neuro-Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Headache Medical Centre, Seilerstaette Linz, Ordensklinikum Linz, Barmherzige Schwestern, Linz, Austria. · Danish Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet-Glostrup, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark. · Metabolic Neurology, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #30298346.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is characterized by an elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP no identifiable cause. The aetiology remains largely unknown, however observations made in a number of recent clinical studies are increasing the understanding of the disease and now provide the basis for evidence-based treatment strategies. METHODS: The Embase, CDSR, CENTRAL, DARE and MEDLINE databases were searched up to 1st June 2018. We analyzed randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews that investigate IIH. RESULTS: Diagnostic uncertainty, headache morbidity and visual loss are among the highest concerns of clinicians and patients in this disease area. Research in this field is infrequent due to the rarity of the disease and the lack of understanding of the underlying pathology. CONCLUSIONS: This European Headache Federation consensus paper provides evidence-based recommendations and practical advice on the investigation and management of IIH.

4 Guideline Antithrombotic Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report. 2018

Lip, Gregory Y H / Banerjee, Amitava / Boriani, Giuseppe / Chiang, Chern En / Fargo, Ramiz / Freedman, Ben / Lane, Deirdre A / Ruff, Christian T / Turakhia, Mintu / Werring, David / Patel, Sheena / Moores, Lisa. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom; Liverpool Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Liverpool, and Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom; and Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. Electronic address: gregory.lip@liverpool.ac.uk. · Institute of Health Informatics, University College London, London, United Kingdom. · Cardiology Division, Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena & Reggio Emilia, Modena University Hospital, Modena, Italy. · General Clinical Research Center and Division of Cardiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Internal Medicine, Riverside University Medical Center, Moreno Valley, CA, and Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Hyperbaric, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA. · Heart Research Institute/Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney and Department of Cardiology Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom, and Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA. · Stroke Research Centre, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, UCL Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, University College Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. · CHEST, Glenview, IL. · Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine, Bethesda, MD. ·Chest · Pubmed #30144419.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The risk of stroke is heterogeneous across different groups of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), being dependent on the presence of various stroke risk factors. We provide recommendations for antithrombotic treatment based on net clinical benefit for patients with AF at varying levels of stroke risk and in a number of common clinical scenarios. METHODS: Systematic literature reviews were conducted to identify relevant articles published from the last formal search perfomed for the Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (9th Edition). The overall quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) approach. Graded recommendations and ungraded consensus-based statements were drafted, voted on, and revised until consensus was reached. RESULTS: For patients with AF without valvular heart disease, including those with paroxysmal AF, who are at low risk of stroke (eg, CHA CONCLUSIONS: Oral anticoagulation is the optimal choice of antithrombotic therapy for patients with AF with ≥1 non-sex CHA

5 Guideline Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE). 2017

Lip, Gregory Y H / Coca, Antonio / Kahan, Thomas / Boriani, Giuseppe / Manolis, Antonis S / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Oto, Ali / Potpara, Tatjana S / Steffel, Jan / Marín, Francisco / de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen / de Simone, Giovanni / Tzou, Wendy S / Chiang, Chern-En / Williams, Bryan / Anonymous4830918 / Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei / Gorenek, Bulent / Fauchier, Laurent / Savelieva, Irina / Hatala, Robert / van Gelder, Isabelle / Brguljan-Hitij, Jana / Erdine, Serap / Lovic, Dragan / Kim, Young-Hoon / Salinas-Arce, Jorge / Field, Michael. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Karolinska Institutet Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital Corp, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cardiology Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy. · Third Department of Cardiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. · Department of Internal Medicine, Holbaek Hospital and Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Memorial Ankara Hospital, Heart and Health Foundation of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey. · School of Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade University, Belgrade, Serbia. · Electrophysiology and Cardiac Devices, Department of Cardiology, University Heart Center Zurich; Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB-Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Cardiology Department, Medicine School, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, via S. Pansini 5, bld # 1, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Cardiac Electrophysiology, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, UK. · Colentina University Hospital, Medicine Faculty, University of Medicine "Carol Davila"-Bucharest Romania. · Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Trousseau, Tours, France. · St George's University Of London, London, UK. · National Cardiovascular Institute, NUSCH, Bratislava, Slovak Republic. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · University Medical Centre, Hypertension Department, Hospital Dr. Peter Drzaja, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School, Head of Hypertension Department, Istanbul, Turkey. · Clinic for internal disease Intermedica, Cardiology department-Hypertension centere, Serbia. · Korea University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Clínica Delgado, Miraflores, Pérou. · University of Wisconsin, Clinical Science Center, Madison, USA. ·Europace · Pubmed #28881872.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient.

6 Guideline Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: executive summary of a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE). 2017

Lip, Gregory Y H / Coca, Antonio / Kahan, Thomas / Boriani, Giuseppe / Manolis, Antonis S / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Oto, Ali / Potpara, Tatjana S / Steffel, Jan / Marín, Francisco / de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen / de Simone, Giovanni / Tzou, Wendy S / En Chiang, Chern / Williams, Bryan. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University of Birmingham, UK. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, c/Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital Corp, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cardiology Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy. · Third Department of Cardiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. · Department of Internal Medicine, Holbaek Hospital and Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Memorial Ankara Hospital; Heart and Health Foundation of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey. · School of Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, Belgrade University, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Cardiology, Electrophysiology and Cardiac Devices, University Heart Center Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB-Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Cardiology Department, Medicine School, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, via S. Pansini 5, bld # 1, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Cardiac Electrophysiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Cardiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, UK. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother · Pubmed #28541499.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in HTN patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), CAD, or HF. In addition, high doses of thiazide diuretics commonly used to treat HTN, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on HTN and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment on the care of a specific patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all individual factors presented. This is an executive summary of the full document co-published by EHRA in EP-Europace.

7 Guideline European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA)/European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (EACPR) position paper on how to prevent atrial fibrillation endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS). 2017

Gorenek Chair, Bulent / Pelliccia Co-Chair, Antonio / Benjamin, Emelia J / Boriani, Giuseppe / Crijns, Harry J / Fogel, Richard I / Van Gelder, Isabelle C / Halle, Martin / Kudaiberdieva, Gulmira / Lane, Deirdre A / Bjerregaard Larsen, Torben / Lip, Gregory Y H / Løchen, Maja-Lisa / Marin, Francisco / Niebauer, Josef / Sanders, Prashanthan / Tokgozoglu, Lale / Vos, Marc A / Van Wagoner, David R / Anonymous1441013 / Fauchier, Laurent / Savelieva, Irina / Goette, Andreas / Agewall, Stefan / Chiang, Chern-En / Figueiredo, Márcio / Stiles, Martin / Dickfeld, Timm / Patton, Kristen / Piepoli, Massimo / Corra, Ugo / Manuel Marques-Vidal, Pedro / Faggiano, Pompilio / Schmid, Jean-Paul / Abreu, Ana. ·Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey bulent@gorenek.com. · Institute of Sport Medicine and Science, Rome, Italy. · Framingham, MA, USA. · University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena Italy. · Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · St Vincent Medical Group, Indiana, USA. · University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Prevention and Sports Medicine, Technical University Munich, München, Germany. · Adana, Turkey. · University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromso, Norway. · Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Centre for Research Excellence to Reduce Inequality in Heart Disease, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia. · Hospital Universitario Virgen De La Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria. · Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia. · Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. · UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Cleveland Clinc Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Trousseau, Tours, France. · St George's University of London, London, UK. · St. Vincenz-Krankenhaus Gmbh Paderborn, Germany. · Oslo University Hospital Ulleval, Ullevål, Norway. · Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · State University of Campinas, San Paolo, Brazil. · Waikato Hospital, Hamilton, New Zealand. · Baltimore, MD, USA. · University of Washington, Seattle, USA. · Polichirurgico Hospital G. Da Saliceto, Romagna, Italy. · Irccs Rehabilitation Medical Center, Veruno, Italy. · University Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Unita' Operativa di Policardiografia, Brescia, Italy. · Spital Tiefenau, Bern, Switzerland. · Hospital de Santa Marta, Lisboa, Portugal. ·Eur J Prev Cardiol · Pubmed #27815538.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline Management of adrenal incidentalomas: European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline in collaboration with the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors. 2016

Fassnacht, Martin / Arlt, Wiebke / Bancos, Irina / Dralle, Henning / Newell-Price, John / Sahdev, Anju / Tabarin, Antoine / Terzolo, Massimo / Tsagarakis, Stylianos / Dekkers, Olaf M. ·Department of Internal Medicine IDivision of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Comprehensive Cancer Center MainfrankenUniversity of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany fassnacht_m@ukw.de. · Institute of Metabolism & Systems ResearchUniversity of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK Centre for EndocrinologyDiabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK. · Institute of Metabolism & Systems ResearchUniversity of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK Centre for EndocrinologyDiabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK Division of EndocrinologyMetabolism, Nutrition and Diabetes, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of GeneralVisceral, and Vascular Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany. · Department of Oncology and MetabolismMedical School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Endocrine UnitRoyal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Department of ImagingSt Bartholomew's Hospital, Barts Health, London, UK. · Department of Endocrinology and INSERM U862University and CHU of Bordeaux, Pessac, France. · Internal Medicine 1Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Department of EndocrinologyDiabetes and Metabolism, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Departments of Clinical Epidemiology and Internal MedicineLeiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands Department of Clinical EpidemiologyAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. ·Eur J Endocrinol · Pubmed #27390021.

ABSTRACT: : By definition, an adrenal incidentaloma is an asymptomatic adrenal mass detected on imaging not performed for suspected adrenal disease. In most cases, adrenal incidentalomas are nonfunctioning adrenocortical adenomas, but may also represent conditions requiring therapeutic intervention (e.g. adrenocortical carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, hormone-producing adenoma or metastasis). The purpose of this guideline is to provide clinicians with best possible evidence-based recommendations for clinical management of patients with adrenal incidentalomas based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. We predefined four main clinical questions crucial for the management of adrenal incidentaloma patients, addressing these four with systematic literature searches: (A) How to assess risk of malignancy?; (B) How to define and manage low-level autonomous cortisol secretion, formerly called 'subclinical' Cushing's syndrome?; (C) Who should have surgical treatment and how should it be performed?; (D) What follow-up is indicated if the adrenal incidentaloma is not surgically removed? SELECTED RECOMMENDATIONS: (i) At the time of initial detection of an adrenal mass establishing whether the mass is benign or malignant is an important aim to avoid cumbersome and expensive follow-up imaging in those with benign disease. (ii) To exclude cortisol excess, a 1mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test should be performed (applying a cut-off value of serum cortisol ≤50nmol/L (1.8µg/dL)). (iii) For patients without clinical signs of overt Cushing's syndrome but serum cortisol levels post 1mg dexamethasone >138nmol/L (>5µg/dL), we propose the term 'autonomous cortisol secretion'. (iv) All patients with '(possible) autonomous cortisol' secretion should be screened for hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus, to ensure these are appropriately treated. (v) Surgical treatment should be considered in an individualized approach in patients with 'autonomous cortisol secretion' who also have comorbidities that are potentially related to cortisol excess. (vi) In principle, the appropriateness of surgical intervention should be guided by the likelihood of malignancy, the presence and degree of hormone excess, age, general health and patient preference. (vii) Surgery is not usually indicated in patients with an asymptomatic, nonfunctioning unilateral adrenal mass and obvious benign features on imaging studies. We provide guidance on which surgical approach should be considered for adrenal masses with radiological findings suspicious of malignancy. Furthermore, we offer recommendations for the follow-up of patients with adrenal incidentaloma who do not undergo adrenal surgery, for those with bilateral incidentalomas, for patients with extra-adrenal malignancy and adrenal masses and for young and elderly patients with adrenal incidentalomas.

9 Guideline Expert consensus document: Defining the major health modifiers causing atrial fibrillation: a roadmap to underpin personalized prevention and treatment. 2016

Fabritz, Larissa / Guasch, Eduard / Antoniades, Charalambos / Bardinet, Isabel / Benninger, Gerlinde / Betts, Tim R / Brand, Eva / Breithardt, Günter / Bucklar-Suchankova, Gabriela / Camm, A John / Cartlidge, David / Casadei, Barbara / Chua, Winnie W L / Crijns, Harry J G M / Deeks, Jon / Hatem, Stéphane / Hidden-Lucet, Françoise / Kääb, Stefan / Maniadakis, Nikos / Martin, Stephan / Mont, Lluis / Reinecke, Holger / Sinner, Moritz F / Schotten, Ulrich / Southwood, Taunton / Stoll, Monika / Vardas, Panos / Wakili, Reza / West, Andy / Ziegler, André / Kirchhof, Paulus. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Division of Rhythmology, University Hospital Münster, Schlossplatz 2, 48149 Munich, Germany. · Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. · Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Carrer del Rosselló, 149, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. · European Society of Cardiology, 2035 Route des Colles, 06903 Sophia Antipolis, France. · Atrial Fibrillation Network (AFNET) Association, Mendelstraße 11, 48149 Munich, Germany. · Internal Medicine D, Department of Nephrology, Hypertension and Rheumatology, University Hospital Münster, Schlossplatz 2, 48149 Munich, Germany. · Roche Professional Diagnostics, Forrenstrasse 2, CH-6343 Rotkreuz, Switzerland. · Cardiovascular Sciences Research Centre, St George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK. · Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK. · UK Health and Environmental Research Institute, Pera Technology, Nottingham Road, Melton Mowbray LE13 0PB, UK. · Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), 6229 ER Maastricht, Netherlands. · Maastricht Centre of Systems Biology (MaCSBio), Maastricht University, 6200 MD Maastricht, Netherlands. · Department of Public Health, School of Health and Population Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. · UPMC Université Paris, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France. · University Hospital Munich, Department of Medicine I, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Professor-Huber-Platz 2, 80539 Munich, Germany. · German Cardiovascular Research Center (DZKH), partner site: Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany. · National School of Public Health, Leof. Alexandras 196, Athens, Greece. · Division of Vascular Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Gebäude A1, 48149 Munich, Germany. · School of Immunity and Infection, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. · University of Crete, Heraklion GR-71003, Greece. · SWBH NHS Trust, Dudley Road, Birmingham, West Midlands B18 7QH, UK. · UHB NHS Trust, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK. ·Nat Rev Cardiol · Pubmed #26701216.

ABSTRACT: Despite remarkable advances in antiarrhythmic drugs, ablation procedures, and stroke-prevention strategies, atrial fibrillation (AF) remains an important cause of death and disability in middle-aged and elderly individuals. Unstructured management of patients with AF sharply contrasts with our detailed, although incomplete, knowledge of the mechanisms that cause AF and its complications. Altered calcium homeostasis, atrial fibrosis and ageing, ion-channel dysfunction, autonomic imbalance, fat-cell infiltration, and oxidative stress, in addition to a susceptible genetic background, contribute to the promotion, maintenance, and progression of AF. However, clinical management of patients with AF is currently guided by stroke risk parameters, AF pattern, and symptoms. In response to this apparent disconnect between the known pathophysiology of AF and clinical management, we propose a roadmap to develop a set of clinical markers that reflect the major causes of AF in patients. Thereby, the insights into the mechanisms causing AF will be transformed into a format that can underpin future personalized strategies to prevent and treat AF, ultimately informing better patient care.

10 Editorial The Journal of Human Hypertension becomes the official journal of the British and Irish Hypertension Society. 2019

Cappuccio, Francesco P. ·President of the British and Irish Hypertension Society, University of Warwick, Warwick Medical School, and UHCW NHS Trust, Coventry, UK. F.P.Cappuccio@warwick.ac.uk. ·J Hum Hypertens · Pubmed #30872778.

ABSTRACT:

11 Editorial Evaluation and management of adult idiopathic intracranial hypertension. 2018

Mollan, Susan P / Hornby, Catherine / Mitchell, James / Sinclair, Alexandra J. ·Metabolic Neurology, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Birmingham Neuro-Ophthalmology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Neurology, University Hospitals Birmingham, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. ·Pract Neurol · Pubmed #30154235.

ABSTRACT: This paper summarises the first consensus guidelines for idiopathic intracranial hypertension as an infographic. Following a systematic literature review, a multidisciplinary specialist interest group met and established questions relating to population, interventions, controls and outcomes (PICO). A survey was sent to doctors who manage idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) regularly. Statements were reviewed by national professional bodies, specifically the Association of British Neurologists, British Association for the Study of Headache, the Society of British Neurological Surgeons and the Royal College of Ophthalmologists and by international experts. Key areas are represented based on the guideline, namely: (1) investigation of papilloedema and diagnosis of IIH; (2) management strategies; and (3) investigation and management of acute exacerbation of headache in established IIH. We present an infographic as an aide-mémoire of the first consensus guidelines for IIH.

12 Editorial Editorial: optimal dose of carvedilol in portal hypertension…nearly there. 2018

Tripathi, D / Stanley, A J. ·Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology & Liver disease, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #29644737.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial The dangerous combination of atrial fibrillation and hypertension: An urgent need to handle complexity. 2018

Proietti, Marco. ·IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche "Mario Negri", Milan, Italy; Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Sapienza-University of Rome, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: marco.proietti@uniroma1.it. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #29407084.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Renal function after new treatment with renin-angiotensin system blockers. 2017

Valente, Marie / Bhandari, Sunil. ·Birmingham Clinical Trials Unit, Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Renal Medicine, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospital NHS Trust and Hull York Medical School, Kingston upon Hull HU32JZ, UK. ·BMJ · Pubmed #28279951.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Changing Current Practice in Urology: Improving Guideline Development and Implementation Through Stakeholder Engagement. 2017

MacLennan, Sara J / MacLennan, Steven / Bex, Axel / Catto, James W F / De Santis, Maria / Glaser, Adam W / Ljungberg, Borje / N'Dow, James / Plass, Karin / Trapero-Bertran, Marta / Van Poppel, Hendrik / Wright, Penny / Giles, Rachel H. ·Academic Urology Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; Urological Cancer Charity, Foresterhill Health Centre, Aberdeen, UK. · Academic Urology Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK. · Department of Urology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Urology Unit, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Cancer Research Centre, University of Warwick, UK. · Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · European Association of Urology Guidelines Office, Arnhem, The Netherlands. · Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Urology, University Hospitals of KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Regenerative Medicine Centre Utrecht, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; International Kidney Cancer Coalition, www.ikcc.org. Electronic address: r.giles@umcutrecht.nl. ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #28237788.

ABSTRACT: Effective stakeholder integration for guideline development should improve outcomes and adherence to clinical practice guidelines.

16 Editorial Editorial: complications of TIPSS - consolidation of a decade of experience. 2017

Rajoriya, N / Tripathi, D. ·Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #27910144.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial SPRINTing towards trials of blood pressure reduction to reduce CKD progression? 2016

Moody, William E / Ferro, Charles J / Townend, Jonathan N. ·Birmingham Cardio-Renal Research Group, University of Birmingham, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK. ·Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes · Pubmed #29474719.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Hypertension: Trajectories of Risk Factors in Yet Another Manifestation of Hypertensive Target Organ Damage. 2016

Lip, Gregory Y H. ·From the University of Birmingham Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, United Kingdom; and Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. g.y.h.lip@bham.ac.uk. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #27402920.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Review Impact of the Pharmacist-Led Intervention on the Control of Medical Cardiovascular Risk Factors for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in General Practice: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. 2019

Alshehri, Abdullah A / Jalal, Zahraa / Cheema, Ejaz / Haque, M Sayeed / Jenkins, Duncan / Yahyouche, Asma. ·School of Pharmacy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. · Clinical Pharmacy Department, College of Pharmacy, Taif University, Al Huwaya, Taif, 26571, Saudi Arabia. · Institute of Applied Health Research, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. · Morph Consultancy Ltd, Worcester, WR12HB, UK. ·Br J Clin Pharmacol · Pubmed #31777082.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of general practice based pharmacists' interventions in reducing the medical risk factors for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events. METHODS: A systemic search was undertaken in eight databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBAS, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, CINAHL Plus, SCOPUS and Science Citation Index, with no start date up to 27 RESULTS: A total of 1,604 studies were identified, with 21 RCTs (8,933 patients) meeting the inclusion criteria. 14 studies were conducted in patients with diabetes, seven in hypertension, two involving dyslipidaemia and two with hypertension and diabetes together. The most frequently used interventions were medication review and medication management. The quality of the included studies was variable. Patients receiving pharmacists-led interventions were associated with a statistically significant reduction in their systolic blood pressure -9.33 mmHg [95% CI -13.36 to -5.30]), HbA1c -0.76% [95% CI -1.15 to -0.37]) and LDL-Cholesterol -15.19 mg/dl [95% CI -24.05 to -6.33]). Moreover, practice-based pharmacists' interventions were also reported to have a positive impact on patient adherence to medications. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this review suggest that Pharmacists-led interventions in general practice can significantly reduce the medical risk factors of CVD events. These findings support the involvement of pharmacists as healthcare providers in managing patients with hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia.

20 Review Multi-Site Photoplethysmography Technology for Blood Pressure Assessment: Challenges and Recommendations. 2019

Chan, Gabriel / Cooper, Rachel / Hosanee, Manish / Welykholowa, Kaylie / Kyriacou, Panayiotis A / Zheng, Dingchang / Allen, John / Abbott, Derek / Lovell, Nigel H / Fletcher, Richard / Elgendi, Mohamed. ·Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. gabriel.chan@alumni.ubc.ca. · Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. rachelcooper@alumni.ubc.ca. · Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. manish.hosanee@alumni.ubc.ca. · Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. kayliewelykholowa@gmail.com. · School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering, University of London, London, EC1V 0HB, UK. p.kyriacou@city.ac.uk. · Research Center of Intelligent Healthcare, Faculty of Health and Life Science, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK. dingchang.zheng@coventry.ac.uk. · Microvascular Diagnostics, Northern Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE7 7DN, UK. john.allen@ncl.ac.uk. · School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia. derek.abbott@adelaide.edu.au. · Centre for Biomedical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia. derek.abbott@adelaide.edu.au. · Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia. n.lovell@unsw.edu.au. · D-Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. fletcher@media.mit.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655, USA. fletcher@media.mit.edu. · Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. melgendi@bcchr.ubc.ca. · School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. melgendi@bcchr.ubc.ca. · BC Children's & Women's Hospital, Vancouver, BC V6H 3N1, Canada. melgendi@bcchr.ubc.ca. ·J Clin Med · Pubmed #31683938.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is one of the most prevalent diseases and is often called the "silent killer" because there are usually no early symptoms. Hypertension is also associated with multiple morbidities, including chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. Early detection and intervention are therefore important. The current routine method for diagnosing hypertension is done using a sphygmomanometer, which can only provide intermittent blood pressure readings and can be confounded by various factors, such as white coat hypertension, time of day, exercise, or stress. Consequently, there is an increasing need for a non-invasive, cuff-less, and continuous blood pressure monitoring device. Multi-site photoplethysmography (PPG) is a promising new technology that can measure a range of features of the pulse, including the pulse transit time of the arterial pulse wave, which can be used to continuously estimate arterial blood pressure. This is achieved by detecting the pulse wave at one body site location and measuring the time it takes for it to reach a second, distal location. The purpose of this review is to analyze the current research in multi-site PPG for blood pressure assessment and provide recommendations to guide future research. In a systematic search of the literature from January 2010 to January 2019, we found 13 papers that proposed novel methods using various two-channel PPG systems and signal processing techniques to acquire blood pressure using multi-site PPG that offered promising results. However, we also found a general lack of validation in terms of sample size and diversity of populations.

21 Review What makes non-cirrhotic portal hypertension a common disease in India? Analysis for environmental factors. 2019

Goel, Ashish / Ramakrishna, Banumathi / Zachariah, Uday / Sajith, K G / Burad, Deepak K / Kodiatte, Thomas A / Keshava, Shyamkumar N / Balasubramanian, K A / Elias, Elwyn / Eapen, C E. ·Department of Hepatology, Division of GI Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. · Department of Pathology, Division of GI Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. · Department of Radio-diagnosis, Division of GI Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. · Department of Wellcome Research Laboratory, Division of GI Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. · Department of Hepatology, Division of GI Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India; Liver Unit, University Hospitals, Birmingham, UK. ·Indian J Med Res · Pubmed #31411170.

ABSTRACT: In India, an unexplained enteropathy is present in a majority of non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension (NCIPH) patients. Small intestinal bacterial contamination and tropical enteropathy could trigger inflammatory stimuli and activate the endothelium in the portal venous system. Groundwater contaminated with arsenic is an environmental factor of epidemic proportions in large areas of India which has similar consequences. Von Willebrand factor (a sticky protein) expressed by activated endothelium may promote formation of platelet microthrombi and occlusion of intrahepatic portal vein branches leading to NCIPH. Environmental factors linked to suboptimal hygiene and sanitation, which enter through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, predispose to platelet plugging onto activated endothelium in portal microcirculation. Thus, NCIPH, an example of poverty linked thrombophilia, is a disease mainly affecting the lower socio-economic strata of Indian population. Public health measures to improve sanitation, provide clean drinking water and eliminate arsenic contamination of drinking water are urgently needed. Till such time as these environmental factors are addressed, NCIPH is likely to remain 'an Indian disease'.

22 Review Next Generation Sequencing Discoveries of the Nitrate-Responsive Oral Microbiome and Its Effect on Vascular Responses. 2019

Grant, Melissa M / Jönsson, Daniel. ·School of Dentistry, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham and Birmingham Community Healthcare Foundation Trust, Birmingham B5 7EG, UK. · Swedish Dental Service of Skåne, 222 37 Lund, Sweden. daniel.jonsson@mau.se. · Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, 214 21 Malmö, Sweden. daniel.jonsson@mau.se. ·J Clin Med · Pubmed #31357429.

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular disease is a worldwide human condition which has multiple underlying contributing factors: one of these is long-term increased blood pressure-hypertension. Nitric oxide (NO) is a small nitrogenous radical species that has a number of physiological functions including vasodilation. It can be produced enzymatically through host nitric oxide synthases and by an alternative nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway from ingested inorganic nitrate. It was discovered that this route relies on the ability of the oral microbiota to reduce nitrate to nitrite and NO. Next generation sequencing has been used over the past two decades to gain deeper insight into the microbes involved, their location and the effect of their removal from the oral cavity. This review article presents this research and comments briefly on future directions.

23 Review Comorbidity burden in systemic sclerosis: beyond disease-specific complications. 2019

Pagkopoulou, Eleni / Arvanitaki, Alexandra / Daoussis, Dimitrios / Garyfallos, Alexandros / Kitas, George / Dimitroulas, Theodoros. ·Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Hippokration University Hospital, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 49 Konstantinoupoleos Str, 54642, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Cardiology Department, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Patras University Hospital, University of Patras Medical School, Patras, Greece. · Department of Rheumatology, Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, Russells Hall Hospital, Dudley, West Midlands, UK. · Arthritis Research UK, Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Hippokration University Hospital, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 49 Konstantinoupoleos Str, 54642, Thessaloniki, Greece. dimitroul@hotmail.com. ·Rheumatol Int · Pubmed #31300848.

ABSTRACT: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic, systemic disease characterized by fibrosis of the skin and internal organs, vasculopathy, and auto-immune activation. On the top of severe organ involvement such as interstitial lung and myocardial fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and renal crisis, individuals diagnosed with SSc may suffer from a number of comorbidities. This is a narrative review according to published recommendations and we searched the online databases MEDLINE and EMBASE using as key words the following terms: systemic sclerosis, scleroderma, myocardial fibrosis in combination with micro- and macro-vascular disease, cardiac involvement, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and coronary arteries, infections, cancer, depression, osteoporosis, and dyslipidemia. Although data are usually inconclusive it appears that comorbidities with significant impact on life expectancy, namely cardiovascular disease, infections, and cancer as well as phycological disorders affecting emotional and mental health are highly prevalent in SSc population. Thereafter, the aim of this review is to summarize the occurrence and the clinical significance of such comorbidities in SSc population and to discuss how rheumatologists can incorporate the management of these conditions in daily clinical practice.

24 Review Joint UK societies' 2019 consensus statement on renal denervation. 2019

Lobo, Melvin D / Sharp, Andrew S P / Kapil, Vikas / Davies, Justin / de Belder, Mark A / Cleveland, Trevor / Bent, Clare / Chapman, Neil / Dasgupta, Indranil / Levy, Terry / Mathur, Anthony / Matson, Matthew / Saxena, Manish / Cappuccio, Francesco P / Anonymous331598. ·William Harvey Research Institute, Centre for Clinical Pharmacology, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Barts, Queen Mary University London, London, UK. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Barts Heart Centre, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, Exeter, UK. · Department of Cardiology, Exeter Hospital, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK. · Department of Cardiology, Imperial College Healthcare Trust, London, UK. · Department of Cardiology, James Cook University Hospital, Middlesborough, UK. · The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Sheffield Vascular Institute, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHSFT, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, UK. · Department of Interventional Radiology, The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth, UK. · Department of Renal Medicine, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Diagnostic Imaging, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. · University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK. ·Heart · Pubmed #31292190.

ABSTRACT: Improved and durable control of hypertension is a global priority for healthcare providers and policymakers. There are several lifestyle measures that are proven to result in improved blood pressure (BP) control. Moreover, there is incontrovertible evidence from large scale randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that antihypertensive drugs lower BP safely and effectively in the long-term resulting in substantial reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Importantly, however, evidence is accumulating to suggest that patients neither sustain long-term healthy behaviours nor adhere to lifelong drug treatment regimens and thus alternative measures to control hypertension warrant further investigation. Endovascular renal denervation (RDN) appears to hold some promise as a non-pharmacological approach to lowering BP and achieves renal sympathectomy using either radiofrequency energy or ultrasound-based approaches. This treatment modality has been evaluated in clinical trials in humans since 2009 but initial studies were compromised by being non-randomised, without sham control and small in size. Subsequently, clinical trial design and rigour of execution has been greatly improved resulting in recent sham-controlled RCTs that demonstrate short-term reduction in ambulatory BP without any significant safety concerns in both medication-naïve and medication-treated hypertensive patients. Despite this, the joint UK societies still feel that further evaluation of this therapy is warranted and that RDN should not be offered to patients outside of the context of clinical trials. This document reviews the updated evidence since our last consensus statement from 2014 and provides a research agenda for future clinical studies.

25 Review Large-duct cholangiopathies: aetiology, diagnosis and treatment. 2019

Menon, Shyam / Holt, Andrew. ·Department of Hepatology and Liver Transplantation, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, UK. ·Frontline Gastroenterol · Pubmed #31288256.

ABSTRACT: Cholangiopathies describe a group of conditions affecting the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary tree. Impairment to bile flow and chronic cholestasis cause biliary inflammation, which leads to more permanent damage such as destruction of the small bile ducts (ductopaenia) and biliary cirrhosis. Most cholangiopathies are progressive and cause end-stage liver disease unless the physical obstruction to biliary flow can be reversed. This review considers large-duct cholangiopathies, such as primary sclerosing cholangitis, ischaemic cholangiopathy, portal biliopathy, recurrent pyogenic cholangitis and Caroli disease.

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