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Hypertension: HELP
Articles from US Mountain Zone
Based on 978 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 978 published articles about Hypertension that originated from US Mountain Zone during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Guideline ACVIM consensus statement: Guidelines for the identification, evaluation, and management of systemic hypertension in dogs and cats. 2018

Acierno, Mark J / Brown, Scott / Coleman, Amanda E / Jepson, Rosanne E / Papich, Mark / Stepien, Rebecca L / Syme, Harriet M. ·Department of Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Midwestern University, 5715 W. Utopia Rd, Glendale Arizona 85308. · College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. · Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, London, United Kingdom. · College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. · Department of Medical Sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, Madison, Wisconsin. ·J Vet Intern Med · Pubmed #30353952.

ABSTRACT: An update to the 2007 American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) consensus statement on the identification, evaluation, and management of systemic hypertension in dogs and cats was presented at the 2017 ACVIM Forum in National Harbor, MD. The updated consensus statement is presented here. The consensus statement aims to provide guidance on appropriate diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in dogs and cats.

3 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous7910925 / Harvin, Howard J / Verma, Nupur / Nikolaidis, Paul / Hanley, Michael / Dogra, Vikram S / Goldfarb, Stanley / Gore, John L / Savage, Stephen J / Steigner, Michael L / Strax, Richard / Taffel, Myles T / Wong-You-Cheong, Jade J / Yoo, Don C / Remer, Erick M / Dill, Karin E / Lockhart, Mark E. ·Principal Author, Scottsdale Medical Imaging, Scottsdale, Arizona. Electronic address: h_harvin@yahoo.com. · Co-author, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. · Panel Vice Chair (Urologic), Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · Panel Vice Chair (Vascular), University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; American Society of Nephrology. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; American Urological Association. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; American Urological Association. · Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · George Washington University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia. · University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Rhode Island Medical Imaging Inc., East Providence, Rhode Island. · Specialty Chair (Urologic), Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Panel Chair (Vascular), UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts. · Panel Chair (Urologic), University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #29101991.

ABSTRACT: Renovascular hypertension is the most common type of secondary hypertension and is estimated to have a prevalence between 0.5% and 5% of the general hypertensive population, and an even higher prevalence among patients with severe hypertension and end-stage renal disease, approaching 25% in elderly dialysis patients. Investigation for renal artery stenosis is appropriate when clinical presentation suggests secondary hypertension rather than primary hypertension, when there is not another known cause of secondary hypertension, and when intervention would be carried out if a significant renal artery stenosis were identified. The primary imaging modalities used to screen for renal artery stenosis are CT, MRI, and ultrasound, with the selection of imaging dependent in part on renal function. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

4 Guideline Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE). 2017

Lip, Gregory Y H / Coca, Antonio / Kahan, Thomas / Boriani, Giuseppe / Manolis, Antonis S / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Oto, Ali / Potpara, Tatjana S / Steffel, Jan / Marín, Francisco / de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen / de Simone, Giovanni / Tzou, Wendy S / Chiang, Chern-En / Williams, Bryan / Anonymous4830918 / Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei / Gorenek, Bulent / Fauchier, Laurent / Savelieva, Irina / Hatala, Robert / van Gelder, Isabelle / Brguljan-Hitij, Jana / Erdine, Serap / Lovic, Dragan / Kim, Young-Hoon / Salinas-Arce, Jorge / Field, Michael. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK. · Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Karolinska Institutet Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital Corp, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cardiology Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy. · Third Department of Cardiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. · Department of Internal Medicine, Holbaek Hospital and Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Memorial Ankara Hospital, Heart and Health Foundation of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey. · School of Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade University, Belgrade, Serbia. · Electrophysiology and Cardiac Devices, Department of Cardiology, University Heart Center Zurich; Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB-Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Cardiology Department, Medicine School, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, via S. Pansini 5, bld # 1, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Cardiac Electrophysiology, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, UK. · Colentina University Hospital, Medicine Faculty, University of Medicine "Carol Davila"-Bucharest Romania. · Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Trousseau, Tours, France. · St George's University Of London, London, UK. · National Cardiovascular Institute, NUSCH, Bratislava, Slovak Republic. · University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · University Medical Centre, Hypertension Department, Hospital Dr. Peter Drzaja, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School, Head of Hypertension Department, Istanbul, Turkey. · Clinic for internal disease Intermedica, Cardiology department-Hypertension centere, Serbia. · Korea University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Clínica Delgado, Miraflores, Pérou. · University of Wisconsin, Clinical Science Center, Madison, USA. ·Europace · Pubmed #28881872.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient.

5 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline for Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. 2017

Flynn, Joseph T / Kaelber, David C / Baker-Smith, Carissa M / Blowey, Douglas / Carroll, Aaron E / Daniels, Stephen R / de Ferranti, Sarah D / Dionne, Janis M / Falkner, Bonita / Flinn, Susan K / Gidding, Samuel S / Goodwin, Celeste / Leu, Michael G / Powers, Makia E / Rea, Corinna / Samuels, Joshua / Simasek, Madeline / Thaker, Vidhu V / Urbina, Elaine M / Anonymous5820916. ·Dr. Robert O. Hickman Endowed Chair in Pediatric Nephrology, Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington; joseph.flynn@seattlechildrens.org. · Departments of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, Case Western Reserve University and MetroHealth System, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Pediatric Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. · Children's Mercy Hospital, University of Missouri-Kansas City and Children's Mercy Integrated Care Solutions, Kansas City, Missouri. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado-Denver and Pediatrician in Chief, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. · Director, Preventive Cardiology Clinic, Boston Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia and British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Consultant, American Academy of Pediatrics, Washington, District of Columbia. · Cardiology Division Head, Nemours Cardiac Center, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware. · National Pediatric Blood Pressure Awareness Foundation, Prairieville, Louisiana. · Departments of Pediatrics and Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington, University of Washington Medicine and Information Technology Services, and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia. · Associate Director, General Academic Pediatric Fellowship, Staff Physician, Boston's Children's Hospital Primary Care at Longwood, Instructor, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, McGovern Medical School, University of Texas, Houston, Texas. · Pediatric Education, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Shadyside Family Medicine Residency, Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Division of Molecular Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and. · Preventive Cardiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #28827377.

ABSTRACT: These pediatric hypertension guidelines are an update to the 2004 "Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents." Significant changes in these guidelines include (1) the replacement of the term "prehypertension" with the term "elevated blood pressure," (2) new normative pediatric blood pressure (BP) tables based on normal-weight children, (3) a simplified screening table for identifying BPs needing further evaluation, (4) a simplified BP classification in adolescents ≥13 years of age that aligns with the forthcoming American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology adult BP guidelines, (5) a more limited recommendation to perform screening BP measurements only at preventive care visits, (6) streamlined recommendations on the initial evaluation and management of abnormal BPs, (7) an expanded role for ambulatory BP monitoring in the diagnosis and management of pediatric hypertension, and (8) revised recommendations on when to perform echocardiography in the evaluation of newly diagnosed hypertensive pediatric patients (generally only before medication initiation), along with a revised definition of left ventricular hypertrophy. These guidelines include 30 Key Action Statements and 27 additional recommendations derived from a comprehensive review of almost 15 000 published articles between January 2004 and July 2016. Each Key Action Statement includes level of evidence, benefit-harm relationship, and strength of recommendation. This clinical practice guideline, endorsed by the American Heart Association, is intended to foster a patient- and family-centered approach to care, reduce unnecessary and costly medical interventions, improve patient diagnoses and outcomes, support implementation, and provide direction for future research.

6 Guideline Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: executive summary of a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE). 2017

Lip, Gregory Y H / Coca, Antonio / Kahan, Thomas / Boriani, Giuseppe / Manolis, Antonis S / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Oto, Ali / Potpara, Tatjana S / Steffel, Jan / Marín, Francisco / de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen / de Simone, Giovanni / Tzou, Wendy S / En Chiang, Chern / Williams, Bryan. ·Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University of Birmingham, UK. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg Thrombosis Research Unit, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit, Hospital Clínic (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, c/Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital Corp, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cardiology Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy. · Third Department of Cardiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. · Department of Internal Medicine, Holbaek Hospital and Centre for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases (CIMA), Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Memorial Ankara Hospital; Heart and Health Foundation of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey. · School of Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, Belgrade University, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Cardiology, Electrophysiology and Cardiac Devices, University Heart Center Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Cardiology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB-Arrixaca, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Cardiology Department, Medicine School, State University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University Hospital, via S. Pansini 5, bld # 1, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Cardiac Electrophysiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Cardiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, UK. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother · Pubmed #28541499.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in HTN patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), CAD, or HF. In addition, high doses of thiazide diuretics commonly used to treat HTN, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on HTN and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment on the care of a specific patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all individual factors presented. This is an executive summary of the full document co-published by EHRA in EP-Europace.

7 Guideline ISFM Consensus Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Management of Hypertension in Cats. 2017

Taylor, Samantha S / Sparkes, Andrew H / Briscoe, Katherine / Carter, Jenny / Sala, Salva Cervantes / Jepson, Rosanne E / Reynolds, Brice S / Scansen, Brian A. ·1 International Cat Care/ISFM, Tisbury, Wiltshire SP3 6LD, UK. · 2 Animal Referral Hospital, 250 Parramatta Road, Homebush, Sydney, NSW 2140, Australia. · 3 PO Box 128209, Remuera, Auckland 1541, New Zealand. · 4 Clínica Felina Barcelona, C/Marqués de Campo Sagrado 12, Barcelona, Spain. · 5 Clinical Sciences and Services, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK. · 6 Université de Toulouse, ENVT, Toulouse, France. · 7 Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Campus Delivery 1678, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. ·J Feline Med Surg · Pubmed #28245741.

ABSTRACT: Practical relevance: Feline hypertension is a common disease in older cats that is frequently diagnosed in association with other diseases such as chronic kidney disease and hyperthyroidism (so-called secondary hypertension), although some cases of apparent primary hypertension are also reported. The clinical consequences of hypertension can be severe, related to 'target organ damage' (eye, heart and vasculature, brain and kidneys), and early diagnosis followed by appropriate therapeutic management should help reduce the morbidity associated with this condition. Clinical challenges: Despite being a common disease, routine blood pressure (BP) monitoring is generally performed infrequently, probably leading to underdiagnosis of feline hypertension in clinical practice. There is a need to: (i) ensure BP is measured as accurately as possible with a reproducible technique; (ii) identify and monitor patients at risk of developing hypertension; (iii) establish appropriate criteria for therapeutic intervention; and (iv) establish appropriate therapeutic targets. Based on current data, amlodipine besylate is the treatment of choice to manage feline hypertension and is effective in the majority of cats, but the dose needed to successfully manage hypertension varies between individuals. Some cats require long-term adjuvant therapy and, occasionally, additional therapy is necessary for emergency management of hypertensive crises. Evidence base: These Guidelines from the International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) are based on a comprehensive review of the currently available literature, and are aimed at providing practical recommendations to address the challenges of feline hypertension for veterinarians. There are many areas where more data is required which, in the future, will serve to confirm or modify some of the recommendations in these Guidelines.

8 Guideline 8 USPSTF recommendations FPs need to know about. 2016

Campos-Outcalt, Doug. ·Medical Director, Mercy Care Plan, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Email: campos-outcaltd@mercycareplan.com. ·J Fam Pract · Pubmed #27275937.

ABSTRACT: Treat high blood pressure only if measurements taken outside of the office confirm an initial high BP reading · Screen blood-glucose levels in overweight/obese individuals 40 to 70 years old · and more.

9 Guideline 2014 evidence-based guideline for the management of high blood pressure in adults: report from the panel members appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8). 2014

James, Paul A / Oparil, Suzanne / Carter, Barry L / Cushman, William C / Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl / Handler, Joel / Lackland, Daniel T / LeFevre, Michael L / MacKenzie, Thomas D / Ogedegbe, Olugbenga / Smith, Sidney C / Svetkey, Laura P / Taler, Sandra J / Townsend, Raymond R / Wright, Jackson T / Narva, Andrew S / Ortiz, Eduardo. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. · Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Tennessee, Memphis. · Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland. · Kaiser Permanente, Anaheim, California. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston. · University of Missouri, Columbia. · Denver Health and Hospital Authority and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland. · at the time of the project,National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland17currently with ProVation Medical, Wolters Kluwer Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JAMA · Pubmed #24352797.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension is the most common condition seen in primary care and leads to myocardial infarction, stroke, renal failure, and death if not detected early and treated appropriately. Patients want to be assured that blood pressure (BP) treatment will reduce their disease burden, while clinicians want guidance on hypertension management using the best scientific evidence. This report takes a rigorous, evidence-based approach to recommend treatment thresholds, goals, and medications in the management of hypertension in adults. Evidence was drawn from randomized controlled trials, which represent the gold standard for determining efficacy and effectiveness. Evidence quality and recommendations were graded based on their effect on important outcomes. There is strong evidence to support treating hypertensive persons aged 60 years or older to a BP goal of less than 150/90 mm Hg and hypertensive persons 30 through 59 years of age to a diastolic goal of less than 90 mm Hg; however, there is insufficient evidence in hypertensive persons younger than 60 years for a systolic goal, or in those younger than 30 years for a diastolic goal, so the panel recommends a BP of less than 140/90 mm Hg for those groups based on expert opinion. The same thresholds and goals are recommended for hypertensive adults with diabetes or nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) as for the general hypertensive population younger than 60 years. There is moderate evidence to support initiating drug treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blocker, calcium channel blocker, or thiazide-type diuretic in the nonblack hypertensive population, including those with diabetes. In the black hypertensive population, including those with diabetes, a calcium channel blocker or thiazide-type diuretic is recommended as initial therapy. There is moderate evidence to support initial or add-on antihypertensive therapy with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker in persons with CKD to improve kidney outcomes. Although this guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for the management of high BP and should meet the clinical needs of most patients, these recommendations are not a substitute for clinical judgment, and decisions about care must carefully consider and incorporate the clinical characteristics and circumstances of each individual patient.

10 Guideline Pharmacologic risk factor management in peripheral arterial disease: a vade mecum for vascular surgeons. 2008

Rehring, Thomas F / Stolcpart, Ryan S / Hollis, H Whitton / Anonymous4600595. ·Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Vascular Therapy, Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Denver, CO 80205, USA. trehring@msn.com ·J Vasc Surg · Pubmed #18372155.

ABSTRACT: There is broad and compelling evidence for risk factor reduction to limit cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Indeed, vascular surgeons have placed a call to arms to ensure this takes place. Despite this fact, some wariness exists on the part of many vascular surgeons to initiate these strategies, functionally abnegating their responsibilities in this regard. The purpose of this article is to provide a simple reference to guide effective therapies for overall cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Specific recommendations are made for tobacco cessation, lipid-lowering therapy, antiplatelet therapy, blood pressure control, and maintenance of normoglycemia.

11 Editorial Acute stroke: low baseline blood pressure equals low seven-day life expectancy? 2018

Girotra, Tarun / Ovbiagele, Bruce. ·University of New Mexico, Department of Neurology, Albuquerque. · Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Neurology, Charleston. ·Arq Neuropsiquiatr · Pubmed #30066792.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Uric Acid and Hypertension Because of Arterial Stiffness. 2018

Kuwabara, Masanari / Kanbay, Mehmet / Hisatome, Ichiro. ·From the Department of Cardiology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan (M. Kuwabara). · Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of Colorado, Denver, School of Medicine (M. Kuwabara). · Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Koç University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey (M. Kanbay). · Division of Regenerative Medicine and Therapeutics, Tottori University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Japan (I.H.). ·Hypertension · Pubmed #29987106.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial New Guidelines for Managing Hypertension - Lower is Better. 2018

Ahmed, Khalid Mohamed / Larson, Eric A. ·Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. · Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. ·S D Med · Pubmed #29439296.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Adverse Outcomes in Pediatric Hypertension. 2017

Daniels, Stephen R. ·From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora. Stephen.Daniels@childrenscolorado.org. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #29084875.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Talking With Patients Is Better Than Talking to Patients. 2017

Havranek, Edward P / Daugherty, Stacie L. ·From the Department of Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, CO (E.P.H.) · and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora (E.P.H., S.L.D.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes · Pubmed #28830862.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Mineralocorticoids: the secret of muscle reflex dysfunction in hypertension? 2017

Wang, Han-Jun. ·Department of Anesthesiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska; and hanjunwang@unmc.edu. · Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska. ·Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol · Pubmed #28822968.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Genetics of Blood Pressure: New Insights Into a Complex Trait. 2017

Bress, Adam P / Irvin, Marguerite R / Muntner, Paul. ·Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT. Electronic address: adam.bress@hsc.utah.edu. · School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL. ·Am J Kidney Dis · Pubmed #28396107.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Hypertension treatment in the elderly: a SPRINT to the finish. 2017

Parsons, Christine / Mookadam, Farouk / Mookadam, Martina. ·The Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 13400 E Shea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ, USA. · The Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, 13400 E Shea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ, USA. · The Department of Family Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 13400 E Shea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ, USA. ·Future Cardiol · Pubmed #28185469.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial How Can We Improve the Management of Patients with Hypertension? 2017

Alpert, Joseph S. ·University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson. Electronic address: jalpert@email.arizona.edu. ·Am J Med · Pubmed #27593607.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Hypertension Management: Ripe for Disruption. 2016

Hess, Paul L / Michael Ho, P. ·Cardiology Section, VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, CO Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO paul.hess@ucdenver.edu. · Cardiology Section, VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, CO Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO. ·J Am Heart Assoc · Pubmed #27792663.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial More HOPE for Prevention with Statins. 2016

Cushman, William C / Goff, David C. ·From the Preventive Medicine Section, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, TN (W.C.C.) · and the Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora (D.C.G.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #27039666.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial The Good and the Bad: Immune Cells and Hypertension. 2015

Hay, Meredith. ·From the Department of Physiology, Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute, Saver Heart Center, University of Arizona, Tucson. mhay@arizona.edu. ·Circ Res · Pubmed #26494923.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Reestablishing trust in the medical profession: making a significant impact on maternal mortality in the United States. 2014

Foley, Michael R. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, and the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. Electronic address: Mike.Foley@BannerHealth.com. ·Am J Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #24972528.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Hypertension self-management: a home run for patients and payers. 2014

Magid, David J / Farmer, Steven A. ·Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Colorado and Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Denver, CO. ·Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes · Pubmed #24619316.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Exploring the role of aldosterone in right ventricular function. 2014

Harrison, Alexis / Wilson, Brent D / Ryan, John J. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Electronic address: john.ryan@hsc.utah.edu. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #24461916.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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