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Hypertension: HELP
Articles from Houston
Based on 624 articles published since 2008
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These are the 624 published articles about Hypertension that originated from Houston during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous7910925 / Harvin, Howard J / Verma, Nupur / Nikolaidis, Paul / Hanley, Michael / Dogra, Vikram S / Goldfarb, Stanley / Gore, John L / Savage, Stephen J / Steigner, Michael L / Strax, Richard / Taffel, Myles T / Wong-You-Cheong, Jade J / Yoo, Don C / Remer, Erick M / Dill, Karin E / Lockhart, Mark E. ·Principal Author, Scottsdale Medical Imaging, Scottsdale, Arizona. Electronic address: h_harvin@yahoo.com. · Co-author, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. · Panel Vice Chair (Urologic), Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · Panel Vice Chair (Vascular), University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; American Society of Nephrology. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; American Urological Association. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; American Urological Association. · Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · George Washington University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia. · University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Rhode Island Medical Imaging Inc., East Providence, Rhode Island. · Specialty Chair (Urologic), Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Panel Chair (Vascular), UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts. · Panel Chair (Urologic), University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #29101991.

ABSTRACT: Renovascular hypertension is the most common type of secondary hypertension and is estimated to have a prevalence between 0.5% and 5% of the general hypertensive population, and an even higher prevalence among patients with severe hypertension and end-stage renal disease, approaching 25% in elderly dialysis patients. Investigation for renal artery stenosis is appropriate when clinical presentation suggests secondary hypertension rather than primary hypertension, when there is not another known cause of secondary hypertension, and when intervention would be carried out if a significant renal artery stenosis were identified. The primary imaging modalities used to screen for renal artery stenosis are CT, MRI, and ultrasound, with the selection of imaging dependent in part on renal function. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline for Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. 2017

Flynn, Joseph T / Kaelber, David C / Baker-Smith, Carissa M / Blowey, Douglas / Carroll, Aaron E / Daniels, Stephen R / de Ferranti, Sarah D / Dionne, Janis M / Falkner, Bonita / Flinn, Susan K / Gidding, Samuel S / Goodwin, Celeste / Leu, Michael G / Powers, Makia E / Rea, Corinna / Samuels, Joshua / Simasek, Madeline / Thaker, Vidhu V / Urbina, Elaine M / Anonymous5820916. ·Dr. Robert O. Hickman Endowed Chair in Pediatric Nephrology, Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington; joseph.flynn@seattlechildrens.org. · Departments of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, Case Western Reserve University and MetroHealth System, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Pediatric Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. · Children's Mercy Hospital, University of Missouri-Kansas City and Children's Mercy Integrated Care Solutions, Kansas City, Missouri. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado-Denver and Pediatrician in Chief, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. · Director, Preventive Cardiology Clinic, Boston Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia and British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Consultant, American Academy of Pediatrics, Washington, District of Columbia. · Cardiology Division Head, Nemours Cardiac Center, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware. · National Pediatric Blood Pressure Awareness Foundation, Prairieville, Louisiana. · Departments of Pediatrics and Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington, University of Washington Medicine and Information Technology Services, and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia. · Associate Director, General Academic Pediatric Fellowship, Staff Physician, Boston's Children's Hospital Primary Care at Longwood, Instructor, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, McGovern Medical School, University of Texas, Houston, Texas. · Pediatric Education, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Shadyside Family Medicine Residency, Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Division of Molecular Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and. · Preventive Cardiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #28827377.

ABSTRACT: These pediatric hypertension guidelines are an update to the 2004 "Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents." Significant changes in these guidelines include (1) the replacement of the term "prehypertension" with the term "elevated blood pressure," (2) new normative pediatric blood pressure (BP) tables based on normal-weight children, (3) a simplified screening table for identifying BPs needing further evaluation, (4) a simplified BP classification in adolescents ≥13 years of age that aligns with the forthcoming American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology adult BP guidelines, (5) a more limited recommendation to perform screening BP measurements only at preventive care visits, (6) streamlined recommendations on the initial evaluation and management of abnormal BPs, (7) an expanded role for ambulatory BP monitoring in the diagnosis and management of pediatric hypertension, and (8) revised recommendations on when to perform echocardiography in the evaluation of newly diagnosed hypertensive pediatric patients (generally only before medication initiation), along with a revised definition of left ventricular hypertrophy. These guidelines include 30 Key Action Statements and 27 additional recommendations derived from a comprehensive review of almost 15 000 published articles between January 2004 and July 2016. Each Key Action Statement includes level of evidence, benefit-harm relationship, and strength of recommendation. This clinical practice guideline, endorsed by the American Heart Association, is intended to foster a patient- and family-centered approach to care, reduce unnecessary and costly medical interventions, improve patient diagnoses and outcomes, support implementation, and provide direction for future research.

3 Editorial Renal denervation: Are we on the right path? 2017

Denktas, Ali E / Paniagua, David / Jneid, Hani. ·Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. ali.denktas@bcm.edu. · Director of Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA. · site Principal Investigator for the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 Trial. · Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Director of Structural Heart Disease Interventions, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of Interventional Cardiology Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Director of Interventional Cardiology, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Cleve Clin J Med · Pubmed #28885900.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial "All hands on deck": An imperative for tackling hypertension in South Asia. 2017

Samad, Zainab / Merchant, Anwar T / Narula, Jagat S / Virani, Salim S. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; WJB Dorn VA Medical Center, Columbia, SC, USA. · Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, USA. · Section of Cardiology, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA; Section of Cardiovascular Research, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address: virani@bcm.edu. ·Indian Heart J · Pubmed #28822505.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Hypertension: Does Polypharmacy Lead to Nonadherence or Nonadherence to Polypharmacy? 2017

Hyman, David J. ·From the Section of General Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. dhyman@bcm.edu. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #28461603.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Controlling Hypertension: We Have the Tools-We Just Need to Use Them. 2017

Hyman, David J / Pavlik, Valory. ·Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. dhyman@bcm.edu. · Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. ·J Gen Intern Med · Pubmed #28455646.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Hypertension Treatment and Outcomes in the Era of Population Health, Coordinated Care, and Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). 2017

Phillips, Robert A. ·From Houston Methodist, Houston, TX and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY. raphillips@houstonmethodist.org. ·Circulation · Pubmed #28438804.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Blood Pressure Variability: Insights From "Big Data". 2016

Krakoff, Lawrence R / Phillips, Robert A. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: Lawrence.krakoff@mountsinai.org. · Houston Methodist, Houston, Texas; Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27659459.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial NTD and NCD Co-morbidities: The Example of Dengue Fever. 2016

Mehta, Priyanka / Hotez, Peter J. ·Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development, National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · Department of Biology, Baylor University, Waco, Texas, United States of America. · James A Baker III Institute for Public Policy, Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, United States of America. ·PLoS Negl Trop Dis · Pubmed #27561091.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial The Global Burden of Cardiovascular Disease. 2016

Moodie, Douglas S. ·Associate Chief of Cardiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Professor of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, 6621 Fannin Street MC, 19345-C, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ·Congenit Heart Dis · Pubmed #27273932.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial "Translational" medicine: transforming SPRINT findings into clinical practice. 2016

Sica, Domenic A / Phillips, Robert A / White, William B / Bisognano, John D / Townsend, Raymond R. ·Section of Clinical Pharmacology and Hypertension, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, VA, USA. · Institute of Academic Medicine, Houston Methodist, Houston, TX, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · Calhoun Cardiology Center, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA. · Cardiology Division, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: townsend@upenn.edu. ·J Am Soc Hypertens · Pubmed #27155246.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial A revisit on the renin-angiotensin system in cardiovascular biology. 2016

Yu Tian, Xiao / Ma, Shuangtao / Huang, Yu / Wong, Wing Tak. ·Institute of Vascular Medicine, Shenzhen Research Institute, Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Institute for Academic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX. · Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Institute for Academic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX. · Institute of Vascular Medicine, Shenzhen Research Institute, Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Institute for Academic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY. Electronic address: wwong@houstonmethodist.org. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #26212445.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Emerging Concepts in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Hypertension in the SPRINT Era. 2015

Phillips, Robert A. ·Houston Methodist, Houston, Texas. ·Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J · Pubmed #27057287.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Seeking best medical treatment for hyperacute intracerebral hemorrhage. 2015

Toyoda, Kazunori / Grotta, James C. ·From the Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine (K.T.), National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Japan · and Memorial Hermann Hospital (J.C.G.), Houston, TX. ·Neurology · Pubmed #25552577.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial A relative rise in blood pressure from 18 to 30 weeks' gestation is associated with reduced fetal growth and lower gestational age at delivery: much ado about nothing? 2014

Sibai, Baha M. ·From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Science, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston. Baha.M.Sibai@uth.tmc.edu. ·Hypertension · Pubmed #24821947.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Review Impaired Hypothalamic Regulation of Sympathetic Outflow in Primary Hypertension. 2019

Zhou, Jing-Jing / Ma, Hui-Jie / Shao, Jian-Ying / Pan, Hui-Lin / Li, De-Pei. ·Division of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Department of Physiology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, 050011, China. · Department of Medicine, Center for Precision Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 65212, USA. lidep@health.missouri.edu. ·Neurosci Bull · Pubmed #30506315.

ABSTRACT: The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is a crucial region involved in maintaining homeostasis through the regulation of cardiovascular, neuroendocrine, and other functions. The PVN provides a dominant source of excitatory drive to the sympathetic outflow through innervation of the brainstem and spinal cord in hypertension. We discuss current findings on the role of the PVN in the regulation of sympathetic output in both normotensive and hypertensive conditions. The PVN seems to play a major role in generating the elevated sympathetic vasomotor activity that is characteristic of multiple forms of hypertension, including primary hypertension in humans. Recent studies in the spontaneously hypertensive rat model have revealed an imbalance of inhibitory and excitatory synaptic inputs to PVN pre-sympathetic neurons as indicated by impaired inhibitory and enhanced excitatory synaptic inputs in hypertension. This imbalance of inhibitory and excitatory synaptic inputs in the PVN forms the basis for elevated sympathetic outflow in hypertension. In this review, we discuss the disruption of balance between glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs and the associated cellular and molecular alterations as mechanisms underlying the hyperactivity of PVN pre-sympathetic neurons in hypertension.

17 Review Pediatric Hypertension: Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment. 2019

Guzman-Limon, Monica / Samuels, Joshua. ·Division of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center, 6431 Fannin Street, MSB 3-121, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Division of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center, 6431 Fannin Street, MSB 3-121, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: Joshua.A.Samuels@uth.tmc.edu. ·Pediatr Clin North Am · Pubmed #30454750.

ABSTRACT: The etiology of hypertension in children and adolescents is varied; however, the prevalence of pediatric primary hypertension is increasing. Early identification and appropriate management of hypertension in children and adolescents is important to prevent the development of hypertensive end organ disease. The 2017 American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents provide a comprehensive reference for evaluation and management of hypertension in this age group and should be used when assessing patients with elevated blood pressure and hypertension.

18 Review Temporal Frame of Immune Cell Infiltration during Heart Failure Establishment: Lessons from Animal Models. 2018

Brenes-Castro, David / Castillo, Elena C / Vázquez-Garza, Eduardo / Torre-Amione, Guillermo / García-Rivas, Gerardo. ·Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Cátedra de Cardiología y Medicina Vascular, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64849, Mexico. dbrenesc@gmail.com. · Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Cátedra de Cardiología y Medicina Vascular, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64849, Mexico. ecgonzalez@itesm.mx. · Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Cátedra de Cardiología y Medicina Vascular, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64849, Mexico. EduardoVzGz@itesm.mx. · Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Cátedra de Cardiología y Medicina Vascular, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64849, Mexico. gtorre@tecsalud.mx. · Tecnologico de Monterrey, Hospital Zambrano Hellion, TecSalud, Centro de Investigación Biomédica, San Pedro Garza García, Nuevo León 66278, Mexico. gtorre@tecsalud.mx. · Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, The Methodist Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX 77030, USA. gtorre@tecsalud.mx. · Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Cátedra de Cardiología y Medicina Vascular, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64849, Mexico. gdejesus@itesm.mx. · Tecnologico de Monterrey, Hospital Zambrano Hellion, TecSalud, Centro de Investigación Biomédica, San Pedro Garza García, Nuevo León 66278, Mexico. gdejesus@itesm.mx. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #30467294.

ABSTRACT: Heart failure (HF) is a cardiovascular syndrome characterized by maladaptive changes with an underlying inflammatory mediated pathogenesis. Nevertheless, current therapy is aimed at the heart workload and neurohormonal axis; thus, prognosis remains poor. To continue improving treatment, we rely on murine models for a better understanding of HF pathophysiology. Among them, pressure overload HF (PO-HF) animal models are a common strategy. Development of PO-HF is characterized by monocyte infiltration, which orchestrates a cascade of events leading to sustained inflammation and maladaptive changes. Here, we divide the PO-HF model progression into four phases and describe the inflammatory, structural, and gene expression profiles. This division is relevant due to its similarities with clinical hypertensive heart disease progression to HF. Evidence shows improvement in hemodynamic and other local parameters by altering the inflammatory response in a specific immune response at a specific point of time. Thus, it is relevant to focus on the time-dependent immune response interaction in order to provide more effective therapy. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of PO-HF murine models, highlighting the inflammatory events in a time frame view. By this approach, we expect to provide researchers with a better understanding of the intertwining time-dependent events that occur in PO-HF.

19 Review Dimerization of AT 2018

Patel, Sanket / Hussain, Tahir. ·Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, Health 2, Room 3046, 4849 Calhoun Street, Houston, TX, 77204-5000, USA. · Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, Health 2, Room 3046, 4849 Calhoun Street, Houston, TX, 77204-5000, USA. thussain@central.uh.edu. ·Curr Hypertens Rep · Pubmed #29717388.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT RECENT FINDINGS: Accumulating evidences show that AT

20 Review Interventions in children with renovascular hypertension: A 27-year retrospective single-center experience. 2018

Agrawal, Hitesh / Moodie, Douglas / Qureshi, Athar M / Acosta, Alisa A / Hernandez, Jose A / Braun, Michael C / Justino, Henri. ·Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, Lillie Frank Abercrombie Section of Cardiology, Houston, Texas. · Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, C. E. Mullins Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories, Houston, Texas. · Renal Section, Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Interventional Radiology Section, Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. ·Congenit Heart Dis · Pubmed #29635838.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Renovascular hypertension (RVH) can be caused by renal artery stenosis (RAS) and/or middle aortic syndrome (MAS). METHODS: Patients who received surgical or transcatheter treatment for RVH between 1/1991 and 11/2017 were retrospectively reviewed using age = adjusted blood pressure ratio (BPR). RESULTS: Fifty-three patients diagnosed with RVH at a median age of 4.5 (0-18) years were included. Vascular involvement ranged from MAS with RAS (20), RAS only (32), and MAS only (1). The first intervention was transcatheter in 47 patients (transcatheter group: angioplasty = 41, stenting = 5, and thrombectomy = 1), and surgical in 6 patients (surgical group), occurring at a median age of 6.2 (0.1-19.6) years. There was a change toward transcatheter interventions as the first procedure over the study period. First reinterventions in the transcatheter group (27 lesions in 18 patients) were repeat transcatheter (in 20 lesions) and surgery (7 lesions) at a median of 92 (2-2555) days; in the surgical group (5 lesions in 4 patients) first reinterventions were transcatheter (4 lesions) and repeat surgery (1) at a median of 2.2 (1.1-12.0) years. A total of 136 transcatheter and 30 surgical discrete interventions were performed. There was a significant decline in antihypertensive medications and BPR at 4-6 months after the first intervention and on last follow-up in patients initially treated by transcatheter means while the decline was not significant in the surgical group (limited by small sample size). Complications were significantly more common in the surgical group (P < .01), 11/27 (41%) vs 10/136 (7.4%). Four patients died (2 from each group): 2 with congenital renal artery atresia and MAS, 2 with MAS and RAS. The median follow-up interval was 3.6 (0.1-35.2) years. CONCLUSION: Pediatric patients with RVH treated with transcatheter means as the first intervention had significant improvement in BPR, as well as decline in antihypertensive medications and were less likely to suffer major complications.

21 Review Novel Biomarkers to Detect Target Organ Damage in Acute Hypertension. 2018

Boone, Stephen / Kuo, Dick. ·Departments of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 1504 Taub Loop, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. Stephen.Boone@bcm.edu. · Department of Emergency Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 1504 Taub Loop, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. ·Curr Hypertens Rep · Pubmed #29556795.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Early lowering of blood pressure is advised for patients with severe hypertension associated with signs of impending or progressive organ damage, whereas aggressive treatment is not recommended in patients with asymptomatic severe hypertension. As treatment goals for asymptomatic hypertension and true hypertensive emergency drastically differ, it is essential to identify patients with evidence of impending or progressive organ damage. Biomarkers may assist providers in identifying high-risk patients who would benefit from early blood pressure reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: In this review, we discuss both currently available and investigational biomarkers that may help identify patients who might benefit from more aggressive therapy. We focus on serum and urinary biomarkers associated with acute cardiovascular, renal, and cerebrovascular damage. There is a dearth of literature regarding the use of biomarkers to assess acute hypertension-related target organ damage. We are primarily forced to draw conclusions on the use of biomarkers from studies of related conditions such as acute heart failure. Further research is needed on the clinical significance of abnormal levels of novel biomarkers of renal, cardiac, and cerebral dysfunction in the setting of severe hypertension, particularly in those patients without overt clinical signs of organ failure.

22 Review Thiamine and Cardiovascular Disease: A Literature Review. 2018

DiNicolantonio, James J / Liu, Jing / O'Keefe, James H. ·Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, United States. Electronic address: jjdinicol@gmail.com. · Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, United States. · Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, United States. ·Prog Cardiovasc Dis · Pubmed #29360523.

ABSTRACT: Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin that plays an important role in the energy metabolism in the human body. Deficiency in thiamine can lead to neurological abnormalities and congestive heart failure (HF), known as dry beriberi and wet beriberi respectively. Several populations are at higher risk for thiamine deficiency, most notably persons with chronic alcoholism. This article aims to provide a review of current literature on the role of thiamine in the human body, the current scope of thiamine deficiency, and explore the specific effects of thiamine deficiency and supplementation on the cardiovascular system. HF as a result of thiamine deficiency can have non-specific presentations, often leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Having an understanding of pathophysiology of thiamine deficiency and considering thiamine deficiency as one of the differentials in patients with new onset HF of unknown etiology with the appropriate risk factors is important in clinical practice.

23 Review Monogenic Hypertension in Children: A Review With Emphasis on Genetics. 2017

Aggarwal, Anjali / Rodriguez-Buritica, David. ·Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX. · Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX. Electronic address: David.F.RodriguezBuritica@uth.tmc.edu. ·Adv Chronic Kidney Dis · Pubmed #29229168.

ABSTRACT: Hypertension (HT) is a public health problem in children particularly related to the epidemic of overweight and obesity. Monogenic forms of HT are important in the differential diagnosis in children presenting with severe or refractory HT, who have a family history of early-onset HT, unusual physical examination findings, and/or characteristic hormonal and biochemical abnormalities. Most genetic defects in these disorders ultimately result in increased sodium transport in the distal nephron resulting in volume expansion and HT. Genetic testing, which is increasingly available, has diagnostic, therapeutic, and predictive implications for families affected by these rare conditions.

24 Review Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A review of pathogenesis and pathophysiology. 2017

Kalikkot Thekkeveedu, Renjithkumar / Guaman, Milenka Cuevas / Shivanna, Binoy. ·Section of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Mississippi, Jackson, MS, USA. · Section of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Section of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address: shivanna@bcm.edu. ·Respir Med · Pubmed #29229093.

ABSTRACT: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease of primarily premature infants that results from an imbalance between lung injury and repair in the developing lung. BPD is the most common respiratory morbidity in preterm infants, which affects nearly 10, 000 neonates each year in the United States. Over the last two decades, the incidence of BPD has largely been unchanged; however, the pathophysiology has changed with the substantial improvement in the respiratory management of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. Here we have attempted to comprehensively review and summarize the current literature on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of BPD. Our goal is to provide insight to help further progress in preventing and managing severe BPD in the ELBW infants.

25 Review Blood Pressure Parameters and their Associations with Death in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease. 2017

Qureshi, Samaya / Lorch, Robert / Navaneethan, Sankar D. ·Selzman Institute for Kidney Health, Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Selzman Institute for Kidney Health, Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. Sankar.Navaneethan@bcm.edu. · Section of Nephrology, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA. Sankar.Navaneethan@bcm.edu. ·Curr Hypertens Rep · Pubmed #29046987.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Optimal blood pressure (BP) parameters among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been a matter of debate. This review critically evaluates recent literature to better define the associations of BP parameters and death among individuals with non-dialysis-dependent CKD. RECENT FINDINGS: Observational studies report a "U- or J-shaped" association between BP and all-cause mortality in CKD and caution-intensive BP lowering in the elderly. Causes of death have been evaluated in a recent report noting higher cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular/non-malignant-related mortality among CKD population with SBP < 110 and > 150 mmHg. Very few randomized control trials evaluated the impact of different BP targets on patient-centered outcomes in those with CKD. Recently published SPRINT trial results suggest that intensive SBP control (<120 mm Hg) reduces cardiovascular events and all-cause death among non-diabetic patients with and without CKD. Clinical trial evidence supports lower BP target in those with mild to moderate non-diabetic CKD. However, clinical trials are warranted to further determine the beneficial effects of intensive blood pressure control in diabetic CKD population. In elderly population with CKD, BP targets might need to be individualized based on their comorbidities, life expectancy, and other factors.

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