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Infertility HELP
Based on 21,983 articles published since 2010
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These are the 21983 published articles about Infertility that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline A Chinese practice guideline of the assisted reproductive technology strategies for women with advanced age. 2019

Jiang, Li / Chen, Yaolong / Wang, Qi / Wang, Xiaoqin / Luo, Xufei / Chen, Junqiao / Han, Hongjing / Sun, Yingpu / Shen, Huan / Anonymous1231027. ·Reproductive Medicine Center, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China. · Evidence-Based Medicine Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu, China. · Chinese GRADE Center, Lanzhou, China. · WHO Collaborating Centre for Guideline Implementation and Knowledge Translation, Lanzhou, China. · Health Policy PhD Program, Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. · McMaster Health Forum, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. · Faculty of Science, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal. · Reproductive Medicine Center, Zhengzhou University First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou, Henan, China. ·J Evid Based Med · Pubmed #31144467.

ABSTRACT: More women postpone childbearing nowadays while female fertility begins to decline with advancing age. Furthermore, with the rolling out of the two-child policy, there is a huge demand for a second child for Chinese aged women. There are various assisted reproductive technology (ART) strategies applied for age-related infertility without solid evidence. On behalf of the Society of Reproductive Medicine, Chinese Medical Association, we would like to develop a Chinese guideline of ART strategies for age-related infertility. This guideline was produced following the recommendations for standard guidelines described in the 2012 WHO Handbook for guideline development. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) framework was also followed. A protocol was formulated and a Guideline Development Group was formed with specialists of reproductive medicine, methodologists from Chinese GRADE working group, and patient representative. Questions regarding the ART strategies for aged infertility were formulated and 8 most important ones were chosen to be structured in PICO format (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes). Comprehensive search and review of the literature were performed and the quality of the evidence was assessed and rated based on certain criteria and be categorized as high, moderate, low, or very low. Twenty-five recommendations were formulated among members of the Guidelines Development Group (Delphi method) basing on the overall quality of the evidence, in addition to the balance between benefits and harms, values and preferences, and resource implications. The final recommendations were agreed on by consensus during face-to-face meetings. This is the first Chinese practice guideline in reproductive medicine developed following the standard and scientific method.

2 Guideline AIUM Practice Parameter for the Performance of a Focused Ultrasound Examination in Reproductive Endocrinology and Female Infertility. 2019

Anonymous31300979. · ·J Ultrasound Med · Pubmed #30758891.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Management of nonobstructive azoospermia: a committee opinion. 2018

Anonymous1570971. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #30503112.

ABSTRACT: The management of nonobstructive azoospermia in the context of fertility treatment is discussed. This document replaces the ASRM document titled "Evaluation of azoospermia," last published in 2008.

4 Guideline Translation and implementation of the Australian-led PCOS guideline: clinical summary and translation resources from the International Evidence-based Guideline for the Assessment and Management of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. 2018

Teede, Helena J / Misso, Marie L / Boyle, Jacqueline A / Garad, Rhonda M / McAllister, Veryan / Downes, Linda / Gibson, Melanie / Hart, Roger J / Rombauts, Luk / Moran, Lisa / Dokras, Anuja / Laven, Joop / Piltonen, Terhi / Rodgers, Raymond J / Thondan, Mala / Costello, Michael F / Norman, Robert J / Anonymous24360969. ·National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in PCOS, Monash and Adelaide Universities, Melbourne, VIC helena.teedee@monash.edu. · National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in PCOS, Monash and Adelaide Universities, Melbourne, VIC. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC. · Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Obstetrics and Gynecology, PEDEGO Research Unit, Medical Research Centre, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. · Harp Family Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #30453865.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: We have developed the first international evidence-based guideline for the diagnosis and management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), with an integrated translation program incorporating resources for health professionals and consumers. The development process involved an extensive Australian-led international and multidisciplinary collaboration of health professionals and consumers over 2 years. The guideline is approved by the National Health and Medical Research Council and aims to support both health professionals and women with PCOS in improving care, health outcomes and quality of life. A robust evaluation process will enable practice benchmarking and feedback to further inform evidence-based practice. We propose that this methodology could be used in developing and implementing guidelines for other women's health conditions and beyond. Main recommendations: The recommendations cover the following broad areas: diagnosis, screening and risk assessment depending on life stage; emotional wellbeing; healthy lifestyle; pharmacological treatment for non-fertility indications; and assessment and treatment of infertility. Changes in management as a result of this guideline: •Diagnosis:▪when the combination of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction is present, ultrasound examination of the ovaries is not necessary for diagnosis of PCOS in adult women;▪requires the combination of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction in young women within 8 years of menarche, with ultrasound examination of the ovaries not recommended, owing to the overlap with normal ovarian physiology; and▪adolescents with some clinical features of PCOS, but without a clear diagnosis, should be regarded as "at risk" and receive follow-up assessment.•Screening for metabolic complications has been refined and incorporates both PCOS status and additional metabolic risk factors.•Treatment of infertility: letrozole is now first line treatment for infertility as it improves live birth rates while reducing multiple pregnancies compared with clomiphene citrate.

5 Guideline European Academy of Andrology guideline Management of oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia. 2018

Colpi, G M / Francavilla, S / Haidl, G / Link, K / Behre, H M / Goulis, D G / Krausz, C / Giwercman, A. ·Department of Andrology and IVF, San Carlo Clinic, Paderno-Dugnano/Milano, Italy. · Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila, Italy. · Department of Dermatology/Andrology Unit, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · Department of Translational Medicine and Reproductive Medicine Centre, Lunds University and Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. · Center for Reproductive Medicine and Andrology, University Hospital, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. · Unit of Reproductive Endocrinology, 1st Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences 'Mario Serio', Centre of Excellence DeNothe, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. ·Andrology · Pubmed #30134082.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia is frequently reported in men from infertile couples. Its etiology remains, in the majority of cases, unknown with a variety of factors to contribute to its pathogenesis. The aim of this European Academy of Andrology guideline was to provide an overview of these factors and to discuss available management options. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PubMed was searched for papers in English for articles with search terms: male infertility and oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia. For evidence-based recommendations, the GRADE system was applied. Issues related to urogenital infections/inflammations have not been included in this document as they will be covered by separate guidelines. RESULTS: For men with oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia, the European Academy of Andrology recommends: A general physical examination to assess signs of hypogonadism. A scrotal physical examination to assess (i) the testes and epididymes for volume and consistency, (ii) deferent ducts for total or partial absence, and (iii) occurrence of varicocoele. Performing two semen analyses, according to World Health Organization guidelines to define an oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia. An endocrine evaluation. A scrotal ultrasound as part of routine investigation. Karyotype analysis and assessment of Yq microdeletions in infertile men with a sperm concentration ≤5 × 10 CONCLUSION: These guidelines can be applied in clinical work and indicate future research needs.

6 Guideline No. 362-Ovulation Induction in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. 2018

Smithson, David S / Vause, Tannys D R / Cheung, Anthony P. ·Edmonton, AB. · Ottawa, ON. · Vancouver, BC. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #29921434.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review current non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for ovulation induction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). OPTIONS: This guideline reviews the evidence for the various options for ovulation induction in PCOS. OUTCOMES: Ovulation, pregnancy and live birth rates, risks, and side effects are the outcomes of interest. EVIDENCE: Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words spanning from 2000 to 2016. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and of health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. VALUES: The evidence gathered was reviewed and evaluated by the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. The quality of evidence was quantified using the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. BENEFITS, HARMS, AND COSTS: Benefits include weight reduction and improvements in ovulation, pregnancy, and live birth rates. Potential harms include medication side effects and multiple pregnancies. VALIDATION: These guidelines have been reviewed and approved by the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Committee of the SOGC. CONCLUSION: First line management of infertility once a diagnosis of PCOS is made should include weight loss and exercise with goals to below class 2 obesity (BMI <35 kg/m SPONSOR: The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.

7 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 194: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. 2018

Anonymous880948. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #29794677.

ABSTRACT: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. Its etiology remains unknown, and treatment is largely symptom based and empirical. PCOS has the potential to cause substantial metabolic sequelae, including an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and these factors should be considered when determining long-term treatment. The purpose of this document is to examine the best available evidence for the diagnosis and clinical management of PCOS.

8 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 194 Summary: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. 2018

Anonymous810948. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #29794670.

ABSTRACT: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. Its etiology remains unknown, and treatment is largely symptom based and empirical. PCOS has the potential to cause substantial metabolic sequelae, including an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and these factors should be considered when determining long-term treatment. The purpose of this document is to examine the best available evidence for the diagnosis and clinical management of PCOS.

9 Guideline Recommendations regarding the genetic and immunological study of reproductive dysfunction. 2018

Alonso-Cerezo, María Concepción / Calero Ruiz, Mercedes / Chantada-Abal, Venancio / de la Fuente-Hernández, Luis Alfonso / García-Cobaleda, Inmaculada / García-Ochoa, Carlos / García-Sagredo, José Miguel / Nuñez, Rocío / Oliva, Rafael / Orera-Clemente, María / Pintado-Vera, David / Sanchez-Ramon, Silvia. ·Asociación Española de Biopatología Médica-Medicina de Laboratorio, Madrid, España; Genética Clínica, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria, Madrid, España. · Asociación Española del Laboratorio Clínico, Madrid, España; UGC Intercentros Laboratorio Clínicos, Hospital Universitario Puerta del Mar, Cádiz, España. · Asociación Española de Urología, Madrid, España; Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña, A Coruña, España. · Sociedad Española de Fertilidad, Madrid, España; Instituto Europeo de Fertilidad, Madrid, España. · Sociedad Española de Medicina de Laboratorio, Barcelona, España; Hospital Universitario Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España. · Centro de Fertilización in Vitro de Asturias, Oviedo, España. · Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España; Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Reproducción, Clínica Tambre, Madrid, España. · Asociación Española de Andrología, Córdoba, España; Unidad de Genética, Departamento de Biomedicina, Facultad de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Barcelona, Servicio de Genética y Biología Molecular, Hospital Clínico de Barcelona, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, España. · Asociación Española de Genética Humana, Madrid, España; Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, España. · Sociedad Española de Ginecología y Obstetricia, Madrid, España; Sección de Esterilidad e Infertilidad, Hospital Quirón, Pamplona, España. · Sociedad Española de Inmunología, Barcelona, España; Servicio de Inmunología, Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid, España. ·Med Clin (Barc) · Pubmed #29680457.

ABSTRACT: In this article several members of diverse scientific associations and reproduction experts from Spain have updated different genetic and immunological procedure recommendations in couples affected by reproductive dysfunction with the goal of providing a set of useful guidelines for the clinic. The laboratory test has been considered as highly recommendable for making clinical decisions when the result of the diagnostic test is relevant, moderately recommendable when the results are of limited evidence because they are inconsistent, and low when the benefit of the test is uncertain. It is expected that these recommendations will provide some useful guidelines for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of couples presenting reproductive dysfunction.

10 Guideline [First line management without IVF of infertility related to endometriosis: Result of medical therapy? Results of ovarian superovulation? Results of intrauterine insemination? CNGOF-HAS Endometriosis Guidelines]. 2018

Boujenah, J / Santulli, P / Mathieu-d'Argent, E / Decanter, C / Chauffour, C / Poncelet, P. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Bondy, avenue du 14-Juillet, 93140 Bondy, France; Centre médical du Château, 22, rue Louis-Besquel, 94300 Vincennes, France. Electronic address: jeremy.boujenah@gmail.com. · Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Équipe génomique, épigénétique et physiopathologie de la reproduction, département développement, reproduction, cancer, Inserm U1016, université Paris-Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-Médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Tenon, AP-HP, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France; Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, 75005 Paris, France; GRC6-UPMC : centre expert en endométriose (C3E), hôpital Tenon, 75020 Paris, France. · Service d'assistance médicale à la procréation et de préservation de la fertilité, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, 1, rue Eugène-Avinée, 59037 Lille cedex, France; EA 4308 gamétogenèse et qualité du gamète, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et reproduction humaine, CHU Estaing, 1, place Lucie-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, centre hospitalier Renée-Dubos, 6, avenue de l'Île-de-France, 95300 Pontoise, France; Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR SMBH, 93022 Bobigny, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29551300.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Using the structured methodology of French guidelines (HAS-CNGOF), the aim of this chapter was to formulate good practice points (GPP), in relation to optimal non-ART management of endometriosis related to infertility, based on the best available evidence in the literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This guideline was produced by a group of experts in the field including a thorough systematic search of the literature (from January 1980 to March 2017). Were included only women with endometriosis related to infertility. For each recommendation, a grade (A-D, where A is the highest quality) was assigned based on the strength of the supporting evidence. RESULTS: Management of endometriosis related to infertility should be multidisciplinary and take account into the pain, the global evaluation of infertile couple and the different phenotypes of endometriotic lesions (good practice point). Hormonal treatment for suppression of ovarian function should not prescribe to improve fertility (grade A). After laproscopy for endometriosis related to infertility, the Endometriosis Fertility Index should be used to counsel patients regarding duration of conventional treatments before undergoing ART (grade C). After laparoscopy surgery for infertile women with AFS/ASRM stage I/II endometriosis or superficial peritoneal endometriosis, controlled ovarian stimulation with or without intrauterine insemination could be used to enhance non-ART pregnancy rate (grade C). Gonadotrophins should be the first line therapy for the stimulation (grade B). The number of cycles before referring ART should not exceed up to 6 cycles (good practice point). No recommendation can be performed for non-ART management of deep infiltrating endometriosis or endometrioma, as suitable evidence is lacking. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Non-ART management is a possible option for the management of endometriosis related to infertility. Endometriosis Fertilty Index could be a useful tool for subsequent postoperative fertility management. Controlled ovarian stimulation can be proposed.

11 Guideline [Management of endometriosis: CNGOF-HAS practice guidelines (short version)]. 2018

Collinet, P / Fritel, X / Revel-Delhom, C / Ballester, M / Bolze, P A / Borghese, B / Bornsztein, N / Boujenah, J / Bourdel, N / Brillac, T / Chabbert-Buffet, N / Chauffour, C / Clary, N / Cohen, J / Decanter, C / Denouël, A / Dubernard, G / Fauconnier, A / Fernandez, H / Gauthier, T / Golfier, F / Huchon, C / Legendre, G / Loriau, J / Mathieu-d'Argent, E / Merlot, B / Niro, J / Panel, P / Paparel, P / Philip, C A / Ploteau, S / Poncelet, C / Rabischong, B / Roman, H / Rubod, C / Santulli, P / Sauvan, M / Thomassin-Naggara, I / Torre, A / Wattier, J M / Yazbeck, C / Canis, M. ·Clinique de gynécologie, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, 59000 Lille, France; Université Lille-Nord-de-France, 59000 Lille, France. Electronic address: pierre.collinet@chru-lille.fr. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, Inserm CIC 1402, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers, France; Université de Poitiers, 86000 Poitiers, France; Inserm CIC 1402, 86000 Poitiers, France. · Haute Autorité de santé, 5, avenue du Stade-de-France, 93218 La Plaine-Saint-Denis cedex, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Tenon, AP-HP, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Service de chirurgie gynécologique oncologique, obstétrique, CHU Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite, France; Université Claude-Bernard-Lyon 1, 69000 Lyon, France. · Service de chirurgie gynécologie-obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Équipe génomique, épigénétique et physiopathologie de la reproduction, département développement, reproduction, cancer, Inserm U1016, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-Médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. · 29, rue de l'Essonne, 91000 Evry, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Bondy, avenue du 14-Juillet, 93140 Bondy, France; Centre médical du Château, 22, rue Louis-Besquel, 94300 Vincennes, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et reproduction humaine, CHU Estaing, 1, place Lucie-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France; Faculté de médecine, Encov-ISIT, UMR6284 CNRS, université d'Auvergne, 28, place Henri-Dunant, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · 98, route de Blagnac, 31200 Toulouse, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Tenon, AP-HP, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France; GRC-6 centre expert en endométriose (C3E), Sorbonne université, Paris, France; UMR-S938 Inserm Sorbonne université, Paris, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et reproduction humaine, CHU Estaing, 1, place Lucie-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · 3, rue Pablo-Picasso, 92160 Antony, France. · Service d'assistance médicale à la procréation et de préservation de la fertilité, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, 1, rue Eugène-Avinée, 59037 Lille cedex, France; EA 4308 gamétogenèse et qualité du gamète, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · EndoFrance, BP 50053, 01124 Montluel cedex, France. · Université Claude-Bernard-Lyon 1, 69000 Lyon, France; Clinique gynécologique et obstétricale, hôpital de la Croix-Rousse, groupe hospitalier Nord, CHU de Lyon-HCL, 103, grande rue de la Croix-Rousse, 69317 Lyon cedex, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHI Poissy-St-Germain, 10, rue du Champ-Gaillard, 78303 Poissy, France; EA 7285 risques cliniques et sécurité en santé des femmes, université Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Bicêtre, AP-HP, 78, avenue du Général-de-Gaulle, 94275 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; CESP-INSERM, U1018, équipe épidémiologie et évaluation des stratégies de prise en charge, VIH, reproduction, pédiatrie, université Paris-Sud, Paris, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpital Mère-Enfant, CHU de Limoges, 8, avenue Dominique-Larrey, 87042 Limoges, France; UMR-1248, faculté de médecine, 87042 Limoges, France. · Service de chirurgie gynécologique oncologique, obstétrique, CHU Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHI Poissy-St-Germain, 10, rue du Champ-Gaillard, 78303 Poissy, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU d'Angers, 4, rue Larrey, 49033 Angers cedex 01, France; CESP-Inserm, U1018, équipe 7, genre, santé sexuelle et reproductive, université Paris-Sud, 94276 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre cedex, France. · Service de chirurgie digestive, groupe hospitalier Paris Saint-Joseph, 185, rue Raymond-Losserand, 75001 Paris, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Tenon, AP-HP, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France; Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, Paris, France; GRC6-UPMC, centre expert en endométriose (C3E), hôpital Tenon, Paris, France. · Service de chirurgie gynécologique, clinique Tivoli, 220, rue Mandron, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, centre hospitalier de Versailles, 177, route de Versailles, 78157 Le Chesnay cedex, France. · Service d'urologie, CHU Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 60495 Pierre-Bénite, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, hôpital Mère-Enfant, CHU de Nantes, 8, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44093 Nantes, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, centre hospitalier Renée-Dubos, 6, avenue de l'Île-de-France, 95300 Pontoise, France; Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR SMBH, 93022 Bobigny, France. · Centre expert de diagnostic et prise en charge multidisciplinaire de l'endométriose, clinique gynécologique et obstétricale, CHU Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France. · Clinique de gynécologie, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, 59000 Lille, France; Université Lille-Nord-de-France, 59000 Lille, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Bicêtre, AP-HP, 78, avenue du Général-de-Gaulle, 94275 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Service d'imagerie, hôpital Tenon, AP-HP, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France; Sorbonne universités, UPMC université Paris 06, Paris, France; Institut universitaire de cancérologie, Assistance publique, Paris, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, hôpital Arnaud-de-Villeneuve, CHU de Montpellier, 371, avenue du Doyen-Gaston-Giraud, 34295 Montpellier, France. · Centre d'étude et traitement de la douleur, hôpital Claude-Huriez, CHRU de Lille, rue Michel-Polonowski, 59000 Lille, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpital Foch, AP-HP, 40, rue Worth, 92151 Suresnes, France; Centre d'assistance médicale à la procréation, clinique Pierre-Cherest, 5, rue Pierre-Cherest, 92200 Neuilly-Sur-Seine, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29550339.

ABSTRACT: First-line investigations to diagnose endometriosis are clinical examination and pelvic ultrasound. Second-line investigations include pelvic examination performed by a referent clinician, transvaginal ultrasound performed by a referent echographist, and pelvic MRI. It is recommended to treat endometriosis when it is symptomatic. First-line hormonal treatments recommended for the management of painful endometriosis are combined with hormonal contraceptives or levonorgestrel 52mg IUD. There is no evidence to recommend systematic preoperative hormonal therapy for the unique purpose of preventing the risk of surgical complications or facilitating surgery. After endometriosis surgery, combined hormonal contraceptives or levonorgestrel SIU 52mg are recommended as first-line therapy in the absence of desire of pregnancy. In case of initial treatment failure, recurrence, or multiple organ involvement by endometriosis, medico-surgical and multidisciplinary discussion is recommended. The laparoscopic approach is recommended for the surgical treatment of endometriosis. HRT may be offered in postmenopausal women operated for endometriosis. In case of infertility related to endometriosis, it is not recommended to prescribe anti-gonadotropic hormone therapy to increase the rate of spontaneous pregnancy, including postoperatively. The possibilities of fertility preservation should be discussed with the patient in case of surgery for ovarian endometrioma.

12 Guideline [Deeply infiltrating endometriosis and infertility: CNGOF-HAS Endometriosis Guidelines]. 2018

Mathieu d'Argent, E / Cohen, J / Chauffour, C / Pouly, J L / Boujenah, J / Poncelet, C / Decanter, C / Santulli, P. ·Service de gynécologie obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, GRC6-UPMC, centre expert en endométriose (C3E), université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, hôpital Tenon, CHU de Tenon, AP-HP, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. Electronic address: emmanuelle.mathieu@aphp.fr. · Service de gynécologie obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, GRC6-UPMC, centre expert en endométriose (C3E), université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, hôpital Tenon, CHU de Tenon, AP-HP, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Service de gynécologie obstétrique et reproduction humaine, CHU Estaing, 1, place Lucie-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Service de gynécologie obstétrique, CHU de Bondy, avenue du 14-Juillet, 93140 Bondy, France; Centre médical du Château, 22, rue Louis-Besquel, 94300 Vincennes, France. · Service de gynécologie obstétrique, centre hospitalier Renée-Dubos, 6, avenue de l'Île-de-France, 95300 Pontoise, France; UFR SMBH, université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, 93022 Bobigny, France. · EA 4308 Gamétogenèse et qualité du gamète, service d'assistance médicale à la procréation et de préservation de la fertilité, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, 1, rue Eugène-Avinée, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU de Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Inserm U1016, équipe génomique, épigénétique et physiopathologie de la reproduction, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris-Descartes, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-Médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29544710.

ABSTRACT: Deeply infiltrating endometriosis is a severe form of the disease, defined by endometriotic tissue peritoneal infiltration. The disease may involve the rectovaginal septum, uterosacral ligaments, digestive tract or bladder. Deeply infiltrating endometriosis is responsible for disabling pain and infertility. The purpose of these recommendations is to answer the following question: in case of deeply infiltrating endometriosis associated infertility, what is the best therapeutic strategy? First-line surgery and then in vitro fertilization (IVF) in case of persistent infertility or first-line IVF, without surgery? After exhaustive literature analysis, we suggest the following recommendations: studies focusing on spontaneous fertility of infertile patients with deeply infiltrating endometriosis found spontaneous pregnancy rates about 10%. Treatment should be considered in infertile women with deeply infiltrating endometriosis when they wish to conceive. First-line IVF is a good option in case of no operated deeply infiltrating endometriosis associated infertility. Pregnancy rates (spontaneous and following assisted reproductive techniques) after surgery (deep lesions without colorectal involvement) varie from 40 to 85%. After colorectal endometriosis resection, pregnancy rates vary from 47 to 59%. The studies comparing the pregnancy rates after IVF, whether or not preceded by surgery, are contradictory and do not allow, to date, to conclude on the interest of any surgical management of deep lesions before IVF. In case of alteration of ovarian reserve parameters (age, AMH, antral follicle count), there is no argument to recommend first-line surgery or IVF. The study of the literature does not identify any prognostic factors, allowing to chose between surgical management or IVF. The use of IVF in the indication "deep infiltrating endometriosis" allows satisfactory pregnancy rates without significant risk, regarding disease progression or oocyte retrieval procedure morbidity.

13 Guideline [Definition, description, clinicopathological features, pathogenesis and natural history of endometriosis: CNGOF-HAS Endometriosis Guidelines]. 2018

Borghese, B / Santulli, P / Marcellin, L / Chapron, C. ·Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Équipe génomique, épigénétique et physiopathologie de la reproduction, Inserm U1016, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. Electronic address: bruno.borghese@aphp.fr. · Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Équipe génomique, épigénétique et physiopathologie de la reproduction, Inserm U1016, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. · Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Équipe stress oxydant, prolifération cellulaire et inflammation, Inserm U1016, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29540335.

ABSTRACT: Endometriosis and adenomyosis are histologically defined. The frequency of endometriosis cannot be precisely estimated in the general population. Endometriosis is considered a disease when it causes pain and/or infertility. Endometriosis is a heterogeneous disease with three well-recognized subtypes that are often associated with each other: superficial endometriosis (SUP), ovarian endometrioma (OMA), and deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). DIE is frequently multifocal and mainly affects the following structures: the uterosacral ligaments, the posterior vaginal cul-de-sac, the bladder, the ureters, and the digestive tract (rectum, recto-sigmoid junction, appendix). The role of menstrual reflux in the pathophysiology of endometriosis is major and explains the asymmetric distribution of lesions, which predominate in the posterior compartment of the pelvis and on the left (NP3). All factors favoring menstrual reflux increase the risk of endometriosis (early menarche, short cycles, AUB, etc.). Inflammation and biosteroid hormones synthesis are the main mechanisms favoring the implantation and the growth of the lesions. Pain associated with endometriosis can be explained by nociception, hyperalgia, and central sensitization, associated to varying degrees in a single patient. Typology of pain (dysmenorrhea, deep dyspareunia, digestive or urinary symptoms) is correlated with the location of the lesions. Infertility associated with endometriosis can be explained by several non-exclusive mechanisms: a pelvic factor (inflammation), disrupting natural fertilization; an ovarian factor, related to oocyte quality and/or quantity; a uterine factor disrupting implantation. The pelvic factor can be fixed by surgical excision of the lesions that improves the chance of natural conception (NP2). The uterine factor can be corrected by an ovulation-blocking treatment that improves the chances of getting pregnant by in vitro fertilization (NP2). The impact of endometrioma exeresis on the ovarian reserve (NP2) should be considered when a surgery is scheduled. Endometriosis is a multifactorial disease, resulting from combined action of genetic and environmental factors. The risk of developing endometriosis for a first-degree relative is five times higher than in the general population (NP2). Identification of genetic variants involved in the disease has no implication for clinical practice for the moment. The role of environmental factors, particularly endocrine disrupters, is plausible but not demonstrated. Literature review does not support the progression of endometriosis over time, either in terms of the volume or the number of the lesions (NP3). The risk of acute digestive occlusion or functional loss of a kidney in patients followed for endometriosis seems exceptional. These complications were revealing the disease in the majority of cases. IVF does not increase the intensity of pain associated with endometriosis (NP2). There is few data on the influence of pregnancy on the lesions, except the possibility of a decidualization of the lesions that may give them a suspicious aspect on imaging. The impact of endometriosis on pregnancy is debated. There is an epidemiological association between endometriosis and rare subtypes of ovarian cancer (endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas) (NP2). However, the relative risk is moderate (around 1.3) (NP2) and the causal relationship between endometriosis and ovarian cancer is not demonstrated so far. Considering the low incidence of endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer, there is no argument to propose a screening or a risk reducing strategy for the patients.

14 Guideline [Management by assisted reproductive technology in women with endometriosis: CNGOF-HAS Endometriosis Guidelines]. 2018

Chauffour, C / Pouly, J-L / Gremeau, A-S. ·Département de gynécologie-obstétrique et de reproduction humaine, CHU Estaing, place Lucie-et-Raymond-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: candicechauffour@gmail.com. · Département de gynécologie-obstétrique et de reproduction humaine, CHU Estaing, place Lucie-et-Raymond-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29523480.

ABSTRACT: Should the presence of endometriosis change the management of assisted reproductive technology? There is no difference in pregnancy rate after IVF between an agonist or antagonist protocol in patients with endometriosis, so the choice between one or the other of these protocols is free. But the review of the literature has shown an improvement in the chances of pregnancy in case of prolonged ovulation suppression before stimulation for IVF with a GnRH agonist analogue or with oral contraception, especially in cases of severe endometriosis. Endometriosis, regardless of the stage and type of lesions, would have no effect on the IVF results in terms of pregnancy rate and live birth rate, but with a lower number of oocytes collected, especially in cases of severe endometriosis. In a context of superficial endometriosis without pain and of infertility, surgical treatment of superficial endometriosis is not recommended just to increase the chances of pregnancy in IVF. Surgery may have a place in case of failure of IVF to improve the results of the ART. In case of recurrence of endometriosis, surgery is not better than IVF, a medico-surgical concertation is recommended. In addition, studies on ovulation stimulation for IVF do not show any aggravation of the symptoms associated with endometriosis lesions, or an acceleration of its progression, or an increase in the rate of recurrence of the disease.

15 Guideline [Minimal and mild endometriosis: Impact of the laparoscopic surgery on pelvic pain and fertility. CNGOF-HAS Endometriosis Guidelines]. 2018

Ploteau, S / Merlot, B / Roman, H / Canis, M / Collinet, P / Fritel, X. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, hôpital mère-enfant, CHU de Nantes, 8, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44093 Nantes, France. Electronic address: stephane.ploteau@chu-nantes.fr. · Service de chirurgie gynécologique, clinique Tivoli, 220, rue Mandron, 39000 Bordeaux, France. · Centre expert de diagnostic et prise en charge multidisciplinaire de l'endométriose, clinique gynécologique et obstétricale, CHU Charle-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et reproduction humaine, CHU Estaing, 1, place Lucie-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Clinique de gynécologie, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, 59000 Lille, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, Inserm CIC 1402, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29510965.

ABSTRACT: Minimal and mild endometriosis (stage 1 and 2 AFSR) can lead to chronic pelvic pain and infertility but can also exist in asymptomatic patients. The prevalence of asymptomatic patients with minimal and mild endometriosis is not clear but typical endometriosis lesions are found in about 5 to 10% of asymptomatic women and more than 50% of painful and/or infertile women. Laparoscopic treatment of minimal and mild endometriotic lesions is justified in case of pelvic pain because their destruction decrease significatively the pain compared with diagnostic laparoscopy alone. In this context, ablation and excision give identical results in terms of pain reduction. Moreover, literature shows no interest in uterine nerve ablation in case of dysmenorrhea due to minimal and mild endometriosis. Then, it is recommended to treat these lesions during a laparoscopy realised as part of pelvic pain. On the other hand, it is not recommended to treat asymptomatic patients. With regard to treatment of minimal and mild endometriosis in infertile patients, only two studies can be selected and both show that laparoscopy with excision or ablation and ablation of adhesions is superior to diagnostic laparoscopy alone in terms of pregnancy rate. However, it is not recommended to treat these lesions when they are asymptomatic because there is no evidence that they can progress with symptomatic disease. There is no study assessing the interest to treat these lesions when they are found fortuitously. Adhesion barrier utilisation permits to reduce post-operative adhesions, however literature failed to demonstrate the clinical profit in terms of reduction of the risk of pain or infertility.

16 Guideline [Management of assisted reproductive technology (ART) in case of endometriosis related infertility: CNGOF-HAS Endometriosis Guidelines]. 2018

Santulli, P / Collinet, P / Fritel, X / Canis, M / d'Argent, E M / Chauffour, C / Cohen, J / Pouly, J L / Boujenah, J / Poncelet, C / Decanter, C / Borghese, B / Chapron, C. ·Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Inserm U1016, équipe génomique, épigénétiques et physiopathologie de la reproduction, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-Médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. Electronic address: pietro.santulli@cch.aphp.fr. · Clinique de gynécologie, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU Lille, 59000 Lille, France; Université Lille-Nord-de-France, 59000 Lille, France; Inserm, U1189-ONCO Thai-image assisted laser therapy for oncology, CHU de Lille, 59000 Lille, France. · Inserm CIC 1402, service de gynécologie - obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers, France; Université de Poitiers, 86000 Poitiers, France; Inserm CIC 1402, 86000 Poitiers, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et reproduction humaine, CHU Estaing, 1, place Lucie-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Tenon, AP-HP, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France; Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, France; GRC6-UPMC : centre expert en endométriose (C3E), hôpital Tenon, Paris, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Bondy, avenue du 14-Juillet, 93140 Bondy, France; Centre médical du Château, 22, rue Louis-Besquel, 94300 Vincennes, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, centre hospitalier de Renée-Dubos, 6, avenue de l'Ile-de-France, 95300 Pontoise, France; Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR SMBH, 93022 Bobigny, France. · Service d'assistance médicale à la procréation et de préservation de la fertilité, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, 1, rue Eugène-Avinée, 59037 Lille cedex, France; EA 4308, gamétogenèse et qualité du gamète, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Inserm U1016, équipe génomique, épigénétiques et physiopathologie de la reproduction, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-Médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29503237.

ABSTRACT: The management of endometriosis related infertility requires a global approach. In this context, the prescription of an anti-gonadotropic hormonal treatment does not increase the rate of non-ART (assisted reproductive technologies) pregnancies and it is not recommended. In case of endometriosis related infertility, the results of IVF management in terms of pregnancy and birth rates are not negatively affected by the existence of endometriosis. Controlled ovarian stimulation during IVF does not increase the risk of endometriosis associated symptoms worsening, nor accelerate the intrinsic progression of endometriosis and does not increase the rate of recurrence. However, in the context of IVF management for women with endometriosis, pre-treatment with GnRH agonist or with oestrogen/progestin contraception improve IVF outcomes. There is currently no evidence of a positive or negative effect of endometriosis surgery on IVF outcomes. Information on the possibilities of preserving fertility should be considered, especially before surgery.

17 Guideline [Fertility preservation, contraception and menopause hormone therapy in women treated for rare ovarian tumors: Guidelines from the French national network dedicated to rare gynaecological cancer]. 2018

Rousset-Jablonski, Christine / Selle, Fréderic / Adda-Herzog, Elodie / Planchamp, François / Selleret, Lise / Pomel, Christophe / Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie / Daraï, Emile / Pautier, Patricia / Trémollières, Florence / Guyon, Frederic / Rouzier, Roman / Laurence, Valérie / Chopin, Nicolas / Faure-Conter, Cécile / Bentivegna, Enrica / Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile / Lhomme, Catherine / Floquet, Anne / Treilleux, Isabelle / Lecuru, Fabrice / Gouy, Sébastien / Kalbacher, Elsa / Genestie, Catherine / de la Motte Rouge, Thibault / Ferron, Gwenael / Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan / Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel / Namer, Moise / Joly, Florence / Pujade-Lauraine, Eric / Grynberg, Michael / Querleu, Denis / Morice, Philippe / Gompel, Anne / Ray-Coquard, Isabelle. ·Centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laënnec, 69008 Lyon, France; Hospices civils de Lyon, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite cedex, France. Electronic address: christine.rousset-jablonski@lyon.unicancer.fr. · Groupe hospitalier Diaconesses Croix-Saint-Simon, 12-18, rue du Sergent-Bauchat, 75012 Paris, France. · Hôpital Foch, service de gynécologie-obstétrique, 40, rue Worth, 92151 Suresnes, France. · Institut Bergonié, 229, Cours-de-l'Argonne, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Hôpital Tenon, service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert BP, 392, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1, France. · Institut Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Edouard-Vaillant, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Hôpital Paule-de-Viguier, centre de ménopause et de dépistage de l'ostéoporose, 330, avenue de Grande-Bretagne, TSA 70034, 31059 Toulouse cedex 9, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · Centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laënnec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Hôpital Cochin-Port Royal, 53, avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris, France. · Hôpital Européen Geroges-Pompidou, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France. · CHU Besançon-Jean-Minjoz, 3, boulevard Alexandre-Fleming, 25030 Besançon cedex, France. · Centre Eugène-Marquis, avenue de la Bataille-Flandres-Dunkerque, 35000 Rennes, France. · CLCC, institut Claudius-Regaud, IUCT Oncopole, 1, avenue Irène-Joliot-Curie, 31100 Toulouse, France. · Hospices civils de Lyon, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite cedex, France. · CHU de Strasbourg, hôpital de Hautepierre, avenue Molière, 67200 Strasbourg, France. · Recommandations pour la pratique clinique, Nice-Saint-Paul, 06000 Nice, France. · Centre François-Baclesse, 3, avenue du Général-Harris, 14076 Caen cedex 5, France. · CHU Paris Centre, hôpital Hôtel-Dieu, 1, place du Parvis-Notre-Dame, 75004 Paris, France. · Hôpital Jean-Verdier, avenue du 14 juillet, 93140 Bondy, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #29397916.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Rare ovarian tumors include complex borderline ovarian tumors, sex-cord tumors, germ cell tumors, and rare epithelial tumors. Indications and modalities of fertility preservation, infertility management and contraindications for hormonal contraception or menopause hormone therapy are frequent issues in clinical practice. A panel of experts from the French national network dedicated to rare gynaecological cancers, and of experts in reproductive medicine and gynaecology have worked on guidelines about fertility preservation, contraception and menopause hormone therapy in women treated for ovarian rare tumors. METHODS: A panel of 39 experts from different specialties contributed to the preparation of the guidelines, following the DELPHI method (formal consensus method). Statements were drafted after a systematic literature review, and then rated through two successive rounds. RESULTS: Thirty-five recommendations were selected, and concerned indications for fertility preservation, contraindications for ovarian stimulation (in the context of fertility preservation or for infertility management), contraceptive options (especially hormonal ones), and menopause hormone therapy for each tumor type. Overall, prudence has been recommended in the case of potentially hormone-sensitive tumors such as sex cord tumors, serous and endometrioid low-grade adenocarcinomas, as well as for high-risk serous borderline ovarian tumors. DISCUSSION: In the context of a scarce literature, a formal consensus method allowed the elaboration of guidelines, which will help clinicians in the management of these patients.

18 Guideline The use of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) for the treatment of the infertile man: position statement from the Italian Society of Andrology and Sexual Medicine (SIAMS). 2018

Barbonetti, A / Calogero, A E / Balercia, G / Garolla, A / Krausz, C / La Vignera, S / Lombardo, F / Jannini, E A / Maggi, M / Lenzi, A / Foresta, C / Ferlin, A. ·Casa di Cura San Raffaele Sulmona, Sulmona, AQ, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Umberto I Hospital, Ancona, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy. · Unit of Andrology and Reproductive Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences 'Mario Serio', University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Laboratory of Seminology-Sperm Bank "Loredana Gandini", Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy. · Department of Systems Medicine, Chair of Endocrinology and Medical Sexology (ENDOSEX), University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Unit of Andrology and Reproductive Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. alberto.ferlin@unibs.it. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. alberto.ferlin@unibs.it. ·J Endocrinol Invest · Pubmed #29392544.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline Child-rearing ability and the provision of fertility services: an Ethics Committee opinion. 2017

Anonymous200929 / Anonymous210929. ·The American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #29202968.

ABSTRACT: Fertility programs may withhold services from prospective patients on the basis of well-grounded reasons that those patients will be unable to provide minimally adequate or safe care for offspring. This document was reviewed and updated; this version replaces the previous version of this document, last published July 2013 (Fertil Steril 2013;100:50-53).

20 Guideline The use of nutraceuticals in male sexual and reproductive disturbances: position statement from the Italian Society of Andrology and Sexual Medicine (SIAMS). 2017

Calogero, A E / Aversa, A / La Vignera, S / Corona, G / Ferlin, A. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. · Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Magna Græcia University, Catanzaro, Italy. · Endocrinology Unit, Medical Department, Maggiore-Bellaria Hospital, Azienda-Usl Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Deparment of Medicine, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. alberto.ferlin@unipd.it. ·J Endocrinol Invest · Pubmed #28589384.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline No. 346-Advanced Reproductive Age and Fertility. 2017

Liu, Kimberly E / Case, Allison. ·Toronto, ON. Electronic address: kliu@mtsinai.on.ca. · Saskatoon, SK. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #28549563.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To improve awareness of the natural age-related decline in female and male fertility with respect to natural fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART), provide recommendations for their management, and to review investigations in the assessment of ovarian aging. OPTIONS: This guideline reviews options for the assessment of ovarian reserve and fertility treatments using ART with women of advanced reproductive age presenting with infertility. OUTCOMES: The outcomes measured are the predictive value of ovarian reserve testing and pregnancy rates with natural and assisted fertility. EVIDENCE: Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in June 2010, using appropriate key words ("ovarian aging," "ovarian reserve," "advanced maternal age," "advanced paternal age," and "assisted reproductive technology"). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to December 2010. VALUES: The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report. BENEFITS, HARMS, AND COSTS: Primary and specialist health care providers and women will be better informed about ovarian aging and the age-related decline in natural fertility and about options for ART.

22 Guideline Performing the embryo transfer: a guideline. 2017

Anonymous8230901 / Anonymous8240901. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #28366416.

ABSTRACT: A systematic review of the literature was conducted which examined each of the major steps of embryo transfer. Recommendations made for improving pregnancy rates are based on interventions demonstrated to be either beneficial or not beneficial.

23 Guideline Guidance on the limits to the number of embryos to transfer: a committee opinion. 2017

Anonymous4090899 / Anonymous4100899. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine; and Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #28292618.

ABSTRACT: Based on American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology data available through 2014, ASRM's guidelines for the limits on the number of embryos to be transferred in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles have been further refined in continuing efforts to promote singleton gestation and reduce the number of multiple pregnancies. This version replaces the document titled Criteria for number of embryos to transfer: a committee opinion that was published most recently in August of 2013 (Fertil Steril 2013;99:44-6).

24 Guideline Recommendations for practices utilizing gestational carriers: a committee opinion. 2017

Anonymous7640892 / Anonymous7650892. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #28069181.

ABSTRACT: This document provides the latest recommendations for evaluation of gestational carriers and intended parents. It incorporates recent information from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the American Association of Tissue Banks, with which all programs offering gestational carrier services must be thoroughly familiar. This document replaces the previous document of the same name, last published in 2015 (Fertil Steril

25 Guideline Financial compensation of oocyte donors: an Ethics Committee opinion. 2016

Anonymous590901 / Anonymous600901. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #28340933.

ABSTRACT: Financial compensation of women donating oocytes for infertility therapy or for research is justified on ethical grounds and should acknowledge the time, inconvenience, and discomfort associated with screening, ovarian stimulation, and oocyte retrieval, and not vary according to the planned use of the oocytes, the number or quality of oocytes retrieved, the number or outcome of prior donation cycles, or the donor's ethnic or other personal characteristics. This document replaces the document of the same name, last published in 2007 (Fertil Steril 2007;88:305-9).

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