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Infertility: HELP
Articles by Charles Chapron
Based on 28 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, C. Chapron wrote the following 28 articles about Infertility.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Guideline [Definition, description, clinicopathological features, pathogenesis and natural history of endometriosis: CNGOF-HAS Endometriosis Guidelines]. 2018

Borghese, B / Santulli, P / Marcellin, L / Chapron, C. ·Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Équipe génomique, épigénétique et physiopathologie de la reproduction, Inserm U1016, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. Electronic address: bruno.borghese@aphp.fr. · Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Équipe génomique, épigénétique et physiopathologie de la reproduction, Inserm U1016, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. · Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Équipe stress oxydant, prolifération cellulaire et inflammation, Inserm U1016, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29540335.

ABSTRACT: Endometriosis and adenomyosis are histologically defined. The frequency of endometriosis cannot be precisely estimated in the general population. Endometriosis is considered a disease when it causes pain and/or infertility. Endometriosis is a heterogeneous disease with three well-recognized subtypes that are often associated with each other: superficial endometriosis (SUP), ovarian endometrioma (OMA), and deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). DIE is frequently multifocal and mainly affects the following structures: the uterosacral ligaments, the posterior vaginal cul-de-sac, the bladder, the ureters, and the digestive tract (rectum, recto-sigmoid junction, appendix). The role of menstrual reflux in the pathophysiology of endometriosis is major and explains the asymmetric distribution of lesions, which predominate in the posterior compartment of the pelvis and on the left (NP3). All factors favoring menstrual reflux increase the risk of endometriosis (early menarche, short cycles, AUB, etc.). Inflammation and biosteroid hormones synthesis are the main mechanisms favoring the implantation and the growth of the lesions. Pain associated with endometriosis can be explained by nociception, hyperalgia, and central sensitization, associated to varying degrees in a single patient. Typology of pain (dysmenorrhea, deep dyspareunia, digestive or urinary symptoms) is correlated with the location of the lesions. Infertility associated with endometriosis can be explained by several non-exclusive mechanisms: a pelvic factor (inflammation), disrupting natural fertilization; an ovarian factor, related to oocyte quality and/or quantity; a uterine factor disrupting implantation. The pelvic factor can be fixed by surgical excision of the lesions that improves the chance of natural conception (NP2). The uterine factor can be corrected by an ovulation-blocking treatment that improves the chances of getting pregnant by in vitro fertilization (NP2). The impact of endometrioma exeresis on the ovarian reserve (NP2) should be considered when a surgery is scheduled. Endometriosis is a multifactorial disease, resulting from combined action of genetic and environmental factors. The risk of developing endometriosis for a first-degree relative is five times higher than in the general population (NP2). Identification of genetic variants involved in the disease has no implication for clinical practice for the moment. The role of environmental factors, particularly endocrine disrupters, is plausible but not demonstrated. Literature review does not support the progression of endometriosis over time, either in terms of the volume or the number of the lesions (NP3). The risk of acute digestive occlusion or functional loss of a kidney in patients followed for endometriosis seems exceptional. These complications were revealing the disease in the majority of cases. IVF does not increase the intensity of pain associated with endometriosis (NP2). There is few data on the influence of pregnancy on the lesions, except the possibility of a decidualization of the lesions that may give them a suspicious aspect on imaging. The impact of endometriosis on pregnancy is debated. There is an epidemiological association between endometriosis and rare subtypes of ovarian cancer (endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas) (NP2). However, the relative risk is moderate (around 1.3) (NP2) and the causal relationship between endometriosis and ovarian cancer is not demonstrated so far. Considering the low incidence of endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer, there is no argument to propose a screening or a risk reducing strategy for the patients.

2 Guideline [Management of assisted reproductive technology (ART) in case of endometriosis related infertility: CNGOF-HAS Endometriosis Guidelines]. 2018

Santulli, P / Collinet, P / Fritel, X / Canis, M / d'Argent, E M / Chauffour, C / Cohen, J / Pouly, J L / Boujenah, J / Poncelet, C / Decanter, C / Borghese, B / Chapron, C. ·Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Inserm U1016, équipe génomique, épigénétiques et physiopathologie de la reproduction, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-Médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. Electronic address: pietro.santulli@cch.aphp.fr. · Clinique de gynécologie, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU Lille, 59000 Lille, France; Université Lille-Nord-de-France, 59000 Lille, France; Inserm, U1189-ONCO Thai-image assisted laser therapy for oncology, CHU de Lille, 59000 Lille, France. · Inserm CIC 1402, service de gynécologie - obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers, France; Université de Poitiers, 86000 Poitiers, France; Inserm CIC 1402, 86000 Poitiers, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et reproduction humaine, CHU Estaing, 1, place Lucie-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Tenon, AP-HP, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France; Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, France; GRC6-UPMC : centre expert en endométriose (C3E), hôpital Tenon, Paris, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Bondy, avenue du 14-Juillet, 93140 Bondy, France; Centre médical du Château, 22, rue Louis-Besquel, 94300 Vincennes, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, centre hospitalier de Renée-Dubos, 6, avenue de l'Ile-de-France, 95300 Pontoise, France; Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR SMBH, 93022 Bobigny, France. · Service d'assistance médicale à la procréation et de préservation de la fertilité, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, 1, rue Eugène-Avinée, 59037 Lille cedex, France; EA 4308, gamétogenèse et qualité du gamète, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Service de chirurgie gynécologie obstétrique 2 et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Cochin, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France; Inserm U1016, équipe génomique, épigénétiques et physiopathologie de la reproduction, département développement, reproduction, cancer, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 12, rue de l'École-de-Médecine, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29503237.

ABSTRACT: The management of endometriosis related infertility requires a global approach. In this context, the prescription of an anti-gonadotropic hormonal treatment does not increase the rate of non-ART (assisted reproductive technologies) pregnancies and it is not recommended. In case of endometriosis related infertility, the results of IVF management in terms of pregnancy and birth rates are not negatively affected by the existence of endometriosis. Controlled ovarian stimulation during IVF does not increase the risk of endometriosis associated symptoms worsening, nor accelerate the intrinsic progression of endometriosis and does not increase the rate of recurrence. However, in the context of IVF management for women with endometriosis, pre-treatment with GnRH agonist or with oestrogen/progestin contraception improve IVF outcomes. There is currently no evidence of a positive or negative effect of endometriosis surgery on IVF outcomes. Information on the possibilities of preserving fertility should be considered, especially before surgery.

3 Editorial Ovarian endometriosis and infertility: in vitro fertilization (IVF) or surgery as the first approach? 2018

Lessey, Bruce A / Gordts, Stephan / Donnez, Olivier / Somigliana, Edgardo / Chapron, Charles / Garcia-Velasco, Juan A / Donnez, Jacques. ·Obstetrics and Gynecology, Greenville Health System, Greenville, South Carolina. · Life Expert Centre, Leuven, Belgium. · Institut du sein et de Chirurgie gynécologique d'Avignon, Polyclinique Urbain V, Elsan Group, Avignon, France. · Università degli Studi di Milano and Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. · Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Cochin, Department of Gynecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Paris, France. · IVI-RMA, Madrid, Spain; Rey Juan Carlos University, Madrid, Spain. · Société de Recherche pour l'Infertilité (SRI), Brussels, Belgium. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #30503109.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Management of infertility today. 2013

Petraglia, Felice / Chapron, Charles / Pegoraro, Renzo. ·Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena. ·Int J Gynaecol Obstet · Pubmed #24156984.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Recent insights on the genetics and epigenetics of endometriosis. 2017

Borghese, B / Zondervan, K T / Abrao, M S / Chapron, C / Vaiman, D. ·Cochin Institute, U1016 INSERM, CNRS 8104, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Department of Gynecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Faculté de Médecine, AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Ouest, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Paris Centre, Paris, France. · Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Endometriosis Care Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Endometriosis Division, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Sao Paulo University, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Reproductive Clinic, Sirio Libanes Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil. ·Clin Genet · Pubmed #27753067.

ABSTRACT: Endometriosis is a gynecologic disease affecting up to 10% of the women and a major cause of pain and infertility. It is characterized by the implantation of functional endometrial tissue at ectopic positions generally within the peritoneum. This complex disease has an important genetic component with a heritability estimated at around 50%. This review aims at providing recent insights into the genetic bases of endometriosis, and presents a detailed overview of evidence of epigenetic alterations specific to this disease. In the future, these alterations may constitute therapeutic targets for pharmacological compounds able to modify the epigenetic code.

6 Review An update on the pharmacological management of adenomyosis. 2014

Streuli, Isabelle / Dubuisson, Jean / Santulli, Pietro / de Ziegler, Dominique / Batteux, Frédéric / Chapron, Charles. ·University Hospitals of Geneva and the Faculty of Medicine of the Geneva University, Departement of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Unit for Reproductive Medicine and Gynecological Endocrinology , 30, boulevard de la Cluse, Geneva, 1205 , Switzerland. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #25196637.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Adenomyosis, characterized by the infiltration of the myometrium by ectopic endometrial islets, is a common condition that causes dysmenorrhea, abnormal uterine bleeding and infertility. Different treatment options exist, including medical and surgical treatments. The most commonly used medications are NSAIDs, progestogens and GnRH agonists (GnRHas). AREAS COVERED: We conducted a literature search for in vitro and animal studies, randomized and non-randomized studies, systematic reviews and ongoing trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. There are almost no well-conducted randomized controlled trials on the pharmacological treatment of adenomyosis and the information collected from published studies is insufficient. Several therapeutic targets have been identified through animal and in vitro studies, and it is hoped that they will lead to further clinical studies on new compounds and treatment targets in this heterogeneous disease. EXPERT OPINION: Hysterectomy is very effective at treating women with symptomatic adenomyosis who have completed their wish of pregnancy. For women with a future desire of pregnancy medical treatments remain the best options. Progestogens and GnRHas are the most frequently used long-term treatments for abnormal uterine bleeding and pain symptoms. In assisted reproductive techniques long agonist stimulation protocols and pretreatment with GnRHas for differed embryo transfer seem to improve pregnancy rates.

7 Review Risk and safety management in infertility and assisted reproductive technology (ART): from the doctor's office to the ART procedure. 2013

de Ziegler, Dominique / Gambone, Joseph C / Meldrum, David R / Chapron, Charles. ·Université Paris Descartes, Paris Sorbonne Cité-Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Medicine, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. Electronic address: ddeziegler@me.com. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #24200109.

ABSTRACT: Risk and safety management (RSM) is receiving increasing attention in medicine, with the goals of reducing medical error and increasing quality of care. The principles and tools of RSM can and should be applied to assisted reproductive technology (ART), a field that has already made significant progress in reducing the undesirable and sometimes dangerous consequences of treatment. ART is a prime area of medicine to contribute and help to lead the application of RSM and patient safety because it has been ahead of many other fields of medicine in standardizing treatment, certifying and auditing practitioners, and reporting standardized outcomes, and because treatments are applied to otherwise healthy individuals where exposure to risk may be less acceptable.

8 Review An update on the pharmacological management of endometriosis. 2013

Streuli, Isabelle / de Ziegler, Dominique / Santulli, Pietro / Marcellin, Louis / Borghese, Bruno / Batteux, Frédéric / Chapron, Charles. ·Service de gynécologie, obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, Groupe hospitalier du centre Cochin -- Broca -- Hôtel-Dieu, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #23356536.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Endometriosis is a common disease that causes pain symptoms and/or infertility in women in their reproductive years. The disease is characterised by the presence of endometrium-like tissue - glands and stroma - outside the uterine cavity. Different treatment options exist for endometriosis including medical and surgical treatments or a combination of the two approaches. The most commonly used medications are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, GnRH agonists, androgen derivatives such as danazol, combined oral contraceptive pills, progestogens and more recently the levonorgestrel intrauterine system. AREAS COVERED: The authors review current medical treatments used for symptomatic endometriosis and also discuss new treatment approaches. The authors conducted a literature search for randomised controlled trials related to medical treatments of endometriosis in humans, searched the Cochrane library for reviews and also searched for registered trials that have not yet been published on ClinicalTrials.gov. EXPERT OPINION: The medical treatment of endometriosis is effective at treating pain and preventing recurrence of disease after surgery. Remarkably, the oral contraceptive pill taken continuously is as effective as GnRH-a, while causing far less side-effects. Conversely, no treatment currently exists for enhancing fecundity in women whose infertility is associated with endometriosis. As all existing therapies of endometriosis are contraceptive, great efforts should be targeted at researching novel products that reduce the disease expression without shuttering ovulation.

9 Review Retrieving oocytes from small non-stimulated follicles in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): in vitro maturation (IVM) is not indicated in the new GnRH antagonist era. 2012

de Ziegler, Dominique / Streuli, Isabelle / Gayet, Vanessa / Frydman, Nelly / Bajouh, Osama / Chapron, Charles. ·Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, Université Paris Descartes, Paris Sorbonne Cité-Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. ddeziegler@orange.fr ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #22846648.

ABSTRACT: It has been two decades since pregnancies have been obtained through in vitro maturation (IVM) of germinal vesicle-stage oocytes retrieved from non-stimulated ovaries. This technique first offered in PCOS cannot be recommended today in this indication because the results do not match those of regular ART, and new GnRH antagonist and agonist-trigger protocols reliably prevent OHSS.

10 Review The value of growth hormone supplements in ART for poor ovarian responders. 2011

de Ziegler, Dominique / Streuli, Isabelle / Meldrum, David R / Chapron, Charles. ·Université Paris Descartes-Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Medicine, Paris, France. ddeziegler@orange.fr ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #22036051.

ABSTRACT: Recently, three meta-analyses have concluded that cotreatment with GH improves assisted reproduction outcome in poor controlled ovarian stimulation responders. Although generally GH supplements did not increase controlled ovarian stimulation response or number of oocytes, the supplements improved pregnancy and live-birth rates-thus speaking for an effect on oocyte quality.

11 Review Endometriosis and infertility: pathophysiology and management. 2010

de Ziegler, Dominique / Borghese, Bruno / Chapron, Charles. ·Université Paris Descartes, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Cochin, Service de Gynécologie Obstétrique II et Médecine de la Reproduction, Paris, France. ddeziegler@orange.fr ·Lancet · Pubmed #20801404.

ABSTRACT: Endometriosis and infertility are associated clinically. Medical and surgical treatments for endometriosis have different effects on a woman's chances of conception, either spontaneously or via assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Medical treatments for endometriosis are contraceptive. Data, mostly uncontrolled, indicate that surgery at any stage of endometriosis enhances the chances of natural conception. Criteria for non-removal of endometriomas are: bilateral cysts, history of past surgery, and altered ovarian reserve. Fears that surgery can alter ovarian function that is already compromised sparked a rule of no surgery before ART. Exceptions to this guidance are pain, hydrosalpinges, and very large endometriomas. Medical treatment-eg, 3-6 months of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues-improves the outcome of ART. When age, ovarian reserve, and male and tubal status permit, surgery should be considered immediately so that time is dedicated to attempts to conceive naturally. In other cases, the preference is for administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues before ART, and no surgery beforehand. The strategy of early surgery, however, seems counterintuitive because of beliefs that milder non-surgical options should be offered first and surgery last (only if initial treatment attempts fail). Weighing up the relative advantages of surgery, medical treatment and ART are the foundations for a global approach to infertility associated with endometriosis.

12 Review Cancer and fecundity issues mandate a multidisciplinary approach. 2010

de Ziegler, Dominique / Streuli, Isabelle / Vasilopoulos, Ioannis / Decanter, Christine / This, Pascale / Chapron, Charles. ·Université Paris Descartes, Service de Gynécologie Obstétrique II et Médecine de la Reproduction, Paris, France. ddeziegler@orange.fr ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #19200974.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review the existing options for preserving fecundity in young cancer patients, outlining the differences that exist in each individual cancer situation and how these affect our choice of fecundity-preserving measures. DESIGN: Review the pathophysiology data on ovarian function that serve for outlining the advantages and/or drawbacks of certain fecundity-preserving measures such as ovarian freezing and emergency IVF. Provide support arguments for outlining the need for setting locally rooted cancer and fecundity task forces that throw the bases for a multidisciplinary approach in this field. SETTING: Review of literature data. PATIENT(S): Women of reproductive age affected with different types of cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Outcome of selected emergency fertility preserving measures such as ovarian tissue freezing followed by grafting or emergency IVF. RESULT(S): When performed in the 30s-the typical age for breast cancer, the most frequently encountered cancer in women of reproductive age, ovarian freezing hampers ovarian recovery and the chances for spontaneous pregnancy. CONCLUSION(S): Based on a review of the different situations encountered, we recommend that fecundity-preserving measures offered to young cancer patients, including ovarian freezing and emergency IVF, emanate from multidisciplinary approaches.

13 Article Oligo-anovulation is not a rarer feature in women with documented endometriosis. 2018

Santulli, Pietro / Tran, Chloe / Gayet, Vanessa / Bourdon, Mathilde / Maignien, Chloe / Marcellin, Louis / Pocate-Cheriet, Khaled / Chapron, Charles / de Ziegler, Dominique. ·Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Department of Development, Reproduction and Cancer, Institut Cochin, INSERM U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Development, Reproduction and Cancer, Institut Cochin, INSERM U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. Electronic address: ddeziegler@me.com. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #30316441.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence of oligo-anovulation in women suffering from endometriosis compared to that of women without endometriosis. DESIGN: A single-center, cross-sectional study. SETTING: University hospital-based research center. PATIENT (S): We included 354 women with histologically proven endometriosis and 474 women in whom endometriosis was surgically ruled out between 2004 and 2016. INTERVENTION: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Frequency of oligo-anovulation in women with endometriosis as compared to that prevailing in the disease-free reference group. RESULTS: There was no difference in the rate of oligo-anovulation between women with endometriosis (15.0%) and the reference group (11.2%). Regarding the endometriosis phenotype, oligo-anovulation was reported in 12 (18.2%) superficial peritoneal endometriosis, 12 (10.6%) ovarian endometrioma, and 29 (16.6%) deep infiltrating endometriosis. CONCLUSION(S): Endometriosis should not be discounted in women presenting with oligo-anovulation.

14 Article The deferred embryo transfer strategy improves cumulative pregnancy rates in endometriosis-related infertility: A retrospective matched cohort study. 2018

Bourdon, Mathilde / Santulli, Pietro / Maignien, Chloé / Gayet, Vanessa / Pocate-Cheriet, Khaled / Marcellin, Louis / Chapron, Charles. ·Department of Gynecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Paris, France. · Department "Stress oxydant, prolifération cellulaire et inflammation", Institut Cochin, INSERM U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department "Development, Reproduction and Cancer", Institut Cochin, INSERM U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Histology-Embryology and Reproductive Biology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Paris, France. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29630610.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Controlled ovarian stimulation in assisted reproduction technology (ART) may alters endometrial receptivity by an advancement of endometrial development. Recently, technical improvements in vitrification make deferred frozen-thawed embryo transfer (Def-ET) a feasible alternative to fresh embryo transfer (ET). In endometriosis-related infertility the eutopic endometrium is abnormal and its functional alterations are seen as likely to alter the quality of endometrial receptivity. One question in the endometriosis ART-management is to know whether Def-ET could restore optimal receptivity in endometriosis-affected women leading to increase in pregnancy rates. OBJECTIVE: To compare cumulative ART-outcomes between fresh versus Def-ET in endometriosis-infertile women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This matched cohort study compared def-ET strategy to fresh ET strategy between 01/10/2012 and 31/12/2014. One hundred and thirty-five endometriosis-affected women with a scheduled def-ET cycle and 424 endometriosis-affected women with a scheduled fresh ET cycle were eligible for matching. Matching criteria were: age, number of prior ART cycles, and endometriosis phenotype. Statistical analyses were conducted using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: 135 in the fresh ET group and 135 in the def-ET group were included in the analysis. The cumulative clinical pregnancy rate was significantly increased in the def-ET group compared to the fresh ET group [58 (43%) vs. 40 (29.6%), p = 0.047]. The cumulative ongoing pregnancy rate was 34.8% (n = 47) and 17.8% (n = 24) respectively in the Def-ET and the fresh-ET groups (p = 0.005). After multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis, Def-ET was associated with a significant increase in the cumulative ongoing pregnancy rate as compared to fresh ET (OR = 1.76, CI95% 1.06-2.92, p = 0.028). CONCLUSION: Def-ET in endometriosis-affected women was associated with significantly higher cumulative ongoing pregnancy rates. Our preliminary results suggest that Def-ET for endometriosis-affected women is an attractive option that could increase their ART success rates. Future studies, with a randomized design, should be conducted to further confirm those results.

15 Article [Bowel endometriosis and infertility: Do we need to operate?] 2017

Bourdon, M / Santulli, P / Marcellin, L / Lamau, M C / Maignien, C / Chapron, C. ·Div. Reproductive Endocrine and Infertility, Department of Gynecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, faculté de médecine, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, hôpital universitaire Paris centre (HUPC), centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Assistance publique-hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), bâtiment Port-Royal, 53, avenue de l'Observatoire, 75679 Paris 14, France; Inserm U1016, Department "Development, Reproduction and Cancer", institut Cochin, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75679 Paris 14, France. · Div. Reproductive Endocrine and Infertility, Department of Gynecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, faculté de médecine, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, hôpital universitaire Paris centre (HUPC), centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Assistance publique-hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), bâtiment Port-Royal, 53, avenue de l'Observatoire, 75679 Paris 14, France; Inserm U1016, Department "Development, Reproduction and Cancer", institut Cochin, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75679 Paris 14, France; Inserm U1016, Department "Development, Reproduction and Cancer", institut Cochin, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. Electronic address: pietro.santulli@cch.aphp.fr. · Div. Reproductive Endocrine and Infertility, Department of Gynecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, faculté de médecine, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, hôpital universitaire Paris centre (HUPC), centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Assistance publique-hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), bâtiment Port-Royal, 53, avenue de l'Observatoire, 75679 Paris 14, France; Inserm U1016, Department "Development, Reproduction and Cancer", institut Cochin, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75679 Paris 14, France; Inserm U1016, Department "Development, Reproduction and Cancer", institut Cochin, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Div. Reproductive Endocrine and Infertility, Department of Gynecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, faculté de médecine, université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, hôpital universitaire Paris centre (HUPC), centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Assistance publique-hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), bâtiment Port-Royal, 53, avenue de l'Observatoire, 75679 Paris 14, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #28864051.

ABSTRACT: Endometriosis is a benign chronic inflammatory disease, whose pathogenesis is still unclear. Endometriosis is responsible for infertility and/or pelvic pain. One of the most important features of the disease is the heterogeneity (clinical and anatomical: superficial peritoneal, ovarian and/or deep infiltrating lesions). Bowel involvement constitutes one particularly severe form of the disease, affecting 8-12% of women with deep endometriosis. In case of associated infertility, bowel endometriosis constitutes a real therapeutic challenge for gynecologists. Indeed, while complete resection of the lesions alleviates pain and seems to improve spontaneous fertility, surgery remains technically challenging and may cause severe complications. Reverting to assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) is another valuable therapeutic option regarding pregnancy rates. Thus, the choice between surgical management or ART is still debated. Benefits and risks of these two options should be considered and discussed before planning treatment. In the present study, we aimed to answer the question: Bowel endometriosis and infertility: do we need to operate?

16 Article Relationship between the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of adenomyosis and endometriosis phenotypes. 2017

Chapron, Charles / Tosti, Claudia / Marcellin, Louis / Bourdon, Mathilde / Lafay-Pillet, Marie-Christine / Millischer, Anne-Elodie / Streuli, Isabelle / Borghese, Bruno / Petraglia, Felice / Santulli, Pietro. ·Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre (HUPC), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Department of Gynecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Paris, France. · Department 'Development, Reproduction and Cancer', Institut Cochin, INSERM U1016 (Doctor Vaiman), Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena, Italy. · Department 'Development, Reproduction and Cancer', Institut Cochin, INSERM U1016 (Professor Batteux), Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Centre de Radiologie Bachaumont, IMPC, Paris, France. · Centre Unit for Reproductive Medicine and Gynaecological Endocrinology, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, University Hospitals of Geneva and the Faculty of Medicine of The Geneva University, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Hum Reprod · Pubmed #28510724.

ABSTRACT: STUDY QUESTION: What is the relationship between endometriosis phenotypes superficial peritoneal endometriosis (SUP), ovarian endometrioma (OMA), deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) and the adenomyosis appearance by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)? SUMMARY ANSWER: Focal adenomyosis located in the outer myometrium (FAOM) was observed more frequently in women with endometriosis, and was significantly associated with the DIE phenotype. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: An association between endometriosis and adenomyosis has been reported previously, although data regarding the association between MRI appearance of adenomyosis and the endometriosis phenotype are currently still lacking. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This was an observational, cross-sectional study using data prospectively collected from non-pregnant patients who were between 18 and 42 years of age, and who underwent surgery for symptomatic benign gynecological conditions between January 2011 and December 2014. For each patient, a standardized questionnaire was completed during a face-to-face interview conducted by the surgeon during the month preceding the surgery. Only women with preoperative standardized uterine MRIs were retained for this study. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Surgery was performed on 292 patients with signed consent and available preoperative MRIs. After a thorough surgical examination of the abdomino-pelvic cavity, 237 women with histologically proven endometriosis were allocated to the endometriosis group and 55 symptomatic women without evidence of endometriosis to the endometriosis free group. The existence of diffuse or FAOM was studied in both groups and according to surgical endometriosis phenotypes (SUP, OMA and DIE). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: Adenomyosis was observed in 59.9% (n = 175) of the total sample population (n = 292). Based on MRI, the distribution of adenomyosis was as follows: isolated diffuse adenomyosis (53 patients; 18.2%), isolated FAOM (74 patients; 25.3%), associated diffuse and FAOM (48 patients; 16.4%). Diffuse adenomyosis (isolated and associated to FAOM) was observed in one-third of the patients regardless of whether they were endometriotic patients or endometriosis free women taken as controls (34.2% (81 cases) versus 36.4% (20 cases)); P = 0.764. Among endometriotic women, diffuse adenomyosis (isolated and associated to FAOM) failed to reach significant correlation with the endometriosis phenotypes (SUP, 20.0% (8 cases); OMA, 45.2% (14 cases) and DIE, 35.5% (59 cases); P = 0.068). In striking contrast, there was a significant increase in the frequency of FAOM in endometriosis-affected women than in controls (119 cases (50.2%) versus 5.4% (3 cases); P < 0.001). FAOM correlated with the endometriosis phenotypes, significantly with DIE (SUP, 7.5% (3 cases); OMA, 19.3% (6 cases) and DIE, 66.3% (110 cases); P < 0.001). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: There was a possible selection bias due to the specificity of the study design, as it only included surgical patients in a referral center that specializes in endometriosis surgery. Therefore, women referred to our center may have suffered from particularly severe forms of endometriosis. This could explain the high number of women with DIE (166/237-70%) in our study group. This referral bias for women with severe lesions may have amplified the difference in association of FAOM with the endometriosis-affected patients compared to women without endometriosis. Furthermore, according to inclusion criteria, women in the endometriosis free group were symptomatic women. This may introduce some bias as symptomatic women may be more prone to have associated adenomyosis that in turn could have been overrepresented in the endometriosis free group. Whether this selection could have introduced a bias in the relationship between endometriosis and adenomyosis remains unknown. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: This study opens the door to future epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic studies aimed at better characterizing diffuse and focal adenomyosis. Further studies are necessary to adequately determine if diffuse and focal adenomyosis are two separate entities that differ in terms of pathogenesis. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): No funding supported this study. The authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

17 Article Prognostic factors for assisted reproductive technology in women with endometriosis-related infertility. 2017

Maignien, Chloé / Santulli, Pietro / Gayet, Vanessa / Lafay-Pillet, Marie-Christine / Korb, Diane / Bourdon, Mathilde / Marcellin, Louis / de Ziegler, Dominique / Chapron, Charles. ·Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Cochin, Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Paris, France. · Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Cochin, Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Paris, France; Institut Cochin, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1016, Laboratoire d'Immunologie and Département de Génetique, Développement et Cancer, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. Electronic address: pietro.santulli@cch.aphp.fr. · Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Cochin, Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Paris, France; Institut Cochin, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1016, Laboratoire d'Immunologie and Département de Génetique, Développement et Cancer, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. ·Am J Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #27899313.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Assisted reproductive technology is one of the therapeutic options offered for managing endometriosis-associated infertility. Yet, published data on assisted reproductive technology outcome in women affected by endometriosis are conflicting and the determinant factors for pregnancy chances unclear. OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate assisted reproductive technology outcomes in a series of 359 endometriosis patients, to identify prognostic factors and determine if there is an impact of the endometriosis phenotype. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective observational cohort study, including 359 consecutive endometriosis patients undergoing in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, from June 2005 through February 2013 at a university hospital. Endometriotic lesions were classified into 3 phenotypes-superficial peritoneal endometriosis, endometrioma, or deep infiltrating endometriosis-based on imaging criteria (transvaginal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging); histological proof confirmed the diagnosis in women with a history of surgery for endometriosis. Main outcome measures were clinical pregnancy rates and live birth rates per cycle and per embryo transfer. Prognostic factors of assisted reproductive technology outcome were identified by comparing women who became pregnant and those who did not, using univariate and adjusted multiple logistic regression models. RESULTS: In all, 359 endometriosis patients underwent 720 assisted reproductive technology cycles. In all, 158 (44%) patients became pregnant, and 114 (31.8%) had a live birth. The clinical pregnancy rate and the live birth rate per embryo transfer were 36.4% and 22.8%, respectively. The endometriosis phenotype (superficial endometriosis, endometrioma, or deep infiltrating endometriosis) had no impact on assisted reproductive technology outcomes. After multivariate analysis, history of surgery for endometriosis (odds ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence ratio, 0.06-0.38) or past surgery for endometrioma (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence ratio, 0.18-0.84) were independent factors associated with lower pregnancy rates. Anti-müllerian hormone levels <2 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence ratio, 0.28-0.91) and antral follicle count <10 (odds ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence ratio, 0.14-0.53) were also associated with negative assisted reproductive technology outcomes. CONCLUSION: The endometriosis phenotype seems to have no impact on assisted reproductive technology results. An altered ovarian reserve and a previous surgery for endometriosis and/or endometrioma are associated with decreased pregnancy rates.

18 Article Risks of tubo-ovarian abscess in cases of endometrioma and assisted reproductive technologies are both under- and overreported. 2016

Villette, Claire / Bourret, Antoine / Santulli, Pietro / Gayet, Vanessa / Chapron, Charles / de Ziegler, Dominique. ·Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Medicine, Université Paris Descartes, Paris Sorbonne Cité-Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. · Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Medicine, Université Paris Descartes, Paris Sorbonne Cité-Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, Paris, France; Laboratoire d'Immunologie, Institut Cochin, Inserm Ua0af, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Département de Génetique, Développement et Cancer, Institut Cochin, Inserm, Ua0af, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Medicine, Université Paris Descartes, Paris Sorbonne Cité-Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. Electronic address: ddeziegler@me.com. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #27178227.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To study possible associations among endometriosis, pelvic infectious disease, and ART. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis over 4 consecutive years, based on medical records and insurance coding in a tertiary endometriosis reference center. SETTING: Tertiary university-based reference center for endometriosis. PATIENT(S): We retrieved all charts carrying the diagnoses infectious process and endometriosis in 2009-2012. Each chart was individually analyzed for categorization of the infectious episode and determining whether ART had been performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Hospitalization for acute infection in women with known endometriosis and possible past ART. INTERVENTION: Retrospective insurance codes-triggered chart analysis. RESULT(S): Ten patients were admitted for an acute infection with fever, acute abdomen syndrome, elevated white blood cell count, and adnexal mass. Three women had oocyte retrieval, and an endometrioma was present 16, 57, and 102 days earlier. In one patient, the complication occurred 37 days after a cesarean section without prior ART. In the remaining six cases tubo-ovarian abscesses (TOAs) occurred spontaneously in endometriosis women who never had ART. Medical treatment succeeded in only two patients, and the remaining eight needed laparoscopic drainage. In 6 out of those 8 cases, laparoscopic drainage was a second-stage measure justified by failure to respond to antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSION(S): Our data indicate that some putative complications of ART and endometrioma may actually not be linked to ART, but rather constitute sporadic occurrences in endometriosis. Furthermore, TOAs occurring in women with endometriosis are best treated by early surgical drainage together with intravenous antibiotics.

19 Article Endometriosis-related infertility: ovarian endometrioma per se is not associated with presentation for infertility. 2016

Santulli, P / Lamau, M C / Marcellin, L / Gayet, V / Marzouk, P / Borghese, B / Lafay Pillet, Marie-Christine / Chapron, C. ·Service de Chirurgie Gynécologie Obstétrique II et Médecine de la Reproduction, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre (HUPC), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Paris, France Equipe Génomique, Epigénétique et Physiopathologie de la Reproduction, Département Développement, Reproduction, Cancer, Inserm U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, AP-HP, HUPC, CHU Cochin, Paris, France Equipe Stress Oxydant, Prolifération Cellulaire et Inflammation, Département Développement, Reproduction, Cancer, Inserm U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, AP-HP, HUPC, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. · Service de Chirurgie Gynécologie Obstétrique II et Médecine de la Reproduction, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre (HUPC), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Paris, France. · Service de Chirurgie Gynécologie Obstétrique II et Médecine de la Reproduction, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre (HUPC), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Paris, France Equipe Stress Oxydant, Prolifération Cellulaire et Inflammation, Département Développement, Reproduction, Cancer, Inserm U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, AP-HP, HUPC, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. · Service de Chirurgie Gynécologie Obstétrique II et Médecine de la Reproduction, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre (HUPC), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Paris, France Equipe Génomique, Epigénétique et Physiopathologie de la Reproduction, Département Développement, Reproduction, Cancer, Inserm U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, AP-HP, HUPC, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. · Service de Chirurgie Gynécologie Obstétrique II et Médecine de la Reproduction, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre (HUPC), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Paris, France Equipe Génomique, Epigénétique et Physiopathologie de la Reproduction, Département Développement, Reproduction, Cancer, Inserm U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, AP-HP, HUPC, CHU Cochin, Paris, France charles.chapron@cch.aphp.fr. ·Hum Reprod · Pubmed #27130614.

ABSTRACT: STUDY QUESTION: Is there an association between the endometriosis phenotype and presentation with infertility? SUMMARY ANSWER: In a population of operated patients with histologically proven endometriosis, ovarian endometrioma (OMA) per se is not associated with an increased risk of presentation with infertility, while previous surgery for endometriosis was identified as a risk factor for infertility. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The increased prevalence of endometriosis among subfertile women indicates that endometriosis impairs reproduction for reasons that are not completely understood. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This was an observational, cross-sectional study using data prospectively collected in all non-pregnant patients aged between 18 and 42 years, who were surgically explored for benign gynaecological conditions at our institution between January 2004 and March 2013. For each patient, a standardized questionnaire was completed during a face-to-face interview conducted by the surgeon during the month preceding surgery. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Surgery was performed in 2208 patients, of which 2066 signed their informed consent. Of the 1059 women with a visual diagnosis of endometriosis, 870 had histologically proven endometriosis and complete treatment for their endometriotic lesions, including 307 who presented with infertility. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to determine factors associated with infertility. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The following variables were identified as risk factors for endometriosis-related infertility: age >32 years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-2.4), previous surgery for endometriosis (OR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3-2.2), as well as peritoneal superficial endometriosis (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.9-4.9); Conversely, previous pregnancy was associated with a lower rate of infertility (OR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.6-0.9 and OR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.9, respectively). OMA is not selected as a significant risk factor for infertility. LIMITATIONS, REASON FOR CAUTION: The selection of our study population was based on a surgical diagnosis. We cannot exclude that infertile women with OMA associated with a diminished ovarian reserve, as assessed during their infertility work-up, were referred less frequently to surgery and might therefore be underrepresented. In addition we cannot exclude that our group of infertile women present associated other causes of infertility. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Identification of risk and preventive factors of endometriosis-related infertility can help improve clinical and surgical management of endometriosis in the setting of infertility. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: None. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: None.

20 Article Endometriosis-related infertility: assisted reproductive technology has no adverse impact on pain or quality-of-life scores. 2016

Santulli, Pietro / Bourdon, Mathilde / Presse, Marion / Gayet, Vanessa / Marcellin, Louis / Prunet, Caroline / de Ziegler, Dominique / Chapron, Charles. ·Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Laboratoire d'Immunologie, Institut Cochin, Inserm, U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. Electronic address: pietro.santulli@cch.aphp.fr. · Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Laboratoire d'Immunologie, Institut Cochin, Inserm, U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Département de Génetique, Développement et Cancer, Institut Cochin, Inserm, U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Obstetrical, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology Research Team, Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institut Cochin, Inserm U1153, Paris, France. · Department of Gynaecology Obstetrics II and Reproductive Medicine, Faculté de Médecine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Universitaire Paris Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Département de Génetique, Développement et Cancer, Institut Cochin, Inserm, U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #26746132.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of assisted reproduction technology (ART) on painful symptoms and quality of life (QoL) in women who have endometriosis as compared with disease-free women. DESIGN: Prospective controlled, observational cohort study. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENT(S): Two hundred and sixty-four matched-pairs of endometriosis and disease-free women undergoing ART. INTERVENTION(S): Assessment of pain evolution using visual analogue scale (VAS) during ART; QoL assessment with the Fertility Quality of Life (FertiQoL) tool. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): VAS pain intensities relative to dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, noncyclic chronic pelvic pain (NCCPP), gastrointestinal pain, lower urinary tract pain; trends for VAS change between postretrieval and baseline evaluation; FertiQoL score; and statistical analyses conducted using univariate and adjusted multiple linear regression models. RESULT(S): After excluding canceled cycles and patients lost to follow-up observation, 102 women with endometriosis and 104 disease-free women were retained for the study. The trends for VAS change between the postretrieval and baseline evaluations in the women with endometriosis compared with the disease-free women revealed a statistically significant pain decrease for dysmenorrhea (-1.35 ± 3.23 and 0.61 ± 4.00) and dyspareunia (-1.19 ± 2.58 and 0.14 ± 2.06). For NCCPP, gastrointestinal symptoms, and lower urinary tract symptoms, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups. After multiple linear regression, no worsening of pain was observed in the endometriosis group as compared with disease-free group. In addition subgroup analysis according to endometriosis phenotype failed to show any increase of pain. The quality of life in the endometriosis group was comparable to that of the disease-free group. CONCLUSION(S): Assisted reproduction technology did not exacerbate the symptoms of endometriosis or negatively impact QoL in women with endometriosis as compared with disease-free women.

21 Article The changing prevalence of infertility. 2013

Petraglia, Felice / Serour, Gamal I / Chapron, Charles. ·Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Siena, Policlinico "Le Scotte", Siena, Italy. Electronic address: felice.petraglia@unisi.it. ·Int J Gynaecol Obstet · Pubmed #24112745.

ABSTRACT: Infertility is a major, multifaceted issue worldwide whose prevalence is increasing in both high- and low-income countries. The reasons are numerous, and may differ among world regions, but lifestyle and nutritional factors, epidemic infections, and sexually transmitted diseases are major determinants in most latitudes. Three other reasons may explain the increasing incidence of infertility. First, owing to the widespread use of contraception, the choice of delaying the first pregnancy until the third decade of life places men and women at higher risk for sexually transmitted diseases, and women at higher risk for uterine fibroids, endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and chronic anovulation. Second, prolonged exposure to chronic stress and environmental pollutants may play a critical role in decreasing fertility. Third, gonadotoxic oncologic treatments allow many patients to survive cancer, at the cost of their fertility. This consideration may justify the development of treatments that preserve fertility.

22 Article In women, the reproductive harm of toxins such as tobacco smoke is reversible in 6 months: basis for the "olive tree" hypothesis. 2013

de Ziegler, Dominique / Santulli, Pietro / Seroka, Alice / Decanter, Christine / Meldrum, David R / Chapron, Charles. ·Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Medicine, Université Paris Descartes, Paris Sorbonne Cité-Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, Paris, France; Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Service de Gynécologie Obstétrique II, Groupe d'Hôpitaux Paris Centre Cochin Broca Hôtel Dieu, Hôpital Cochin, Paris, France. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #23796366.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Article In women with endometriosis anti-Müllerian hormone levels are decreased only in those with previous endometrioma surgery. 2012

Streuli, Isabelle / de Ziegler, Dominique / Gayet, Vanessa / Santulli, Pietro / Bijaoui, Gérard / de Mouzon, Jacques / Chapron, Charles. ·Department of Obstetrics Gynaecology and Reproductive Medicine, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité - Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, 53, Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris, France. ·Hum Reprod · Pubmed #22821432.

ABSTRACT: STUDY QUESTION: Are anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels lower in women with endometriosis, notably those with endometriomas (OMAs) and deep infiltrating lesions, compared with controls without endometriosis? SUMMARY ANSWER: Endometriosis and OMAs per se do not result in lower AMH levels. AMH levels are decreased in women with previous OMA surgery independently of the presence of current OMAs. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The impact of endometriosis and OMAs per se on the ovarian reserve is controversial. Most previous studies have been conducted in infertile women. The strength of our study lies in the following points: (i) the selection of women undergoing surgery and not only according to the presence of infertility, (ii) the classification of women with endometriosis and controls based on strict surgical and histological criteria. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Cross-sectional study using data prospectively collected in all non-pregnant <42-year-old patients, who were surgically explored for a benign gynaecological condition at a university tertiary referral centre between 2004 and 2008. For each patient, a structured questionnaire was completed during a face-to-face interview conducted by the surgeon during the month preceding surgery. AMH levels were measured in serum samples drawn in the month preceding surgery, without regard to menstrual phase or hormonal therapy. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Operations were done on 1262 women between 2004 and 2008, of which 1133 signed the informed consent. Of the 566 women with a visual diagnosis of endometriosis, 411 had histologically proven endometriosis. Frozen serum samples for the AMH measurement were available in 313 of them. Out of the 554 women without visual endometriosis and without past endometriosis surgery, 413 had a frozen serum sample for the AMH measurement. Univariate analysis examined AMH levels according to baseline patient characteristics, the presence and type of endometriosis (superficial lesion, OMA, deep infiltrating lesion) and previous OMA surgery. Analysis of variance-covariance then examined the effects of co-variables on AMH levels. Finally, logistic regressions were conducted to examine the odds ratio (OR) of having AMH levels <1 ng/ml according to the same co-variables. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The difference in AMH levels between women with endometriosis and controls did not reach significance (3.6 ± 3.1 versus 4.1 ± 3.4 ng/ml, P = 0.06). Analysis of variance-covariance demonstrated that AMH levels significantly decreased with age (P < 0.001) and in women with prior OMA surgery irrespective of whether OMAs were present or not at the time of study (P < 0.05). Logistic regression revealed that two major factors were related to AMH levels <1 ng/ml: (i) age (compared with <29 years; 30-34 years OR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.5-6.4, P = 0.01; 35-39 years OR = 7.0, 95% CI: 3.5-14.1, P = 0.001; ≥40 years OR = 20.8, 95% CI: 9.1-47.4, P = 0.001) and (ii) prior OMA surgery (OR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.4-6.41, P = 0.01). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The selection of our study population was based on a surgical diagnosis. Women with an asymptomatic form of endometriosis are therefore not included in our study. We cannot exclude that infertile women with OMAs associated with a diminished ovarian reserve, as assessed during their infertility work-up, were less likely to be referred for surgery and might therefore be underrepresented. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Our findings suggest that OMAs per se do not diminish the ovarian reserve reflected by AMH levels but that alterations seen in women with endometriosis are a deleterious consequence of OMA surgery. These findings should be taken into account in the decision to operate OMAs in women with a desire for future pregnancy. STUDY FUNDING: none. Potential competing interests: none.

24 Article Infertility and endometriosis: a need for global management that optimizes the indications for surgery and ART. 2011

De Ziegler, D / Streuli, M I / Borghese, B / Bajouh, O / Abrao, M / Chapron, C. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, Paris Descartes University, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. ddeziegler@orange.fr ·Minerva Ginecol · Pubmed #21747345.

ABSTRACT: Endometriosis causes pelvic pain and infertility. Infertility results from effects of endometriosis exerted in the pelvic cavity, in the ovaries and/or on the uterus. Medical treatment effective on pain and at preventing disease recurrence following surgery is of no use for improving the chances of conceiving naturally. Surgery however improves the chances of conceiving in the 12-18 months afterward. Endometriosis through extension of the disease to the ovaries may harm ovarian response to COS needed in ART. Surgery for endometrioma(s) may further reduce ovarian responses to COS in case of endometriosis. Remarkably however, reduced ovarian responses due to endometriosis are not necessarily associated with reduced oocyte quality and ART outcome. Pre-ART treatment with oral contraceptives (OC) improves ART outcome in case of ovarian endometriosis particularly, if endometriomas are present at the time of oocyte retrieval. This measure requires however that a proper OC-FSH/hMG interval is respected and that "LH" effects are provided during the ovarian stimulation, using either hMG or small doses of hCG. These latter precautions prevent the adverse outcome reported in case of pre-ART use of OC when ovarian stimulation is conducted using r-FSH exclusively.

25 Article HIV-positive patients undertaking ART have longer infertility histories than age-matched control subjects. 2011

Santulli, Pietro / Gayet, Vanessa / Fauque, Patricia / Chopin, Nicolas / Dulioust, Emmanuel / Wolf, Jean Philippe / Chapron, Charles / de Ziegler, Dominique. ·Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Medicine, Université Paris Descartes-Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, CHU Cochin, Paris, France. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #20970124.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review 5 years of assisted reproductive treatments (ART) provided to couples affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DESIGN: Age-matched cohort study. SETTING: University-based tertiary center. PATIENT(S): Couples in whom the male (n = 87), female (n = 57), or both (n = 17) partners were HIV infected. The first ART cycle was compared with three sets of age-matched control subjects (3-to-1) which included 261, 171, and 51 couples, respectively. INTERVENTION(S): ART in HIV-infected couples and age-matched controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Infertility duration and ART outcome. RESULT(S): When initiating ART, all three HIV-infected groups had longer infertility histories, computed from when conception was attempted or infertility diagnosed, compared with noninfected age-matched control subjects. Outcome, however, was not different when only the male or female partner was infected, though with a trend toward higher cancellation and lower pregnancy rates. When both partners were HIV infected, cancellation were higher and pregnancy rates lower (12% versus 41.2%), than in age-matched control subjects. CONCLUSION(S): Our data showed longer infertility histories in all HIV-infected couples when undertaking their first ART. Outcome, however, was not altered when only one partner--male or female--was HIV infected. Efforts should therefore aim at assuring that HIV-infected couples access ART as promptly as their noninfected counterparts.

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