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Infertility: HELP
Articles by Richard H. Reindollar
Based on 8 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Richard H. Reindollar wrote the following 8 articles about Infertility.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Proposal for a national registry to monitor women with Turner syndrome seeking assisted reproductive technology. 2016

Lin, Angela E / Karnis, Megan F / Calderwood, Laurel / Crenshaw, Melissa / Bhatt, Ami / Souter, Irene / Silberbach, Michael / Reindollar, Richard H. ·Medical Genetics, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Ontario Network of Experts in Fertility, Burlington, Ontario, Canada; Gynecologic Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Medical Genetics, All Children's Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine, St. Petersburg, Florida. · Adult Congenital Heart Defect Service, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Pediatric Cardiology, Doernbecher Children's Hospital, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #26878093.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Gonadotropin therapy: a 20th century relic. 2012

Reindollar, Richard H / Goldman, Marlene B. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dartmouth Medical School, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756, USA. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #22463775.

ABSTRACT: Gonadotropin therapy has been a cornerstone of infertility therapy for half a century. From the very beginning, its use has been associated with a high rate of multiple births, particularly high order multiples, and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Initially, success rates seemed acceptable when used for superovulation (SO)/IUI therapy. However, as data from RCTs have emerged, reported outcomes suggest that we question the use of injectible gonadotropins. This manuscript examines the studies that have challenged gonadotropin use for SO/IUI and other research that supports reduced doses of gonadotropins for IVF. We examine the challenges for its continued use for SO/IUI and for moving to lower doses worldwide for IVF. We propose a future that views gonadotropins as a relic of the twentieth century.

3 Article Increasing access to infertility care- What will it take? 2017

Reindollar, Richard H. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire; and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #28965555.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Embryo transfer techniques: an American Society for Reproductive Medicine survey of current Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology practices. 2017

Toth, Thomas L / Lee, Malinda S / Bendikson, Kristin A / Reindollar, Richard H / Anonymous260902. ·Vincent Reproductive Medicine and IVF, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: TLTOTH@partners.org. · Vincent Reproductive Medicine and IVF, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · USC Fertility, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #28366408.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To better understand practice patterns and opportunities for standardization of ET. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): Not applicable. INTERVENTION(S): An anonymous 82-question survey was emailed to the medical directors of 286 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology member IVF practices. A follow-up survey composed of three questions specific to ET technique was emailed to the same medical directors. Descriptive statistics of the results were compiled. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): The survey assessed policies, protocols, restrictions, and specifics pertinent to the technique of ET. RESULT(S): There were 117 (41%) responses; 32% practice in academic settings and 68% in private practice. Responders were experienced clinicians, half of whom had performed <10 procedures during training. Ninety-eight percent of practices allowed all practitioners to perform ET; half did not follow a standardized ET technique. Multiple steps in the ET process were identified as "highly conserved;" others demonstrated discordance. ET technique is divided among [1] trial transfer followed immediately with ET (40%); [2] afterload transfer (30%); and [3] direct transfer without prior trial or afterload (27%). Embryos are discharged in the upper (66%) and middle thirds (29%) of the endometrial cavity and not closer than 1-1.5 cm from fundus (87%). Details of each step were reported and allowed the development of a "common" practice ET procedure. CONCLUSION(S): ET training and practices vary widely. Improved training and standardization based on outcomes data and best practices are warranted. A common practice procedure is suggested for validation by a systematic literature review.

5 Article A randomized clinical trial to determine optimal infertility treatment in older couples: the Forty and Over Treatment Trial (FORT-T). 2014

Goldman, Marlene B / Thornton, Kim L / Ryley, David / Alper, Michael M / Fung, June L / Hornstein, Mark D / Reindollar, Richard H. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire; Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire. Electronic address: marlene.b.goldman@dartmouth.edu. · Boston IVF, Waltham, Massachusetts. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire; American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #24796764.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the optimal infertility therapy for women at the end of their reproductive potential. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Academic medical centers and private infertility center in a state with mandated insurance coverage. PATIENT(S): Couples with ≥ 6 months of unexplained infertility; female partner aged 38-42 years. INTERVENTION(S): Randomized to treatment with two cycles of clomiphene citrate (CC) and intrauterine insemination (IUI), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)/IUI, or immediate IVF, followed by IVF if not pregnant. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Proportion with a clinically recognized pregnancy, number of treatment cycles, and time to conception after two treatment cycles and at the end of treatment. RESULT(S): We randomized 154 couples to receive CC/IUI (N = 51), FSH/IUI (N = 52), or immediate IVF (N = 51); 140 (90.9%) couples initiated treatment. The cumulative clinical pregnancy rates per couple after the first two cycles of CC/IUI, FSH/IUI, or immediate IVF were 21.6%, 17.3%, and 49.0%, respectively. After all treatments, 110 (71.4%) of 154 couples had conceived a clinically recognized pregnancy, and 46.1% had delivered at least one live-born baby; 84.2% of all live-born infants resulting from treatment were achieved via IVF. There were 36% fewer treatment cycles in the IVF arm compared with either COH/IUI arm, and the couples conceived a pregnancy leading to a live birth after fewer treatment cycles. CONCLUSION(S): A randomized controlled trial in older women with unexplained infertility to compare treatment initiated with two cycles of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation/IUI versus immediate IVF demonstrated superior pregnancy rates with fewer treatment cycles in the immediate IVF group. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00246506.

6 Article Female dietary antioxidant intake and time to pregnancy among couples treated for unexplained infertility. 2014

Ruder, Elizabeth H / Hartman, Terryl J / Reindollar, Richard H / Goldman, Marlene B. ·Department of Sports Medicine and Nutrition, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: eruder@pitt.edu. · Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire; Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #24355050.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine whether increased antioxidant intake in women is associated with shorter time to pregnancy (TTP) among a cohort of couples being treated for unexplained infertility. DESIGN: Secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Academic medical center associated with a private infertility center. PATIENTS: Females with unexplained infertility. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): The time it took to establish a pregnancy that led to a live birth. RESULT(S): Mean nutrient intake exceeded the estimated average requirement (EAR) for vitamins C and E. No differences in mean intake of any of the antioxidants were noted between women who delivered a live-born infant during the study period vs. those who did not. In multivariable models, intake of β-carotene from dietary supplements was associated with shorter TTP among women with body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m(2) (hazard ratio [HR] 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.53) and women <35 y (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.01-1.41). Intake of vitamin C from dietary supplements was associated with shorter TTP among women with BMI <25 kg/m(2) (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.03-1.15) and women <35 y (HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.18). Intake of vitamin E from dietary supplements among women ≥35 y also was associated with shorter TTP (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.13). CONCLUSION(S): Shorter TTP was observed among women with BMI <25 kg/m(2) with increasing vitamin C, women with BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) with increasing β-carotene, women <35 y with increasing β-carotene and vitamin C, and women ≥35 y with increasing vitamin E. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00260091.

7 Article A randomized clinical trial to evaluate optimal treatment for unexplained infertility: the fast track and standard treatment (FASTT) trial. 2010

Reindollar, Richard H / Regan, Meredith M / Neumann, Peter J / Levine, Bat-Sheva / Thornton, Kim L / Alper, Michael M / Goldman, Marlene B. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dartmouth Medical School and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756, USA. Richard.H.Reidollar@Hitchcock.org ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #19531445.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the value of gonadotropin/intrauterine insemination (FSH/IUI) therapy for infertile women aged 21-39 years. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Academic medical center associated with a private infertility center. PATIENT(S): Couples with unexplained infertility. INTERVENTION(S): Couples were randomized to receive either conventional treatment (n=247) with three cycles of clomiphene citrate (CC)/IUI, three cycles of FSH/IUI, and up to six cycles of IVF or an accelerated treatment (n=256) that omitted the three cycles of FSH/IUI. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): The time it took to establish a pregnancy that led to a live birth and cost-effectiveness, defined as the ratio of the sum of all health insurance charges between randomization and delivery divided by the number of couples delivering at least one live-born baby. RESULT(S): An increased rate of pregnancy was observed in the accelerated arm (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.56) compared with the conventional arm. Median time to pregnancy was 8 and 11 months in the accelerated and conventional arms, respectively. Per cycle pregnancy rates for CC/IUI, FSH/IUI, and IVF were 7.6%, 9.8%, and 30.7%, respectively. Average charges per delivery were $9,800 lower (95% CI, $25,100 lower to $3,900 higher) in the accelerated arm compared to conventional treatment. The observed incremental difference was a savings of $2,624 per couple for accelerated treatment and 0.06 more deliveries. CONCLUSION(S): A randomized clinical trial demonstrated that FSH/IUI treatment was of no added value.

8 Minor Treatment for couples with unexplained infertility: the female partner at the end of reproductive years. 2014

Goldman, Marlene B / Reindollar, Richard H. ·Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire. · American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #24794313.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --