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Infertility HELP
Based on 20,002 articles published since 2008
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These are the 20002 published articles about Infertility that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
51 Guideline Fertility preservation for patients with cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update. 2013

Loren, Alison W / Mangu, Pamela B / Beck, Lindsay Nohr / Brennan, Lawrence / Magdalinski, Anthony J / Partridge, Ann H / Quinn, Gwendolyn / Wallace, W Hamish / Oktay, Kutluk / Anonymous1531008. ·Institute for Fertility Preservation, New York Medical College, Rye, NY, USA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #23715580.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To update guidance for health care providers about fertility preservation for adults and children with cancer. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through January 2013 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Panel reviewed the evidence and updated the recommendation language. RESULTS: There were 222 new publications that met inclusion criteria. A majority were observational studies, cohort studies, and case series or reports, with few randomized clinical trials. After review of the new evidence, the Update Panel concluded that no major, substantive revisions to the 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations were warranted, but clarifications were added. RECOMMENDATIONS: As part of education and informed consent before cancer therapy, health care providers (including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gynecologic oncologists, urologists, hematologists, pediatric oncologists, and surgeons) should address the possibility of infertility with patients treated during their reproductive years (or with parents or guardians of children) and be prepared to discuss fertility preservation options and/or to refer all potential patients to appropriate reproductive specialists. Although patients may be focused initially on their cancer diagnosis, the Update Panel encourages providers to advise patients regarding potential threats to fertility as early as possible in the treatment process so as to allow for the widest array of options for fertility preservation. The discussion should be documented. Sperm and embryo cryopreservation as well as oocyte cryopreservation are considered standard practice and are widely available. Other fertility preservation methods should be considered investigational and should be performed by providers with the necessary expertise.

52 Guideline Management of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome guidelines. Produced on behalf of the BFS Policy and Practice Committee. 2013

Tan, Bee Kang / Mathur, Raj / Anonymous2900759. · ·Hum Fertil (Camb) · Pubmed #23705631.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

53 Guideline Consideration of the gestational carrier: a committee opinion. 2013

Anonymous2540754. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama 35216, USA. ASRM@asrm.org ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #23541404.

ABSTRACT: Gestational carriers have a right to be fully informed of the risks of the surrogacy process and of pregnancy, should receive psychological evaluation and counseling, and should have independent legal counsel.

54 Guideline Defining embryo donation: a committee opinion. 2013

Anonymous3740752. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama 35216, USA. ASRM@asrm.org ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #23481275.

ABSTRACT: Building families through adoption of children has been supported by human society throughout history. The ethical appropriateness of patients donating embryos to other patients for family building, or for research, is well established and is affirmed by this body. The use of the term "adoption" to embryos is inaccurate and should be avoided. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee statement by the same name, last published in 2009.

55 Guideline The clinical utility of sperm DNA integrity testing: a guideline. 2013

Anonymous4180749. · ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #23391408.

ABSTRACT: Sperm DNA damage is more common in infertile men and may contribute to poor reproductive performance. However, current methods for assessing sperm DNA integrity do not reliably predict treatment outcomes and cannot be recommended routinely for clinical use.

56 Guideline Recommendations for gamete and embryo donation: a committee opinion. 2013

Anonymous3120740 / Anonymous3130740. · ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #23095142.

ABSTRACT: This document provides the latest recommendations for evaluation of potential sperm, oocyte, and embryo donors, incorporating recent information about optimal screening and testing for sexually transmitted infections, genetic diseases, and psychological assessments. This revised document incorporates recent information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the American Association of Tissue Banks, with which all programs offering gamete and embryo donation services must be thoroughly familiar, and replaces the document titled, "2008 Guidelines for Gamete and Embryo Donation: A Practice Committee Report," last published in Fertil Steril 2008;90:S30-44.

57 Guideline German guidelines for psychosocial counselling in the area of "cross border reproductive services". 2013

Thorn, Petra / Wischmann, Tewes. ·Praxis für Paar-und Familientherapie, Langener Str. 37, 64546 Mörfelden, Germany. Mail@pthorn.de ·Arch Gynecol Obstet · Pubmed #23086135.

ABSTRACT: An increasing number of couples and individuals with a desire for a child travel abroad for assisted reproductive technologies that are not available in their home country. This trend has been coined "cross border reproductive services" (CBRS), often comprising third party reproduction. In order to respect the welfare of all parties involved, the German Society for Fertility Counselling has developed guidelines for psychosocial counselling in this area in 2010. The following article raises some of the controversies in CBRS and introduces these guidelines.

58 Guideline Recommendations for reducing the risk of viral transmission during fertility treatment with the use of autologous gametes: a committee opinion. 2013

Anonymous6590736. · ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #22975112.

ABSTRACT: This document provides strategies, based on scientific principles and clinical experience, to reduce the risk of viral transmission in couples seeking treatment for infertility using their own gametes. This document replaces the ASRM Practice Committee document, "Guidelines for reducing the risk of viral transmission during fertility treatment," last published in Fertil Steril 2008;90(5 Suppl):S156-62.

59 Guideline AIUM practice guideline for the performance of a focused reproductive endocrinology and infertility scan. 2012

Anonymous1790745 / Anonymous1800745 / Anonymous1810745 / Anonymous1820745 / Anonymous1830745. · ·J Ultrasound Med · Pubmed #23248819.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

60 Guideline [Mexican National Consensus on Assisted Reproduction Treatment]. 2012

Kably Ambe, Alberto / López Ortiz, Carlos Salazar / Serviere Zaragoza, Claudio / Velázquez Cornejo, Gerardo / Pérez Peña, Efrain / Santos Haliscack, Roberto / Luna Rojas, Martha / Valerio, Emilio / Santana, Héctor / Gaviño Gaviño, Fernando. · ·Ginecol Obstet Mex · Pubmed #23243837.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It is estimated that 15% of couples living in industrialized countries are infertile, ie have failed to conceive, reproductive age, after 12 months ormore of regular intercourse without contraception. During the past decade has increased the demand for fertility treatments because they believe are moreeffective now. OBJECTIVE: To unify the therapeutic approach and service to patients and set a precedent for a Mexican Official Standard respect and support for the legislation of these procedures. METHOD: Consensus by technical experts group panel with the participation of 34 national centers accredited for use in assisted reproduction. He organized seven workshops with the following themes: 1) selection of patients for assisted reproduction treatment, 2) schemes controlled ovarian stimulation for assisted reproduction techniques of high complexity, 3) preparation and egg retrieval technique, 4) transferembryo; 5) luteal phase supplementation; 6) indications and techniques of cryopreservation and 7) informed consent. Each table had a coordinator who wrote and presented the findings to the full, it made a number of observations until they reached unanimity of criteria, which are reflected in this document. RESULTS: Patient selection for assisted reproduction techniques is the first step of the process. Proper selection lead to success, in the same way that a bad pick up for failure. In the case of egg donation the most important recommendation is that only one to two embryos transferred in order to reduce multiple pregnancy rates and maintaining high pregnancy rates.

61 Guideline Canadian HIV Pregnancy Planning Guidelines: No. 278, June 2012. 2012

Anonymous2670741 / Anonymous2680741 / Anonymous2690741 / Anonymous2700741 / Anonymous2710741 / Anonymous2720741 / Loutfy, Mona R / Margolese, Shari / Money, Deborah M / Gysler, Mathias / Hamilton, Scot / Yudin, Mark H. · ·Int J Gynaecol Obstet · Pubmed #23125998.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Four main clinical issues need to be considered for HIV-positive individuals and couples with respect to pregnancy planning and counselling: (1) pre-conceptional health; (2) transmission from mother to infant, which has been significantly reduced by combined antiretroviral therapy; (3) transmission between partners during conception, which requires different prevention and treatment strategies depending on the status and needs of those involved; and (4) management of infertility issues. The objective of the Canadian HIV Pregnancy Planning Guidelines is to provide clinical information and recommendations for health care providers to assist HIV-positive individuals and couples with their fertility and pregnancy planning decisions. These guidelines are evidence- and community-based and flexible, and they take into account diverse and intersecting local/population needs and the social determinants of health. OUTCOMES: Intended outcomes are (1) reduction of risk of vertical transmission and horizontal transmission of HIV, (2) improvement of maternal and infant health outcomes in the presence of HIV, (3) reduction of the stigma associated with pregnancy and HIV, and (4) increased access to pregnancy planning and fertility services. EVIDENCE: PubMed and Medline were searched for articles published in English or French to December 20, 2010, using the following terms: "HIV" and "pregnancy" or "pregnancy planning" or "fertility" or "reproduction" or "infertility" or "parenthood" or "insemination" or "artificial insemination" or "sperm washing" or "IVF" or "ICSI" or "IUI." Other search terms included "HIV" and 'horizontal transmission" or "sexual transmission" or "serodiscordant." The following conference databases were also searched: Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, International AIDS Conference, International AIDS Society, Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, the Canadian Association of HIV/AIDS Research, and the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Research Conference. Finally, a hand search of key journals and conferences was performed, and references of retrieved articles were reviewed for additional citations. Subsequently, abstracts were categorized according to their primary topic (based on an outline of the guidelines) into table format with the following headings: author, title, study purpose, participants, results and general comments. Finally, experts in the field were consulted for their opinions as to whether any articles were missed. VALUES: The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table) and through use of the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation instrument for the development of clinical guidelines. SPONSORS: The Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada, Women and HIV Research Program, Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Abbott Laboratories Canada, the Ontario HIV Treatment Network, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Canadian HIV Trials Network.

62 Guideline Canadian HIV pregnancy planning guidelines. 2012

Loutfy, Mona R / Margolese, Shari / Money, Deborah M / Gysler, Mathias / Hamilton, Scot / Yudin, Mark H. ·Toronto ON. · Vancouver BC. · Mississauga ON. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #22673174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Four main clinical issues need to be considered for HIV-positive individuals and couples with respect to pregnancy planning and counselling: (1) pre-conceptional health; (2) transmission from mother to infant, which has been significantly reduced by combined antiretroviral therapy; (3) transmission between partners during conception, which requires different prevention and treatment strategies depending on the status and needs of those involved; and (4) management of infertility issues. The objective of the Canadian HIV Pregnancy Planning Guidelines is to provide clinical information and recommendations for health care providers to assist HIV-positive individuals and couples with their fertility and pregnancy planning decisions. These guidelines are evidence- and community-based and flexible, and they take into account diverse and intersecting local/population needs and the social determinants of health. OUTCOMES: Intended outcomes are (1) reduction of risk of vertical transmission and horizontal transmission of HIV, (2) improvement of maternal and infant health outcomes in the presence of HIV, (3) reduction of the stigma associated with pregnancy and HIV, and (4) increased access to pregnancy planning and fertility services. EVIDENCE: PubMed and Medline were searched for articles published in English or French to December 20, 2010, using the following terms: "HIV" and "pregnancy" or "pregnancy planning" or "fertility" or "reproduction" or "infertility" or "parenthood" or "insemination" or "artificial insemination" or "sperm washing" or "IVF" or "ICSI" or "IUI." Other search terms included "HIV" and "horizontal transmission" or "sexual transmission" or "serodiscordant." The following conference databases were also searched: Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, International AIDS Conference, International AIDS Society, Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, the Canadian Association of HIV/AIDS Research, and the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Research Conference. Finally, a hand search of key journals and conferences was performed, and references of retrieved articles were reviewed for additional citations. Subsequently, abstracts were categorized according to their primary topic (based on an outline of the guidelines) into table format with the following headings: author, title, study purpose, participants, results and general comments. Finally, experts in the field were consulted for their opinions as to whether any articles were missed. VALUES: The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table) and through use of the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation instrument for the development of clinical guidelines. SPONSORS: The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, Women and HIV Research Program, Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Abbott Laboratories Canada, the Ontario HIV Treatment Network, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Canadian HIV Trials Network. KEY POINTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: HIV-positive people who are considering pregnancy should be counselled on the following issues so they can make an informed decision.

63 Guideline European Association of Urology guidelines on Male Infertility: the 2012 update. 2012

Jungwirth, Andreas / Giwercman, Aleksander / Tournaye, Herman / Diemer, Thorsten / Kopa, Zsolt / Dohle, Gert / Krausz, Csilla / Anonymous2140726. ·EMCO Private Clinic, Bad Dürrnberg, Austria. andreas.jungwirth@utanet.at ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #22591628.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: New data regarding the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility have emerged and led to an update of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for Male Infertility. OBJECTIVE: To review the new EAU guidelines for Male Infertility. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A comprehensive work-up of the literature obtained from Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists in publications and review articles was developed and screened by a group of urologists and andrologists appointed by the EAU Guidelines Committee. Previous recommendations based on the older literature on this subject were taken into account. Levels of evidence and grade of guideline recommendations were added, modified from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence. EVIDENCE SUMMARY: These EAU guidelines are a short comprehensive overview of the updated guidelines of male infertility as recently published by the EAU (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/), and they are also available in the National Guideline Clearinghouse (http://www.guideline.gov/).

64 Guideline [Polish Gynecological Society and Polish Society for Reproductive Medicine recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of infertility]. 2012

Kuczyński, Waldemar / Kurzawa, Rafał / Oszukowski, Przemysław / Pawelczyk, Leszek / Poreba, Ryszard / Radowicki, Stanisław / Szamatowicz, Marian / Wołczyński, Sławomir / Anonymous3620725. · ·Ginekol Pol · Pubmed #22568363.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

65 Guideline Fertility treatment when the prognosis is very poor or futile: a committee opinion. 2012

Anonymous3730724. · ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #22537382.

ABSTRACT: The Ethics Committee recommends development of evidence-based policies that are patient-centered for each in vitro fertilization (IVF) center. In most cases, the provision of futile therapies is not ethically justifiable. For those treatments with very poor success rates, clinicians must be vigilant in their presentation of risks, benefits, and alternatives. This document was reviewed in January 2012. This version replaces the previous version of this document, published in 2009.

66 Guideline Advanced reproductive age and fertility: no. 269, November 2011. 2012

Kimberly, Liu / Case, Allison / Cheung, Anthony P / Sierra, Sony / AlAsiri, Saleh / Carranza-Mamane, Belina / Case, Allison / Dwyer, Cathie / Graham, James / Havelock, Jon / Hemmings, Robert / Lee, Francis / Liu, Kimberly / Murdock, Ward / Senikas, Vyta / Vause, Tannys D R / Wong, Benjamin Chee-Man. · ·Int J Gynaecol Obstet · Pubmed #22506284.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To improve awareness of the natural age-related decline in female and male fertility with respect to natural fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and provide recommendations for their management,and to review investigations in the assessment of ovarian aging. OPTIONS: This guideline reviews options for the assessment of ovarian reserve and fertility treatments using ART with women of advanced reproductive age presenting with infertility. OUTCOMES: The outcomes measured are the predictive value of ovarian reserve testing and pregnancy rates with natural and assisted fertility. EVIDENCE: Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in June 2010, using appropriate key words (ovarian aging, ovarian reserve, advanced maternal age, advanced paternal age, ART). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to December 2010. VALUES: The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table). BENEFITS, HARMS, AND COSTS: Primary and specialist health care providers and women will be better informed about ovarian aging and the age-related decline in natural fertility and about options for assisted reproductive technology.

67 Guideline Recommendations for practices utilizing gestational carriers: an ASRM Practice Committee guideline. 2012

Anonymous3100723 / Anonymous3110723. · ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #22503416.

ABSTRACT: This document provides the latest recommendations for evaluation of gestational carriers and intended parents. It incorporates recent information from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the American Association of Tissue Banks, with which all programs offering gestational carrier services must be thoroughly familiar.

68 Guideline AAGL practice report: practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of submucous leiomyomas. 2012

Anonymous4530719. · ·J Minim Invasive Gynecol · Pubmed #22381967.

ABSTRACT: Submucous leiomyomas or myomas are commonly encountered by gynecologists and specialists in reproductive endocrinology and infertility with patients presenting with 1 or a combination of symptoms that include heavy menstrual bleeding, infertility, and recurrent pregnancy loss. There exists a variety of interventions that include those performed under hysteroscopic, laparoscopic and laparotomic direction; an evolving spectrum of image guided procedures, and an expanding number of pharmaceutical agents, each of which has value for the appropriately selected and counseled patient. Identification of the ideal approach requires the clinician to be intimately familiar with a given patient's history, including her desires with respect to fertility, as well as an appropriately detailed evaluation of the uterus with any one or a combination of a number of imaging techniques, including hysteroscopy. This guideline has been developed following a systematic review of the evidence, to provide guidance to the clinician caring for such patients, and to assist the clinical investigator in determining potential areas of research. Where high level evidence was lacking, but where a majority of opinion or consensus could be reached, the guideline development committee provided consensus recommendations as well.

69 Guideline Elective single-embryo transfer. 2012

Anonymous100714 / Anonymous110714. · ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #22196716.

ABSTRACT: As in vitro fertilization implantation rates have improved, the practice of transfering multiple embryos must be evaluated. The purpose of this document is to reassess the literature on elective single-embryo transfer, to provide guidance for patient selection, and to discuss barriers to utilization.

70 Guideline Multiple gestation associated with infertility therapy: an American Society for Reproductive Medicine Practice Committee opinion. 2012

Anonymous6230713. · ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #22192352.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this committee opinion, which replaces the 2006 ASRM Practice Committee document titled Multiple Pregnancy Associated with Infertility Therapy, is to provide physicians with pertinent information that may help to avoid multiple gestations and to aid in patient counseling regarding the associated risks.

71 Guideline [Evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of male infertility]. 2011

Anonymous1390713. · ·Ginecol Obstet Mex · Pubmed #22168123.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

72 Guideline [Basic analysis of the infertile couple]. 2011

Anonymous1310713. · ·Ginecol Obstet Mex · Pubmed #22168115.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

73 Guideline [Infertility prevention]. 2011

Anonymous1300713. · ·Ginecol Obstet Mex · Pubmed #22168114.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

74 Guideline Advanced reproductive age and fertility. 2011

Liu, Kimberly / Case, Allison / Anonymous3790710. ·Toronto ON. · Saskatoon SK. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #22082792.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To improve awareness of the natural age-related decline in female and male fertility with respect to natural fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and provide recommendations for their management, and to review investigations in the assessment of ovarian aging. OPTIONS: This guideline reviews options for the assessment of ovarian reserve and fertility treatments using ART with women of advanced reproductive age presenting with infertility. OUTCOMES: The outcomes measured are the predictive value of ovarian reserve testing and pregnancy rates with natural and assisted fertility. EVIDENCE: Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in June 2010, using appropriate key words (ovarian aging, ovarian reserve, advanced maternal age, advanced paternal age, ART). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to December 2010. VALUES: The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table). BENEFITS, HARMS, AND COSTS: Primary and specialist health care providers and women will be better informed about ovarian aging and the age-related decline in natural fertility and about options for assisted reproductive technology. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. Women in their 20s and 30s should be counselled about the age-related risk of infertility when other reproductive health issues, such as sexual health or contraception, are addressed as part of their primary well-woman care. Reproductive-age women should be aware that natural fertility and assisted reproductive technology success (except with egg donation) is significantly lower for women in their late 30s and 40s. (II-2A) 2. Because of the decline in fertility and the increased time to conception that occurs after the age of 35, women > 35 years of age should be referred for infertility work-up after 6 months of trying to conceive. (III-B) 3. Ovarian reserve testing may be considered for women ≥ 35 years of age or for women < 35 years of age with risk factors for decreased ovarian reserve, such as a single ovary, previous ovarian surgery, poor response to follicle-stimulating hormone, previous exposure to chemotherapy or radiation, or unexplained infertility. (III-B) 4. Ovarian reserve testing prior to assisted reproductive technology treatment may be used for counselling but has a poor predictive value for non-pregnancy and should be used to exclude women from treatment only if levels are significantly abnormal. (II-2A) 5. Pregnancy rates for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation are low for women > 40 years of age. Women > 40 years should consider IVF if they do not conceive within 1 to 2 cycles of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. (II-2B) 6. The only effective treatment for ovarian aging is oocyte donation. A woman with decreased ovarian reserve should be offered oocyte donation as an option, as pregnancy rates associated with this treatment are significantly higher than those associated with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation or in vitro fertilization with a woman's own eggs. (II-2B) 7. Women should be informed that the risk of spontaneous pregnancy loss and chromosomal abnormalities increases with age. Women should be counselled about and offered appropriate prenatal screening once pregnancy is established. (II-2A) 8. Pre-conception counselling regarding the risks of pregnancy with advanced maternal age, promotion of optimal health and weight, and screening for concurrent medical conditions such as hypertension and diabetes should be considered for women > age 40. (III-B) 9. Advanced paternal age appears to be associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion and increased frequency of some autosomal dominant conditions, autism spectrum disorders, and schizophrenia. Men > age 40 and their partners should be counselled about these potential risks when they are seeking pregnancy, although the risks remain small. (II-2C).

75 Guideline Disclosure of medical errors involving gametes and embryos. 2011

Anonymous2740708. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #22019125.

ABSTRACT: Medical providers have an ethical duty to immediately disclose clinical errors involving gametes or embryos; clinics should have written policies in place for reducing and disclosing errors. This document was reviewed and affirmed in 2011 and replaces the earlier document of the same name.

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