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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Jeroen S. Benjamins
Based on 5 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Jeroen S. Benjamins wrote the following 5 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Insomnia heterogeneity: Characteristics to consider for data-driven multivariate subtyping. 2017

Benjamins, Jeroen S / Migliorati, Filippo / Dekker, Kim / Wassing, Rick / Moens, Sarah / Blanken, Tessa F / Te Lindert, Bart H W / Sjauw Mook, Jeffrey / Van Someren, Eus J W. ·Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Social, Health and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Experimental Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Social Brain Lab, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Neuroscience Amsterdam, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Neuroscience Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: e.van.someren@nin.knaw.nl. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #29066053.

ABSTRACT: Meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported surprisingly few consistent insomnia-characteristics with respect to cognitions, mood, traits, history of life events and family history. One interpretation of this limited consistency is that different subtypes of insomnia exist, each with its own specific multivariate profile of characteristics. Because previously unrecognized subtypes will be differentially represented in individual studies and dilute effect sizes of subtype-dependent characteristics of importance, they are unlikely to be reported consistently in individual studies, let alone in meta-analyses. This review therefore aims to complement meta-analyses by listing previously reported psychometric characteristics of insomnia, irrespective of the degree of consistency over studies. The review clearly indicates that characteristics of insomnia may not be limited to sleep. Reports suggest that at least some individuals with insomnia may deviate from people without sleep complaints with respect to demographics, mental and physical health, childhood trauma, life events, fatigue, sleepiness, hyperarousal, hyperactivity, other sleep disorders, lifetime sleep history, chronotype, depression, anxiety, mood, quality of life, personality, happiness, worry, rumination, self-consciousness, sensitivity, dysfunctional beliefs, self-conscious emotion regulation, coping, nocturnal mentation, wake resting-state mentation, physical activity, food intake, temperature perception and hedonic evaluation. The value of this list of characteristics is that 1) internet has now made it feasible to asses them all in a large sample of people suffering from insomnia, and 2) statistical methods like latent class analysis and community detection can utilize them for a truly bottom-up data-driven search for subtypes. The supplement to this review provides a blueprint of this multivariate approach as implemented in the Sleep registry platform (www.sleepregistry.nl), that allows for bottom-up subtyping and fosters cross-cultural comparison and worldwide collaboration on insomnia subtype finding - and beyond.

2 Article Genome-wide analysis of insomnia in 1,331,010 individuals identifies new risk loci and functional pathways. 2019

Jansen, Philip R / Watanabe, Kyoko / Stringer, Sven / Skene, Nathan / Bryois, Julien / Hammerschlag, Anke R / de Leeuw, Christiaan A / Benjamins, Jeroen S / Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B / Nagel, Mats / Savage, Jeanne E / Tiemeier, Henning / White, Tonya / Anonymous3351197 / Tung, Joyce Y / Hinds, David A / Vacic, Vladimir / Wang, Xin / Sullivan, Patrick F / van der Sluis, Sophie / Polderman, Tinca J C / Smit, August B / Hjerling-Leffler, Jens / Van Someren, Eus J W / Posthuma, Danielle. ·Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Social, Health and Organisational Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Genetics, Section of Complex Trait Genetics, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · 23andMe, Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA. · Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (an institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences), Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Departments of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. d.posthuma@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Genetics, Section of Complex Trait Genetics, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. d.posthuma@vu.nl. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #30804565.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is the second most prevalent mental disorder, with no sufficient treatment available. Despite substantial heritability, insight into the associated genes and neurobiological pathways remains limited. Here, we use a large genetic association sample (n = 1,331,010) to detect novel loci and gain insight into the pathways, tissue and cell types involved in insomnia complaints. We identify 202 loci implicating 956 genes through positional, expression quantitative trait loci, and chromatin mapping. The meta-analysis explained 2.6% of the variance. We show gene set enrichments for the axonal part of neurons, cortical and subcortical tissues, and specific cell types, including striatal, hypothalamic, and claustrum neurons. We found considerable genetic correlations with psychiatric traits and sleep duration, and modest correlations with other sleep-related traits. Mendelian randomization identified the causal effects of insomnia on depression, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, and the protective effects of educational attainment and intracranial volume. Our findings highlight key brain areas and cell types implicated in insomnia, and provide new treatment targets.

3 Article Wake High-Density Electroencephalographic Spatiospectral Signatures of Insomnia. 2016

Colombo, Michele A / Ramautar, Jennifer R / Wei, Yishul / Gomez-Herrero, Germán / Stoffers, Diederick / Wassing, Rick / Benjamins, Jeroen S / Tagliazucchi, Enzo / van der Werf, Ysbrand D / Cajochen, Christian / Van Someren, Eus J W. ·Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN), an institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Faculty of Biology, and Bernstein Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel (UPK), Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Departments of Integrative Neurophysiology and Psychiatry, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University and Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Sleep · Pubmed #26951395.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Although daytime complaints are a defining characteristic of insomnia, most EEG studies evaluated sleep only. We used high-density electroencephalography to investigate wake resting state oscillations characteristic of insomnia disorder (ID) at a fine-grained spatiospectral resolution. METHODS: A case-control assessment during eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) was performed in a laboratory for human physiology. Participants (n = 94, 74 female, 21-70 y) were recruited through www.sleepregistry.nl: 51 with ID, according to DSM-5 and 43 matched controls. Exclusion criteria were any somatic, neurological or psychiatric condition. Group differences in the spectral power topographies across multiple frequencies (1.5 to 40 Hz) were evaluated using permutation-based inference with Threshold-Free Cluster-Enhancement, to correct for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: As compared to controls, participants with ID showed less power in a narrow upper alpha band (11-12.7 Hz, peak: 11.7 Hz) over bilateral frontal and left temporal regions during EO, and more power in a broad beta frequency range (16.3-40 Hz, peak: 19 Hz) globally during EC. Source estimates suggested global rather than cortically localized group differences. CONCLUSIONS: The widespread high power in a broad beta band reported previously during sleep in insomnia is present as well during eyes closed wakefulness, suggestive of a round-the-clock hyperarousal. Low power in the upper alpha band during eyes open is consistent with low cortical inhibition and attentional filtering. The fine-grained HD-EEG findings suggest that, while more feasible than PSG, wake EEG of short duration with a few well-chosen electrodes and frequency bands, can provide valuable features of insomnia.

4 Article Slow dissolving of emotional distress contributes to hyperarousal. 2016

Wassing, Rick / Benjamins, Jeroen S / Dekker, Kim / Moens, Sarah / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Feige, Bernd / Riemann, Dieter / van der Sluis, Sophie / Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D / Talamini, Lucia M / Walker, Matthew P / Schalkwijk, Frans / Van Someren, Eus J W. ·Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1105 BA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; r.wassing@nin.knaw.nl. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1105 BA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Social, Health and Organizational Psychology, Experimental Psychology Section, Utrecht University, 3584 CS, Utrecht, The Netherlands; · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1105 BA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; · Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychophysiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg, Germany; · Department of Clinical Genetics, Complex Trait Genetics Section, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; · Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; · Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, 1021 WX, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; · Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1650; · Institute for Psychotherapy, 1076 AP, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1105 BA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Medical Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, 1081 HZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Integrative Neurophysiology, Neuroscience Campus, Vrije Universiteit, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A · Pubmed #26858434.

ABSTRACT: The mechanisms underlying hyperarousal, the key symptom of insomnia, have remained elusive, hampering cause-targeted treatment. Recently, restless rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep emerged as a robust signature of sleep in insomnia. Given the role of REM sleep in emotion regulation, we hypothesized that restless REM sleep could interfere with the overnight resolution of emotional distress, thus contributing to accumulation of arousal. Participants (n = 1,199) completed questionnaires on insomnia severity, hyperarousal, self-conscious emotional distress, and thought-like nocturnal mentation that was validated to be a specific proxy for restless REM sleep (selective fragmentation: R = 0.57, P < 0.001; eye movement density: R = 0.46, P < 0.01) in 32 polysomnographically assessed participants. The experience of distress lasting overnight increased with insomnia severity (β = 0.29, P < 10(-23)), whereas short-lasting distress did not (β = -0.02, P = 0.41). Insomnia severity was associated with hyperarousal (β = 0.47, P < 10(-63)) and with the thought-like nocturnal mentation that is specifically associated with restless REM sleep (β = 0.31, P < 10(-26)). Structural equation modeling showed that 62.4% of the association between these key characteristics of insomnia was mediated specifically by reduced overnight resolution of emotional distress. The model outperformed all alternative mediation pathways. The findings suggest that restless REM sleep reflects a process that interferes with the overnight resolution of distress. Its accumulation may promote the development of chronic hyperarousal, giving clinical relevance to the role of REM sleep in emotion regulation in insomnia, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder.

5 Article Effectiveness of internet-supported cognitive behavioral and chronobiological interventions and effect moderation by insomnia subtype: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial. 2015

Dekker, Kim / Benjamins, Jeroen S / Van Straten, Annemieke / Hofman, Winni F / Van Someren, Eus J W. ·Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 BA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. k.dekker@nin.knaw.nl. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS, Utrecht, The Netherlands. j.s.benjamins@uu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam & EMGO Institute for Health Care and Research, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. a.van.straten@vu.nl. · Department of Psychology, Brain and Cognition group, University of Amsterdamy, Weesperplein 4, 1018 XA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. w.f.hofman@uva.nl. · Personal Health Institute International, Lobo-Braakensiekstraat 94, 1065 HP, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. w.f.hofman@uva.nl. · Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 BA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. e.van.someren@nin.knaw.nl. · Departments of Integrative Neurophysiology and Medical Psychology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University and Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. e.van.someren@nin.knaw.nl. ·Trials · Pubmed #26141682.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: DSM-V criteria for insomnia disorder are met by 6 to 10% of the adult population. Insomnia has severe consequences for health and society. One of the most common treatments provided by primary caregivers is pharmacological treatment, which is far from optimal and has not been recommended since a 2005 consensus report of the National Institutes of Health. The recommended treatment is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia. Effectiveness, however, is still limited. Only a few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of chronobiological treatments, including the timed application of bright light, physical activity and body warming. Another opportunity for optimization of treatment is based on the idea that the people suffering from insomnia most likely represent a heterogeneous mix of subtypes, with different underlying causes and expected treatment responses. The present study aims to evaluate the possibility for optimizing insomnia treatment along the principles of personalized and stratified medicine. It evaluates the following: 1. The relative effectiveness of internet-supported cognitive behavioral therapy, bright light, physical activity and body warming; 2. Whether the effectiveness of internet-supported cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia can be augmented by simultaneous or prior application of bright light, physical activity and body warming; and 3. Whether the effectiveness of the interventions and their combination are moderated by the insomnia subtype. METHODS/DESIGN: In a repeated measures, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial that included 160 people diagnosed with insomnia disorder, we are evaluating the relative effectiveness of 4 intervention weeks. Primary outcome is subjective sleep efficiency, quantified using a sleep diary. Secondary outcomes include other complaints of sleep and daytime functioning, health-related cost estimates and actigraphic objective sleep estimates. Compliance will be monitored both subjectively and objectively using activity, light and temperature sensors. Insomnia subtypes will be assessed using questionnaires. Mixed effect models will be used to evaluate intervention effects and moderation by insomnia subtype ratings. DISCUSSION: The current study addresses multiple opportunities to optimize and personalize treatment of insomnia disorder. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands National Trial Register NTR4010, 4 June 2013.