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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Yves A. Dauvilliers
Based on 20 articles published since 2009
(Why 20 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Yves Dauvilliers wrote the following 20 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Heritability in chronic insomnia: commentary on Yun-Kwok Wing et al. familial aggregation and heritability of insomnia in a community-based study Sleep Med 2012. 2012

Dauvilliers, Yves. · ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #22841024.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Hypertension and sleep: overview of a tight relationship. 2014

Pepin, Jean-Louis / Borel, Anne-Laure / Tamisier, Renaud / Baguet, Jean-Philippe / Levy, Patrick / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·HP2 Laboratory, INSERM U1042, Grenoble Alpes University, Grenoble, France; Grenoble University Hospital, EFCR Laboratory, Locomotion, Rehabilitation and Physiology Department, Grenoble, France. Electronic address: JPepin@chu-grenoble.fr. · HP2 Laboratory, INSERM U1042, Grenoble Alpes University, Grenoble, France; Grenoble University Hospital, Endocrinology Department, Grenoble, France. · HP2 Laboratory, INSERM U1042, Grenoble Alpes University, Grenoble, France; Grenoble University Hospital, EFCR Laboratory, Locomotion, Rehabilitation and Physiology Department, Grenoble, France. · Grenoble University Hospital, Cardiology Department, Grenoble, France. · Sleep Unit, Department of Neurology, Hopital-Gui-de Chauliac, CHU Montpellier, National Reference Network for Narcolepsy, and INSERM U1061, Montpellier, France. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #24846771.

ABSTRACT: Autonomic cardiovascular control changes across sleep stages. Thus, blood pressure (BP), heart rate and peripheral vascular resistance progressively decrease in non-rapid eye movement sleep. Any deterioration in sleep quality or quantity may be associated with an increase in nocturnal BP which could participate in the development or poor control of hypertension. In the present report, sleep problems/disorders, which impact either the quality or quantity of sleep, are reviewed for their interaction with BP regulation and their potential association with prevalent or incident hypertension. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, sleep duration/deprivation, insomnia, restless legs syndrome and narcolepsy are successively reviewed. Obstructive sleep apnea is clearly associated with the development of hypertension that is only slightly reduced by continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Shorter and longer sleep durations are associated with prevalent or incident hypertension but age, gender, environmental exposures and ethnic differences are clear confounders. Insomnia with objective short sleep duration, restless legs syndrome and narcolepsy may impact BP control, needing additional studies to establish their impact in the development of permanent hypertension. Addressing sleep disorders or sleep habits seems a relevant issue when considering the risk of developing hypertension or the control of pre-existent hypertension. Combined sleep problems may have potential synergistic deleterious effects.

3 Review Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management. 2011

Mayer, Geert / Jennum, Poul / Riemann, Dieter / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·Hephata Klinik, Schwalmstadt-Treysa, Germany. geert.mayer@hephata.com ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #21481621.

ABSTRACT: The objective of this review is to highlight the impact of insomnia in central neurological disorders by providing information on its prevalence and give recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia in neurological disorders is a frequent, but underestimated symptom. Its occurrence may be a direct consequence of the disease itself or may be secondary to pain, depression, other sleep disorders or the effects of medications. Insomnia can have a significant impact on the patient's cognitive and physical function and may be associated with psychological distress and depression. Diagnosis of insomnia is primarily based on medical history and validated questionnaires. Actigraphy is a helpful diagnostic tool for assessing the circadian sleep-wake rhythm. For differential diagnosis and to measure the duration of sleep full polysomnography may be recommended. Prior to initiating treatment the cause of insomnia must be clearly identified. First line treatment aims at the underlying neurologic disease. The few high quality treatment studies show that short term treatment with hypnotics may be recommended in most disorders after having ruled out high risk for adverse effects. Sedating antidepressants may be an effective treatment for insomnia in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Melatonin and light treatment can stabilize the sleep-wake circadian rhythm and shorten sleep latency in dementias and PD. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be effective in treating insomnia symptoms associated with most of the central neurological diseases. The prevalence and treatment of insomnia in neurological diseases still need to be studied in larger patient groups with randomized clinical trials to a) better understand their impact and causal relationship and b) to develop and improve specific evidence-based treatment strategies.

4 Article Insomnia: 10 key messages 2017

Dauvilliers, Yves / M Morin, Charles. ·Centre national de référence narcolepsie, hypersomnie idiopathique, unité des troubles du sommeil - département de neurologie, hôpital Gui-de- Chauliac ; Inserm U1061, hôpital La Colombière, université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France. · Université Laval, École de psychologie, Québec, QC, Canada. ·Rev Prat · Pubmed #30512818.

ABSTRACT:

5 Article Definitions and epidemiology of insomnia 2017

Jaussent, Isabelle / Morin, Charles / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·Inserm - unité 1061, hôpital La Colombière, Montpellier, France. · École de psychologie, université Laval ; centre de recherche CERVO, Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Québec, Québec, QC, Canada. · Centre national de référence narcolepsie, hypersomnies idiopathiques, unité des troubles du sommeil - département de neurologie, hôpital Gui-de- Chauliac ; Inserm U1061, hôpital La Colombière, université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France. ·Rev Prat · Pubmed #30512811.

ABSTRACT: Definitions and epidemiology of insomnia Complaints of poor sleep are numerous and frequent in the general population. One of the most important is insomnia. As it is a subjective complaint, it can be difficult to define and diagnose. Various nosologies propose a common definition even if no consensus has yet been reached. Insomnia may be associated to or be the consequence of various psychiatric and somatic comorbidities. The purpose of this article is to present various definitions used to diagnose insomnia and provide updated knowledge about its prevalence, incidence, determinants and consequences.

6 Article Insomnia: so frequent and insufficiently supported 2017

Dauvilliers, Yves / M Morin, Charles. ·Centre national de référence narcolepsie, hypersomnies idiopathiques, unité des troubles du sommeil - département de neurologie, hôpital Gui-de- Chauliac ; Inserm U1061, hôpital La Colombière, université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France. · Université Laval, École de psychologie, Québec, QC, Canada. ·Rev Prat · Pubmed #30512810.

ABSTRACT:

7 Article Familial Aggregation of Insomnia. 2017

Jarrin, Denise C / Morin, Charles M / Rochefort, Amélie / Ivers, Hans / Dauvilliers, Yves A / Savard, Josée / LeBlanc, Mélanie / Merette, Chantal. ·École de psychologie, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada. · Centre d'étude des troubles du sommeil, Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Québec, Québec City, Québec, Canada. · National Reference Centre for Orphan Diseases, Narcolepsy, Sleep Unit, Department of Neurology, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, CHU Montpellier, Inserm, U1061 Montpellier, France. ·Sleep · Pubmed #28364499.

ABSTRACT: Study Objectives: There is little information about familial aggregation of insomnia; however, this type of information is important to (1) improve our understanding of insomnia risk factors and (2) to design more effective treatment and prevention programs. This study aimed to investigate evidence of familial aggregation of insomnia among first-degree relatives of probands with and without insomnia. Methods: Cases (n = 134) and controls (n = 145) enrolled in a larger epidemiological study were solicited to invite their first-degree relatives and spouses to complete a standardized sleep/insomnia survey. In total, 371 first-degree relatives (Mage = 51.9 years, SD = 18.0; 34.3% male) and 138 spouses (Mage = 55.5 years, SD = 12.2; 68.1% male) completed the survey assessing the nature, severity, and frequency of sleep disturbances. The dependent variable was insomnia in first-degree relatives and spouses. Familial aggregation was claimed if the risk of insomnia was significantly higher in the exposed (relatives of cases) compared to the unexposed cohort (relatives of controls). The risk of insomnia was also compared between spouses in the exposed (spouses of cases) and unexposed cohort (spouses of controls). Results: The risk of insomnia in exposed and unexposed biological relatives was 18.6% and 10.4%, respectively, yielding a relative risk (RR) of 1.80 (p = .04) after controlling for age and sex. The risk of insomnia in exposed and unexposed spouses was 9.1% and 4.2%, respectively; however, corresponding RR of 2.13 (p = .28) did not differ significantly. Conclusions: Results demonstrate evidence of strong familial aggregation of insomnia. Additional research is warranted to further clarify and disentangle the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors in insomnia.

8 Article Impact of sleep disturbances on kidney function decline in the elderly. 2016

Jaussent, Isabelle / Cristol, Jean-Paul / Stengel, Benedicte / Ancelin, Marie-Laure / Dupuy, Anne-Marie / Besset, Alain / Helmer, Catherine / Ritchie, Karen / Berr, Claudine / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, France Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France isabelle.jaussent@inserm.fr. · Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France Laboratoire de Biochimie, CHRU de Montpellier, Montpellier, France Inserm, U1046, CNRS UMR 9214, Montpellier, France. · Inserm U1018, Team 5, Villejuif, France Université Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France Université Versailles-Saint-Quentin, France. · Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, France Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France. · Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, France Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France Laboratoire de Biochimie, CHRU de Montpellier, Montpellier, France. · Inserm, U897, Bordeaux, France Université de Bordeaux, ISPED, Bordeaux, France. · Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, France Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London, UK. · Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, France Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France Service de Neurologie, Unité des Troubles du Sommeil, CHU Montpellier, Hôpital Gui-de-Chauliac, Montpellier, France. ·Eur Respir J · Pubmed #26647438.

ABSTRACT: While sleep disturbances are frequent in renal disease patients, no studies have examined prospectively the associations between sleep disturbances and kidney function decline in community-dwelling elderly subjects.Glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) were estimated at baseline and at 11-year follow-up. A glomerular filtration decline over the follow-up period was defined as a percentage decline greater than or equal to the cut-off value of the highest tertile of kidney function decline (22%) in 1105 subjects. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and insomnia complaints were self-rated at baseline. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and its age at onset were assessed at study end-point. An ambulatory polysomnography recording was performed during the follow-up in 277 subjects. Apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and total sleep time were analysed.An increased risk of eGFR decline was associated with EDS (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.18-2.34) and RLS (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.18-3.30) independently of potential confounders including cardiovascular risk factors. Among insomnia complaints, a borderline association with eGFR decline was found for early morning awakening only. High AHI (≥30 events·h(-1)) and short total sleep time (<6 h), but not PLMS were linked to eGFR decline in crude associations, but only AHI remained significantly associated after multi-adjustments.EDS, RLS and AHI constitute independent risk factors for kidney glomerular function decline.

9 Article Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Symptoms in Pediatric Narcolepsy: A Cross-Sectional Study. 2015

Lecendreux, Michel / Lavault, Sophie / Lopez, Régis / Inocente, Clara Odilia / Konofal, Eric / Cortese, Samuele / Franco, Patricia / Arnulf, Isabelle / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·AP-HP, Pediatric Sleep Center, CHU Robert-Debré, Paris, France. · National Reference Centre for Orphan Diseases, Narcolepsy, Idiopathic hypersomnia and Kleine-Levin Syndrome, France. · AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpétrière, Service des Pathologies du Sommeil & Université Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, Centre de Recherche de l'Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière, Paris, France. · Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, Gui-de-Chauliac Hospital, CHU Montpellier, Inserm U1061, Montpellier, France. · Integrative Physiology of Brain Arousal System, CRNL, University Lyon 1, Lyon, France. · Department of Psychology, Developmental Brain-Behaviour Laboratory, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · New York University Child Study Center, New York, NY. · Pediatric Sleep Unit, Hôpital Femme-Mère Enfant, University Lyon 1, Lyon, France. ·Sleep · Pubmed #26118560.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the frequency, severity, and associations of symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with narcolepsy with and without cataplexy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTINGS: Four French national reference centers for narcolepsy. PATIENTS: One hundred eight consecutively referred children aged younger than 18 y with narcolepsy, with (NwC, n = 86) or without cataplexy (NwoC, n = 22), and 67 healthy controls. INTERVENTIONS: The participants, their families, and sleep specialists completed a structured interview and questionnaires about sleep, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and ADHD symptoms (ADHD-rating scale based upon Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision [DSM-IV-TR] symptoms), and use of psychostimulants for the treatment of narcolepsy (administered in 68.2%). Polysomnographic measures were collected. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Clinically significant levels of ADHD symptoms were found in 4.8% of controls compared with 35.3% in patients with NwoC (P < 0.001) and 19.7% in patients with NwC (P < 0.01). Total ADHD scores were 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.5, 9.0) in controls compared with 14.2 (95% CI: 10.6, 18.9; P < 0.001), in patients with NwoC and 12.2 (95% CI: 9.8, 15.3; P < 0.01) in patients with NwC; subscores of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity were also significantly higher in both narcolepsy groups compared with controls. No difference was found between the NwC and NwoC groups for any ADHD measure. ADHD symptom severity was associated with increased levels of sleepiness, fatigue, and insomnia. Compared with the 34 untreated patients, the 73 patients treated with psychostimulants (modafinil in 91%) showed a trend toward lower narcolepsy symptoms but not lower ADHD symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric patients with narcolepsy have high levels of treatment-resistant attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. The optimal treatment for ADHD symptoms in these patients warrants further evaluation in longitudinal intervention studies.

10 Article Pain in Sleepwalking: A Clinical Enigma. 2015

Lopez, Régis / Jaussent, Isabelle / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·National Reference Network for Narcolepsy, Sleep-Wake Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, Gui-de-Chauliac Hospital, CHU Montpellier, France. · Inserm U1061, Montpellier, France, Université Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France. ·Sleep · Pubmed #25902807.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Sleepwalking is a disorder characterized by arousal specifically from slow wave sleep with dissociated brain activity that may be related to lower nociceptive state. Our objectives were to assess the frequency of chronic pain, headache, and migraine in sleepwalkers compared to controls, examine the impact and determinants of pain in sleepwalkers, and report analgesia frequency during injurious parasomnia episodes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional case-control study. SETTING: Data were collected at the Sleep Disorders Center, Montpellier, France. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred patients with sleepwalking were assessed for disease characteristics, sleep (polysomnography, sleepiness, and insomnia), pain (chronic pain, multidimensional pain inventory, headache, and migraine), depressive symptoms, and quality of life compared to 100 adult controls. Pain perception was retrospectively assessed during injurious parasomnia episodes. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Raw association data showed that lifetime headache, migraine, and chronic pain at time of study were significantly associated with sleepwalking (also called somnambulism). Compared to controls, sleepwalkers reported more frequent daytime sleepiness, and depressive and insomnia symptoms. After adjustments, sleepwalking was associated with increased risk for headache and migraine only. Compared to pain-free sleepwalkers, sleepwalkers with chronic pain were more likely to be older and to have greater daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and depressive symptoms, with no difference in polysomnography assessment. Of the 47 sleepwalkers with at least one previous violent parasomnia episode, 78.7% perceived no pain during episodes, allowing them to remain asleep despite injury. CONCLUSION: Our results highlight the clinical enigma of pain in sleepwalking patients with complaints of frequent chronic pain, migraine, and headache during wakefulness but who report retrospectively experience of analgesia during severe parasomnia episodes, suggesting a relationship between dissociated brain activity and nociceptive dysregulation.

11 Article Sleep complaints and metabolic syndrome in an elderly population: the Three-City Study. 2015

Akbaraly, Tasnime N / Jaussent, Isabelle / Besset, Alain / Bertrand, Marion / Barberger-Gateau, Pascale / Ritchie, Karen / Ferrie, Jane E / Kivimaki, Mika / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·INSERM U1061, Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France; INSERM U710, Montpellier, France; EPHE, Paris, France; INSERM U1198, Montpellier, France; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom; INSERM U710, Montpellier, France; EPHE, Paris, France. Electronic address: tasnime.akbaraly@inserm.fr. · INSERM U1061, Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France. · INSERM U708-Neuroepidemiology, Université Bordeaux-Segalen, Bordeaux, France. · Université Bordeaux, ISPED, Centre INSERM U897-Epidemiologie-Biostatistique, Bordeaux, France. · INSERM U1061, Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France; Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom. · INSERM U1061, Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France; CHU Montpellier, Service de Neurologie, Unité des Troubles du Sommeil, Hôpital Gui-de-Chauliac, Montpellier, France. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #25499672.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To assess whether sleep complaints (rather than clinically defined sleep disturbances) were associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and each of its components in an elderly population. METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses of data from the French Three City Study, a large multicenter cohort of elderly community-dwellers. PARTICIPANTS: 6,354 participants (56.4% women, median age 73; range: 65-97 years). MEASUREMENTS: Frequency of insomnia complaints (difficulty in initiating sleep, difficulty in maintaining sleep [DMS], and early morning awakening) and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) were self-reported. MetS was assessed using National Cholesterol Education program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. RESULTS: A total of 977 participants had MetS. After adjustment for a large range of potential confounders, we report an association between the number of insomnia complaints and MetS. Among insomnia complaints only DMS was consistently associated with MetS (OR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.43). Our results showed that EDS independently increased the risk of MetS (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.18 to 1.81 for "frequently"; OR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.49 to 1.67 for "often"). The EDS-MetS association was independent of past-history of cardiovascular disease, insomnia complaints, and obesity and loud snoring. CONCLUSION: We report significant independent associations between frequent sleep complaints (EDS and to a lesser extent DMS) and MetS in the elderly with potential implications in terms of management and cardiovascular prevention in general geriatric practice. Prospective studies are required to clarify the direction of the association between sleep complaints and MetS.

12 Article [Sleep disorders in children and adults]. 2014

Barateau, Lucie / Lopez, Régis / Dauvilliers, Yves. · ·Rev Prat · Pubmed #25510152.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Article Hypnotics and mortality in an elderly general population: a 12-year prospective study. 2013

Jaussent, Isabelle / Ancelin, Marie-Laure / Berr, Claudine / Pérès, Karine / Scali, Jacqueline / Besset, Alain / Ritchie, Karen / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·Inserm, U1061, Montpellier F-34000, France. ydauvilliers@yahoo.fr. ·BMC Med · Pubmed #24070457.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hypnotics are widely used by the elderly, and their impact on mortality remains controversial. The inconsistent findings could be due to methodological limitations, notably the lack of control for underlying sleep symptoms or illness associated with hypnotic use, for example, insomnia symptoms and excessive daytime sleepiness, depression and anxiety. Our objective was to examine the association between the use of hypnotics and mortality risk in a large cohort of community-dwelling elderly, taking into account a wide range of potential competing risks including sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, and chronic disorders as well as underlying psychiatric disorders and sleep complaints. METHODS: Analyses were carried out on 6,696 participants aged 65 years or older randomly recruited from three French cities and free of dementia at baseline. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models with delayed entry, and age of the participants as the time scale, were used to determine the association between hypnotic use and 12-year survival. RESULTS: At baseline, 21.7% of the participants regularly used at least one hypnotic. During follow-up, 1,307 persons died, 480 from cancer and 344 from cardiovascular disease. Analyses adjusted for study center, age and gender showed a significantly greater risk of all-cause and cardiovascular-related mortality with hypnotics, particularly benzodiazepines, and this increased with the number of hypnotics used. None of these associations were significant in models adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics, chronic disorders including cardiovascular pathologies, sleep and psychiatric disorders. Results remained unchanged when duration of past hypnotic intake or persistent versus intermittent use during follow-up were taken into account. CONCLUSIONS: When controlling for a large range of potential confounders, the risk of mortality was not significantly associated with hypnotic use regardless of the type and duration. Underlying psychiatric disorders appear to be the principal confounders of the observed association.

14 Article Insomnia, daytime sleepiness and cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in the elderly: a 6-year prospective study. 2013

Jaussent, Isabelle / Empana, Jean-Philippe / Ancelin, Marie-Laure / Besset, Alain / Helmer, Catherine / Tzourio, Christophe / Ritchie, Karen / Bouyer, Jean / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, France. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23457496.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine 1) the associations between history of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) and insomnia complaints and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), and 2) the relationships between sleep complaints and future CVD in persons over 65. METHODS: CVD was assessed at baseline and during two, four, and six-year follow-up in 5494 non-demented subjects. Self-reported insomnia complaints (poor sleep quality, difficulty in initiating sleep, difficulty in maintening sleep, and early morning awakening), EDS and sleep medication use were evaluated at baseline. Logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazard models, with delayed entry and age of participants as the time scale, were adjusted for socio-demographic, lifestyle and clinical variables. RESULTS: At baseline, 748 participants had a past-history of CVD. A past-history of CVD was associated with EDS (OR = 1.28 95%CI = [1.05-1.57]) and the number of insomnia complaints (OR = 1.26 95%CI = [1.03-1.55] for 1-2 insomnia complaints; OR = 1.32 95%CI = [1.03-1.71] for ≥3 complaints). In longitudinal analyses, neither the four components of insomnia nor the number of insomnia complaints were significantly associated with first or recurrent CVD events (n = 391 events). EDS was independently associated with future CVD events even after adjusting for prescribed sleep medication and past-history of CVD (HR = 1.35 95%CI = [1.06-1.71]). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the relationships between sleep complaints and CVD could be complex. Insomnia complaints are more likely a consequence of CVD, whereas EDS appears to be a determinant of CVD independently of past-history of CVD. EDS screening may thus constitute a means of detecting persons at high risk of CVD.

15 Article Functional impairment in adult sleepwalkers: a case-control study. 2013

Lopez, Regis / Jaussent, Isabelle / Scholz, Sabine / Bayard, Sophie / Montplaisir, Jacques / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·Sleep Unit, Department of Neurology, Gui-de-Chauliac Hospital, National Reference Network for Narcolepsy, CHU Montpellier, France. ·Sleep · Pubmed #23450499.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To investigate the restorative quality of sleep and daytime functioning in sleepwalking adult patients in comparison with controls. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SETTING: Data were collected at the Sleep Disorders Center, Hôpital-Gui-de Chauliac, Montpellier, France between June 2007 and January 2011. PARTICIPANTS: There were 140 adult sleepwalkers (100 (median age 30 y, 55% male) in whom primary SW was diagnosed) who underwent 1 night of video polysomnography. All patients participated in a standardized clinical interview and completed a battery of questionnaires to assess clinical characteristics of parasomnia, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and health-related quality of life. Results were compared with those of 100 sex- and age-matched normal controls. INTERVENTIONS: N/A. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Of the sleepwalkers, 22.3% presented with daily episodes and 43.5% presented with weekly episodes. Median age at sleepwalking onset was 9 y. Familial history of sleepwalking was reported in 56.6% of sleepwalkers and violent sleep related behaviors in 57.9%, including injuries requiring medical care for at least one episode in 17%. Significant associations were found between sleepwalking and daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and altered quality of life. Early-onset sleepwalkers had higher frequency of violent behaviors and injuries. Sleepwalkers with violent behaviors had higher frequency of sleep terrors and triggering factors, with greater alteration in health-related quality of life. CONCLUSION: Adult sleepwalking is a potentially serious condition that may induce violent behaviors, self-injury or injury to bed partners, sleep disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and psychological distress, all of which affect health-related quality of life. CITATION: Lopez R; Jaussent I; Scholz S; Bayard S; Montplaisir J; Dauvilliers Y. Functional impairment in adult sleepwalkers: a case-control study. SLEEP 2013;36(3):345-351.

16 Article Trajectories of sleep complaints from early midlife to old age: longitudinal modeling study. 2012

Salo, Paula / Vahtera, Jussi / Ferrie, Jane E / Akbaraly, Tasnime / Goldberg, Marcel / Zins, Marie / Pentti, Jaana / Virtanen, Marianna / Shipley, Martin J / Singh-Manoux, Archana / Dauvilliers, Yves / Kivimaki, Mika. ·Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. paula.salo@ttl.fi ·Sleep · Pubmed #23115405.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To estimate trajectories of sleep lost over worry as a function of age, using longitudinal modeling, and compare these trajectories with those for insomnia symptoms. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data from two prospective, occupational cohorts (the Whitehall II and Finnish Public Sector studies) comprising 84,384 observations from four to eight repeat measurements in 1985-2010. PARTICIPANTS: There were 16,408 men and women age 34-79 yr. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Age-related trajectories of sleep lost over worry and insomnia symptoms (sleep initiation or maintenance problems, nonrefreshing sleep) were estimated using repeated-measures log-binomial regression analysis and generalized estimating equations. These analyses were adjusted for year of birth and time of measurement to minimize confounding by cohort or period effects. The prevalence ratio for insomnia symptoms was higher in older age groups compared with participants age 34-45 yr. In contrast, the age-related trajectory of sleep lost over worry included two phases: a period of high prevalence of sleep complaints at age 34-60 yr followed by a declining trajectory at older ages. Compared with participants age 34-45 yr, prevalence ratios for sleep lost over worry were 0.63 (0.49-0.80) and 0.59 (0.41-0.84) in the Whitehall II study participants ages 61-65 and 71-79 years. Corresponding figures were 0.62 (0.52-0.75) and 0.46 (0.32-0.66) in the Finnish Public Sector study. CONCLUSION: This study shows a general age-related decrease in sleep lost over worry between late midlife and old age, a pattern strikingly different from the age-related increase in insomnia symptoms.

17 Article Excessive sleepiness is predictive of cognitive decline in the elderly. 2012

Jaussent, Isabelle / Bouyer, Jean / Ancelin, Marie-Laure / Berr, Claudine / Foubert-Samier, Alexandra / Ritchie, Karen / Ohayon, Maurice M / Besset, Alain / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, France. ·Sleep · Pubmed #22942498.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To examine the association of sleep complaints reported at baseline (insomnia complaints and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS)) and medication, with cognitive decline in community-dwelling elderly. DESIGN: An 8-yr longitudinal study. SETTING: The French Three-City Study. PARTICIPANTS: There were 4,894 patients without dementia recruited from 3 French cities and having a Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score ≥ 24 points at baseline. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Questionnaires were used to evaluate insomnia complaints (poor sleep quality (SQ), difficulty in initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty in maintaining sleep (DMS), early morning awakening (EMA)), EDS, and sleep medication at baseline. Cognitive decline was defined as a 4-point reduction in MMSE score during follow-up at 2, 4, and 8 yr. Logistic regression models were adjusted for sociodemographic, behavioral, physical, and mental health variables, and apolipoprotein E genotype. EDS independently increased the risk of cognitive decline (odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-1.56), especially for those patients who also developed dementia during the follow-up period (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.00-1.97). The number of insomnia complaints and DMS were negatively associated with MMSE cognitive decline (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.60-0.98 for 3-4 complaints, OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.68-0.96, respectively). The 3 other components of insomnia (SQ, DIS, EMA) were not significantly associated with MMSE cognitive decline. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that EDS may be associated independently with the risk of cognitive decline in the elderly population. Such results could have important public health implications because EDS may be an early marker and potentially reversible risk factor of cognitive decline and onset of dementia.

18 Article Insomnia and daytime sleepiness are risk factors for depressive symptoms in the elderly. 2011

Jaussent, Isabelle / Bouyer, Jean / Ancelin, Marie-Laure / Akbaraly, Tasnime / Pérès, Karine / Ritchie, Karen / Besset, Alain / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, F-34000 France. ·Sleep · Pubmed #21804672.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have reported that insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) may predict depression in adults. However, these associations have not been investigated in community-dwelling elderly taking into account insomnia symptoms, EDS, and sleep medication. DESIGN: Four-year longitudinal study. SETTING: The French Three-City Study. PARTICIPANTS: 3824 subjects aged ≥ 65 years and free of depressive symptoms at baseline. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Questionnaires were used to evaluate "insomnia symptoms", EDS, and sleep medication at baseline. Depressive symptoms (DEP-s) were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale at baseline, and at 2-year and 4-year follow-up. Logistic regression models controlling for potential confounders were generated to determine whether sleep disturbances were associated with incident DEP-s and to determine the effect of individual insomnia symptoms. Insomnia symptoms and EDS independently increased the risk of incident DEP-s (OR=1.23, 95% CI=1.01-1.49 and OR=2.05, 95% CI=1.30-3.23, respectively). Poor sleep quality and difficulty in initiating and in maintaining sleep-but not early morning awakening-were identified as risk factors of DEP-s, with risk increasing with the frequency of insomnia symptoms. Sleep medication was not only a risk factor for DEP-s independent of insomnia symptoms (OR=1.62, 95% CI=1.26-2.09), but also independent of EDS (OR=1.71 95%=1.33-2.20). CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia symptoms, EDS, and the use of medication independently increase the risk of subsequent depression in the elderly. In clinical practice, disturbed sleep and prolonged use of sleep medication may be early indicators or potentially reversible risk factors for depression, suggesting the need for further clinical interventional research.

19 Article Insomnia symptoms in older adults: associated factors and gender differences. 2011

Jaussent, Isabelle / Dauvilliers, Yves / Ancelin, Marie-Laure / Dartigues, Jean-François / Tavernier, Béatrice / Touchon, Jacques / Ritchie, Karen / Besset, Alain. ·Inserm, U888, Univ Montpellier 1, Montpellier, Inserm, U897, Univ Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux, France. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #20808113.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: the aim of this study was to examine the factors associated with insomnia in community-dwelling elderly as a function of the nature and number of insomnia symptoms (IS), e.g., difficulty with initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty with maintaining sleep (DMS), and early morning awakening (EMA). METHODS: is were assessed in a sample of 2,673 men and 3,213 women aged 65 years and older. The participants were administered standardized questionnaires regarding the frequency of IS and other sleep characteristics (snoring, nightmares, sleeping medication, and sleepiness) and various sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical variables, and measures of physical and mental health. RESULTS: more than 70% of men and women reported at least one IS, DMS being the most prevalent symptom in both men and women. Women reported more frequently two or three IS, whereas men reported more often only one IS. Multivariate regression analyses stratified by gender showed that men and women shared numerous factors associated with IS, sleeping medication, nightmares, sleepiness, chronic diseases, and depression being independently associated with two or three IS. For both sexes, age was associated with only one IS in all age categories. Loud snoring was strongly associated with increased DMS in men only. High body mass index increased the risk for DIS in men but tended to decrease it in women. In women, hormonal replacement therapy, Mediterranean diet, and caffeine and alcohol intake had a protective effect. CONCLUSION: our data suggest that women may have specific predisposition factors of multiple IS, which may involve both behavioral and hormonal factors. Identification and treatment of these risk factors may form the basis of an intervention program for reduction of IS in the elderly.

20 Article Elevated Tribbles homolog 2-specific antibody levels in narcolepsy patients. 2010

Cvetkovic-Lopes, Vesna / Bayer, Laurence / Dorsaz, Stéphane / Maret, Stéphanie / Pradervand, Sylvain / Dauvilliers, Yves / Lecendreux, Michel / Lammers, Gert-Jan / Donjacour, Claire E H M / Du Pasquier, Renaud A / Pfister, Corinne / Petit, Brice / Hor, Hyun / Mühlethaler, Michel / Tafti, Mehdi. ·Département de Neurosciences Fondamentales, Centre Médical Universitaire, Genève, Switzerland. ·J Clin Invest · Pubmed #20160349.

ABSTRACT: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and attacks of muscle atonia triggered by strong emotions (cataplexy). Narcolepsy is caused by hypocretin (orexin) deficiency, paralleled by a dramatic loss in hypothalamic hypocretin-producing neurons. It is believed that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disorder, although definitive proof of this, such as the presence of autoantibodies, is still lacking. We engineered a transgenic mouse model to identify peptides enriched within hypocretin-producing neurons that could serve as potential autoimmune targets. Initial analysis indicated that the transcript encoding Tribbles homolog 2 (Trib2), previously identified as an autoantigen in autoimmune uveitis, was enriched in hypocretin neurons in these mice. ELISA analysis showed that sera from narcolepsy patients with cataplexy had higher Trib2-specific antibody titers compared with either normal controls or patients with idiopathic hypersomnia, multiple sclerosis, or other inflammatory neurological disorders. Trib2-specific antibody titers were highest early after narcolepsy onset, sharply decreased within 2-3 years, and then stabilized at levels substantially higher than that of controls for up to 30 years. High Trib2-specific antibody titers correlated with the severity of cataplexy. Serum of a patient showed specific immunoreactivity with over 86% of hypocretin neurons in the mouse hypothalamus. Thus, we have identified reactive autoantibodies in human narcolepsy, providing evidence that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disorder.