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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Tanja Van der Zweerde
Based on 10 articles published since 2010
(Why 10 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, T. van der Zweerde wrote the following 10 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia for Patients with Chronic Insomnia. 2020

van der Zweerde, Tanja / Lancee, Jaap / Ida Luik, Annemarie / van Straten, Annemieke. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Van der Boechorststraat 7, Amsterdam 1081 BT, the Netherlands. Electronic address: t.vander.zweerde@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129, Amsterdam 1018 WS, the Netherlands; PsyQ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Dr. Molewaterplein 40, Rotterdam 3015 GD, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Van der Boechorststraat 7, Amsterdam 1081 BT, the Netherlands. ·Sleep Med Clin · Pubmed #32386688.

ABSTRACT: Chronic insomnia is preferably treated with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI), but many insomnia sufferers receive medication instead, likely because of high costs, lack of knowledge about optimal insomnia treatment among physicians, and lack of CBTI-trained professionals in mental health care. A possible solution is to offer CBTI through the Internet: I-CBTI. I-CBTI is generally acceptable to patients and greatly improves insomnia symptoms. We review the state of knowledge around I-CBTI and its effects. CBTI's effectiveness is influenced by treatment characteristics and patient-specific factors. We review potential factors that help identify which patients may benefit from I-CBTI.

2 Review Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: A meta-analysis of long-term effects in controlled studies. 2019

van der Zweerde, Tanja / Bisdounis, Lampros / Kyle, Simon D / Lancee, Jaap / van Straten, Annemieke. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: t.vander.zweerde@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; PsyQ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #31491656.

ABSTRACT: Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a treatment with moderate to large effects. These effects are believed to be sustained long-term, but no systematic meta-analyses of recent evidence exist. In this present meta-analysis, we investigate long-term effects in 30 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CBT-I to non-active control groups. The primary analyses (n = 29 after excluding one study which was an outlier) showed that CBT-I is effective at 3-, 6- and 12-mo compared to non-active controls: Hedges g for Insomnia severity index: 0.64 (3 m), 0.40 (6 m) and 0.25 (12 m); sleep onset latency: 0.38 (3 m), 0.29 (6 m) and 0.40 (12 m); sleep efficiency: 0.51 (3 m), 0.32 (6 m) and 0.35 (12 m). We demonstrate that although effects decline over time, CBT-I produces clinically significant effects that last up to a year after therapy.

3 Review Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia for Patients with Chronic Insomnia. 2019

van der Zweerde, Tanja / Lancee, Jaap / Ida Luik, Annemarie / van Straten, Annemieke. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Van der Boechorststraat 7, Amsterdam 1081 BT, the Netherlands. Electronic address: t.vander.zweerde@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129, Amsterdam 1018 WS, the Netherlands; PsyQ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Dr. Molewaterplein 40, Rotterdam 3015 GD, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Van der Boechorststraat 7, Amsterdam 1081 BT, the Netherlands. ·Sleep Med Clin · Pubmed #31375200.

ABSTRACT: Chronic insomnia is preferably treated with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI), but many insomnia sufferers receive medication instead, likely because of high costs, lack of knowledge about optimal insomnia treatment among physicians, and lack of CBTI-trained professionals in mental health care. A possible solution is to offer CBTI through the Internet: I-CBTI. I-CBTI is generally acceptable to patients and greatly improves insomnia symptoms. We review the state of knowledge around I-CBTI and its effects. CBTI's effectiveness is influenced by treatment characteristics and patient-specific factors. We review potential factors that help identify which patients may benefit from I-CBTI.

4 Review Digital Delivery of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia. 2019

Luik, Annemarie I / van der Zweerde, Tanja / van Straten, Annemieke / Lancee, Jaap. ·Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, PO Box 20140, 3000 CA, Rotterdam, Netherlands. a.luik@erasmusmc.nl. · Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · PsyQ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·Curr Psychiatry Rep · Pubmed #31161406.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Digital cognitive behavioral therapy (dCBT) has been available for over a decade. We reviewed the evidence that accumulated over the past 5 years and discuss the implications for introducing dCBT into standard healthcare. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies have consistently supported the use of dCBT to treat insomnia. Evidence is now demonstrating large short-term effects and smaller long-term effects up to 1.5 years after treatment across populations with various co-occurring health problems. The effects also extend into a range of psychological well-being factors. Mediators and moderators have been studied to understand mechanisms and create new opportunities to enhance effectiveness and reduce dropout. Incorporating personalized guidance in dCBT may further enhance effectiveness. The evidence for dCBT for insomnia is strong and suggests that dCBT is ready for application in standard healthcare. Further research, digital innovation, and development of effective implementation methods are required to ensure dCBT fulfills its potential.

5 Review Cognitive and behavioral therapies in the treatment of insomnia: A meta-analysis. 2018

van Straten, Annemieke / van der Zweerde, Tanja / Kleiboer, Annet / Cuijpers, Pim / Morin, Charles M / Lancee, Jaap. ·Department of Clinical Psychology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.van.straten@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Université Laval, École de Psychologie, Québec City, QC, Canada. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #28392168.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is a major public health problem considering its high prevalence, impact on daily life, co-morbidity with other disorders and societal costs. Cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBTI) is currently considered to be the preferred treatment. However, no meta-analysis exists of all studies using at least one component of CBTI for insomnia, which also uses modern techniques to pool data and to analyze subgroups of patients. We included 87 randomized controlled trials, comparing 118 treatments (3724 patients) to non-treated controls (2579 patients). Overall, the interventions had significant effects on: insomnia severity index (g = 0.98), sleep efficiency (g = 0.71), Pittsburgh sleep quality index (g = 0.65), wake after sleep onset (g = 0.63) and sleep onset latency (SOL; g = 0.57), number of awakenings (g = 0.29) and sleep quality (g = 0.40). The smallest effect was on total sleep time (g = 0.16). Face-to-face treatments of at least four sessions seem to be more effective than self-help interventions or face-to-face interventions with fewer sessions. Otherwise the results seem to be quite robust (similar for patients with or without comorbid disease, younger or older patients, using or not using sleep medication). We conclude that CBTI, either its components or the full package, is effective in the treatment of insomnia.

6 Article Nurse-Guided Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in General Practice: Results from a Pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial. 2020

Van der Zweerde, Tanja / Lancee, Jaap / Slottje, Pauline / Bosmans, Judith E / Van Someren, Eus J W / van Straten, Annemieke. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, t.vander.zweerde@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · PsyQ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of General Practice and Elderly Care, Academic Network of General Practice (ANH), Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Science, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, an Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Departments of Integrative Neurophysiology and Psychiatry, Centre for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Psychother Psychosom · Pubmed #32069463.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Guidelines recommend cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) as the first line of treatment for insomnia in general practice, but CBT-I is rarely available. Nurse-guided Internet-delivered CBT-I might be a solution to improve access to care. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the effectiveness of nurse-guided Internet-delivered CBT-I (I-CBT-I) on insomnia severity experienced by patients in general practice. METHODS: Nurse-guided I-CBT-I ("i-Sleep") was compared to care-as-usual (and I-CBT-I after 6 months) in 15 participating general practices among 134 patients (≥18 years old) with clinical insomnia symptoms. Assessments took place at 8, 26 and 52 weeks. Primary outcome was self-reported insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index) at 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes were sleep diary indices, depression and anxiety symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), fatigue, daytime consequences of insomnia, sleep medication and adverse events. RESULTS: Two thirds of the 69 intervention patients (n = 47; 68%) completed the whole intervention. At the posttest examination, there were large significant effects for insomnia severity (Cohen's d =1.66), several sleep diary variables (wake after sleep onset, number of awakenings, terminal wakefulness, sleep efficiency, sleep quality) and depression. At 26 weeks there were still significant effects on insomnia severity (d = 1.02) and on total sleep time and sleep efficiency. No significant effects were observed for anxiety, fatigue, daily functioning or sleep medication. No adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Nurse-guided I-CBT-I effectively reduces insomnia severity among general practice patients. I-CBT-I enables general practitioners to offer effective insomnia care in accordance with the clinical guidelines.

7 Article Cognitive processes mediate the effects of insomnia treatment: evidence from a randomized wait-list controlled trial. 2019

Lancee, J / Effting, M / van der Zweerde, T / van Daal, L / van Straten, A / Kamphuis, J H. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: j.lancee@uva.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #30529782.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Both guided online and individual face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) are effective in improving insomnia symptoms and sleep efficiency. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms generating this effect. The present study tests the assumption that pre-sleep arousal, sleep-related worry and dysfunctional beliefs about sleep are mediators in the effect of cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia. METHODS: A secondary analysis was performed on data previously collected from a randomized controlled trial (N = 90). In this trial, participants were randomized to either a face-to-face CBT-I condition, an internet-delivered CBT-I condition, or a wait-list group. This article reports on the efficacy of these interventions on pre-sleep arousal, sleep-related worry, and dysfunctional beliefs. Furthermore, we investigated whether these measures mediated the treatment effect on insomnia severity and sleep efficiency. RESULTS: Both treatment modalities were efficacious for these cognitive measures; however, face-to-face treatment showed superiority over the online treatment. All three cognitive measures mediated the effect on insomnia severity. Sleep-related worry and pre-sleep arousal mediated the effect on sleep efficiency, but dysfunctional beliefs did not. CONCLUSION: Overall, these results point toward the importance of cognitive processes in the treatment of insomnia, implying that psychological treatments for insomnia may best be guided by (also) targeting these cognitive processes.

8 Article Does online insomnia treatment reduce depressive symptoms? A randomized controlled trial in individuals with both insomnia and depressive symptoms. 2019

van der Zweerde, T / van Straten, A / Effting, M / Kyle, S D / Lancee, J. ·Department of Clinical Psychology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University,Amsterdam,The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology,University of Amsterdam,Amsterdam,The Netherlands. · Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, University of Oxford,Oxford,UK. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #29747706.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insomnia is effectively treated with online Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I). Previous research has suggested the effects might not be limited to sleep and insomnia severity, but also apply to depressive symptoms. Results, however, are mixed. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial we investigated the effects of guided online CBT-I on depression and insomnia in people suffering from symptoms of both. Participants (n = 104) with clinical insomnia and at least subclinical depression levels were randomized to (1) guided online CBT-I and sleep diary monitoring (i-Sleep) or (2) control group (sleep diary monitoring only). The primary outcome was the severity of depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 without sleep item; PHQ-WS). Secondary outcomes were insomnia severity, sleep diary parameters, fatigue, daytime consequences of insomnia, anxiety, and perseverative thinking. RESULTS: At post-test, participants in the i-Sleep condition reported significantly less depressive symptoms (PHQ-WS) compared with participants in the sleep-diary condition (d = 0.76). Large significant effects were also observed for insomnia severity (d = 2.36), most sleep diary parameters, daytime consequences of insomnia, anxiety, and perseverative thinking. Effects were maintained at 3 and 6 month follow-up. We did not find significant post-test effects on fatigue or total sleep time. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate that guided online CBT-I is not only effective for insomnia complaints but also for depressive symptoms. The effects are large and comparable with those of depression therapy. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NTR6049 (Netherlands Trial Register).

9 Article Cost-effectiveness of i-Sleep, a guided online CBT intervention, for patients with insomnia in general practice: protocol of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial. 2016

van der Zweerde, Tanja / Lancee, Jaap / Slottje, Pauline / Bosmans, Judith / Van Someren, Eus / Reynolds, Charles / Cuijpers, Pim / van Straten, Annemieke. ·Department of Clinical, Neuro, and Developmental Psychology, Section Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. t.vander.zweerde@vu.nl. · EMGO institute for Health Care and Research, VU University Medical Centre, van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. t.vander.zweerde@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · EMGO institute for Health Care and Research, VU University Medical Centre, van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Network of Family Medicine (ANH), VU University Medical Center, van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, an Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Departments of Integrative Neurophysiology and Psychiatry, Centre for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Department of Clinical, Neuro, and Developmental Psychology, Section Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #27038786.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insomnia is a highly prevalent disorder causing clinically significant distress and impairment. Furthermore, insomnia is associated with high societal and individual costs. Although cognitive behavioural treatment for insomnia (CBT-I) is the preferred treatment, it is not used often. Offering CBT-I in an online format may increase access. Many studies have shown that online CBT for insomnia is effective. However, these studies have all been performed in general population samples recruited through media. This protocol article presents the design of a study aimed at establishing feasibility, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a guided online intervention (i-Sleep) for patients suffering from insomnia that seek help from their general practitioner as compared to care-as-usual. METHODS/DESIGN: In a pragmatic randomized controlled trial, adult patients with insomnia disorder recruited through general practices are randomized to a 5-session guided online treatment, which is called "i-Sleep", or to care-as-usual. Patients in the care-as-usual condition will be offered i-Sleep 6 months after inclusion. An ancillary clinician, known as the psychological well-being practitioner who works in the GP practice (PWP; in Dutch: POH-GGZ), will offer online support after every session. Our aim is to recruit one hundred and sixty patients. Questionnaires, a sleep diary and wrist actigraphy will be administered at baseline, post intervention (at 8 weeks), and at 6 months and 12 months follow-up. Effectiveness will be established using insomnia severity as the main outcome. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility (using costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY) as outcome) will be conducted from a societal perspective. Secondary measures are: sleep diary, daytime consequences, fatigue, work and social adjustment, anxiety, alcohol use, depression and quality of life. DISCUSSION: The results of this trial will help establish whether online CBT-I is (cost-) effective and feasible in general practice as compared to care-as-usual. If it is, then quality of care might be increased because implementation of i-Sleep makes it easier to adhere to insomnia guidelines. Strengths and limitations are discussed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial register NTR 5202 (registered April 17(st) 2015).

10 Minor Introducing Network Intervention Analysis to Investigate Sequential, Symptom-Specific Treatment Effects: A Demonstration in Co-Occurring Insomnia and Depression. 2019

Blanken, Tessa F / Van Der Zweerde, Tanja / Van Straten, Annemieke / Van Someren, Eus J W / Borsboom, Denny / Lancee, Jaap. ·Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, an Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, t.f.blanken@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, an Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Psychiatry, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychological Methods, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Psychother Psychosom · Pubmed #30625483.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --