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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles from Amsterdam
Based on 66 articles published since 2009
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These are the 66 published articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders that originated from Amsterdam during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Review Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-i) in School-Aged Children and Adolescents. 2019

Dewald-Kaufmann, Julia / de Bruin, Ed / Michael, Gradisar. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Nussbaumstr. 7, Munich 80336, Germany; Hochschule Fresenius, University of Applied Sciences, Infanteriestr. 11a, Munich 80797, Germany. Electronic address: Julia.dewald-kaufmann@hs-fresenius.de. · Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 127, Amsterdam 1018 WS, the Netherlands. · School of Psychology, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia. ·Sleep Med Clin · Pubmed #31029183.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is one of the most prevalent sleep disorders in school-aged children and adolescents. Although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) is the first-line treatment for adults, and existing studies show promising effects also for children and adolescents, the number of randomized controlled trials in younger age groups is rather small. CBT-i techniques for school-aged children and adolescents include bedtime shifts (including sleep restriction), stimulus control, thought challenging, psychoeducation, and relaxation techniques. The integration of parents, especially in school-aged children with insomnia, is highly recommended. More research is needed to investigate specific characteristics and models of child and adolescent insomnia.

2 Review The role of the circadian system in the etiology and pathophysiology of ADHD: time to redefine ADHD? 2019

Bijlenga, Denise / Vollebregt, Madelon A / Kooij, J J Sandra / Arns, Martijn. ·PsyQ Expertise Center Adult ADHD, Carel Reinierszkade 197, 2593 HR, The Hague, The Netherlands. d.bijlenga@psyq.nl. · Research Institute Brainclinics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Radboud University Medical Centre, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · PsyQ Expertise Center Adult ADHD, Carel Reinierszkade 197, 2593 HR, The Hague, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Experimental Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · neuroCare Group, Munich, Germany. ·Atten Defic Hyperact Disord · Pubmed #30927228.

ABSTRACT: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is highly associated with the delayed sleep phase disorder, a circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder, which is prevalent in 73-78% of children and adults with ADHD. Besides the delayed sleep phase disorder, various other sleep disorders accompany ADHD, both in children and in adults. ADHD is either the cause or the consequence of sleep disturbances, or they may have a shared etiological and genetic background. In this review, we present an overview of the current knowledge on the relationship between the circadian rhythm, sleep disorders, and ADHD. We also discuss the various pathways explaining the connection between ADHD symptoms and delayed sleep, ranging from genetics, behavioral aspects, daylight exposure, to the functioning of the eye. The treatment options discussed are focused on improvement of sleep quality, quantity, and phase-resetting, by means of improving sleep hygiene, chronotherapy, treatment of specific sleep disorders, and by strengthening certain neuronal networks involved in sleep, e.g., by sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback. Ultimately, the main question is addressed: whether ADHD needs to be redefined. We propose a novel view on ADHD, where a part of the ADHD symptoms are the result of chronic sleep disorders, with most evidence for the delayed circadian rhythm as the underlying mechanism. This substantial subgroup should receive treatment of the sleep disorder in addition to ADHD symptom treatment.

3 Review A lack of consistent brain alterations in insomnia disorder: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis. 2018

Tahmasian, Masoud / Noori, Khadijeh / Samea, Fateme / Zarei, Mojtaba / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Eickhoff, Simon B / Van Someren, Eus / Khazaie, Habibolah / Eickhoff, Claudia R. ·Institute of Medical Science and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. · Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Centre - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Germany. · Institute of Systems Neuroscience, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany; Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 Amsterdam BA, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University and Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1187, 1081 Amsterdam HV, The Netherlands. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address: hakhazaie@gmail.com. · Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #30093361.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia disorder is a prevalent sleep disorder, which affects about 10% of general population. However, its neural mechanisms are poorly understood. Recently, several structural and functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted in patients with insomnia disorder, but these studies have yielded diverse findings. Here, we aimed to identify consistent patterns of abnormal brain alterations in insomnia disorder by performing a quantitative coordinate-based meta-analysis. Following the preferred reporting for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, we searched PubMed database and used reference tracking and finally retrieved 19 eligible studies (six task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging, eight resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, three voxel-based morphometry, and two positron emission tomography). We extracted peak coordinates from these studies and tested for convergence using the activation likelihood estimation method. Using this method, we found no significant convergent evidence for combination of structural atrophy and functional disturbances across previous studies (p = 0.914). Inconsistencies across these studies might be related to heterogonous clinical populations, the explorative nature of these studies in combination with small sample sizes, different experimental designs, and various preprocessing and statistical approaches. Future neuroimaging studies on insomnia disorder should include larger well-characterized samples, as well as standard imaging and analysis protocols.

4 Review Cognitive and behavioral therapies in the treatment of insomnia: A meta-analysis. 2018

van Straten, Annemieke / van der Zweerde, Tanja / Kleiboer, Annet / Cuijpers, Pim / Morin, Charles M / Lancee, Jaap. ·Department of Clinical Psychology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.van.straten@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Université Laval, École de Psychologie, Québec City, QC, Canada. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #28392168.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is a major public health problem considering its high prevalence, impact on daily life, co-morbidity with other disorders and societal costs. Cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBTI) is currently considered to be the preferred treatment. However, no meta-analysis exists of all studies using at least one component of CBTI for insomnia, which also uses modern techniques to pool data and to analyze subgroups of patients. We included 87 randomized controlled trials, comparing 118 treatments (3724 patients) to non-treated controls (2579 patients). Overall, the interventions had significant effects on: insomnia severity index (g = 0.98), sleep efficiency (g = 0.71), Pittsburgh sleep quality index (g = 0.65), wake after sleep onset (g = 0.63) and sleep onset latency (SOL; g = 0.57), number of awakenings (g = 0.29) and sleep quality (g = 0.40). The smallest effect was on total sleep time (g = 0.16). Face-to-face treatments of at least four sessions seem to be more effective than self-help interventions or face-to-face interventions with fewer sessions. Otherwise the results seem to be quite robust (similar for patients with or without comorbid disease, younger or older patients, using or not using sleep medication). We conclude that CBTI, either its components or the full package, is effective in the treatment of insomnia.

5 Review Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Insomnia: an Update of the Literature. 2017

Wynchank, Dora / Bijlenga, Denise / Beekman, Aartjan T / Kooij, J J Sandra / Penninx, Brenda W. ·PsyQ Expertise Center Adult ADHD, Carel Reinierszkade 197, 2593 HR, The Hague, The Netherlands. d.wynchank@parnassiagroep.nl. · PsyQ Expertise Center Adult ADHD, Carel Reinierszkade 197, 2593 HR, The Hague, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Curr Psychiatry Rep · Pubmed #29086065.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Insomnia is diagnosed when there is dissatisfaction with sleep quantity or quality. It has a prevalence in the general population ranging from 31 to 56%. Insomnia has previously been associated with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this review, we address three topics: (1) the cross-sectional relationship between ADHD and insomnia in adulthood, (2) the longitudinal relationship between ADHD and insomnia, and (3) insomnia as a side effect of pharmacological treatments for adult ADHD. RECENT FINDINGS: Three cross-sectional, clinical, and population studies report a prevalence of insomnia in ADHD adults ranging from 43 to 80%. Longitudinal evidence for a link between childhood-onset ADHD and insomnia at later age is mixed, with one study confirming and another study not supporting such a longitudinal association. In randomized, placebo-controlled trials, insomnia is reported significantly more often in the treatment arm than in the placebo arm. In varying percentages of trial participants, insomnia is a treatment-emergent adverse effect in triple-bead mixed amphetamine salts (40-45%), dasotraline (35-45%), lisdexamfetamine (10-19%), and extended-release methylphenidate (11%). Ten to seventeen percent of subjects in placebo-controlled trials of atomoxetine report insomnia, possibly related to poor metabolizer status. The mechanisms explaining the relationship between ADHD and sleep problems are incompletely understood, but both genetic and non-shared environmental influences may be involved. Adults with ADHD should be assessed for insomnia, which is frequently comorbid, and both conditions should be treated.

6 Review Insomnia heterogeneity: Characteristics to consider for data-driven multivariate subtyping. 2017

Benjamins, Jeroen S / Migliorati, Filippo / Dekker, Kim / Wassing, Rick / Moens, Sarah / Blanken, Tessa F / Te Lindert, Bart H W / Sjauw Mook, Jeffrey / Van Someren, Eus J W. ·Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Social, Health and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Experimental Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Social Brain Lab, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Neuroscience Amsterdam, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Neuroscience Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: e.van.someren@nin.knaw.nl. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #29066053.

ABSTRACT: Meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported surprisingly few consistent insomnia-characteristics with respect to cognitions, mood, traits, history of life events and family history. One interpretation of this limited consistency is that different subtypes of insomnia exist, each with its own specific multivariate profile of characteristics. Because previously unrecognized subtypes will be differentially represented in individual studies and dilute effect sizes of subtype-dependent characteristics of importance, they are unlikely to be reported consistently in individual studies, let alone in meta-analyses. This review therefore aims to complement meta-analyses by listing previously reported psychometric characteristics of insomnia, irrespective of the degree of consistency over studies. The review clearly indicates that characteristics of insomnia may not be limited to sleep. Reports suggest that at least some individuals with insomnia may deviate from people without sleep complaints with respect to demographics, mental and physical health, childhood trauma, life events, fatigue, sleepiness, hyperarousal, hyperactivity, other sleep disorders, lifetime sleep history, chronotype, depression, anxiety, mood, quality of life, personality, happiness, worry, rumination, self-consciousness, sensitivity, dysfunctional beliefs, self-conscious emotion regulation, coping, nocturnal mentation, wake resting-state mentation, physical activity, food intake, temperature perception and hedonic evaluation. The value of this list of characteristics is that 1) internet has now made it feasible to asses them all in a large sample of people suffering from insomnia, and 2) statistical methods like latent class analysis and community detection can utilize them for a truly bottom-up data-driven search for subtypes. The supplement to this review provides a blueprint of this multivariate approach as implemented in the Sleep registry platform (www.sleepregistry.nl), that allows for bottom-up subtyping and fosters cross-cultural comparison and worldwide collaboration on insomnia subtype finding - and beyond.

7 Review Neuropsychological long-term sequelae of Ebola virus disease survivors - A systematic review. 2017

Lötsch, Felix / Schnyder, Jenny / Goorhuis, Abraham / Grobusch, Martin P. ·Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.p.grobusch@amc.uva.nl. ·Travel Med Infect Dis · Pubmed #28478336.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The recent West African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak had catastrophic impact on populations, health care systems and economies of the affected countries. Somatic symptoms have been reported to persist long beyond the acute infection. This review was conducted to provide an overview on neuro- and socio-psychological long-term sequelae of EVD survivors. METHODS: Utilizing Pubmed and PsycInfo databases, a systematic review prepared according to PRISMA guidelines. Only studies reporting quantitative data on neuropsychological sequelae three weeks or later after discharge from the Ebola-treating unit were included. Pooled proportions of common outcomes were calculated. RESULTS: In total, 224 papers were identified, of which 10 were included. Depression, insomnia, fatigue, anxiety and post-traumatic stress were common sequelae in EVD survivors. However, data from high-quality studies were scarce. CONCLUSIONS: EVD survivors have been thought to commonly face neuropsychological long-term sequelae. Methodological drawbacks and heterogeneity of current studies limit conclusions of the impact and magnitude of such sequelae. We advocate the preparation of a prospective, controlled cohort study protocol in preparation for a future outbreak.

8 Review The effects of light therapy on sleep problems: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2016

van Maanen, Annette / Meijer, Anne Marie / van der Heijden, Kristiaan B / Oort, Frans J. ·Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: A.vanMaanen@uva.nl. · Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Child and Adolescent Studies, Leiden University, The Netherlands. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #26606319.

ABSTRACT: Although bright light therapy seems a promising treatment for sleep problems, research shows inconclusive results. This meta-analysis is the first to systematically review the effect of light therapy on sleep problems in general and on specific types of sleep problems in particular (circadian rhythm sleep disorders, insomnia, sleep problems related to Alzheimer's disease and dementia). Fifty-three studies with a total of 1154 participants were included. Overall effects and effects on separate circadian and sleep outcomes were examined. We calculated Hedges' g effect sizes and we investigated the effects of twelve moderators (design-related, treatment-related, participant-related). Light therapy was found effective in the treatment of sleep problems in general (g = 0.39), and for circadian rhythm sleep disorders (g = 0.41), insomnia (g = 0.47), and sleep problems related to Alzheimer's disease/dementia (g = 0.30) specifically. For circadian rhythm sleep disorders, effects were smaller for randomised controlled trials. For insomnia, we found larger effects for studies using a higher light intensity, and for sleep problems related to Alzheimer's disease/dementia larger effects were found for studies with more female participants. There was indication of publication bias. To conclude, light therapy is effective for sleep problems in general, particularly for circadian outcomes and insomnia symptoms. However, most effect sizes are small to medium.

9 Review Recommended patient-reported core set of symptoms to measure in adult cancer treatment trials. 2014

Reeve, Bryce B / Mitchell, Sandra A / Dueck, Amylou C / Basch, Ethan / Cella, David / Reilly, Carolyn Miller / Minasian, Lori M / Denicoff, Andrea M / O'Mara, Ann M / Fisch, Michael J / Chauhan, Cynthia / Aaronson, Neil K / Coens, Corneel / Bruner, Deborah Watkins. ·Affiliations of authors: Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (BBR, EB) · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (SAM) · Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (LMM and AMO) · Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (AMD) · Division of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (ACD) · Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (DC) · Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (CMR, DWB) · Department of General Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (MJF) · Mayo Clinic Breast SPORE, Rochester, MN (CCh) · Department of Psychological Research, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (NKA) · Quality of Life Department, European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer, Brussels, Belgium (CCo). ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #25006191.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The National Cancer Institute's Symptom Management and Health-Related Quality of Life Steering Committee held a clinical trials planning meeting (September 2011) to identify a core symptom set to be assessed across oncology trials for the purposes of better understanding treatment efficacy and toxicity and to facilitate cross-study comparisons. We report the results of an evidence-synthesis and consensus-building effort that culminated in recommendations for core symptoms to be measured in adult cancer clinical trials that include a patient-reported outcome (PRO). METHODS: We used a data-driven, consensus-building process. A panel of experts, including patient representatives, conducted a systematic review of the literature (2001-2011) and analyzed six large datasets. Results were reviewed at a multistakeholder meeting, and a final set was derived emphasizing symptom prevalence across diverse cancer populations, impact on health outcomes and quality of life, and attribution to either disease or anticancer treatment. RESULTS: We recommend that a core set of 12 symptoms--specifically fatigue, insomnia, pain, anorexia (appetite loss), dyspnea, cognitive problems, anxiety (includes worry), nausea, depression (includes sadness), sensory neuropathy, constipation, and diarrhea--be considered for inclusion in clinical trials where a PRO is measured. Inclusion of symptoms and other patient-reported endpoints should be well justified, hypothesis driven, and meaningful to patients. CONCLUSIONS: This core set will promote consistent assessment of common and clinically relevant disease- and treatment-related symptoms across cancer trials. As such, it provides a foundation to support data harmonization and continued efforts to enhance measurement of patient-centered outcomes in cancer clinical trials and observational studies.

10 Review Optimal dosages for melatonin supplementation therapy in older adults: a systematic review of current literature. 2014

Vural, Esmée M S / van Munster, Barbara C / de Rooij, Sophia E. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Geriatric Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, e.vural@vumc.nl. ·Drugs Aging · Pubmed #24802882.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Melatonin is a hormone that regulates circadian rhythm, and its levels decline with age. As melatonin levels decrease, older adults are prone to develop disorders related to an altered circadian rhythm. The effective dose of melatonin supplementation in these disorders remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to define the optimal dosage of exogenous melatonin administration in disorders related to altered melatonin levels in older adults aged 55 years and above by determining the dose-response effect of exogenous administered melatonin on endogenous levels. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review through PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase, both from 1980 until November 2013. Included articles studied the effect of exogenous melatonin administration on endogenous melatonin levels in either serum, urine, or saliva in humans aged 55 years and above. RESULTS: We included 16 articles, nine of which were randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The mean age varied from 55.3 to 77.6 years. Melatonin dosage varied from 0.1 mg to 50 mg/kg and was administered orally in all studies. Pre- and post-intervention levels revealed a significant elevation of the post-intervention melatonin levels in a dose-dependent fashion. The maximum concentrations measured in serum and urine were all elevated compared with placebo, and a higher elevation in older adults than in younger adults was demonstrated. Even though there were no differences between times to reach maximum concentration in serum and urine, melatonin levels with higher doses were maintained longer above a certain threshold than were lower doses. CONCLUSION: In older adults, we advise the use of the lowest possible dose of immediate-release formulation melatonin to best mimic the normal physiological circadian rhythm of melatonin and to avoid prolonged, supra-physiological blood levels.

11 Review Sleep, vigilance, and thermosensitivity. 2012

Romeijn, Nico / Raymann, Roy J E M / Møst, Els / Te Lindert, Bart / Van Der Meijden, Wisse P / Fronczek, Rolf / Gomez-Herrero, German / Van Someren, Eus J W. ·Department of Sleep & Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, an Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 BA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Pflugers Arch · Pubmed #22048563.

ABSTRACT: The regulation of sleep and wakefulness is well modeled with two underlying processes: a circadian and a homeostatic one. So far, the parameters and mechanisms of additional sleep-permissive and wake-promoting conditions have been largely overlooked. The present overview focuses on one of these conditions: the effect of skin temperature on the onset and maintenance of sleep, and alertness. Skin temperature is quite well suited to provide the brain with information on sleep-permissive and wake-promoting conditions because it changes with most if not all of them. Skin temperature changes with environmental heat and cold, but also with posture, environmental light, danger, nutritional status, pain, and stress. Its effect on the brain may thus moderate the efficacy by which the clock and homeostat manage to initiate or maintain sleep or wakefulness. The review provides a brief overview of the neuroanatomical pathways and physiological mechanisms by which skin temperature can affect the regulation of sleep and vigilance. In addition, current pitfalls and possibilities of practical applications for sleep enhancement are discussed, including the recent finding of impaired thermal comfort perception in insomniacs.

12 Clinical Trial Sleep Stage Transition Dynamics Reveal Specific Stage 2 Vulnerability in Insomnia. 2017

Wei, Yishul / Colombo, Michele A / Ramautar, Jennifer R / Blanken, Tessa F / van der Werf, Ysbrand D / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Feige, Bernd / Riemann, Dieter / Van Someren, Eus J W. ·Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN), Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Bernstein Center Freiburg and Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel (UPK), Basel, Switzerland. · Departments of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University and Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center-University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. ·Sleep · Pubmed #28934523.

ABSTRACT: Study Objectives: Objective sleep impairments in insomnia disorder (ID) are insufficiently understood. The present study evaluated whether whole-night sleep stage dynamics derived from polysomnography (PSG) differ between people with ID and matched controls and whether sleep stage dynamic features discriminate them better than conventional sleep parameters. Methods: Eighty-eight participants aged 21-70 years, including 46 with ID and 42 age- and sex-matched controls without sleep complaints, were recruited through www.sleepregistry.nl and completed two nights of laboratory PSG. Data of 100 people with ID and 100 age- and sex-matched controls from a previously reported study were used to validate the generalizability of findings. The second night was used to obtain, in addition to conventional sleep parameters, probabilities of transitions between stages and bout duration distributions of each stage. Group differences were evaluated with nonparametric tests. Results: People with ID showed higher empirical probabilities to transition from stage N2 to the lighter sleep stage N1 or wakefulness and a faster decaying stage N2 bout survival function. The increased transition probability from stage N2 to stage N1 discriminated people with ID better than any of their deviations in conventional sleep parameters, including less total sleep time, less sleep efficiency, more stage N1, and more wake after sleep onset. Moreover, adding this transition probability significantly improved the discriminating power of a multiple logistic regression model based on conventional sleep parameters. Conclusions: Quantification of sleep stage dynamics revealed a particular vulnerability of stage N2 in insomnia. The feature characterizes insomnia better than-and independently of-any conventional sleep parameter.

13 Article Biological and clinical insights from genetics of insomnia symptoms. 2019

Lane, Jacqueline M / Jones, Samuel E / Dashti, Hassan S / Wood, Andrew R / Aragam, Krishna G / van Hees, Vincent T / Strand, Linn B / Winsvold, Bendik S / Wang, Heming / Bowden, Jack / Song, Yanwei / Patel, Krunal / Anderson, Simon G / Beaumont, Robin N / Bechtold, David A / Cade, Brian E / Haas, Mary / Kathiresan, Sekar / Little, Max A / Luik, Annemarie I / Loudon, Andrew S / Purcell, Shaun / Richmond, Rebecca C / Scheer, Frank A J L / Schormair, Barbara / Tyrrell, Jessica / Winkelman, John W / Winkelmann, Juliane / Anonymous5371464 / Hveem, Kristian / Zhao, Chen / Nielsen, Jonas B / Willer, Cristen J / Redline, Susan / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Kyle, Simon D / Ray, David W / Zwart, John-Anker / Brumpton, Ben / Frayling, Timothy M / Lawlor, Deborah A / Rutter, Martin K / Weedon, Michael N / Saxena, Richa. ·Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Genetics of Complex Traits, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK. · Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Netherlands eScience Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · K.G. Jebsen Centre for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. · FORMI and Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. · Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. · College of Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Gastroenterology, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Mathematics, Aston University, Birmingham, UK. · Media Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. · Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. · Institute of Neurogenomics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany. · Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich, Germany. · Institute of Human Genetics, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Neurogenetics, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Departments of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Centre-University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, OX37LE/NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK. · Department of Thoracic and Occupational Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. · Manchester Diabetes Centre, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK. · Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. rsaxena@partners.org. · Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. rsaxena@partners.org. · Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA. rsaxena@partners.org. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #30804566.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is a common disorder linked with adverse long-term medical and psychiatric outcomes. The underlying pathophysiological processes and causal relationships of insomnia with disease are poorly understood. Here we identified 57 loci for self-reported insomnia symptoms in the UK Biobank (n = 453,379) and confirmed their effects on self-reported insomnia symptoms in the HUNT Study (n = 14,923 cases and 47,610 controls), physician-diagnosed insomnia in the Partners Biobank (n = 2,217 cases and 14,240 controls), and accelerometer-derived measures of sleep efficiency and sleep duration in the UK Biobank (n = 83,726). Our results suggest enrichment of genes involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and of genes expressed in multiple brain regions, skeletal muscle, and adrenal glands. Evidence of shared genetic factors was found between frequent insomnia symptoms and restless legs syndrome, aging, and cardiometabolic, behavioral, psychiatric, and reproductive traits. Evidence was found for a possible causal link between insomnia symptoms and coronary artery disease, depressive symptoms, and subjective well-being.

14 Article Genome-wide analysis of insomnia in 1,331,010 individuals identifies new risk loci and functional pathways. 2019

Jansen, Philip R / Watanabe, Kyoko / Stringer, Sven / Skene, Nathan / Bryois, Julien / Hammerschlag, Anke R / de Leeuw, Christiaan A / Benjamins, Jeroen S / Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B / Nagel, Mats / Savage, Jeanne E / Tiemeier, Henning / White, Tonya / Anonymous3351197 / Tung, Joyce Y / Hinds, David A / Vacic, Vladimir / Wang, Xin / Sullivan, Patrick F / van der Sluis, Sophie / Polderman, Tinca J C / Smit, August B / Hjerling-Leffler, Jens / Van Someren, Eus J W / Posthuma, Danielle. ·Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Social, Health and Organisational Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Genetics, Section of Complex Trait Genetics, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · 23andMe, Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA. · Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (an institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences), Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Departments of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. d.posthuma@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Genetics, Section of Complex Trait Genetics, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. d.posthuma@vu.nl. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #30804565.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is the second most prevalent mental disorder, with no sufficient treatment available. Despite substantial heritability, insight into the associated genes and neurobiological pathways remains limited. Here, we use a large genetic association sample (n = 1,331,010) to detect novel loci and gain insight into the pathways, tissue and cell types involved in insomnia complaints. We identify 202 loci implicating 956 genes through positional, expression quantitative trait loci, and chromatin mapping. The meta-analysis explained 2.6% of the variance. We show gene set enrichments for the axonal part of neurons, cortical and subcortical tissues, and specific cell types, including striatal, hypothalamic, and claustrum neurons. We found considerable genetic correlations with psychiatric traits and sleep duration, and modest correlations with other sleep-related traits. Mendelian randomization identified the causal effects of insomnia on depression, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, and the protective effects of educational attainment and intracranial volume. Our findings highlight key brain areas and cell types implicated in insomnia, and provide new treatment targets.

15 Article Insomnia Severity in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder is Associated with sensory Hyper-Reactivity and Social Skill Impairment. 2019

Hohn, Vanessa D / de Veld, Danielle M J / Mataw, Kawita J S / van Someren, Eus J W / Begeer, Sander. ·Section Clinical Developmental Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, An Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Departments of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universtiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Departments of Integrative Neurophysiology and Psychiatry, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University and Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Section Clinical Developmental Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. S.Begeer@vu.nl. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #30737588.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is a common source of distress in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Two characteristics of ASD could be relevant to insomnia complaints by hampering the entrainment of a circadian sleep-wake rhythm. First, sensory hyper-reactivity could lead to bright light avoidance and thus affect photoperiodic input to the circadian system. Second, impaired social skills complicate the establishment of a social interactions and thus affect scheduled social-behavioral input to the circadian system. We investigated the association of insomnia severity with sensory reactivity and social skills in 631 adults (18-65 years) with ASD. Results revealed positive associations of insomnia severity with general and visual sensory hyper-reactivity and with impairment of social skills. The findings warrant further studies which (1) directly assess whether a suboptimal functioning of the biological clock underlies these associations and (2) identify other factors that could contribute to observed sleep problems.

16 Article Insomnia disorder subtypes derived from life history and traits of affect and personality. 2019

Blanken, Tessa F / Benjamins, Jeroen S / Borsboom, Denny / Vermunt, Jeroen K / Paquola, Casey / Ramautar, Jennifer / Dekker, Kim / Stoffers, Diederick / Wassing, Rick / Wei, Yishul / Van Someren, Eus J W. ·Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Integrative Neurophysiology and Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: t.blanken@nin.knaw.nl. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Social, Health and Organizational Psychology and Department of Experimental Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands. · Department of Psychological Methods, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Methodology and Statistics, Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Spinoza Centre for Neuroimaging, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Integrative Neurophysiology and Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·Lancet Psychiatry · Pubmed #30630691.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insomnia disorder is the second most prevalent mental disorder, and it is a primary risk factor for depression. Inconsistent clinical and biomarker findings in patients with insomnia disorder suggest that heterogeneity exists and that subtypes of this disease remain unrecognised. Previous top-down proposed subtypes in nosologies have had insufficient validity. In this large-scale study, we aimed to reveal robust subtypes of insomnia disorder by use of data-driven analyses on a multidimensional set of biologically based traits. METHODS: In this series of studies, we recruited participants from the Netherlands Sleep Registry, a database of volunteers aged 18 years or older, who we followed up online to survey traits, sleep, life events, and health history with 34 selected questionnaires of which participants completed at least one. We identified insomnia disorder subtypes by use of latent class analyses. We evaluated the value of our identified subtypes of insomnia disorder by use of a second, non-overlapping cohort who were recruited through a newsletter that was emailed to a new sample of Netherlands Sleep Registry participants, and by assessment of within-subject stability over several years of follow-up. We extensively tested the clinical validity of these subtypes for the development of sleep complaints, comorbidities (including depression), and response to benzodiazepines; in two subtypes of insomnia disorder, we also assessed the clinical relevance of these subtypes by use of an electroencephalogram biomarker and the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy. To facilitate implementation, we subsequently constructed a concise subtype questionnaire and we validated this questionnaire in the second, non-overlapping cohort. FINDINGS: 4322 Netherlands Sleep Registry participants completed at least one of the selected questionnaires, a demographic questionnaire, and an assessment of their Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) between March 2, 2010, and Oct 28, 2016. 2224 (51%) participants had probable insomnia disorder, defined as an ISI score of at least 10, and 2098 (49%) participants with a lower ISI score served as a control group. With a latent class analysis of the questionnaire responses of 2224 participants, we identified five novel insomnia disorder subtypes: highly distressed, moderately distressed but reward sensitive (ie, with intact responses to pleasurable emotions), moderately distressed and reward insensitive, slightly distressed with high reactivity (to their environment and life events), and slightly distressed with low reactivity. In a second, non-overlapping replication sample of 251 new participants who were assessed between June 12, 2017, and Nov 26, 2017, five subtypes were also identified to be optimal. In both the development sample and replication sample, each participant was classified as having only one subtype with high posterior probability (0·91-1·00). In 215 of the original sample of 2224 participants with insomnia who were reassessed 4·8 (SD 1·6) years later (between April 13, 2017, and June 21, 2017), the probability of maintaining their original subtype was 0·87, indicating a high stability of the classification. We found differences between the identified subtypes in developmental trajectories, response to treatment, the presence of an electroencephalogram biomarker, and the risk of depression that was up to five times different between groups, which indicated a clinical relevance of these subtypes. INTERPRETATION: High-dimensional data-driven subtyping of people with insomnia has addressed an unmet need to reduce the heterogeneity of insomnia disorder. Subtyping facilitates identification of the underlying causes of insomnia, development of personalised treatments, and selection of patients with the highest risk of depression for inclusion in trials regarding prevention of depression. FUNDING: European Research Council and Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

17 Article Poor Sleep in Hospitalized Patients: Are Hospital-Related Factors at Fault?-Reply. 2018

van den Ende, Eva S / Bosch, Frank H / Nanayakkara, Prabath W B. ·Section of Acute Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and Amsterdam Cardiovascular Sciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Internal Medicine, Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, the Netherlands. ·JAMA Intern Med · Pubmed #30508057.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Article The association between multiple sleep-related characteristics and the metabolic syndrome in the general population: the New Hoorn study. 2018

van der Pal, Kaira C / Koopman, Anitra D M / Lakerveld, Jeroen / van der Heijden, Amber A / Elders, Petra J / Beulens, Joline W / Rutters, Femke. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam University Medical Centres, The Netherlands; Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, The Netherlands. · Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, The Netherlands; Department of General Practice, Amsterdam University Medical Centres, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam University Medical Centres, The Netherlands; Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, The Netherlands; Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam University Medical Centres, The Netherlands; Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, The Netherlands. Electronic address: f.rutters@vumc.nl. ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #30278295.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous studies have investigated the association between sleep duration, insomnia, day-time napping and metabolic syndrome individually, but never conjointly. In addition, the association with sleep medication use has yet to be investigated. We aimed to examine the associations between these sleep-related characteristics and the metabolic syndrome, individually and conjointly, in a population-based cohort. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used cross-sectional data of 1679 participants from the New Hoorn study, 52.6% women and age 60.8 + 6.4y. Sleep duration, insomnia, and day-time napping were measured using validated questionnaires. The use of sleep medication was documented by the registration of dispensing labels. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to ATP III. Linear and Poisson regressions were used, and all analyses were adjusted for age, sex, education level, job status, smoking, physical activity, depression and BMI. RESULTS: In our population-based cohort, 447 (26.6%) persons had the metabolic syndrome. Individual associations showed that, after correction, day-time napping for ≤30 min and >30 min was associated with a prevalence ratio for the metabolic syndrome of 1.28 (95% CI: 1.1-1.5) and 1.74 (95% CI: 1.4-2.2), respectively, compared to participants who did not nap. Sleep duration, insomnia, and sleep medication use were not associated with the metabolic syndrome individually. However, conjointly analyses showed that, after correction, having ≥2 sleep-related characteristics was associated with a PR of 1.36 (95% CI: 1.0-1.8) of having the metabolic syndrome, compared to having no sleep-related characteristics. CONCLUSION: Sleep-related characteristics were associated with a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the general population.

19 Article Bright environmental light ameliorates deficient subjective 'liking' in insomnia: an experience sampling study. 2018

Te Lindert, Bart H W / Itzhacki, Jacob / van der Meijden, Wisse P / Kringelbach, Morten L / Mendoza, Jorge / Van Someren, Eus J W. ·Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Institute of Cellular and Integrative Neurosciences CNRS-UPR3212, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. · Center for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerl. · Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Center for Music in the Brain (MIB), Aarhus University, Denmark. · Departments of Integrative Neurophysiology and Psychiatry, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University and Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Sleep · Pubmed #29425334.

ABSTRACT: Study Objectives: Altered comfort sensing and reduced gray matter volume in the orbitofrontal cortex of the brain in people suffering from insomnia disorder (ID) suggest compromised processes of motivation and hedonia. The experience sampling (ES) method was used to evaluate whether, in naturalistic conditions, people with ID differ from those without sleep complaints with respect to subjective Wanting and Liking, two major dimensions of the reward system. Since light affects brain circuits involved in affect and reward, ES was combined with ambulatory monitoring of light intensity fluctuations to evaluate their effect on subjective Wanting and Liking. Methods: Participants with ID (n = 17, 12 females, 56.8 ± 6.5 mean ± standard deviation years of age) and matched controls without sleep complaints (n = 18, 12 females, 57.0 ± 8.6 years of age) were probed by a smartphone alarm to log their subjective Wanting, Liking, and mood nine times a day for 7 days. Using an ambulatory light recorder, light intensity exposure was sampled simultaneously and averaged over the intervals between subsequent ES alarms. Mixed-effect models were used to evaluate how ID and varying light intensity affected subjective assessments. Results: The results indicated significantly lower subjective Liking and Wanting in people suffering from ID, particularly at low environmental light intensity. Conclusions: Wanting and Liking, rather than more commonly used mood adjectives, showed an increased sensitivity to detect deficient hedonic and reward processing in insomnia during everyday life. Deficient Liking may in part be rescued by exposure to bright environmental light.

20 Article Improvements of adolescent psychopathology after insomnia treatment: results from a randomized controlled trial over 1 year. 2018

de Bruin, Eduard J / Bögels, Susan M / Oort, Frans J / Meijer, Anne Marie. ·Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Psychology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·J Child Psychol Psychiatry · Pubmed #29052846.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Adolescent insomnia can be treated effectively with cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBTI). However, little is known about effects of CBTI on psychopathology in adolescents. This study aimed to investigate whether (a) CBTI improves psychopathology in Internet- (IT) and face-to-face group treatment (GT) compared to waitlist (WL), (b) improvement in psychopathology can be attributed to reduced insomnia, (c) improvement in psychopathology remains stable for up to 1 year. METHODS: One hundred and sixteen participants (age = 15.6 years, 25% males) with DSM-5 insomnia, were randomly assigned to IT, GT or WL. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://www.controlledtrials.com (ISRCTN33922163). Assessments of psychopathology, insomnia and objectively and subjectively measured sleep occurred at baseline, post-treatment, and at 2-, 6- and 12-month follow-up. Multilevel and mediation analyses were run to test hypotheses. The CBTI protocol, 'Sleeping Smart' for both IT and GT consisted of six weekly sessions and a booster session after 2 months. RESULTS: Psychopathology symptoms, insomnia and sleep problems as measured by actigraphy and sleep logs decreased substantially in IT and GT compared with WL at 2-month follow-up with medium to large effect sizes (ESs). Psychopathology symptoms remained stable or further improved for up to 12-month follow-up. ESs at 12-month follow-up for IT and GT were respectively: affective (d = -0.87 and -0.97), anxiety (d = -0.81 for IT), somatic (d = -0.38 and d = -0.52), oppositional (d = -0.42 for GT) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) problems (d = -0.47 and -0.46). Mediation analyses indicated that reduction of insomnia symptoms after CBTI fully mediated the effects of CBTI on affective and anxiety problems, and partially mediated the effect on ADHD problems. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study demonstrating that Internet and face-to-face CBT for insomnia achieves long-term reduction in adolescent psychopathology and does so by improving insomnia. This finding can have profound implications for youth mental health care.

21 Article Chronic sleep reduction is associated with academic achievement and study concentration in higher education students. 2018

van der Heijden, Kristiaan B / Vermeulen, Marije C M / Donjacour, Claire E H M / Gordijn, Marijke C M / Hamburger, Hans L / Meijer, Anne M / van Rijn, Karin J / Vlak, Monique / Weysen, Tim. ·Department of Clinical Child and Adolescent Studies, Institute of Education and Child Studies, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, an Institute of the Royal Netherlands Society for Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen, Zwolle, the Netherlands. · Chrono@work B.V., Groningen & GeLifes, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands. · Boerhaave Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Centre for Sleep and Wake Disorders, Medical Center Haaglanden and Bronovo-Nebo, The Hague, the Netherlands. · Brain, Behavior & Cognition Department, Philips Group Innovation | Research, Eindhoven, the Netherlands. ·J Sleep Res · Pubmed #28880425.

ABSTRACT: Inadequate sleep impairs cognitive function and has been associated with worse academic achievement in higher education students; however, studies that control for relevant background factors and include knowledge on sleep hygiene are scarce. This study examined the association of chronic sleep reduction (i.e. symptoms of chronic sleep reduction such as shortness of sleep, sleepiness and irritation), subjective sleep quality and sleep hygiene knowledge with academic achievement (grades and study credits) and study concentration among 1378 higher education students (71% female, mean age 21.73 years, SD = 3.22) in the Netherlands. Demographic, health, lifestyle and study behaviour characteristics were included as covariates in hierarchical regression analyses. After controlling for significant covariates, only chronic sleep reduction remained a significant predictor of lower grades (last exam, average in current academic year). Better sleep quality and sleep hygiene knowledge were associated with better academic achievement, but significance was lost after controlling for covariates, except for a remaining positive association between sleep hygiene beliefs and grades in the current academic year. Moreover, better sleep quality and lower scores on chronic sleep reduction were associated with better study concentration after controlling for significant covariates. To conclude, chronic sleep reduction is associated with academic achievement and study concentration in higher education students. Inadequate sleep hygiene knowledge is moderately associated with worse academic achievement. Future research should investigate whether sleep hygiene interventions improve academic achievement in students of higher education.

22 Article Subjective insomnia symptoms and sleep duration are not related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in older adults. 2018

van Neijenhof, Rian J G Peters / van Duijn, Erik / Van Den Berg, Julia F / de Waal, Margot W M / van der Mast, Roos C / Comijs, Hannie C. ·Center for Mental Health Care Delfland, Delft, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, Den Haag, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, CAPRI-University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium. · Department of Psychiatry/EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, GGZ InGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·J Sleep Res · Pubmed #28618114.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia symptoms are highly prevalent in depressed older adults. This study investigates the association between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and symptoms of insomnia, respectively, sleep duration among 294 depressed and 123 non-depressed older adults of the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older people (NESDO) study. Insomnia symptoms were defined as clinically relevant when having a score ≥ 10 points on the Women's Health Initiative Insomnia Rating Scale (WHIIRS). Sleep duration was categorized in short (≤ 6 h per night), normal (7-8 h per night) and long (≥ 9 h per night) duration. Salivary cortisol levels were used to assess the following cortisol parameters for HPA axis activity: area under the curve with respect to the increase (AUCi) and to the ground (AUCg), diurnal slope, evening cortisol level and dexamethasone suppression ratio. Clinically relevant insomnia symptoms were present in 46% of the participants. Thirty-two per cent of the participants were short sleepers, whereas 16% were long sleepers. However, univariate analyses showed no differences in any of the HPA axis parameters between people with and without insomnia symptoms or between the three groups with different sleep duration. In addition, no significant interaction was found between a diagnosis of depression or the severity of depressive symptoms and any of the cortisol parameters in relation to insomnia symptoms or sleep duration.

23 Article Genome-wide association analysis of insomnia complaints identifies risk genes and genetic overlap with psychiatric and metabolic traits. 2017

Hammerschlag, Anke R / Stringer, Sven / de Leeuw, Christiaan A / Sniekers, Suzanne / Taskesen, Erdogan / Watanabe, Kyoko / Blanken, Tessa F / Dekker, Kim / Te Lindert, Bart H W / Wassing, Rick / Jonsdottir, Ingileif / Thorleifsson, Gudmar / Stefansson, Hreinn / Gislason, Thorarinn / Berger, Klaus / Schormair, Barbara / Wellmann, Juergen / Winkelmann, Juliane / Stefansson, Kari / Oexle, Konrad / Van Someren, Eus J W / Posthuma, Danielle. ·Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (an institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences), Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Integrative Neurophysiology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · deCODE Genetics, Amgen, Inc., Reykjavík, Iceland. · Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. · Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Landspitali, National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. · Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Münster, Münster, Germany. · Institute of Neurogenomics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany. · Institute of Human Genetics, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Rechts der Isar der Technischen Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich, Germany. · Department of Clinical Genetics, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #28604731.

ABSTRACT: Persistent insomnia is among the most frequent complaints in general practice. To identify genetic factors for insomnia complaints, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a genome-wide gene-based association study (GWGAS) in 113,006 individuals. We identify three loci and seven genes associated with insomnia complaints, with the associations for one locus and five genes supported by joint analysis with an independent sample (n = 7,565). Our top association (MEIS1, P < 5 × 10

24 Article Attentional bias modification training for insomnia: A double-blind placebo controlled randomized trial. 2017

Lancee, Jaap / Yasiney, Samya L / Brendel, Ruben S / Boffo, Marilisa / Clarke, Patrick J F / Salemink, Elske. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. · School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #28423038.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Attentional bias toward sleep-related information is believed to play a key role in insomnia. If attentional bias is indeed of importance, changing this bias should then in turn have effects on insomnia complaints. In this double-blind placebo controlled randomized trial we investigated the efficacy of attentional bias modification training in the treatment of insomnia. METHOD: We administered baseline, post-test, and one-week follow-up measurements of insomnia severity, sleep-related worry, depression, and anxiety. Participants meeting DSM-5 criteria for insomnia were randomized into an attentional bias training group (n = 67) or a placebo training group (n = 70). Both groups received eight training sessions over the course of two weeks. All participants kept a sleep diary for four consecutive weeks (one week before until one week after the training sessions). RESULTS: There was no additional benefit for the attentional bias training over the placebo training on sleep-related indices/outcome measures. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of the effect may be explained by the fact that there was neither attentional bias at baseline nor any reduction in the bias after the training. Either way, this study gives no support for attentional bias modification training as a stand-alone intervention for ameliorating insomnia complaints.

25 Article Mobile Phone-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomized Waitlist Controlled Trial. 2017

Horsch, Corine Hg / Lancee, Jaap / Griffioen-Both, Fiemke / Spruit, Sandor / Fitrianie, Siska / Neerincx, Mark A / Beun, Robbert Jan / Brinkman, Willem-Paul. ·Department of Intelligent Systems, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands. ·J Med Internet Res · Pubmed #28400355.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This study is one of the first randomized controlled trials investigating cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered by a fully automated mobile phone app. Such an app can potentially increase the accessibility of insomnia treatment for the 10% of people who have insomnia. OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to investigate the efficacy of CBT-I delivered via the Sleepcare mobile phone app, compared with a waitlist control group, in a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: We recruited participants in the Netherlands with relatively mild insomnia disorder. After answering an online pretest questionnaire, they were randomly assigned to the app (n=74) or the waitlist condition (n=77). The app packaged a sleep diary, a relaxation exercise, sleep restriction exercise, and sleep hygiene and education. The app was fully automated and adjusted itself to a participant's progress. Program duration was 6 to 7 weeks, after which participants received posttest measurements and a 3-month follow-up. The participants in the waitlist condition received the app after they completed the posttest questionnaire. The measurements consisted of questionnaires and 7-day online diaries. The questionnaires measured insomnia severity, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, and anxiety and depression symptoms. The diary measured sleep variables such as sleep efficiency. We performed multilevel analyses to study the interaction effects between time and condition. RESULTS: The results showed significant interaction effects (P<.01) favoring the app condition on the primary outcome measures of insomnia severity (d=-0.66) and sleep efficiency (d=0.71). Overall, these improvements were also retained in a 3-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated the efficacy of a fully automated mobile phone app in the treatment of relatively mild insomnia. The effects were in the range of what is found for Web-based treatment in general. This supports the applicability of such technical tools in the treatment of insomnia. Future work should examine the generalizability to a more diverse population. Furthermore, the separate components of such an app should be investigated. It remains to be seen how this app can best be integrated into the current health regimens. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register: NTR5560; http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=5560 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6noLaUdJ4).

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