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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles from Bergen, NO
Based on 66 articles published since 2009
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These are the 66 published articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders that originated from Bergen, NO during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Guideline European guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of insomnia. 2017

Riemann, Dieter / Baglioni, Chiara / Bassetti, Claudio / Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Dolenc Groselj, Leja / Ellis, Jason G / Espie, Colin A / Garcia-Borreguero, Diego / Gjerstad, Michaela / Gonçalves, Marta / Hertenstein, Elisabeth / Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus / Jennum, Poul J / Leger, Damien / Nissen, Christoph / Parrino, Liborio / Paunio, Tiina / Pevernagie, Dirk / Verbraecken, Johan / Weeß, Hans-Günter / Wichniak, Adam / Zavalko, Irina / Arnardottir, Erna S / Deleanu, Oana-Claudia / Strazisar, Barbara / Zoetmulder, Marielle / Spiegelhalder, Kai. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · University Hospital for Neurology, Inselspital Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Northumbria Sleep Research Laboratory, Northumbria University, Newcastle, UK. · Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Sleep Research Institute Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. · Centro de Medicina de Sono, Hospital Cuf, Porto, Portugal. · Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Centre du Sommeil et de la Vigilance et EA 7330 VIFASOM, Université Paris Descartes, Clinic Hotel-Dieu, Sorbonne Paris Cité, APHP, HUPC, Hotel Dieu de Paris, Paris, France. · University Hospital of Psychiatry, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Sleep Medicine Centre, Kempenhaeghe Foundation, Heeze, The Netherlands. · Multidisciplinary Sleep Disorders Centre, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Edegem-Wilrijk, Belgium. · Sleep Center Pfalzklinikum, Klingenmünster, Germany. · Sleep Medicine Center and Third Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland. · Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of the Federal Medical Biological Agency, Moscow, Russia. · Sleep Measurements, National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. · Institute for Pneumology, Medical Faculty, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania. · Centre for Sleep Disorders in Children and Adolescents, General Hospital Celje, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Department of Neurology, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·J Sleep Res · Pubmed #28875581.

ABSTRACT: This European guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of insomnia was developed by a task force of the European Sleep Research Society, with the aim of providing clinical recommendations for the management of adult patients with insomnia. The guideline is based on a systematic review of relevant meta-analyses published till June 2016. The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians involved in the management of insomnia, and the target patient population includes adults with chronic insomnia disorder. The GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system was used to grade the evidence and guide recommendations. The diagnostic procedure for insomnia, and its co-morbidities, should include a clinical interview consisting of a sleep history (sleep habits, sleep environment, work schedules, circadian factors), the use of sleep questionnaires and sleep diaries, questions about somatic and mental health, a physical examination and additional measures if indicated (i.e. blood tests, electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram; strong recommendation, moderate- to high-quality evidence). Polysomnography can be used to evaluate other sleep disorders if suspected (i.e. periodic limb movement disorder, sleep-related breathing disorders), in treatment-resistant insomnia, for professional at-risk populations and when substantial sleep state misperception is suspected (strong recommendation, high-quality evidence). Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia is recommended as the first-line treatment for chronic insomnia in adults of any age (strong recommendation, high-quality evidence). A pharmacological intervention can be offered if cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia is not sufficiently effective or not available. Benzodiazepines, benzodiazepine receptor agonists and some antidepressants are effective in the short-term treatment of insomnia (≤4 weeks; weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Antihistamines, antipsychotics, melatonin and phytotherapeutics are not recommended for insomnia treatment (strong to weak recommendations, low- to very-low-quality evidence). Light therapy and exercise need to be further evaluated to judge their usefulness in the treatment of insomnia (weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). Complementary and alternative treatments (e.g. homeopathy, acupuncture) are not recommended for insomnia treatment (weak recommendation, very-low-quality evidence).

2 Review [Symptom patterns in chronic sleep disorders]. 2009

Øyane, Nicolas / van den Hoven, Anne Marie / Fetveit, Arne / Pallesen, Ståle / Bjorvatn, Bjørn. ·Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag, Universitetet i Bergen og Nasjonalt kompetansesenter for søvnsykdommer, Haukeland universitetssykehus, 5021 Bergen og Bergen Søvnsenter, Norway. nicolas.oyane@isf.uib.no ·Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen · Pubmed #19823208.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders are classified into six main categories: insomnias, circadian rhythm disorders, sleep-related movement disorders, sleep-related breathing disorders, hypersomnias and parasomnias. The aim of this article is to shed light on differences between these categories with respect to symptom patterns. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The main sources of information are the diagnosis manual published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine in 2005 and papers identified through non-systematic searches in Pubmed. RESULTS: Long sleep onset latency is most common in patients with insomnia, delayed sleep phase syndrome and restless legs while nightly awakenings are most common in patients with insomnia, restless legs and the sleep apnoea syndrome. Excessive daytime sleepiness is most pronounced in patients with hypersomnia, sleep apnoea syndrome and delayed sleep phase syndrome, whereas patients with insomnia rarely have this problem. Fatigue is a common feature of all sleep disorders, especially insomnia. The diagnosis of insomnia, circadian rhythm disturbances, restless legs and most parasomnias is mainly based on anamnestic data. Objective sleep recordings are necessary to diagnose sleep apnoea syndrome, hypersomnia and periodic leg movement during sleep. INTERPRETATION: The six sleep disorder categories differ substantially with respect to symptom patterns. Sleep disorders can often be distinguished from each other by use of anamnestic data without resorting to further assessment, but objective sleep recordings are needed for accurate diagnosis of some patients.

3 Review [Insomnia]. 2009

Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Sivertsen, Børge / Øyane, Nicolas / Nordhus, Inger Hilde / Pallesen, Ståle. ·Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag Universitetet i Bergen, Postboks 7804, 5020 Bergen og Nasjonalt kompetansesenter for søvnsykdommer, Haukeland universitetssykehus, Bergen, Norway. bjorn.bjorvatn@isf.uib.no ·Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen · Pubmed #19756061.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insomnia is the most prevalent sleep disorder. Chronic insomnia affects about 10% of the adult population. MATERIAL AND METHOD: This review is based on the authors' experience, as well as articles identified through non-systematic searches in Pubmed. RESULTS: Insomnia is characterized by problems with falling asleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, waking up to early and/or poor sleep quality. The diagnosis implies that the problem causes some type of daytime impairment. Insomnia is divided into several different subtypes. Recent studies indicate that insomnia is an independent risk factor for sick leave and disability pension. Non-pharmacological treatment, i.e. stimulus control and sleep restriction yields better outcome than hypnotics, particularly on a long-term basis. INTERPRETATION: Insomnia is highly prevalent, and non-pharmacological therapy is the best documented treatment.

4 Clinical Trial Specific EEG sleep pattern in the prefrontal cortex in primary insomnia. 2015

Perrier, Joy / Clochon, Patrice / Bertran, Françoise / Couque, Colette / Bulla, Jan / Denise, Pierre / Bocca, Marie-Laure. ·Normandie Univ, Caen, 14032, France; UNICAEN, COMETE, Caen, 14032, France; INSERM, U 1075 COMETE, Caen, 14032, France. · INSERM, U1077, Caen, 14074, France; UNICAEN, UMR-S1077, Caen, 14074, France; Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, UMR-S1077, Caen, 14074, France. · CHU de Caen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Caen, 14033, France; INSERM, U1077, Caen, 14074, France; UNICAEN, UMR-S1077, Caen, 14074, France; Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, UMR-S1077, Caen, 14074, France. · CHU de Caen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Caen, 14033, France. · Department of Mathematics, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7800, 5020 Bergen, Norway. · Normandie Univ, Caen, 14032, France; UNICAEN, COMETE, Caen, 14032, France; INSERM, U 1075 COMETE, Caen, 14032, France; CHU de Caen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Caen, 14033, France. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25611059.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess the specific prefrontal activity in comparison to those in the other main cortical areas in primary insomnia patients and in good sleepers. METHODS: Fourteen primary insomnia patients and 11 good sleepers were included in the analysis. Participants completed one night of polysomnography in the sleep lab. Power spectra were calculated during the NREM (Non-rapid eyes movements) and the REM (Rapid eyes movements) sleep periods at prefrontal, occipital, temporal and central electrode positions. RESULTS: During the NREM sleep, the power spectra did not differ between groups in the prefrontal cortex; while primary insomnia patients exhibited a higher beta power spectrum and a lower delta power spectrum compared to good sleepers in other areas. During the REM sleep, the beta1 power spectrum was lower in the prefrontal cortex in primary insomnia patients compared to good sleepers; while no significant difference between groups was obtained for the other areas. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows a specific prefrontal sleep pattern during the whole sleep period. In addition, we suggest that primary insomnia patients displayed a dysfunction in the reactivation of the limbic system during the REM sleep and we give additional arguments in favor of a sleep-protection mechanism displayed by primary insomnia patients.

5 Article The Short-Term Efficacy of an Unguided Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial With a Six-Month Nonrandomized Follow-Up. 2019

Hagatun, Susanne / Vedaa, Øystein / Nordgreen, Tine / Smith, Otto R F / Pallesen, Ståle / Havik, Odd E / Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Thorndike, Frances P / Ritterband, Lee M / Sivertsen, Børge. ·a Department of Health Promotion , Norwegian Institute of Public Health , Bergen , Norway. · b Department of Psychosocial Science , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway. · c Department of Clinical Psychology , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway. · d Anxiety Disorders Research Network, Haukeland University Hospital , Bergen , Norway. · e Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital , Bergen , Norway. · f Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway. · g Center for Behavioral Health and Technology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences , University of Virginia Health System , Charlottesville , Virginia. · h The Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health , Bergen , Norway. · i Department of Research and Innovation , Helse Fonna HF , Haugesund , Norway. ·Behav Sleep Med · Pubmed #28345961.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Insomnia is a major health problem, and the need for effective and accessible treatment is urgent. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the short-term efficacy of an unguided Internet-based cognitive-behavioral treatment program for insomnia (CBTi), called SHUTi (Sleep Healthy Using the Internet). METHODS: This study used a parallel arm randomized controlled trial in Norway. Participants were randomly allocated to the SHUTi condition or a Web-based patient education condition. Both groups were assessed before and after the nine-week intervention period (online sleep diaries and questionnaires). The SHUTi participants were reassessed in a six-month nonrandomized follow-up. Primary outcome measures were the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and the Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS). RESULTS: A total of 181 participants were included in the study; SHUTi condition (n = 95), patient education condition (n = 86). Intention-to-treat mixed-model repeated-measures analysis revealed that the SHUTi group had better short-term outcomes compared with the patient education group on most sleep measures. The SHUTi group showed a significant decrease on the primary outcomes, the ISI (d CONCLUSION: Unguided Internet-based CBTi produced significant short-term improvements in sleep in patients with chronic insomnia. This highlights the benefits of making Internet-delivered CBTi programs available as a standard first-line treatment option in public health services. Nevertheless, the rate of dropout attrition (participants not completing post-assessment) in this trial limits the generalizability of the findings.

6 Article Protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of research on the associations between workplace bullying and sleep. 2018

Nielsen, Morten Birkeland / Pallesen, Ståle / Harris, Anette / Einarsen, Ståle Valvatne. ·National Institute of Occupational Health, Pb 5330 Majorstuen, N- 0304, Oslo, Norway. morten.nielsen@stami.no. · Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. morten.nielsen@stami.no. · Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. ·Syst Rev · Pubmed #30545416.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Existing evidence on the association between exposure to bullying and sleep is limited and inconclusive. The aims of this planned systematic review and meta-analysis are therefore (1) to determine whether exposure to workplace bullying is related to changes in sleep function and (2) to establish mediating and moderating factors that govern the relationship between bullying and sleep. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis will be conducted. Electronic databases will be searched using predefined search terms to identify relevant studies. Eligible studies should report empirical findings on the association between exposure to workplace bullying and at least one indicator of sleep. Primary observational studies with cross-sectional or prospective research design, case-control studies, and studies with experimental designs will be included. Qualitative interviews and case studies will be excluded. The methodological quality of the included studies will be assessed with a previously established checklist for studies on workplace bullying. The quality of evidence for an association between bullying and sleep problems will evaluated in accordance with the GRADE system. A random effects meta-analysis will be conducted with the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software, version 3. DISCUSSION: This review and meta-analysis will be among the first to systematically explore and integrate the evidence available on the association between exposure to bullying and sleep, as well as on the mediating and moderating factors that can govern this associations. By gathering and summarizing information about potential factors that can explain when and how bullying is related to sleep, the findings from this study will provide directions for future research and provide practitioners and clinicians with an understanding about the nature and consequences of workplace bullying and point to directions for relevant interventions. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: The protocol has been registered at the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO; registration number: CRD42018082192 ).

7 Article Factors associated with self-rated health in primary care. 2018

Mildestvedt, Thomas / Herikstad, Vibeke V / Undheim, Ida / Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Meland, Eivind. ·a Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway. ·Scand J Prim Health Care · Pubmed #30139280.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Self-rated health (SRH) measures one's current general health and is a widely used health indicator. Sleep problems, somatic health complaints, and unmet needs in interpersonal relationships are suspected to influence SRH, but studies in primary health care settings are sparse. OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between patients' self-rated health and their sleep problems, somatic health complaints, and unmet needs in interpersonal relationships. DESIGN: We collected data via questionnaires for this cross-sectional study from general practice. SETTING: Primary health care in Norway. SUBJECTS: 1302 consecutive patients participated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The questionnaire included a single question about SRH, the Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS), five questions on somatic health complaints, and three questions from the Basic Psychological Needs Scale (BPNS) pertaining to the relationships domain. We analyzed our data using ordinal logistic regression models. RESULTS: Our response rate was 74%. The prevalence of fair/poor SRH was 26%, with no gender differences. We revealed a significant association between increasing age and reduced SRH. The study showed that sleep problems and somatic health complaints were strongly associated with SRH, and unmet needs in relationships were also significantly and independently associated with reduced SRH in a full model analysis. CONCLUSION: Sleep problems, somatic health complaints, and unmet needs in interpersonal relationships were all associated with reduced SRH. These factors are all modifiable and could be managed both within and outside a primary care setting in order to improve SRH. Key Points There was a high prevalence of reduced SRH in clinical general practice Sleep problems, somatic health complaints, and unmet needs in interpersonal relationships were all associated with reduced SRH These predictors are all modifiable with a potential to improve SRH.

8 Article Association of sleep duration and sleep quality with the physical, social, and emotional functioning among Australian adults. 2018

Lallukka, Tea / Sivertsen, Børge / Kronholm, Erkki / Bin, Yu Sun / Øverland, Simon / Glozier, Nick. ·Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 18, FIN 00032 Helsinki, Finland; Department of Public Health, P.O. Box 20 (Tukholmankatu 8 B), FIN-00014, University of Helsinki, Finland; Sydney Medical School, Sleep Group, D17 - Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney NSW, Australia 2006. Electronic address: tea.lallukka@ttl.fi. · Department of Research and Innovation, Helse-Fonna HF Haugesund Hospital, Postbox 2170, 5504, Haugesund, Norway; Department of Health Promotion, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Zander Kaaesgate 7, 5015 Bergen, Norway. · Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Lemminkäisenkatu 14-18 B, FI-20032, Turku, Finland. · Sydney Medical School, Sleep Group, D17 - Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney NSW, Australia 2006. · Department of Health Promotion, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Zander Kaaesgate 7, 5015 Bergen, Norway; Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Postboks 7807, 5020 Bergen, Norway. · Sydney Medical School, Sleep Group, D17 - Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney NSW, Australia 2006; Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, 94 Mallett Street, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. ·Sleep Health · Pubmed #29555134.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the interaction of two key determinants of sleep health, quantity and quality, with physical, emotional, and social functioning, in the general population. DESIGN: Nationally-representative Australian cross-sectional study. SETTING: General population. PARTICIPANTS: 14,571 people aged 15 or older in Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) in 2013. MEASUREMENTS: The associations of sleep quality (good/poor) in combination with mid-range (6-8 hours), short (<6) or long (>8) sleep duration with functioning, determined from the SF-36, were evaluated using logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic, relationships, health behaviors, obesity, pain, and mental and physical illness confounders. RESULTS: After adjusting for gender, and age, poor sleep quality in combination with short, mid-range and long sleep was associated with worse physical, emotional and social functioning. Pain and comorbid illness explained much of these associations, while attenuation from other covariates was minor. The associations of poor sleep quality with worse functioning remained after full adjustment regardless of sleep duration, while among people with good quality sleep, only those with long sleep duration reported poorer functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Poor sleep quality has robust associations with worse functioning regardless of total duration in the general population. There appears to be a substantial number of functional short sleepers with good quality sleep.

9 Article The association between insomnia and bedroom habits and bedroom characteristics: an exploratory cross-sectional study of a representative sample of adults. 2018

Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Waage, Siri / Pallesen, Ståle. ·Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.; Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway.. Electronic address: bjorn.bjorvatn@uib.no. · Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.; Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway. · Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.; Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Norway. ·Sleep Health · Pubmed #29555133.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Major age and sex differences are reported in bedroom habits and bedroom characteristics. However, few studies have investigated whether such bedroom habits and characteristics differ between patients with chronic insomnia disorder and good sleepers. METHODS: We assessed the association between several bedroom habits (i.e. electronic media use, bed sharing) and bedroom characteristics (i.e. bedroom temperature, blackout curtains) and chronic insomnia disorder among 1001 randomly selected adults responding to a telephone survey in Norway. Response rate was 63%. Insomnia symptoms were evaluated with the validated Bergen Insomnia Scale (with ICSD-3/DSM-5 criteria). RESULTS: Chronic insomnia disorder was associated with reporting worse bed comfort, having newer beds, more noise stemming from both within and outside the building, higher bedroom temperature during the summer, and not preferring the supine position when trying to sleep. However, we found no associations between chronic insomnia disorder and electronic media use in bed, reading in bed, how important the mattress, pillow and comforter were rated, bed sharing, bedroom temperature during winter, open or closed bedroom window, use of blackout curtains, and most self-reported preferred body positions for sleep. CONCLUSION: We found few and small differences in bedroom habits and bedroom characteristics between respondents with and without chronic insomnia disorder. Future studies with experimental and longitudinal designs should investigate whether and how such habits and characteristics are causally and temporally linked to insomnia.

10 Article The effect of hardiness on symptoms of insomnia during a naval mission. 2017

Nordmo, Morten / Hystad, Sigurd William / Sanden, Sverre / Johnsen, Bjørn Helge. ·Department of Psychosocial Science, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway. morten.nordmo@uib.no. ·Int Marit Health · Pubmed #28952659.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sleep is increasingly being recognised as important for the health and well-being of sailors. The aim of the current study is to investigate the relationship between hardiness and reported insomnia-symptoms in a maritime military setting during a 4-month counter piracy naval mission in the Gulf of Aden. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A sample of 281 officers, sailors, and enlisted personnel were measured on levels of hardiness before the mission. The participants were split into low and high hardiness groups based on the group level mean. Insomnia-symptoms were measured before, midway and at the end of the mission. RESULTS: The results showed a significant main effect of time and a significant main effect of hardiness. The crew experienced the most insomnia symptoms in the middle of the mission and the high hardy group experienced less insomnia symptoms, in total, during the mission. There was also found a significant interaction effect of time and hardiness. The high hardiness group experienced less insomnia symptoms before and towards the end of the mission. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that high levels of hardiness may be a protective factor between the stressors of a naval mission and symptoms of insomnia.

11 Article Sleep improvement by internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy might help prevent mental health disorders. 2017

Lallukka, Tea / Sivertsen, Børge. ·Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: tea.lallukka@ttl.fi. · The Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway; Department of Research and Innovation, Helse-Fonna HF Haugesund Hospital, Haugesund, Norway; Department of Health Promotion, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ·Lancet Psychiatry · Pubmed #28888926.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Article Prevalence and clinical correlates of insomnia in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. 2017

Brevik, E J / Lundervold, A J / Halmøy, A / Posserud, M-B / Instanes, J T / Bjorvatn, B / Haavik, J. ·Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · K.G. Jebsen Centre for Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Acta Psychiatr Scand · Pubmed #28547881.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of insomnia in adults with Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its association with clinical subtypes, current ADHD symptoms, and stimulant treatment. METHOD: We obtained diagnostic information, symptom rating scales and treatment history from clinically ascertained adult ADHD patients diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria (n = 268, mean age 38.1 years) and randomly selected population controls (n = 202, mean age 36.5 years). The Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS) was used to measure insomnia. ADHD symptom domains were self-rated using the Adult ADHD Self-Rating Scale. RESULTS: Insomnia was far more frequent among adults with ADHD (66.8%) than in the population controls (28.8%) (P < 0.001). Insomnia was more common in adults with the combined subtype than in those with the inattentive subtype (79.7% and 55.6%, respectively) (P = 0.003). For self-reported current ADHD symptoms, inattention was strongly correlated to insomnia. Patients currently using stimulant treatment for ADHD reported a lower total insomnia score compared to patients without medication (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Insomnia was highly prevalent among adults with ADHD. The lower insomnia score in patients on current stimulant treatment suggests that stimulant treatment is not associated with worsening of insomnia symptoms in adult ADHD patients.

13 Article The Course and Impact of Poststroke Insomnia in Stroke Survivors Aged 18 to 65 Years: Results from the Psychosocial Outcomes In StrokE (POISE) Study
. 2017

Glozier, Nick / Moullaali, Tom J / Sivertsen, Børge / Kim, Dukyeon / Mead, Gillian / Jan, Stephen / Li, Qiang / Hackett, Maree L. ·Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Public Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway. · The Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Psychiatry, Helse Fonna HF, Haugesund, Norway. · Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. · School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom. ·Cerebrovasc Dis Extra · Pubmed #28161702.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insomnia symptoms are common in the population and have negative psychosocial and functional sequelae. There are no prospective studies of the course of such symptoms and their impact, if any, in stroke survivors. This prospective cohort study investigated insomnia after stroke in working-age adults and evaluated its impact on psychological and functional outcomes over the subsequent year. METHODS: We prospectively recruited 441 young (<65 years) consecutive stroke survivors from 20 public hospitals in the New South Wales Stroke Service network. Participants were assessed by self-report and interview at 28 days, 6 months, and 12 months after stroke. Insomnia was defined using a common epidemiological measure of sleep disturbance and daytime consequences. Depression, anxiety, disability, and return to work were assessed through standardized measures. RESULTS: The point prevalence of insomnia at each time point in the year after stroke was stable at 30-37% and more common in females. Fifty-eight (16%) of all participants reported "chronic" insomnia, with symptoms at both baseline and 6 months later. At 12 months, this group was more likely to be depressed (OR 6.75, 95% CI 2.78-16.4), anxious (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.54-7.09), disabled (OR 3.60, 95% CI 2.07-6.25), and not have returned to work, compared to those without insomnia over the same period. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic insomnia has a negative effect on disability and return to work 1 year after stroke even after adjusting for demographic, psychiatric, and disability factors. Identifying and appropriately targeting insomnia through known effective treatments may improve functional outcomes after stroke.
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14 Article Insomnia before and after childbirth: The risk of developing postpartum pain-A longitudinal population-based study. 2017

Sivertsen, Børge / Petrie, Keith J / Skogen, Jens Christoffer / Hysing, Mari / Eberhard-Gran, Malin. ·Domain for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 973 Sentrum, 5808 Bergen, Norway; The Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, P.O. Box 7810, N-5020 Bergen, Norway; Department of Psychiatry, Helse Fonna HF, P.O. Box 2170, N-5504 Haugesund, Norway. Electronic address: borge.sivertsen@fhi.no. · Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. · Domain for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 973 Sentrum, 5808 Bergen, Norway; The Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, P.O. Box 7810, N-5020 Bergen, Norway; Alcohol and Drug Research Western Norway, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. · The Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, P.O. Box 7810, N-5020 Bergen, Norway. · Domain for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 973 Sentrum, 5808 Bergen, Norway; Health Services Research Center, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, Campus Ahus, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, Norway. ·Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol · Pubmed #28126668.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine if insomnia before and after childbirth predicts the development of postpartum bodily pain. METHODS: This study is part of a longitudinal cohort study, the Akershus Birth Cohort Study, which targeted all women giving birth at Akershus University Hospital in Norway. The current sample is comprised of 1480 women who participated at all three time points, yielding a participation rate of 32% of the 4662 women who originally consented to participate. The Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS) was used to measure insomnia and a latent profile analysis (LPA) was used to identify subsets of women who shared a similar pattern of responses on the BIS-scale across the three time points. Pain was measured using the bodily pain scale, derived from the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) and symptoms of depression were measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). RESULTS: Using a latent profile analysis a three class model showed the best fit and identified one major group (55.6%) with a low BIS scores across all three time points, one group with intermediate BIS scores (32.9%), and a smaller group (11.5%) with higher BIS scores across all three times. The chronic high insomnia group had a 2.8-fold increased risk of reporting high levels of bodily pain. The chronic intermediate group was associated with a 2.2-fold increased risk of bodily pain at two years postpartum. Adjusting for demographics and lifestyle behaviors did not reduce any of the associations, while adjusting for depression significantly attenuated the associations. Additional adjustment for pain at eight weeks postpartum further reduced the magnitude of the associations, but both chronic intermediate insomnia and chronic high insomnia remained strongly associated with the onset of bodily pain in the fully adjusted models (RR=1.75, 95% CI: 1.37-2.23) and RR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.15-2.32, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of insomnia among women during and after childbirth, in combination with the strong prospective association with impaired physical health, emphasizes the importance of adequately identifying, preventing and treating insomnia for this population.

15 Article Change in organizational justice as a predictor of insomnia symptoms: longitudinal study analysing observational data as a non-randomized pseudo-trial. 2017

Lallukka, Tea / Halonen, Jaana I / Sivertsen, Børge / Pentti, Jaana / Stenholm, Sari / Virtanen, Marianna / Salo, Paula / Oksanen, Tuula / Elovainio, Marko / Vahtera, Jussi / Kivimäki, Mika. ·Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Turku & Kuopio, Finland. · Department of Public Health, Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Health Promotion, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway. · Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Psychiatry, Helse Fonna HF, Haugesund, Norway. · Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. · Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. · Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Health and Social Care Systems, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. ·Int J Epidemiol · Pubmed #28065888.

ABSTRACT: Background: Despite injustice at the workplace being a potential source of sleep problems, longitudinal evidence remains scarce. We examined whether changes in perceived organizational justice predicted changes in insomnia symptoms. Methods: Data on 24 287 Finnish public sector employees (82% women), from three consecutive survey waves between 2000 and 2012, were treated as 'pseudo-trials'. Thus, the analysis of unfavourable changes in organizational justice included participants without insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, with high organizational justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 6307). In the analyses of favourable changes in justice, participants had insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, low justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 2903). In both analyses, the outcome was insomnia symptoms in Wave 3. We used generalized estimating equation models to analyse the data. Results: After adjusting for social and health-related covariates in Wave 1, unfavourable changes in relational organizational justice (i.e. fairness of managerial behaviours) were associated with increased odds of developing insomnia symptoms [odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.30]. A favourable change in relational organizational justice was associated with lower odds of persistent insomnia symptoms (odds ratio = 0.83; 95% CI 0.71-0.96). Changes in procedural justice (i.e. the fairness of decision-making procedures) were not associated with insomnia symptoms. Conclusions: These data suggest that changes in perceived relational justice may affect employees' sleep quality. Decreases in the fairness of managerial behaviours were linked to increases in insomnia symptoms, whereas rises in fairness were associated with reduced insomnia symptoms.

16 Article Changes in insomnia subtypes in early Parkinson disease. 2017

Tholfsen, Lena K / Larsen, Jan P / Schulz, Jörn / Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn / Gjerstad, Michaela D. ·From the Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders (L.K.T., J.S., M.D.G.) and Department of Neurology (L.K.T., M.D.G.), Stavanger University Hospital · Network for Medical Sciences (J.P.L.), Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger · and Department of Neurology (O.-B.T.), Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Neurology · Pubmed #27986876.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine the development of factors associated with insomnia in a cohort of originally drug-naive patients with incident Parkinson disease (PD) during the first 5 years after diagnosis. METHODS: One hundred eighty-two drug-naive patients with PD derived from a population-based incident cohort and 202 control participants were assessed for insomnia before treatment initiation and were repeatedly examined after 1, 3, and 5 years. Insomnia was diagnosed according to the Stavanger Sleepiness Questionnaire. The Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale was used to differentiate sleep initiation problems from problems of sleep maintenance. Generalized estimating equation models were applied for statistical measures. RESULTS: The prevalence of insomnia in general was not higher in patients with PD compared to controls at the 5-year follow-up. There were changes in the prevalence of the different insomnia subtypes over the 5-year follow-up. The prevalence of solitary problems in sleep maintenance increased from 31% (n = 18) in the drug-naive patients at baseline to 49% (n = 29) after 1 year and were associated with the use of dopamine agonists and higher Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores. The prevalence of solitary sleep initiation problems decreased continuously from 21% (n = 12) at baseline to 7.4% (n = 4) after 5 years; these were associated with less daytime sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence rates of the different insomnia subtypes changed notably in patients with early PD. The frequency of sleep maintenance problems increased, and these problems were associated with dopamine agonist use and depressive symptoms, while the total number of patients with insomnia remained stable. Our findings reflect the need for early individual assessments of insomnia subtypes and raise the possibility of intervention to reduce these symptoms in patients with early PD.

17 Article Social and emotional loneliness and self-reported difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep (DIMS) in a sample of Norwegian university students. 2017

Hayley, Amie C / Downey, Luke A / Stough, Con / Sivertsen, Børge / Knapstad, Marit / Øverland, Simon. ·Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia. · Department of Public Mental Health, Domain for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway. · Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Psychiatry, Helse Fonna HF, Haugesund, Norway. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Psychosocial Science, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. ·Scand J Psychol · Pubmed #27983749.

ABSTRACT: Social and emotional loneliness negatively impact several areas of health, including sleep. However, few comprehensive population-based studies have evaluated this relationship. Over 12,000 students aged 21-35 years who participated in the student survey for higher education in Norway (the SHoT study) were assessed. Loneliness was assessed using the Social and Emotional Loneliness Scale. Difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep (DIMS) was assessed by a single-item subjective response on the depression scale of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (HSCL-25). Social loneliness was associated with more serious DIMS (unadjusted proportional odds-ratio [OR] = 2.69, 95% CI = 2.46-2.95). This association was attenuated following adjustment for anxiety (adjusted OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.75-2.10) and depression (adjusted OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.34-1.63), however was not substantially altered when all demographics and psychological distress were accounted for (fully adjusted OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.30-1.63). Emotional loneliness was also associated with more serious DIMS (unadjusted proportional OR = 2.33, 95% CI = 2.12-2.57). Adjustment for anxiety (adjusted OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.78-2.15) and depression (adjusted OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48-1.80) attenuated, but did not extinguish this relationship in the fully adjusted model (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.09-1.31). Mediation analyses revealed that the social loneliness-DIMS association was fully attributed to psychological distress, while the emotional loneliness-DIMS association was only partially mediated, and a direct association was still observed. Associations between social and emotional loneliness and subjective DIMS were embedded in a larger pattern of psychological distress. Mitigating underlying feelings of loneliness may reduce potentially deleterious effects on sleep health and psychological wellbeing in young adults.

18 Article High prevalence of insomnia and hypnotic use in patients visiting their general practitioner. 2017

Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Meland, Eivind / Flo, Elisabeth / Mildestvedt, Thomas. ·Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway bjorn.bjorvatn@uib.no. · Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. ·Fam Pract · Pubmed #27789518.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sleep problems are common in the general population, but there are few prevalence studies among patients visiting their GP. Since sleep problems frequently co-occur with existing psychological and somatic conditions, the prevalence is likely to be higher in patients visiting their GPs compared to the prevalence in the general population. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of insomnia [based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental disorders (DSM)-version IV] and hypnotic use among patients in general practice and to evaluate whether the prevalence depended on sex and age. METHODS: Questionnaire data were collected by 66 medical students while deployed in different general practices during their last year of school. A total of 1346 (response rate 74%) consecutive and unselected patients visiting their GPs answered the validated Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS) and single questions on self-reported sleep problems and hypnotic use. RESULTS: The prevalence of insomnia according to BIS was 53.6%. Sleep problems (based on the single question) were self-reported by 55.8%, with 18.0% reporting to experience sleep problems a lot/very much. Hypnotic use was reported by 16.2% (daily use by 5.5%). Insomnia and hypnotic use were all more prevalent in females compared with males. Hypnotic use increased with age, whereas the prevalence of insomnia was highest in the younger age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia and hypnotic use were very prevalent among patients visiting their GPs. As insomnia can be effectively treated, we maintain that the diagnosis has a high pay-off and should earn greater awareness in GP's diagnostic evaluation and management.

19 Article Excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep need and insomnia 3 years after Giardia infection: a cohort study. 2016

Hunskar, Gunnhild S / Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Wensaas, Knut-Arne / Hanevik, Kurt / Eide, Geir Egil / Langeland, Nina / Rortveit, Guri. ·Research Group for General Practice, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: gunnhild.hunskar@uib.no. · Research Group for General Practice, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Research Unit for General Practice, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; National Centre for Tropical Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Research Group for Lifestyle Epidemiology, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Research Group for General Practice, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Research Unit for General Practice, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway. ·Sleep Health · Pubmed #28923259.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether prior infection with Giardia lamblia is associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and level of sleep need. DESIGN: A questionnaire was sent to all confirmed cases of giardiasis 3 years after the outbreak and a control group matched on age and gender. Associations were evaluated by use of multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: Excessive daytime sleepiness (score ≥11 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale) was reported by 31.5% of the Giardia-exposed and 14.1% of the controls. In multivariate analysis, excessive daytime sleepiness was independently associated with Giardia exposure, with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.86). Insomnia was reported by 15.4% of Giardia-exposed and 8.8% of controls, adjusted odds ratio was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.65-1.35). Mean (SD) self-reported sleep need was 8 (1.4) hours among Giardia-exposed and 7.5 (1.1) hours in the control group (P < .001). The adjusted regression coefficient was 0.12 (95% CI, 0.01-0.24). CONCLUSION: Being exposed to Giardia was independently associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and larger sleep need, but not with insomnia.

20 Article Self-reported short sleep duration and insomnia symptoms as predictors of post-pregnancy weight change: Results from a cohort study. 2016

Rognmo, Kamilla / Sivertsen, Børge / Eberhard-Gran, Malin. ·Department of Psychology, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway kamilla.rognmo@uit.no. · Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. · Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Psychiatry, Helse Fonna HF, Haugesund, Norway. · Health Services Research Center, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, Norway. ·Womens Health (Lond) · Pubmed #27634975.

ABSTRACT: This study aims to investigate whether change in sleep duration and insomnia symptoms in the postpartum period is related to change in body mass index from before to 2 years after pregnancy. This study is based on self-report data from a Norwegian cohort, the AHUS Birth Cohort Study. Data were collected at 8 weeks (T1) and 2 years (T2) postpartum. Data from 812 women were analyzed. The results showed that only women with symptoms of insomnia at both T1 and T2 (persistent symptoms) had a greater increase in body mass index compared to women with no insomnia symptoms at T1 or T2.The results indicate that persistent insomnia symptoms are related to a greater increase in body mass index.

21 Article GP consultations for common mental disorders and subsequent sickness certification: register-based study of the employed population in Norway. 2016

Gjesdal, Sturla / Holmaas, Tor Helge / Monstad, Karin / Hetlevik, Øystein. ·Department of Global Public Health and Primary care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, sturla.gjesdal@uib.no. · UNI Research Rokkan Centre, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Global Public Health and Primary care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. ·Fam Pract · Pubmed #27535329.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Challenges related to work are in focus when employed people with common mental disorders (CMDs) consult their GPs. Many become sickness certified and remain on sick leave over time. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the frequency of new CMD episodes among employed patients in Norwegian general practice and subsequent sickness certification. METHODS: Using a national claims register, employed persons with a new episode of CMD were included. Sickness certification, sick leave over 16 days and length of absences were identified. Patient- and GP-related predictors for the different outcomes were assessed by means of logistic regression. RESULTS: During 1 year 2.6% of employed men and 4.2% of employed women consulted their GP with a new episode of CMD. Forty-five percent were sickness certified, and 24 percent were absent over 16 days. Thirty-eight percent had depression and 19% acute stress reaction, which carried the highest risk for initial sickness certification, 75%, though not for prolonged absence. Men and older patients had lower risk for sickness certification, but higher risk for long-term absence. CONCLUSION: Better knowledge of factors at the workplace detrimental to mental health, and better treatment for depression and stress reactions might contribute to timely return of sickness absentees.

22 Article Prospective study of predictors and consequences of insomnia: personality, lifestyle, mental health, and work-related stressors. 2016

Vedaa, Øystein / Krossbakken, Elfrid / Grimsrud, Ingse Dagny / Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Sivertsen, Børge / Magerøy, Nils / Einarsen, Ståle / Pallesen, Ståle. ·Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: oystein.vedaa@psysp.uib.no. · Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. · Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway; The Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway; Department of Psychiatry, Helse Fonna HF, Haugesund, Norway. · Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #27318226.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To prospectively investigate the reciprocal relationships between personality traits, lifestyle factors, mental health, sleepiness, and work-related stressors against insomnia. METHODS: A total of 799 Norwegian shift-working nurses (mean age 33.2 years, 90% female) participated in this prospective cohort study. They were assessed on self-report instruments (Bergen Insomnia Scale, Diurnal Type Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised, Work-Family Interface Scale, among others) in 2008/2009 (wave 1) and 2011 (wave 3). Structural equation modeling was employed to investigate the bidirectional relationship between a wide range of individual and work-related variables and insomnia. RESULTS: Languidity (β = 0.18***), anxiety (β = 0.11**), depression (β = 0.14***), exposure to bullying behavior (β = 0.08*), and negative spillover between work and family life (work to family, β = 0.08*; family to work, β = 0.07*) predicted increased symptoms of insomnia over time. Morningness (β = -0.09*) and positive spillover from work to family (β = -0.11**) predicted less symptoms of insomnia over time. No support was found for night work as a predictor of increased insomnia. Insomnia was a precursor for anxiety (β = 0.11**), but not for depression (*p <0.05, **p <0.01, ***p <0.001). CONCLUSION: The data suggested that insomnia more often emerges as a consequence of individual and work-related factors than as a precursor to them. The scope of factors causing insomnia, and factors protecting against it, should be further investigated. Insomnia should be considered in prediction models for mental illnesses and as an outcome of adverse work-related experiences.

23 Article Trajectories of sleepiness and insomnia symptoms in Norwegian nurses with and without night work and rotational work. 2016

Thun, Eirunn / Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Åkerstedt, Torbjørn / Moen, Bente Elisabeth / Waage, Siri / Molde, Helge / Pallesen, Ståle. ·a University of Bergen , Department of Psychosocial Science , Bergen , Norway. · b University of Bergen , Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care , Bergen , Norway. · c Haukeland University Hospital , Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders , Bergen , Norway. · d Stockholm University , Stress Research Institute , Stockholm , Sweden. · e University of Bergen , Centre for International Health , Bergen , Norway. · f University of Bergen , Department of Clinical Psychology , Bergen , Norway. ·Chronobiol Int · Pubmed #27030964.

ABSTRACT: Numerous cross-sectional studies report high prevalence rates of sleepiness and insomnia in shift workers, but few longitudinal studies exist. We investigated trajectories of sleepiness and insomnia symptoms in a sample of Norwegian nurses across four measurements, spanning a total of four years (sleepiness) and five years (insomnia). The participants completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Bergen Insomnia Scale at each measurement instance. Latent growth curve models were used to analyse the data. Separate models examined night work (night work, entering and leaving night work) and rotational work (rotational work, entering and leaving rotational work) as predictors for trajectories of sleepiness and insomnia symptoms, respectively. Baseline values of sleepiness and insomnia were higher among rotational shift workers than among workers with fixed shifts (day or night). The results showed that night work throughout the period and entering night work during the period were not associated with different trajectories of sleepiness or insomnia symptoms, compared to not having night work. The same results were found for rotational work and entering rotational work, compared to not having rotational work. Leaving night work and leaving rotational work were associated with a decrease in sleepiness and insomnia symptoms, compared to staying in such work.

24 Article Sleep among bereaved caregivers of patients admitted to hospice: a 1-year longitudinal pilot study. 2016

Lerdal, Anners / Slåtten, Kari / Saghaug, Elisabeth / Grov, Ellen Karine / Normann, Are Peder / Lee, Kathryn A / Bjorvatn, Bjørn / Gay, Caryl L. ·Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Lovisenberg Diakonale University College, Oslo, Norway. · Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Oslo, Norway Department of Health, Sogn and Fjordane University College, Førde, Norway. · Department of Family and Health Care Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Haukeland University Hospital, Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Bergen, Norway. · Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, Oslo, Norway Department of Family and Health Care Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #26729383.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This pilot study aimed to describe the sleep of partners and other family caregivers prior to and in the first year after a hospice patient's death. The study also evaluated the feasibility of the study protocol and determined the effect sizes in preparation for a full-scale study. DESIGN: The pilot study used a longitudinal, descriptive and comparative design. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants included primary family caregivers of patients admitted to a hospice in Oslo, Norway. PRIMARY OUTCOME: Caregiver sleep was measured subjectively with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and objectively using wrist actigraphy for 4 nights and 3 days at three different times: during the hospice stay, and at 6 and 12 months after the patient's death. RESULTS: 16 family caregivers (10 partners and 6 other family members) completed the 1-year study protocol. Overall, sleep quality and quantity were stable over time and at each assessment, approximately half of the sample had poor sleep quality, both by self-report and objective measures. However, the sleep trajectories differed significantly over time, with older caregivers (≥ 65 years) having significantly longer sleep durations than younger caregivers (<65 years). Furthermore, sleep quality also differed over time depending on the caregiver's relationship to the patient, with partner caregivers having significantly worse sleep quality than other family caregivers. CONCLUSIONS: Caring for a dying family member is known to interfere with sleep, yet little is known about bereaved caregivers. The results of this pilot study demonstrate the feasibility of the longitudinal study protocol and indicate that sleep problems are common for caregivers and continue into the bereavement period, particularly for partner caregivers. The caregiver's relationship to the patient may be an important factor to consider in future studies.

25 Article Association Between Sleep Problems and Symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Adolescence: Results From a Large Population-Based Study. 2016

Hysing, Mari / Lundervold, Astri J / Posserud, Maj-Britt / Sivertsen, Børge. ·a Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare , Uni Research Health , Bergen , Norway. · b Department of Biological and Medical Psychology , University of Bergen , Norway. · c K. G. Jebsen Centre for Research on Neuropsychiatric Disorders , University of Bergen , Norway. · d Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry , Haukeland University Hospital , Bergen , Norway. · e Division of Mental Health , Norwegian Institute of Public Health , Bergen , Norway. · f Department of Psychiatry , Helse Fonna HF , Haugesund , Norway. ·Behav Sleep Med · Pubmed #26503122.

ABSTRACT: Sleep problems and symptoms of ADHD are common in adolescence, but detailed epidemiological assessment of their association is lacking. Using data from a recent population-based study, 9,846 adolescents aged 16 to 19 provided detailed information on sleep and symptoms of ADHD. Results confirmed a large overlap between self-reported symptoms of ADHD and all sleep variables studied. Symptoms of ADHD were linked to shorter sleep duration, longer sleep latency, and nocturnal wake time, as well as larger sleep deficiency. ADHD symptoms also increased the odds of insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome. The associations were only partially explained by confounders (mainly depression). The findings suggest that sleep problems should be included as a treatment target in efforts to reduce symptoms of ADHD in adolescence.

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