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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles from Miscellaneous cities in China
Based on 49 articles published since 2009
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These are the 49 published articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders that originated from Miscellaneous cities in China during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review Association between insomnia and job stress: a meta-analysis. 2018

Yang, Bing / Wang, Yongwei / Cui, Fangfang / Huang, Ting / Sheng, Peijia / Shi, Ting / Huang, Chan / Lan, Yajia / Huang, Yi-Na. ·Department of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, West China School of Public Health, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan, China. · Department of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, West China School of Public Health, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan, China. wangyw_1980@sina.com. · Department of Occupational Health, No.4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan, China. wangyw_1980@sina.com. · Occupational Health Emergency Key Laboratory of West China Occupational Disease Hospital and No.4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan, China. wangyw_1980@sina.com. · Department of Occupational Health, No.4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan, China. · Occupational Health Emergency Key Laboratory of West China Occupational Disease Hospital and No.4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan, China. · Center for Test, West China Occupational Disease Hospital and No.4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan, China. · Changji State Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changji, 831100, Xinjiang, China. ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #29959635.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Insomnia has become one of the foremost health concerns among workers. Despite a significant number of epidemiological studies have reported on the correlation between insomnia and job stress, comprehensive evidence remains insufficient. Therefore, this research seeks to provide evidence with greater reliability, through summarizing relevant contemporary literature via a meta-analysis. METHODS: Literature from across Europe and Asia that was of both a prospective and cross-sectional design was included, if well-controlled odds ratios were available. The meta-analysis was undertaken in accordance with the guidelines devised by PRISMA, including tests for publication bias and heterogeneity. RESULTS: High job stress was associated with a greater risk of suffering from insomnia (random OR = 1.73, 95% CI 1.46-2.05), and the correlation between effort-reward imbalance and insomnia was statistically significant (random OR = 2.63, 95% CI 1.22-5.69). Higher demand was correlated to a relatively greater risk of insomnia (random OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.20-1.51), while the pooled effect of low control was not found to be statistically significant. The summary random odds ratio of heavy workload was 2.76, and a pooled odds ratio of 1.67 (fixed, 95% CI 1.11-2.52) was calculated in low social support. With regard to the overall population, work-family conflict was correlated with insomnia (random OR = 2.32, 95% CI 1.53-3.51). The subgroup analysis provided comparable outcomes, for both males (fixed OR = 1.97, 95% CI 1.50-2.57) and females (random OR = 2.80, 95% CI 1.30-6.05). Egger's regression indicated that publication bias may be apparent in the syntheses of effort-reward imbalance, low social support, and work-family conflict (p < 0.05). Heterogeneity was caused by design, measuring the exposure or outcome, in addition to the region where the research was conducted. CONCLUSIONS: The correlation between insomnia and higher levels of job stress, effort-reward imbalance, high demand, heavy workload, and low social support was determined. Publication bias and heterogeneity were partially observed. Furthermore, future studies with improved methodologies and a focus on mechanisms are anticipated.

2 Review Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of Drugs for Treating Behavioural Insomnia in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systematic Review with Methodological Quality Assessment. 2017

Anand, Shweta / Tong, Henry / Besag, Frank M C / Chan, Esther W / Cortese, Samuele / Wong, Ian C K. ·Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Centre for Safe Medication Practice and Research, The University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong. · School of Health Science, Macao Polytechnic Institute, Macao SAR, China. · East London NHS Foundation Trust, Bedfordshire, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK. · Research Department of Practice and Policy, School of Pharmacy, University College London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London, WC1N 1AX, UK. · Department of Psychology, Developmental Brain-Behaviour Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · The Child Study Center at NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Centre for Safe Medication Practice and Research, The University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong. i.wong@ucl.ac.uk. · Research Department of Practice and Policy, School of Pharmacy, University College London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London, WC1N 1AX, UK. i.wong@ucl.ac.uk. ·Paediatr Drugs · Pubmed #28391425.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A large proportion of paediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have associated sleep problems which not only affect the child's wellbeing but also impact family functioning. Management of sleep problems is consequently an important aspect of overall ADHD management in paediatric patients. Although some drugs are being used off-label for the management of paediatric insomnia, there is scant clinical evidence supporting their use. Our aim was to identify and assess the quality of published studies reporting the safety, tolerability and efficacy of drugs used for treating behavioural insomnia in children with ADHD. METHODS: After an initial screen to determine which drugs were most commonly used, we conducted a systematic review of English-language publications from searches of PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and two trial register databases to February 2017, using keywords 'clonidine', 'melatonin', 'zolpidem', 'eszopiclone', 'L-theanine', 'guanfacine', 'ADHD', 'sleep disorder' and 'children'. For quality assessment of included studies, we used the CONSORT checklist for randomised control trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black checklist for non-RCTs. RESULTS: Twelve studies were included. Two case series for clonidine, two RCTs and four observational studies for melatonin and one RCT each for zolpidem, eszopiclone, L-theanine and guanfacine. Of the 12 included studies, only one on eszopiclone scored excellent for quality. The quality of the rest of the studies varied from moderate to low. For clonidine, melatonin and L-theanine, improvements in sleep-onset latency and total sleep duration were reported; however, zolpidem, eszopiclone and guanfacine failed to show any improvement when compared with placebo. Clonidine, melatonin, L-theanine, eszopiclone and guanfacine were well tolerated with mild to moderate adverse events; zolpidem was associated with neuropsychiatric adverse effects. CONCLUSION: There is generally poor evidence for prescribing drugs for behavioural insomnia in children with ADHD. Further controlled studies are warranted.

3 Review Efficacy and safety of Suanzaoren decoction for primary insomnia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. 2013

Xie, Cheng-long / Gu, Yong / Wang, Wen-Wen / Lu, Lin / Fu, Deng-lei / Liu, Ai-ju / Li, Hui-qin / Li, Ji-huang / Lin, Yan / Tang, Wen-jie / Zheng, Guo-qing. ·The Center of Neurology and Rehabilitation, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, 325027, China. ·BMC Complement Altern Med · Pubmed #23336848.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insomnia is a widespread human health problem, but there currently are the limitations of conventional therapies available. Suanzaoren decoction (SZRD) is a well known classic Chinese herbal prescription for insomnia and has been treating people's insomnia for more than thousand years. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SZRD for insomnia. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed for 6 databases up to July of 2012 to identify randomized control trials (RCTs) involving SZRD for insomniac patients. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed independently using the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. RESULTS: Twelve RCTs with total of 1376 adult participants were identified. The methodological quality of all included trials are no more than 3/8 score. Majority of the RCTs concluded that SZRD was more significantly effective than benzodiazepines for treating insomnia. Despite these positive outcomes, there were many methodological shortcomings in the studies reviewed, including insufficient information about randomization generation and absence of allocation concealment, lack of blinding and no placebo control, absence of intention-to-treat analysis and lack of follow-ups, selective publishing and reporting, and small number of sample sizes. A number of clinical heterogeneity such as diagnosis, intervention, control, and outcome measures were also reviewed. Only 3 trials reported adverse events, whereas the other 9 trials did not provide the safety information. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the apparent reported positive findings, there is insufficient evidence to support efficacy of SZRD for insomnia due to the poor methodological quality and the small number of trials of the included studies. SZRD seems generally safe, but is insufficient evidence to make conclusions on the safety because fewer studies reported the adverse events. Further large sample-size and well-designed RCTs are needed.

4 Article Effectiveness of Chinese herbal medicine for patients with primary insomnia: A PRISMA-compliant meta-analysis. 2019

Zhang, Hongshi / Liu, Peng / Wu, Xingquan / Zhang, Yan / Cong, Deyu. ·Innovation and Practice Center. · Affiliated Clinical Hospital, Changchun University of Chinese Medicine, Changchun, China. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #31192935.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Traditional medicine is widely used for patients with primary insomnia, but the studies showed inconsistent results. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) versus placebo for primary insomnia patients. METHODS: The electronic databases including PubMed, EmBase, Cochrane library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched to identify the RCTs published from inception till July 2018. The summary weighted mean difference (WMD) with its 95% confidence interval (CI) for Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), sleep onset latency, total sleep duration, Athens insomnia scale (AIS), and sleep efficiency were calculated using random-effects model. RESULTS: Fifteen RCTs comprising 1500 patients were finally included in the meta-analysis. Overall, patients who received CHM had lower levels of PSQI (WMD: -2.36; 95% CI: -4.02 to -0.70; P = .005), sleep onset latency (WMD: -11.54; 95% CI: -20.55 to -2.54; P = .012), and AIS (WMD: -0.59; 95% CI: -0.97 to -0.22; P = .002) as compared with placebo. Moreover, the summary WMDs of CHM versus placebo were associated with higher total sleep duration (WMD: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.56-1.02; P < .001), and sleep efficiency (WMD: 9.72; 95% CI: 6.49-12.96; P < .001). The treatment effect on PSQI might be affected by publication year, sample size, mean age, percentage male, diagnostic tool, duration of insomnia, treatment duration, and study quality. CONCLUSION: The findings of this meta-analysis indicated that CHM could significantly improve the symptoms of insomnia than placebo for patients with primary insomnia.

5 Article [Characteristics of sleep disorder in HIV positive and HIV negative individuals: a cluster analysis]. 2019

Ning, C X / Chen, X X / Lin, H J / Qiao, X T / Xu, Y Y / Shen, W W / Zhao, D / He, N / Ding, Y Y. ·Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. · Taizhou Prefectural Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Taizhou 318000, China. ·Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi · Pubmed #31177727.

ABSTRACT:

6 Article [Psychological characteristics in different clinical subgroups of insomniacs]. 2019

Li, Yali / Ning, Wenya / Tan, Liwen / Zhang, Chunyan / Deng, Yunlong. ·Psychosomatic Health Institute, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China. · Mental Health Institute, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410011, China. ·Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban · Pubmed #30837388.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate psychological characteristics in different clinical subgroups of insomniacs, and to provide the basis for the accurate simplification of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia.
 Methods: A total of 212 insomniacs from November 2014 to June 2017 in Clinical Psychology Department or Sleep Department of 2 general hospitals in Hunan Province were included in convenient and classified into sleep onset insomnia (SOI), difficulty maintaining insomnia (DMI), early morning awakening insomnia (EMAI), and combined insomnia (CI) subgroups. Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST), Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ), Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale 16 version (DBAS-16), Sleep-Related Behavior Questionnaire (SRBQ), Pre-sleep Arousal Scale (PSAS), Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were used to investigate the psychological characteristics.
 Results: SOI and CI insomniacs had a higher frequency in use of sleep-related behavior than those with DMI; CI had a higher frequency in use of sleep-related behavior than those with EMAI (all P<0.05). Both SOI and CI insomniacs had a higher level of pre-sleep cognitive arousal than DMI and EMAI (all P<0.05). CI insomniacs noticed more consequences of insomnia and had more worries on insomnia than DMI, and CI insomniacs had more expectations of sleep than SOI (all P<0.05).
 Conclusion: Insomniacs with different clinical subgroups have different features of psychological characteristics. Both the insomnia subgroups and the psychological characteristics should be taken into account when we simplify cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) precisely.

7 Article Dynamic functional abnormalities in generalized anxiety disorders and their increased network segregation of a hyperarousal brain state modulated by insomnia. 2019

Li, Changhong / Xia, Likun / Ma, Jian / Li, Shumei / Liang, Sayuan / Ma, Xiaofen / Wang, Tianyue / Li, Meng / Wen, Hua / Jiang, Guihua. ·Department of Medical Imaging, Guangdong No. 2 Provincial People's Hospital, Guangzhou, PR China. · Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Yuxi People's Hospital, Yuxi, PR China. · Clinical Solution, Philips Innovation Hub, Shanghai, PR China. · Department of Medical Imaging, Guangdong No. 2 Provincial People's Hospital, Guangzhou, PR China. Electronic address: jiangguihua1970@163.com. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #30597294.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insomnia is frequently accompanied by the generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) but mostly fMRI studies investigated their aberrant functional connectivity (FC) without this issue. Recently, dynamic FC approach is prevailing to capture the time-varying fluctuations of spontaneous brain activities. Nevertheless, it is unclear how the dynamic FC characteristics are altered by insomnia in GAD. METHODS: We acquired resting state fMRI and neuropsychological tests for the 17 comorbid GAD with insomnia (GAD/IS), 15 GAD and 24 healthy controls (HC). Then, based on the sliding window correlations, we estimated distinct brain states and statistically compared their dynamic properties. Further combining with graph theory, their network properties of each state among groups were accessed. Lastly, we examined associations between abnormal parameters and neuropsychological tests. RESULTS: We identified four brain states but did not observe significance on the state transitions. The mean dwell time and fraction of one globally hypoactive state accounted for high proportion of brain activities were significantly different (GAD > HC > GAD/IS). Meanwhile, we found gradual decreases in a brain state representing slight sleep/drowsiness (HC > GAD/IS > GAD). Additionally, we observed the GAD/IS patients had significantly increased network segregation and posterior cingulate cortex in a hyperarousal state, as well as significant associations with anxiety and insomnia severity. LIMITATIONS: The influences of depression on dynamic FC properties in GAD are unclear yet and more subjects should be recruited. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide new insights about the temporal features in GAD and offer potential biomarkers to evaluate the impacts of insomnia.

8 Article Optimism outweighs neuroticism and anxiety sensitivity to predict insomnia symptoms in women after surgery for breast cancer. 2019

Ren, Yizhen / Li, Shichen / Zhou, Shijie / Wang, Yuping / Li, Lingyan / Zhang, Jinqiang / Yang, Yanjie / He, Jincai / Zhu, Xiongzhao. ·Medical Psychological Center, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410011, Hunan, China. · Department of Medical Psychology, Public Health Institute, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, China. · The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China. · Medical Psychological Center, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410011, Hunan, China. xiongzhaozhu@csu.edu.cn. ·Support Care Cancer · Pubmed #30560420.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Insomnia symptoms are common among women who have undergone surgery for breast cancer. Personality traits are also believed to have an impact on sleep. However, there are no reports to address the effects of personality traits on sleep in women with breast cancer. This study examined the separate and competing roles of neuroticism, anxiety sensitivity, and optimism in predicting post-surgery insomnia symptoms. METHODS: Women with breast cancer (n = 749) were enrolled the week prior to surgery and required to complete a demographic questionnaire, the Chinese version of Neuroticism subscale of NEO-Five Factor Inventory (CV-N-NEO-FFI), Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (CV-ASI-3), and Life Orientation Test-Revised (CV-LOT-R). Four weeks post-surgery, the Chinese version of Insomnia Severity Index (CV-ISI) was administered to evaluate insomnia symptoms. RESULTS: Neuroticism (β = 0.317, p < 0.001), anxiety sensitivity (β = 0.220, p < 0.001), and optimism (β = - 0.332, p < 0.001) could predict post-surgery insomnia symptoms. When putting them together into one stepwise regression, optimism (β = - 0.215, p < 0.001) became the statistically most important predictor for insomnia symptoms. Optimism suppressed the predictions of insomnia symptoms provided by neuroticism (β = 0.114, p < 0.001) and anxiety sensitivity (β = 0.079, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Neuroticism and anxiety sensitivity positively predicted insomnia, but optimism negatively predicted insomnia. In particular, optimism plays a more important role in post-surgery insomnia symptoms in women with breast cancer compared to neuroticism and anxiety sensitivity. Sleep intervention in women with breast cancer should focus on enhancing their optimism level.

9 Article Beneficial effect of compound essential oil inhalation on central fatigue. 2018

Han, Chenxia / Li, Feng / Tian, Simin / Liu, Yan / Xiao, Huai / Wu, Xiumei / Zhang, Weiyue / Zhang, Wei / Mao, Meng. ·Basic Medicine School, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, People's Republic of China. · Basic Medicine School, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, People's Republic of China. lifeng_bucm0610@126.com. · Chinese Medicine School, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, People's Republic of China. · Insect Biological Medicine Research Institution, Dali University, Dali, Yunnan, People's Republic of China. ·BMC Complement Altern Med · Pubmed #30477490.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUNDS: Although the physical and mental enhancement effect of essential oils have been proved, the beneficial effect of essential oil in central fatigue remains unclear. In this study, we extracted essential oils from nine aromatic plants to make a compound essential oil, and detected the therapeutic effect of central fatigue by daily aerial diffusion. METHODS: Thirty-three rats were randomly and equally divided into control group, chronic sleep deprivation group, and compound essential oil inhalation group. Central fatigue was generated by chronic sleep deprivation. RESULTS: After 21-day various interferences, it is found that the sleep deprivation rats showed an evident decrease in physical endurance, negative emotion, and cognitive dysfunction compared with the control group, and the group that treated with the compound essential oil behaved significantly better than central fatigue group. CONCLUSION: We concluded that this formula of essential oils could alleviate central fatigue on rats, and our study provides a new direction of application of aromatic therapy, which could be expanded to insomnia, depression and other healthy issue in the further research.

10 Article Sleep onset latency is related with reduced bone mineral density in elderly people with insomnia: a retrospective study. 2018

Tong, Qian / Wu, Wanzhen / Wu, Qing / Yu, Yanbo / Lv, Xiaoling / Wang, Bozhong / Wang, Guofu. ·Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053, Zhejiang, China, 1090983005@qq.com. · Department of Geriatrics, Zhejiang Hospital, Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab of Geriatrics, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China, 1090983005@qq.com. · Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 325035 Zhejiang, China. ·Clin Interv Aging · Pubmed #30214172.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: Inconsistent outcome about association between insufficient sleep and bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported. The present study aimed to determine whether BMD was associated with score of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Methods: A total of 410 patients (mean age 81.6±5.9 years) attending our hospital for evaluation of sleep were retrospectively studied. Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry was used to measure BMD and T-score at femoral neck and lumbar spines over L2-L4 regions. Subjective sleep status was evaluated by the PSQI questionnaires. The Mann-Whitney Results: Majority of the participants with osteoporosis (OP) were female and had lower body mass index (BMI) and higher sleep onset latency score. Spearman correlation test showed that gender, BMI, score of total PSQI, and sleep onset latency were significantly related to BMD and T-score in femoral neck and lumbar region L2-L4. Finally, multinomial logistic regression analysis demonstrated that gender and age were independent factors for OP and osteopenia and that after adjustment for gender, age, and BMI, sleep onset latency of <15 minutes (OR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.15-0.96; Conclusion: There was a significant association between BMD and sleep onset latency, suggesting that, in elderly patients with sleep problem, BMD measurement and intervention for OP might be valuable.

11 Article SZSJ protects against insomnia by a decrease in ADMA level and an improvement in DDAH production in sleep-deprived rats. 2018

Xiao, Hong-Bo / Wang, Yi-Shan / Luo, Zhi-Feng / Lu, Xiang-Yang. ·College of Veterinary Medicine, Hunan Agricultural University, China; Hunan Province University Key Laboratory for Agricultural Biochemistry and Biotransformation, Hunan Agricultural University, China; Hunan Engineering Research Center of Veterinary Drug, China. Electronic address: xhbzhb@hunau.edu.cn. · College of Veterinary Medicine, Hunan Agricultural University, China. · Department of Basic Medicine, Xiangnan University, China. · Hunan Province University Key Laboratory for Agricultural Biochemistry and Biotransformation, Hunan Agricultural University, China; Hunan Co-Innovation Center for Utilization of Botanical Functional Ingredients, China. ·Life Sci · Pubmed #30048696.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: Recent investigations have shown that dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) may be related to sleep disorder. The present study was conducted to test the hypnotic effect of jujubosides from Semen Ziziphi Spinosae (SZSJ) on sleep deprivation and the mechanisms involved. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10): two groups of sleep-deprived rats treated with SZSJ (10 or 30 mg/kg per day), sleep-deprived rats group, and control group. At the end of experiment, cerebral DDAH expression, cerebral asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) level, sleep parameters, behavioral activities, and cerebral neurotransmitters level brain was examined. KEY FINDINGS: Six days after treatment, SZSJ treatment up-regulated cerebral expression of DDAH I and DDAH II concomitantly with elevated parameters of total sleep time, cerebral γ‑aminobutyric acid and 5‑hydroxytryptamine, and reduced values of forelimb lifting-up frequency and walking time, cerebral 8-isoprostane, ADMA, noradrenaline, and glutamic acid in sleep deprivation of rats. SIGNIFICANCE: The present results suggest that SZSJ Protects against insomnia by a decrease in ADMA level and an improvement in DDAH production in sleep-deprived rats.

12 Article The clinical features in Chinese patients with PRNP D178N mutation. 2018

Chen, S / He, S / Shi, X-H / Shen, X-J / Liang, K-K / Zhao, J-H / Yan, B-C / Zhang, J-W. ·Department of Neurology, Zhengzhou University People's Hospital, Zhengzhou, China. · Henan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhengzhou, China. ·Acta Neurol Scand · Pubmed #29569252.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is an autosomal dominant disease due to the D178N mutation of PRNP gene coupling with homozygous methionine (Met) at codon 129. It is generally considered that D178N mutation cases with 129 M/M homozygotes present as FFI, and 129 V/V as genetic CJD. However, the frequency of 129 Met alleles in Chinese population is much higher than that in Caucasians. This study aims to investigate the clinical features and genetic characteristics of Chinese D178N mutants in this genetic context. METHODS: We reviewed the clinical and genetic features of seven D178N patients. The clinical data, genetic data, electroencephalogram (EEG), brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), polysomnography (PSG), CSF 14-3-3 protein examinations of the seven patients were analyzed. RESULTS: The genotypes at codon 129 were all M/M. Four of the seven cases reported positive family history. Four patients were more likely the CJD phenotype and three were FFI phenotype according to the core clinical features. No major differences were found on the EEG, CSF 14-3-3 protein, and PSG presentations between this study and western studies. Novel neuroimaging findings were two patients had typical neuroimaging abnormalities of CJD and frontotemporal dementia, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike the western populations, the diverse phenotypical presentations of D178N mutants were not simply determined by the 129 genotypes in Chinese. The underlying modifying factors for phenotypical variations warrant further investigations. For those with atypical clinical and imaging features, genetic testing was important for final diagnosis.

13 Article Auricular acupressure for insomnia in hemodialysis patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. 2018

Wu, Yuchi / Yang, Lihong / Li, Lingli / Wu, Xiuqing / Zhong, Zhicong / He, Zhiren / Ma, Hongyan / Wang, Lixin / Lu, Zhaoyu / Cai, Cun / Zhao, Daixin / Meng, Xiangxin / Qi, Airong / Yang, Aicheng / Su, Guobin / Guo, Xinfeng / Liu, Xusheng / Zou, Chuan / Lin, Qizhan. ·Hemodialysis Department, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. · Second Clinical Medical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. · Hemodialysis Department, Guangzhou Charity Hospital, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. · Hemodialysis Department, Guangzhou HEMC (Higher Education Mega Center) Hospital, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. · Hemodialysis Department, Guangzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. · Hemodialysis Department, Shenzhen Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China. · Hemodialysis Department, Wuyi Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jiangmen, People's Republic of China. · Evidence-based Medicine and Clinical Research Service Group, Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. · Second Clinical Medical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. doctorzc541888@126.com. · Hemodialysis Department, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. linqizhan656635@163.com. ·Trials · Pubmed #29514705.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) frequently complain of insomnia. Poor sleep quality impairs their quality of life and adversely affects long-term outcome. Previously we applied auricular acupressure therapy (AAT) for MHD patients with insomnia and yielded favorable results. AAT probably improves sleep quality by stimulating the vagus nerve and inhibiting sympathetic overactivity. However, the efficacy of AAT for insomnia in this population is still lacking. The proposed randomized controlled trial (RCT) will evaluate the efficacy and safety of AAT for improvement of sleep quality in MHD patients with insomnia. METHODS/DESIGN: The proposed study is a multi-center, double-blind (participants and assessors), parallel-group RCT. A total of 112 participants with insomnia will be recruited from six hemodialysis centers in Guangzhou, China, and randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive auricular acupressure on either active points (AA group) or control points (points irrelevant to insomnia management, SAA group). The treatment will last for 8 weeks prior to a follow-up period of 12 weeks. Evaluation by blinded assessors at baseline, at 8 weeks (end of treatment) as well as at 4-week, 8-week and 12-week follow-ups (after intervention) will include Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores and average weekly dose of hypnotics. The primary endpoint is clinical response rate (percentage of participants who reach a reduction of PSQI global score ≥ 3 in each group) at 8 weeks from baseline. Secondary endpoints include the changes in PSQI scores over time from baseline, as well as the changes in weekly dose of hypnotics. DISCUSSION: This paper describes the rationale and design of a double-blind RCT that aims to determine the efficacy and safety of AAT for insomnia of hemodialysis patients. If successful, this project will provide evidence of the efficacy and safety of AAT for insomnia of hemodialysis patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov , Identifier: NCT03015766 . Registered on 22 December 2016.

14 Article Rest but busy: Aberrant resting-state functional connectivity of triple network model in insomnia. 2018

Dong, Xiaojuan / Qin, Haixia / Wu, Taoyu / Hu, Hua / Liao, Keren / Cheng, Fei / Gao, Dong / Lei, Xu. ·Sleep and NeuroImaging Center Faculty of Psychology Southwest University Chongqing China. · Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality of Ministry of Education Chongqing China. · School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences PKU-IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research Beijing Key Laboratory of Behavior and Mental Health Peking University Beijing China. · Department of Psychiatry the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University Chongqing China. · Sleep Psychology Center Daping Hospital Third Military Medical University Chongqing China. ·Brain Behav · Pubmed #29484254.

ABSTRACT: Introduction: One classical hypothesis among many models to explain the etiology and maintenance of insomnia disorder (ID) is hyperarousal. Aberrant functional connectivity among resting-state large-scale brain networks may be the underlying neurological mechanisms of this hypothesis. The aim of current study was to investigate the functional network connectivity (FNC) among large-scale brain networks in patients with insomnia disorder (ID) during resting state. Methods: In the present study, the resting-state fMRI was used to evaluate whether patients with ID showed aberrant FNC among dorsal attention network (DAN), frontoparietal control network (FPC), anterior default mode network (aDMN), and posterior default mode network (pDMN) compared with healthy good sleepers (HGSs). The Pearson's correlation analysis was employed to explore whether the abnormal FNC observed in patients with ID was associated with sleep parameters, cognitive and emotional scores, and behavioral performance assessed by questionnaires and tasks. Results: Patients with ID had worse subjective thought control ability measured by Thought Control Ability Questionnaire (TCAQ) and more negative affect than HGSs. Intriguingly, relative to HGSs, patients with ID showed a significant increase in FNC between DAN and FPC, but a significant decrease in FNC between aDMN and pDMN. Exploratory analysis in patients with ID revealed a significantly positive correlation between the DAN-FPC FNC and reaction time (RT) of psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). Conclusion: The current study demonstrated that even during the resting state, the task-activated and task-deactivated large-scale brain networks in insomniacs may still maintain a hyperarousal state, looking quite similar to the pattern in a task condition with external stimuli. Those results support the hyperarousal model of insomnia.

15 Article Disrupted brain network topology in chronic insomnia disorder: A resting-state fMRI study. 2018

Li, Zhonglin / Chen, Rui / Guan, Min / Wang, Enfeng / Qian, Tianyi / Zhao, Cuihua / Zou, Zhi / Beck, Thomas / Shi, Dapeng / Wang, Meiyun / Zhang, Hongju / Li, Yongli. ·People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, China. · Henan Key Laboratory for Medical Imaging of Neurological Diseases, Department of Functional Imaging, China. · Siemens Healthcare, MR Collaboration, NEA, Beijing, China. · Siemens Healthcare, MR Strategy and Innovation, Erlangen, Germany. · People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Neurology, China. ·Neuroimage Clin · Pubmed #29387533.

ABSTRACT: This study investigated the topological characteristics of brain functional networks in chronic insomnia disorder (CID) patients. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph theory analysis method were applied to investigate the brain functional connectome patterns among 45 CID patients and 32 healthy controls. The brain functional connectome was constructed by thresholding partial correlation matrices of 90 brain regions from an automated anatomical labeling atlas. The topologic properties of brain functional connectomes at both global and nodal levels were tested. The CID patients had decreased number of module (

16 Article Poor nighttime sleep is positively associated with dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease patients. 2018

Mao, Cheng-Jie / Yang, Ya-Ping / Chen, Ju-Ping / Wang, Fen / Chen, Jing / Zhang, Jin-Ru / Zhang, Hui-Jun / Zhuang, Sheng / Xiong, Yi-Tong / Gu, Chen-Chen / Yuan, Wen / Huang, Juan-Ying / Fay, Alexander / Zhong, Chong-Ke / Liu, Chun-Feng. ·Department of Neurology and Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004, China. · Department of Neurology, Changshu Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, East Huanghe Road, Changshu 215000, China. · Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China. · Department of Neurology, UCSF School of Medicine, Medical Center, San Francisco, California CA94143, United States. · Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, China. · Department of Neurology and Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004, China; Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China. Electronic address: liuchunfeng@suda.edu.cn. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #29305084.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Dyskinesia is a troublesome complication of long-term dopaminergic medications in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Many factors are reported to be associated with dyskinesia in PD. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between sleep quality and dyskinesia in patients with PD. METHODS: Four hundred twenty-five patients with PD were enrolled in this study. Demographic information was collected. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) stage scale were also performed. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were applied to evaluate daytime sleepiness and overall nighttime sleep quality, respectively, in PD patients. RESULTS: Patients with dyskinesia tended to have a longer duration of disease, higher daily levodopa-equivalent dose (LED), H-Y stage, UPDRS II and PSQI score, and a higher percentage of levodopa treatment than those without dyskinesia. After adjusting for age, sex, age at onset of PD, disease duration, UPDRS I, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, cigarette smoking, use of different antiparkinsonian drugs, phenotype, daily LED, and restless leg syndrome (RLS), PSQI score was still associated with dyskinesia, with corresponding ORs 1.111 (95% CI, 1.004-1.229) as a continuous variable, and 2.469 (95% CI, 1.051-5.800) as a categorical variable, respectively. Further analysis of PSQI components showed that subjective sleep quality and sleep latency were associated with dyskinesia in PD patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that poor nighttime sleep is positively associated with dyskinesia in PD patients. Attention to the management of nighttime sleep quality may be beneficial to dyskinesia in patients with PD.

17 Article Randomized single-blind multicenter trial comparing the effects of standard and augmented acupuncture protocols on sleep quality and depressive symptoms in patients with depression. 2018

Wen, Xiuyun / Wu, Qian / Liu, Jianhua / Xu, Zhenhua / Fan, Li / Chen, Xiaokai / He, Qing / Ma, Rui / Wu, Yanan / Jiang, Shuo / Xu, Shujun / Fu, Wenbin. ·a Baoan Hospital, Southern Medical University , Shenzhen , China. · b The Second Clinical Medical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine , Guangzhou , China. · c Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion , Guangdong Provincial Hospital of TCM , Guangzhou , China. · d The Third People's Hospital of Huizhou City , Huizhou , China. · e Traditional Chinese Medicine Research Center of Hong Kong Baptist University , Hong Kong , China. · f Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion , Zhejiang Provincial Hospital of TCM , Hangzhou , China. ·Psychol Health Med · Pubmed #28899206.

ABSTRACT: The study was aimed to compare the effects of standard and augmented acupuncture on depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances in patients with depression. This is a randomized, single-blind, multicenter trial. 140 subjects with clinical insomnia (score of ≥ 7 on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)) were randomized to the standard (LI4, LIV3, EX-HN3, and GV20) or augmented (LI4, LIV3, EX-HN3, GV20, LU7, and KID6, including intradermal needles for sustained treatment) acupuncture groups. Participants received two sessions weekly for six weeks. In trial, The primary outcomes were improvements in PSQI and the Hamilton Rating Scale (HAMD). Secondary outcomes were treatment credibility and adverse events. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, week 3, end of treatment, and 4-week follow-up. From the 105 randomized patients, 89 completed the trial and were included in the final analyses. Better efficacy was observed in the augmented group compared with the standard acupuncture to improve the PSQI and HAMD at week 3, end of treatment, and 4-week follow-up (all p < .05). The HAMD scores improved with time, except between end of treatment and 4-week follow-up, while in the standard group, HAMD scored improved from baseline to week 3, and stopped improving thereafter. The PSQI scores improved with time in the two groups, except between end of treatment and 4-week follow-up. Compared with the standard protocol, the augmented acupuncture protocol had a better efficacy to treat depression and to improve sleep quality of patients with depression.

18 Article Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in chronic insomnia patients and the association with poor treatment outcome at 2months. 2017

Zhao, Kai / Luan, Xiaoqian / Liu, Yuntao / Tu, Xinjie / Chen, Huijun / Shen, Huiping / Qiu, Huihua / Zhu, Zhuoying / He, Jincai. ·Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325000, China. · Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325000, China. Electronic address: hjc@wmu.edu.cn. ·Clin Chim Acta · Pubmed #29080688.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The association between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and sleep disorder has been reported. We investigated whether serum concentrations of 25(OH)D are altered in chronic insomnia patients. The relationship between serum concentrations of 25(OH)D and the treatment outcome in patients at 2months was also investigated. METHODS: In total, 181 chronic insomnia patients were consecutively recruited. All patients received pharmacotherapy for the treatment of chronic insomnia. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were quantified by a competitive electrochemiluminescence protein binding assay. Treatment outcomes were defined as "response" versus "non-response", according to the change of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). We also recruited 100 healthy subjects as a control group. RESULTS: Fifty-four out of 181 (29.8%) patients met the criteria for non-response. Chronic insomnia patients had significantly lower 25(OH)D concentrations compared with healthy controls (23.01±9.18 vs 27.17±6.41ng/ml, P<0.001). Non-response patients also had significantly lower 25(OH)D concentrations than those with response. Vitamin D deficiency(25(OH)D concentrations<20ng/ml) was independently associated with a higher probability of treatment non-response at 2months (odds ratio 11.636, 95% confidence interval 3.966-34.142, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of serum 25(OH)D concentrations are probably useful for judging treatment outcomes of pharmacotherapy in chronic insomnia patients.

19 Article Frequency-dependent changes in local intrinsic oscillations in chronic primary insomnia: A study of the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the resting state. 2017

Zhou, Fuqing / Huang, Suhua / Zhuang, Ying / Gao, Lei / Gong, Honghan. ·Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006, China; Jiangxi Province Medical Imaging Research Institute, Nanchang, 330006, China. Electronic address: fq.chou@yahoo.com. · Department of Radiology, Jiangxi Province Children's Hospital, Nanchang 330006, China. · Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang 330003, China. · Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006, China. · Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006, China; Jiangxi Province Medical Imaging Research Institute, Nanchang, 330006, China. Electronic address: honghan_gong@sina.com. ·Neuroimage Clin · Pubmed #28649490.

ABSTRACT: New neuroimaging techniques have led to significant advancements in our understanding of cerebral mechanisms of primary insomnia. However, the neuronal low-frequency oscillation remains largely uncharacterized in chronic primary insomnia (CPI). In this study, the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF), a data-driven method based on resting-state functional MRI, was used to examine local intrinsic activity in 27 patients with CPI and 27 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls. We examined neural activity in two frequency bands, slow-4 (between 0.027 and 0.073 Hz) and slow-5 (0.010-0.027 Hz), because blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in different low-frequency bands may present different neurophysiological manifestations that pertain to a spatiotemporal organization. The ALFF associated with the primary disease effect was widely distributed in the cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL), dorsal and ventral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, somatosensory cortex, and several default-mode sub-regions. Several brain regions (i.e., the right cerebellum, anterior lobe, and left putamen) exhibited an interaction between the frequency band and patient group. In the slow-5 band, increased ALFF of the right postcentral gyrus/inferior parietal lobule (PoCG/IPL) was enhanced in association with the sleep quality (ρ = 0.414,

20 Article Efficacy and safety of suanzaoren decoction for chronic insomnia disorder in adults: study protocol for randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled trial. 2017

Zhou, Qi-Hui / Wang, Hui-Lin / Zhou, Xiao-Li / Xu, Meng-Bei / Zhang, Hong-Feng / Huang, Li-Bo / Zheng, Guo-Qing / Lin, Yan. ·Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital and Yuying Children's Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #28377394.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insomnia disorder is defined as a combination of dissatisfaction with sleep quantity or quality and a significant negative impact on daytime functioning. Chronic insomnia disorder refers to clinical symptoms of persistent insomnia at least three nights a week for at least 3 months. Prevalence estimates of insomnia disorder range from 12% to 20% in the adult population, with approximately 50% having a chronic course. The potential side effects of hypnotic medications hinder their clinical application. Thus, traditional Chinese medicine is considered as an alternative option for treating insomnia. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of suanzaoren decoction (SZRD), a classic Chinese herbal prescription, for adult chronic insomnia disorder. METHODS/ANALYSIS: This is a randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled clinical trial. A total of 150 patients with chronic insomnia disorder are randomised, allocated in a ratio of 1:1:1 to three groups: intervention group, control group and placebo group. The intervention group receives SZRD granule plus zolpidem tartrate (ZT) placebo; the control group receives ZT tablet plus SZRD granule placebo; and the placebo group receives ZT placebo and SZRD granule placebo. The patients receive medicine or placebo for 5 weeks and are followed up at 20 weeks. The primary outcome measures are polysomnography and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Secondary outcome measures are the Insomnia Severity Index, sleep diary and safety assessment. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline and after treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ChiCTR-IOR-16009198. pre-results.

21 Article Comprehensive assessments of long-term sleep habits in epidemiological study: Validity and reliability of sleep factors questionnaire (SFQ) among Chinese women. 2017

Yang, Wan-Shui / Fu, Wen-Xue / Wang, Xin / Deng, Qin / Wang, Ling / Wang, Lin-Yan / Zhao, Hao / Fan, Wen-Yan / Huang, Shao-Xin. ·Department of Social Science and Public Health, School of Basic Medical Science, Jiujiang University, No. 17, Lufeng Road, Jiujiang 332000, China. Electronic address: 10111130003@fudan.edu.cn. · Department of Anatomy, School of Basic Medical Science, Jiujiang University, No. 17, Lufeng Road, Jiujiang 332000, China. · Department of Social Science and Public Health, School of Basic Medical Science, Jiujiang University, No. 17, Lufeng Road, Jiujiang 332000, China. ·J Psychosom Res · Pubmed #28314544.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological studies suggested that poor sleep is a potentially novel risk factor for several health outcomes currently; however, there are no validated questionnaires that can systematically measure sleep parameters within these studies. We evaluated the reliability and validity of 17-item sleep factors questionnaire (SFQ), which was developed to comprehensively assess long-term sleep habits for the Jiujiang Breast Cancer Study (JBCS), Jiujiang, China. METHODS: The participants included 100 women aged 18-74years, who were randomly selected from the JBCS project, and completed a SFQ at baseline and again 1year later, and 4 quarterly 30 consecutive days (a total of 120days) sleep diaries over this same year. Reliability was tested by comparing the 2 SFQs; validity by comparing the average measures between the SFQ and the 4 sleep diaries. RESULTS: Validity analysis showed moderate correlation (γ=0.41) for sleep duration with the adjusted concordance correlation coefficient (CCC CONCLUSIONS: The SFQ showed reasonable reliability and validity for sleep assessments in most domains.

22 Article Gender and Regional Differences in Sleep Quality and Insomnia: A General Population-based Study in Hunan Province of China. 2017

Tang, Jinsong / Liao, Yanhui / Kelly, Brian C / Xie, Liqin / Xiang, Yu-Tao / Qi, Chang / Pan, Chen / Hao, Wei / Liu, Tieqiao / Zhang, Fengyu / Chen, Xiaogang. ·Department of Psychiatry &Mental Health Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University. National Clinical Research Center on Mental Disorders &National Technology Institute on Mental Disorders. Hunan Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health, 139 Renmin (M) Rd, Changsha, Hunan 410011, P. R. China. · Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. · Department of Sociology &Center for Research on Young People's Health (CRYPH), Purdue University, 700 W State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. · Changsha Social Work College, 22 Xiangzhang Rd, Yuhua, Changsha, Hunan, 410116, P. R. China. · Unit of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, 3/F, Building E12, Macau SAR, Taipa, P. R. China. · Clinical Psychology Department, the Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410013, China. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28262807.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia and the inability to sleep affect people's health and well-being. However, its systematic estimates of prevalence and distribution in the general population in China are still lacking. A population-based cluster sampling survey was conducted in the rural and urban areas of Hunan, China. Subjects (n = 26,851) were sampled from the general population, with a follow-up using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for interview to assess quality of sleep and Insomnia (PSQI score >5). While the overall prevalence of insomnia was 26.6%, and little difference was found between males (26.3%) and females (27.0%); the mean PSQI score was 4.26 (±2.67), and significant higher in females (4.32 ± 2.70) than males (4.21 ± 2.64, p = 0.003). Individuals in the rural areas tended to report a higher PSQI score (4.45 ± 2.81) than urban residents did (4.18 ± 2.60) (p < 0.001) and the estimates of prevalence of insomnia was 29.4% in the rural areas, significant higher than 25.5% in the urban areas (p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that female gender, older age, higher level of education, being unmarried, living in the rural area, cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking were associated with insomnia. Our study may provide important information for general and mental health research.

23 Article Associations of domain-specific physical activities with insomnia symptoms among 0.5 million Chinese adults. 2017

Zheng, Bang / Yu, Canqing / Lin, Liling / Du, Huaidong / Lv, Jun / Guo, Yu / Bian, Zheng / Chen, Yiping / Yu, Min / Li, Jianguo / Chen, Junshi / Chen, Zhengming / Li, Liming / Anonymous5570897. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China. · Clinical Trial Service Unit & Epidemiological Studies Unit (CTSU), Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. · Zhejiang Center for Disease Control and Prevention Administration Office, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China. · Pengzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Pengzhou, Sichuan, China. · China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing, China. ·J Sleep Res · Pubmed #28230295.

ABSTRACT: Previous studies have demonstrated the association between physical activity and sleep quality. However, there is little evidence regarding different domains of physical activity. This study aimed to examine the associations between domain-specific physical activities and insomnia symptoms among Chinese men and women. Data of 452 024 Chinese adults aged 30-79 years from the China Kadoorie Biobank Study were analysed. Insomnia symptoms were assessed with self-reported difficulties in initiating or maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, daytime dysfunction and any insomnia symptoms. Physical activity assessed by questionnaire consisted of four domains, including occupational, commuting-related, household and leisure-time activities. Gender-specific multiple logistic regression models were employed to estimate independent associations of overall and domain-specific physical activities with insomnia symptoms. Overall, 12.9% of men and 17.8% of women participants reported having insomnia symptoms. After adjustment for potential confounders, a moderate to high level of overall activity was associated with reduced risks of difficulties in initiating or maintaining sleep and daytime dysfunction in both sexes (odds ratios range: 0.87-0.94, P < 0.05). As to each domain of physical activity, similar associations were identified for occupational, household and leisure-time activities in women but not men (odds ratios range: 0.84-0.94, P < 0.05). Commuting-related activity, however, was associated with increased risks of difficulties in initiating or maintaining sleep and any insomnia symptoms in both sexes (odds ratios range: 1.07-1.17, P < 0.05). In conclusion, a moderate to high level of physical activity was associated with lower risks of insomnia symptoms among Chinese adults. However, such associations varied hugely in different domains of physical activity and with gender differences, which could help with better policy-making and clinical practice.

24 Article Increased insular connectivity with emotional regions in primary insomnia patients: a resting-state fMRI study. 2017

Wang, Tianyue / Yan, Jianhao / Li, Shumei / Zhan, Wenfeng / Ma, Xiaofen / Xia, Likun / Li, Meng / Lin, Chulan / Tian, Junzhang / Li, Cheng / Jiang, Guihua. ·Guangdong No. 2 Provincial People's Hospital, Guangzhou, China. · People's Hospital of Yuxi City, Yuxi, China. · Guangdong No. 2 Provincial People's Hospital, Guangzhou, China. GH.jiang2002@163.com. ·Eur Radiol · Pubmed #28144739.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To explore the abnormal connectivity patterns between the insular and the voxels of the brain in primary insomnia (PI) with insular-based functional connectivity (FC). METHODS: With the resting-state fMRI data acquired from 57 PI patients and 46 healthy controls, a two-sample t test was performed on individual FC correlation maps from two groups. The person correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the abnormal FC and clinical features. RESULTS: PI patients show enhanced connectivity between the left insula with the right anterior cingulate cortex (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, AlphaSim-corrected), right frontal sup orb, bilateral thalamus and left precuneus,as well as decreased connectivity with the left middle temporal gyrus and right fusiform (p < 0.05, AlphaSim-corrected). Correlation analysis indicated the enhanced connectivities in the PI patients have significant negative correlations with Self-Rating Depression Scale(SDS)and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale(SAS)scores. In addition, the decreased functional connectivities showed positive correlations with SDS and SAS scores. CONCLUSION: Our study showed the increased connectivity regions with insula were mainly in the emotional circle and decreased connectivity was in cognitive-related regions. These provide additional evidence from functional integration view to understand the possible underlying neural- mechanisms of PI. KEY POINTS: • The aberrant insular-based connectivity pattern of PI patients was detected. • Regions showing increased connectivity with left insular were mainly in emotional circle. • Significant correlations between changed FC and SDS and SAS score were found.

25 Article Quality of life and clinical correlates in older adults living in the community and in nursing homes in Macao. 2017

C F Kuok, Kenny / Li, Lu / Xiang, Yu-Tao / Nogueira, Bernice O C Lam / Ungvari, Gabor S / Ng, Chee H / Chiu, Helen F K / Tran, Linda / Meng, Li-Rong. ·School of Health Sciences, Macao Polytechnic Institute, Macao SAR, China. · Unit of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macao SAR, China. · Macao Sino-Portuguese Nurses Association, „, Macao SAR, China. · School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, „, Australia. · University of Notre Dame Australia/Marian Centre, „, Perth, „, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China, „. ·Psychogeriatrics · Pubmed #28093847.

ABSTRACT: AIM: There have been no previous studies of quality of life (QOL) in older adults in Macao. This study aimed to examine QOL in relation to the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of adults aged ≥50 years in Macao. METHODS: A sample of 451 subjects (203 living in the community, 248 living in nursing homes) was interviewed using standardized instruments. Basic sociodemographic and clinical data including QOL were collected. RESULT: There were no significant differences between the community and nursing home groups in any of the QOL domains. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that poor physical QOL was significantly predicted by severe depressive symptoms, insomnia, major medical conditions, unmarried status, and lower education ( F CONCLUSION: Older Macanese adults had poorer scores on physical and social QOL domains than the general Hong Kong Chinese population. Their QOL was more strongly related to severe depressive symptoms, major medical conditions, and insomnia.

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