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Irritable Bowel Syndrome HELP
Based on 5,528 articles published since 2010
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These are the 5528 published articles about Irritable Bowel Syndrome that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline AGA Technical Review on the Evaluation of Functional Diarrhea and Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Adults (IBS-D). 2019

Carrasco-Labra, Alonso / Lytvyn, Lyubov / Falck-Ytter, Yngve / Surawicz, Christina M / Chey, William D. ·Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Department of Oral and Craniofacial Health Science, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Gastroenterology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio; Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #31351880.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: The evaluation of patients with chronic watery diarrhea represents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians because organic causes, including inflammatory bowel disease, microscopic colitis, and chronic infection, must be differentiated from functional diarrhea and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the usefulness of diagnostic tests in such patients. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE via OVID, from 1978 until April 2017. We included diagnostic test accuracy studies reporting on the use of fecal and blood tests for the evaluation of adult patients with functional diarrhea, including irritable bowel syndrome. We assessed the risk of bias of included studies using a modified version of the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies II, and the certainty in the evidence using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) approach. We calculated pooled sensitivity and specificity, and the proportion of patients with true and false positive and negative results. We evaluated the following tests: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, fecal lactoferrin, fecal calprotectin, serologic tests for celiac disease, tests for bile acid diarrhea, the commercially available version of anti-cytolethal distending toxin B and anti-vinculin antibodies, and tests for Giardia infection. We did not evaluate breath tests for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, as they are not part of a standard diarrhea workup. RESULTS: Thirty-eight studies proved eligible to evaluate 1 or more of these tests. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were similar at discriminating organic from functional disease, with sensitivity and specificity, respectively, of 0.54-0.78 and 0.46-0.95 for erythrocyte sedimentation rate and 0.73 and 0.78 for C-reactive protein. Among fecal tests, fecal calprotectin in a range of 50-60 μg/g (pooled sensitivity 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-0.86; pooled specificity 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.92) and fecal lactoferrin in a range of 4.0-7.25 μg/g (pooled sensitivity 0.79; 95% CI, 0.73-0.84; pooled specificity 0.93; 95%CI 0.63-0.99) presented the lowest proportion of false-negative results (low certainty in the evidence). Among tests for celiac disease, IgA tissue transglutaminase presented the best diagnostic test accuracy (sensitivity range, 0.79-0.99; specificity range, 0.90-0.99) with moderate certainty in the evidence. Among tests for bile acid diarrhea, the CONCLUSIONS: Moderate to low certainty in the evidence indicates that available fecal and blood tests may play a role in the diagnostic workup of adult patients with functional diarrhea. At the moment, no tests are available to reliably rule in irritable bowel syndrome.

2 Guideline AGA Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Laboratory Evaluation of Functional Diarrhea and Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Adults (IBS-D). 2019

Smalley, Walter / Falck-Ytter, Corinna / Carrasco-Labra, Alonso / Wani, Sachin / Lytvyn, Lyubov / Falck-Ytter, Yngve. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee; Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Health Care System, Nashville, Tennessee. · Departments of Medicine and Gastroenterology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio; Veterans Affairs Northeast Ohio Health System, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Dentistry, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry for the American Dental Association, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #31302098.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Rome Foundation Working Team Report on Post-Infection Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 2019

Barbara, Giovanni / Grover, Madhusudan / Bercik, Premysl / Corsetti, Maura / Ghoshal, Uday C / Ohman, Lena / Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana. ·Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: giovanni.barbara@unibo.it. · Enteric NeuroScience Program, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Medicine, Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Centre, National Institute for Health Research, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, University of Nottingham, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India. · Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #30009817.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: The existence of postinfection irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) has been substantiated by epidemiology studies conducted in diverse geographic and clinical settings. However, the available evidence has not been well summarized, and there is little guidance for diagnosis and treatment of PI-IBS. The ROME Foundation has produced a working team report to summarize the available evidence on the pathophysiology of PI-IBS and provide guidance for diagnosis and treatment, based on findings reported in the literature and clinical experience. METHODS: The working team conducted an evidence-based review of publication databases for articles describing the clinical features (diagnosis), pathophysiology (intestinal sensorimotor function, microbiota, immune dysregulation, barrier dysfunction, enteroendocrine pathways, and genetics), and animal models of PI-IBS. We used a Delphi-based consensus system to create guidelines for management of PI-IBS and a developed treatment algorithm based on published findings and experiences of team members. RESULTS: PI-IBS develops in about 10% of patients with infectious enteritis. Risk factors include female sex, younger age, psychological distress during or before acute gastroenteritis, and severity of the acute episode. The pathogenesis of PI-PBS appears to involve changes in the intestinal microbiome as well as epithelial, serotonergic, and immune system factors. However, these mechanisms are incompletely understood. There are no evidence-based, effective pharmacologic strategies for treatment of PI-IBS. We provide a consensus-based treatment algorithm, based on clinical presentation and potential disease mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS: Based on a systematic review of the literature and team experience, we summarize the clinical features, pathophysiology (from animal models and human studies), and progression of PI-IBS. Based on these findings, we present an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of PI-IBS based on team consensus. We also propose areas for future investigation.

4 Guideline American College of Gastroenterology Monograph on Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 2018

Ford, Alexander C / Moayyedi, Paul / Chey, William D / Harris, Lucinda A / Lacy, Brian E / Saito, Yuri A / Quigley, Eamonn M M / Anonymous1710953. ·Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Leeds and Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds, UK. · Division of Gastroenterology, Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Houston Methodist Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX, USA. equigley@houstonmethodist.org. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29950604.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline Consensus Statement of Definitions for Anorectal Physiology Testing and Pelvic Floor Terminology (Revised). 2018

Bordeianou, Liliana G / Carmichael, Joseph C / Paquette, Ian M / Wexner, Steven / Hull, Tracy L / Bernstein, Mitchell / Keller, Deborah S / Zutshi, Massarat / Varma, Madhulika G / Gurland, Brooke H / Steele, Scott R. ·Prepared on behalf of the Pelvic Floor Disorders Committee and the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee of The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. ·Dis Colon Rectum · Pubmed #29521821.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline The current treatment landscape of irritable bowel syndrome in adults in Hong Kong: consensus statements. 2017

Wu, J Cy / Chan, A Oo / Chan, Y W / Cheung, G Cl / Cheung, T K / Kwan, A Cp / Leung, V Ks / Mak, A Dp / Sze, W C / Wong, R. ·Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, Happy Valley, Hong Kong. · Hong Kong Institute of Integrative Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong. · Hong Kong Nutrition Association, Hong Kong. · Private specialist in Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hong Kong. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hong Kong Baptist Hospital, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. · Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong. ·Hong Kong Med J · Pubmed #29226832.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The estimated prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome in Hong Kong is 6.6%. With the increasing availability of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, the Hong Kong Advisory Council on Irritable Bowel Syndrome has developed a set of consensus statements intended to serve as local recommendations for clinicians about diagnosis and management of irritable bowel syndrome. PARTICIPANTS: A multidisciplinary group of clinicians constituting the Hong Kong Advisory Council on Irritable Bowel Syndrome-seven gastroenterologists, one clinical psychologist, one psychiatrist, and one nutritionist-convened on 20 April 2017 in Hong Kong. EVIDENCE: Published primary research articles, meta-analyses, and guidelines and consensus statements issued by different regional and international societies on the diagnosis and management of irritable bowel syndrome were reviewed. CONSENSUS PROCESS: An outline of consensus statements was drafted prior to the meeting. All consensus statements were finalised by the participants during the meeting, with 100% consensus. CONCLUSIONS: Twenty-four consensus statements were generated at the meeting. The statements were divided into four parts covering: (1) patient assessment; (2) patient's psychological distress; (3) dietary and alternative approaches to managing irritable bowel syndrome; and (4) evidence to support pharmacological management of irritable bowel syndrome. It is recommended that primary care physicians assume the role of principal care provider for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The current statements are intended to guide primary care physicians in diagnosing and managing patients with irritable bowel syndrome in Hong Kong.

7 Guideline Danish national guideline: Diagnosis and treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 2017

Krarup, Anne Lund / Engsbro, Anne Line Østergaard / Fassov, Janne / Fynne, Lotte / Christensen, Anders Bak / Bytzer, Peter. ·pmby@regionsjaelland.dk. ·Dan Med J · Pubmed #28566121.

ABSTRACT: National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adult patients in secondary and tertiary care have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology. IBS can be a positive diagnosis in patients fulfilling the Rome III criteria for IBS with no alarm signals, a normal physical examination and a normal CRP and hemoglobin. In patients < 40 years with IBS and diarrhea, a normal fecal calprotectin excludes inflammatory bowel disease with a high probability. Patients with IBS and diarrhea should be tested for celiac disease. Endoscopy is not routinely recommended. The therapeutic gain of various treatment modalities is small and most likely overestimated in older studies. However, side effects are usually mild which may justify empirical treatment. The choice of therapy based on IBS subtyping is pragmatic and there are only few trials as guidance. The significance of previous failure with another treatment modality is unclear. There is a lack of long-term treatment trials. The generalizability of the trials is poor, mainly due to selection bias.

8 Guideline [Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and functional constipation in adults: Treatment (Part 2 of 2)]. 2017

Mearin, F / Ciriza, C / Mínguez, M / Rey, E / Mascort, J J / Peña, E / Cañones, P / Júdez, J / Anonymous6180897. ·Coordinación de la GPC, Comité Roma de Trastornos Funcionales Intestinales, Asociación Española de Gastroenterología (AEG), Centro Médico Teknon, Barcelona, España. · Grupo de Trastornos Funcionales, Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva (SEPD), Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Madrid, España. · AEG y SEPD, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia, España. · SEPD, Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid, España. · Secretaría Científica, Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria (semFYC), España. Electronic address: jmascort@semfyc.es. · Coordinación de Digestivo, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN), España. · Coordinación de Digestivo, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia (SEMG), España. · Departamento de Gestión del Conocimiento, SEPD, España. ·Aten Primaria · Pubmed #28238460.

ABSTRACT: In this Clinical practice guide we examine the diagnostic and therapeutic management of adult patients with constipation and abdominal discomfort, at the confluence of the spectrum of irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation. Both fall within the framework of functional intestinal disorders and have major personal, health and social impact, altering the quality of life of the patients affected. The former is a subtype of irritable bowel syndrome in which constipation and altered bowel habit predominate, often along with recurring abdominal pain, bloating and abdominal distension. Constipation is characterised by infrequent or hard-to-pass bowel movements, often accompanied by straining during defecation or the sensation of incomplete evacuation. There is no underlying organic cause in the majority of cases; it being considered a functional bowel disorder. There are many clinical and pathophysiological similarities between the two conditions, the constipation responds in a similar way to commonly used drugs, the fundamental difference being the presence or absence of pain, but not in an "all or nothing" way. The severity of these disorders depends not only on the intensity of the intestinal symptoms but also on other biopsychosocial factors: association of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, degree of involvement, forms of perception and behaviour. Functional bowel disorders are diagnosed using the Rome criteria. This Clinical practice guide adapts to the Rome IV criteria published at the end of May 2016. The first part (96, 97, 98) examined the conceptual and pathophysiological aspects, alarm criteria, diagnostic test and referral criteria between Primary Care and Gastroenterology. This second part reviews all the available treatment alternatives (exercise, fluid ingestion, diet with soluble fibre-rich foods, fibre supplements, other dietary components, osmotic or stimulating laxatives, probiotics, antibiotics, spasmolytics, peppermint essence, prucalopride, linaclotide, lubiprostone, biofeedback, antdepressants, psychological treatment, acupuncture, enemas, sacral root neurostimulation and surgery), and practical recommendations are made for each.

9 Guideline [Clinical practice guidelines: Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and functional constipation in adults: Concept, diagnosis, and healthcare continuity. (Part 1 of 2)]. 2017

Mearin, F / Ciriza, C / Mínguez, M / Rey, E / Mascort, J J / Peña, E / Cañones, P / Júdez, J / Anonymous5450891 / Anonymous5460891 / Anonymous5470891 / Anonymous5480891 / Anonymous5490891 / Anonymous5500891 / Anonymous5510891. ·Coordinación de la guía de práctica clínica (GPC), Comité Roma de Trastornos Funcionales Intestinales, Asociación Española de Gastroenterología (AEG), Centro Médico Teknon, Barcelona, España. · Grupo de Trastornos Funcionales, Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva (SEPD), Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Madrid, España. · AEG y SEPD, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia, España. · SEPD Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid, España. · Secretaría Científica, Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria (semFYC), España. Electronic address: jmascort@semfyc.es. · Coordinación de Digestivo, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN), España. · Coordinación de Digestivo, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia (SEMG), España. · Departamento de Gestión del Conocimiento, SEPD, España. ·Aten Primaria · Pubmed #28027792.

ABSTRACT: In this Clinical practice guide, an analysis is made of the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with constipation and abdominal discomfort, under the spectrum of irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation. These have an important personal, health and social impact, affecting the quality of life of these patients. In irritable bowel syndrome with a predominance of constipation, this is the predominant change in bowel movements, with recurrent abdominal pain, bloating and frequent abdominal distension. Constipation is characterised by infrequent or difficulty in bowel movements, associated with excessive straining during bowel movement or sensation of incomplete evacuation. There is often no underling cause, with an intestinal functional disorder being considered. They have many clinical and pathophysiological similarities, with a similar response of the constipation to common drugs. The fundamental difference is the presence or absence of pain, but not in a way evaluable way; "all or nothing". The severity depends on the intensity of bowel symptoms and other factors, a combination of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms, level of involvement, forms of perception, and behaviour. The Rome criteria diagnose functional bowel disorders. This guide is adapted to the Rome criteria IV (May 2016) and in this first part an analysis is made of the alarm criteria, diagnostic tests, and the criteria for referral between Primary Care and Digestive Disease specialists. In the second part, a review will be made of the therapeutic alternatives available (exercise, diet, drug therapies, neurostimulation of sacral roots, or surgery), making practical recommendations for each one of them.

10 Guideline World Gastroenterology Organisation Global Guidelines Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Global Perspective Update September 2015. 2016

Quigley, Eamonn M M / Fried, Michael / Gwee, Kok-Ann / Khalif, Igor / Hungin, A P S / Lindberg, Greger / Abbas, Zaigham / Fernandez, Luis B / Bhatia, Shobna J / Schmulson, Max / Olano, Carolina / LeMair, Anton / Anonymous350881. ·World Gastroenterology Organisation, Milwaukee, WI. ·J Clin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #27623513.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline British Dietetic Association systematic review and evidence-based practice guidelines for the dietary management of irritable bowel syndrome in adults (2016 update). 2016

McKenzie, Y A / Bowyer, R K / Leach, H / Gulia, P / Horobin, J / O'Sullivan, N A / Pettitt, C / Reeves, L B / Seamark, L / Williams, M / Thompson, J / Lomer, M C E / Anonymous4570870. ·Nuffield Health The Manor Hospital, Oxford, UK. yvonne@digestiblenutrition.co.uk. · Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Swindon, UK. · Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Dr Ashok Ayurveda Clinic, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK. · Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, King's College London, London, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Allergy Services, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · Specialist Gastroenterology Community Dietetic Service, Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Bridgwater, UK. · Calm Gut Clinic, Todmorden, UK. · Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, St Thomas' Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. ·J Hum Nutr Diet · Pubmed #27272325.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The first British Dietetic Association (BDA) guidelines for the dietary management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults were published in 2012. Subsequently, there has been a wealth of new research. The aim of this work was to systematically review the evidence for the role of diet in the management of IBS and to update the guidelines. METHODS: Twelve questions relating to diet and IBS were defined based on review of the previous guideline questions, current evidence and clinical practice. Chosen topics were on healthy eating and lifestyle (alcohol, caffeine, spicy food, elimination diets, fat and fluid intakes and dietary habits), milk and dairy, dietary fibre, fermentable carbohydrates, gluten, probiotics and elimination diets/food hypersensitivity. Data sources were CINAHL, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science up to October 2015. Studies were assessed independently in duplicate using risk of bias tools specific to each included study based on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each question. National Health and Medical Research Council grading evidence levels were used to develop evidence statements and recommendations, in accordance with Practice-based Evidence in Nutrition Global protocol used by the BDA. RESULTS: Eighty-six studies were critically appraised to generate 46 evidence statements, 15 clinical recommendations and four research recommendations. The IBS dietary algorithm was simplified to first-line (healthy eating, provided by any healthcare professional) and second-line [low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) to be provided by dietitian] dietary advice. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines provide updated comprehensive evidence-based details to achieve the successful dietary management of IBS in adults.

12 Guideline British Dietetic Association systematic review of systematic reviews and evidence-based practice guidelines for the use of probiotics in the management of irritable bowel syndrome in adults (2016 update). 2016

McKenzie, Y A / Thompson, J / Gulia, P / Lomer, M C E / Anonymous2990870. ·Nuffield Health, The Manor Hospital, Oxford, UK. yvonne@digestiblenutrition.co.uk. · Calm Gut Clinic, Todmorden, Lancashire, UK. · Dr Ashok Ayurveda Clinic, Birmingham, UK. · Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, King's College London, London, UK. · Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. ·J Hum Nutr Diet · Pubmed #27265510.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Probiotics are often taken by individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Which products are effective is unclear, despite an increasing research base. This project will systematically review which strain- and dose- specific probiotics can be recommended to adults with IBS to improve symptoms and quality of life (QoL). It is part of a broader systematic review to update British Dietetic Association guidelines for the dietary management of IBS in adults. METHODS: CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science were searched for systematic reviews (SRs) of randomised controlled trial (RCT)s recruiting adults with IBS comparing probiotic intervention with placebo. AMSTAR, risk of bias and diet bias tools were used to appraise methodological quality. Symptom and QoL data were appraised to develop probiotic-specific evidence statements on clinically meaningful and marginal outcomes in various settings, graded clinical practice recommendations and practical considerations. RESULTS: Nine systematic reviews and 35 RCTs were included (3406 participants) using 29 dose-specific probiotic formulations. None of the RCTs were at low risk of bias. Twelve out of 29 probiotics (41%) showed no symptom or QoL benefits. Evidence indicated that no strain or dose specific probiotic was consistently effective to improve any IBS symptoms or QoL. Two general clinical practice recommendations were made. CONCLUSIONS: Symptom outcomes for dose-specific probiotics were heterogeneous. Specific probiotic recommendations for IBS management in adults were not possible at this time. More data from high-quality RCTs treating specific symptom profiles are needed to support probiotic therapy in the management of IBS.

13 Guideline Pharmacologic Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 2015

Rao, Vijaya L / Cifu, Adam S / Yang, Leslie W / Anonymous4350853. ·Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. · Section of General Internal Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. ·JAMA · Pubmed #26720029.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for irritable bowel syndrome. 2015

Fukudo, Shin / Kaneko, Hiroshi / Akiho, Hirotada / Inamori, Masahiko / Endo, Yuka / Okumura, Toshikatsu / Kanazawa, Motoyori / Kamiya, Takeshi / Sato, Ken / Chiba, Toshimi / Furuta, Kenji / Yamato, Shigeru / Arakawa, Tetsuo / Fujiyama, Yoshihide / Azuma, Takeshi / Fujimoto, Kazuma / Mine, Tetsuya / Miura, Soichiro / Kinoshita, Yoshikazu / Sugano, Kentaro / Shimosegawa, Tooru. ·Guidelines Committee for creating and evaluating the "Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for irritable bowel syndrome", the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE), K-18 Building 8F, 8-9-13 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo, 104-0061, Japan, sfukudo@med.tohoku.ac.jp. ·J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25500976.

ABSTRACT: New strategies for the care of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are developing and several novel treatments have been globally produced. New methods of care should be customized geographically because each country has a specific medical system, life style, eating habit, gut microbiota, genes and so on. Several clinical guidelines for IBS have been proposed and the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) subsequently developed evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for IBS. Sixty-two clinical questions (CQs) comprising 1 definition, 6 epidemiology, 6 pathophysiology, 10 diagnosis, 30 treatment, 4 prognosis, and 5 complications were proposed and statements were made to answer to CQs. A diagnosis algorithm and a three-step treatment was provided for patients with chronic abdominal pain or abdominal discomfort and/or abnormal bowel movement. If more than one alarm symptom/sign, risk factor and/or routine examination is positive, colonoscopy is indicated. If all of them, or the subsequent colonoscopy, are/is negative, Rome III or compatible criteria is applied. After IBS diagnosis, step 1 therapy consisting of diet therapy, behavioral modification and gut-targeted pharmacotherapy is indicated for four weeks. Non-responders to step 1 therapy proceed to the second step that includes psychopharmacological agents and simple psychotherapy for four weeks. In the third step, for patients non-responsive to step 2 therapy, a combination of gut-targeted pharmacotherapy, psychopharmacological treatments and/or specific psychotherapy is/are indicated. Clinical guidelines and consensus for IBS treatment in Japan are well suited for Japanese IBS patients; as such, they may provide useful insight for IBS treatment in other countries around the world.

15 Guideline The use of mebeverine in irritable bowel syndrome. A Position paper of the Romanian Society of Neurogastroenterology based on evidence. 2014

Dumitrascu, Dan L / Chira, Alexandra / Bataga, Simona / Diculescu, Mircea / Drug, Vasile / Gheorghe, Cristian / Goldis, Adrian / Nedelcu, Laurentiu / Porr, Paul J / Sporea, Ioan / Anonymous730816. ·2nd Medical Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. ddumitrascu@umfcluj.ro. · 2nd Medical Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. · University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Tg-Mures, Romania. · Center of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Iasi, Romania. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania. · Department of Internal Medicine, Transilvania University, Brasov, Romania. · Lucian Blaga University, Sibiu, Romania. ·J Gastrointestin Liver Dis · Pubmed #25532003.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the pharmacological management of irritable bowel syndrome. 2014

Weinberg, David S / Smalley, Walter / Heidelbaugh, Joel J / Sultan, Shahnaz / Anonymous4020806. ·Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. · University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gastroenterology Section, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health System, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #25224526.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline [Joint Statement of the German Society for Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS), the German Society for Neurogastroenterology and motility (DGNM) and the German Society for Internal Medicine (DGIM) for linaclotide-benefit assessment of the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) in accordance with § 35a SGB V (dossier evaluation)]. 2013

Andresen, V / Layer, P / Anonymous3630776 / Anonymous3640776 / Anonymous3650776. · ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24266047.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline Intestinal microbiota in functional bowel disorders: a Rome foundation report. 2013

Simrén, Magnus / Barbara, Giovanni / Flint, Harry J / Spiegel, Brennan M R / Spiller, Robin C / Vanner, Stephen / Verdu, Elena F / Whorwell, Peter J / Zoetendal, Erwin G / Anonymous6010729. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg S-41345, Sweden. magnus.simren@medicine.gu.se ·Gut · Pubmed #22730468.

ABSTRACT: It is increasingly perceived that gut host-microbial interactions are important elements in the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). The most convincing evidence to date is the finding that functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may develop in predisposed individuals following a bout of infectious gastroenteritis. There has been a great deal of interest in the potential clinical and therapeutic implications of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in IBS. However, this theory has generated much debate because the evidence is largely based on breath tests which have not been validated. The introduction of culture-independent molecular techniques provides a major advancement in our understanding of the microbial community in FGID. Results from 16S rRNA-based microbiota profiling approaches demonstrate both quantitative and qualitative changes of mucosal and faecal gut microbiota, particularly in IBS. Investigators are also starting to measure host-microbial interactions in IBS. The current working hypothesis is that abnormal microbiota activate mucosal innate immune responses which increase epithelial permeability, activate nociceptive sensory pathways and dysregulate the enteric nervous system. While we await important insights in this field, the microbiota is already a therapeutic target. Existing controlled trials of dietary manipulation, prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics and non-absorbable antibiotics are promising, although most are limited by suboptimal design and small sample size. In this article, the authors provide a critical review of current hypotheses regarding the pathogenetic involvement of microbiota in FGID and evaluate the results of microbiota-directed interventions. The authors also provide clinical guidance on modulation of gut microbiota in IBS.

19 Guideline British Dietetic Association evidence-based guidelines for the dietary management of irritable bowel syndrome in adults. 2012

McKenzie, Y A / Alder, A / Anderson, W / Wills, A / Goddard, L / Gulia, P / Jankovich, E / Mutch, P / Reeves, L B / Singer, A / Lomer, M C E / Anonymous930723. ·Nuffield Health The Manor Hospital, Oxford, UK Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, UK. ·J Hum Nutr Diet · Pubmed #22489905.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND:  Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic debilitating functional gastrointestinal disorder. Diet and lifestyle changes are important management strategies. The aim of these guidelines is to systematically review key aspects of the dietary management of IBS, with the aim of providing evidence-based guidelines for use by registered dietitians. METHODS: Questions relating to diet and IBS symptom management were developed by a guideline development group. These included the role of milk and lactose, nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP), fermentable carbohydrates in abdominal bloating, probiotics and empirical or elimination diets. A comprehensive literature search was conducted and relevant studies from January 1985 to November 2009 were identified using the electronic database search engines: Cinahl, Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science. Evidence statements, recommendations, good practice points and research recommendations were developed. RESULTS: Thirty studies were critically appraised. A dietetic care pathway was produced following a logical sequence of treatment and formed the basis of these guidelines. Three lines of dietary management were identified. first line: Clinical and dietary assessment, healthy eating and lifestyle management with some general advice on lactose and NSP. Second line: Advanced dietary interventions to improve symptoms based on NSP, fermentable carbohydrates and probiotics. Third line: Elimination and empirical diets. Research recommendations were also identified relating to the need for adequately powered and well designed randomised controlled trials. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines provide evidence-based details of how to achieve the successful dietary management of IBS.

20 Guideline [IBD ahead 2010--Answering important questions in Crohn's disease treatment]. 2011

Schmidt, C / Dignass, A / Hartmann, F / Hüppe, D / Kruis, W / Layer, P / Lüers, A / Stallmach, A / Teich, N / Sturm, A / Anonymous6180703. ·Universitätklinikum Jena, Klinik für Innere Medizin II, Abteilung für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Infektiologie. ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #21866492.

ABSTRACT: The treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease has become more complex in recent years through the introduction of various immunosuppressive agents as well as the approval of monoclonal antibodies against TNF-α and patients receiving such treatment must be carefully monitored. National and international guidelines define a diagnostic and therapeutic context for the practitioner, but can only partially respond to specific questions on the procedure for individual patients. Within the framework of a project initiated by Abbott entitled "IBD ahead" 38 German IBD experts have elaborated concrete proposals for dealing with corticosteroids, immunosuppressants and TNF-α antibodies on the basis of the published literature and their own personal experience in order to close the gap between these guidelines and daily clinical practice. Statements were developed on the choice of correct timing of initiation, dose and duration of the individual substances and on how to proceed with patients exhibiting treatment failure. Moreover, recommendations are also made on drug combination strategies, safety monitoring and the risks regarding the development of infectious complications and malignancies. These recommendations are illustrated by case studies from everyday practice in participating centres.

21 Guideline [Guidelines for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome]. 2011

Kwon, Joong Goo / Park, Kyung Sik / Park, Jung Ho / Park, Jae Myung / Park, Cheol Hee / Lee, Kwang Jae / Park, Hyo Jin / Rhee, Jong Chul / Anonymous4180687. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Korea. ·Korean J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #21350320.

ABSTRACT: Traditional symptom-based therapies of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are directed at the relief of individual IBS symptoms, but they are often of limited efficacy in addressing the entire symptom complex. Combinations of drugs to target bothersome symptoms are suggested as the first-line pharmacologic treatment. Increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms of IBS has resulted in the development of several new therapeutic approaches. Thirteen consensus statements for the treatment of IBS were developed using the modified Delphi approach. Exclusion diets have modest efficacy in improving symptoms in some IBS patients. Symptom-based therapies with dietary fiber, bulking agents, laxatives, antispasmodics and laxatives are effective in the improvement of some individual symptoms, e.g. dietary fiber and bulking agents for constipation, laxatives for constipation, antispasmodics for abdominal pain and discomfort, antidiarrheals for diarrhea. 5HT3 receptor antagonists and 5HT((4)) receptor agonists are effective in the relief of global IBS symptoms and individual symptoms such as abdominal pain and abnormal bowel habits. A short term course of nonabsorbable antibiotics may improve global IBS symptoms, particularly in patients with diarrhea- predominant IBS. Some probiotics appear to have the potential benefit in improving global IBS symptoms. Selective C-2 chloride channel activator is more effective than placebo at relieving global IBS symptoms in patients with constipation-predominant IBS. Both tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are equally effective in relieving global IBS symptoms, and have some benefits in treating abdominal pain. Certain types of psychologic therapy may be effective in improving global symptoms in some IBS patients. Further studies are strongly needed to develop better treatment strategies for Korean patients with IBS.

22 Guideline [Irritable bowel syndrome: German consensus guidelines on definition, pathophysiology and management]. 2011

Layer, P / Andresen, V / Pehl, C / Allescher, H / Bischoff, S C / Classen, M / Enck, P / Frieling, T / Haag, S / Holtmann, G / Karaus, M / Kathemann, S / Keller, J / Kuhlbusch-Zicklam, R / Kruis, W / Langhorst, J / Matthes, H / Mönnikes, H / Müller-Lissner, S / Musial, F / Otto, B / Rosenberger, C / Schemann, M / van der Voort, I / Dathe, K / Preiss, J C / Anonymous5280685 / Anonymous5290685. ·Für die Konsensusgruppe Reizdarmsyndrom; Konsensuskonferenz 18./ 19.9.2009. layer@ik-h.de ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #21287438.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline Asian consensus on irritable bowel syndrome. 2010

Gwee, Kok-Ann / Bak, Young-Tae / Ghoshal, Uday Chand / Gonlachanvit, Sutep / Lee, Oh Young / Fock, Kwong Ming / Chua, Andrew Seng Boon / Lu, Ching-Liang / Goh, Khean-Lee / Kositchaiwat, Chomsri / Makharia, Govind / Park, Hyo-Jin / Chang, Full-Young / Fukudo, Shin / Choi, Myung-Gyu / Bhatia, Shobna / Ke, Meiyun / Hou, Xiaohua / Hongo, Michio / Anonymous5520664. ·Stomach Liver and Bowel Clinic, Gleneagles Hospital, Singapore. slbclinic@gmail.com ·J Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #20594245.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Many of the ideas on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are derived from studies conducted in Western societies. Their relevance to Asian societies has not been critically examined. Our objectives were to bring to attention important data from Asian studies, articulate the experience and views of our Asian experts, and provide a relevant guide on this poorly understood condition for doctors and scientists working in Asia. METHODS: A multinational group of physicians from Asia with special interest in IBS raised statements on IBS pertaining to symptoms, diagnosis, epidemiology, infection, pathophysiology, motility, management, and diet. A modified Delphi approach was employed to present and grade the quality of evidence, and determine the level of agreement. RESULTS: We observed that bloating and symptoms associated with meals were prominent complaints among our IBS patients. In the majority of our countries, we did not observe a female predominance. In some Asian populations, the intestinal transit times in healthy and IBS patients appear to be faster than those reported in the West. High consultation rates were observed, particularly in the more affluent countries. There was only weak evidence to support the perception that psychological distress determines health-care seeking. Dietary factors, in particular, chili consumption and the high prevalence of lactose malabsorption, were perceived to be aggravating factors, but the evidence was weak. CONCLUSIONS: This detailed compilation of studies from different parts of Asia, draws attention to Asian patients' experiences of IBS.

24 Editorial Patient Engagement and Multidisciplinary Involvement Has an Impact on Clinical Guideline Development and Decisions: A Comparison of Two Irritable Bowel Syndrome Guidelines Using the Same Data. 2019

Moayyedi, Paul / Marsiglio, Megan / Andrews, Christopher N / Graff, Lesley A / Korownyk, Christina / Kvern, Brent / Lazarescu, Adriana / Liu, Louis / MacQueen, Glenda / Paterson, William G / Sidani, Sacha / Vanner, Stephen J / Sinclair, Paul / Marshall, Lesley / Fernandes, Aida. ·Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · IMAGINE Network Patient Research Partner, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · GI Diseases Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. · Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal Hopital St-Luc, Division of Gastroenterology, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · GI Diseases Research Unit, Kingston General Hospital, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. · Canadian Association of Gastroenterology, Oakville, Ontario, Canada. ·J Can Assoc Gastroenterol · Pubmed #31294725.

ABSTRACT: Background and Aim: The value of a multidisciplinary group and patient engagement in guideline groups is uncertain. We compared the recommendations of two guidelines that used the same data during the same time frame but with different participants to obtain a "real world" perspective on influence of the composition of guideline groups. Methods: The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG) and the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) recently updated their clinical practice guidelines for the management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Both the CAG and ACG used the same methodology and methodologist and were presented with the same data for interpretation. The ACG group consisted of predominantly academic gastroenterologists, while the CAG group also included general practitioners, a psychiatrist, a psychologist and a patient representative. The CAG group were also asked what components of the group were valuable. Results: There were 14 statements with the same or similar recommendations. There were 10 statements in the CAG guideline not addressed by the ACG guideline and five recommendations where the opposite was the case. There was one statement that the two groups both addressed, but each group came to different conclusions. CAG members were in 100% agreement that involving a patient and having a multidisciplinary team was valuable and may have played a role in these differing interpretations of the same data in an IBS guideline. Conclusions: There has been little uptake of patient involvement and multidisciplinary teams in guideline groups. However, this study provides a unique example of added benefit through broader group representation.

25 Editorial The Role for Food Allergies in the Pathogenesis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Understanding Mechanisms of Intestinal Mucosal Responses Against Food Antigens. 2019

Choung, Rok Seon / Murray, Joseph A. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: murray.joseph@mayo.edu. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #31145873.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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