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Irritable Bowel Syndrome: HELP
Articles by Maria Ines Pintos-Sanchez
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, M. I. Pintos-Sanchez wrote the following 4 articles about Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Prevalence of organic disease at colonoscopy in patients with symptoms compatible with irritable bowel syndrome: cross-sectional survey. 2015

Patel, Purav / Bercik, Premysl / Morgan, David G / Bolino, Carolina / Pintos-Sanchez, Maria Ines / Moayyedi, Paul / Ford, Alexander C. ·Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, St. James's University Hospital , Leeds , UK. ·Scand J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25636675.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Guidelines for the management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) encourage a positive diagnosis, but some evidence suggests organic disease may be missed unless investigations are performed. We examined yield of colonoscopy in a cohort of secondary care patients meeting criteria for IBS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Demographic data, symptoms and findings at colonoscopy were recorded prospectively in consecutive, unselected adults with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms compatible with IBS according to the Rome III criteria. Prevalence of organic GI disease was compared between those meeting criteria for IBS, according to the presence or absence of co-existent alarm features, and by IBS subtype. RESULTS: A total of 559 patients met Rome III criteria for IBS, of whom 423 reported ≥1 alarm feature and 136 none. There was a significantly higher prevalence of organic GI disease among those reporting alarm features (117 [27.7%]), compared with those without (21 [15.4%]) (p = 0.002). In the latter group of 136 patients, Crohn's disease was the commonest finding (10 [7.4%] subjects), followed by coeliac disease (4 [2.9%] subjects), and microscopic colitis (3 [2.2%] subjects). Regardless of presence or absence of alarm features, patients with constipation-predominant IBS were less likely to exhibit organic GI disease than those with diarrhea-predominant or mixed IBS (12.7% vs. 32.1% and 23.8%, p = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: One in six patients with symptoms compatible with IBS without alarm features in this selected group exhibited organic GI disease following investigation. Assessment of alarm features in a comprehensive history is vital to reduce diagnostic uncertainty that can surround IBS.

2 Article Irritable bowel syndrome is significantly associated with somatisation in 840 patients, which may drive bloating. 2015

Patel, P / Bercik, P / Morgan, D G / Bolino, C / Pintos-Sanchez, M I / Moayyedi, P / Ford, A C. ·Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK; Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #25586008.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psychological factors may influence persistence and perceived severity of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Literature suggests that somatisation is associated with IBS. However, the relationship between IBS subtype, symptoms of IBS and somatisation is unclear. AIM: To examine this issue in a large cohort of secondary care patients. METHODS: Demographic and gastrointestinal (GI) symptom data were collected from 4224 adult patients via the Rome III questionnaire. Somatisation data were collected using the patient health questionnaire-12. Mean somatisation score and number of somatic symptoms were compared between IBS patients and controls with minimal GI symptoms, and between IBS subtypes using analysis of variance. Effect of level of somatisation on symptom frequency was compared according to IBS subtype using a χ(2) test. RESULTS: 840 patients met Rome III criteria for IBS, controls were 2137 patients with GI symptoms without IBS. Mean somatisation scores and number of somatic symptoms were higher in IBS vs. controls (P < 0.001), and in mixed stool pattern IBS (IBS-M), vs. IBS with constipation (IBS-C) or diarrhoea (IBS-D) (P < 0.001). High levels of somatisation were more prevalent in IBS-M (31.7%) vs. IBS-C (22.5%) or IBS-D (20.8%) (P = 0.003). For all IBS subtypes, high levels of somatisation were associated with a greater frequency of bloating or abdominal distension prior to logistic regression. CONCLUSIONS: IBS is strongly associated with higher levels of somatisation, particularly IBS-M. Bloating may be associated with higher levels of somatisation, perhaps explaining why it can be difficult to treat.

3 Article Characteristics of functional bowel disorder patients: a cross-sectional survey using the Rome III criteria. 2014

Ford, A C / Bercik, P / Morgan, D G / Bolino, C / Pintos-Sanchez, M I / Moayyedi, P. ·Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK; Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #24308816.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that, despite attempts to classify them separately, functional bowel disorders are not distinct entities and that such divisions are artificial. AIM: To examine this issue in a large cohort of secondary care patients. METHODS: Consecutive, unselected adults with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms attending out-patient clinics at two hospitals in Hamilton, Ontario were recruited. Demographic data, symptoms and presence of anxiety, depression or somatisation were collected prospectively. We used validated questionnaires, including the Rome III questionnaire, with patients categorised as having irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional diarrhoea or chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC). We compared data between these disorders, and measured degree of overlap between them by suspending their mutual exclusivity. RESULTS: Of 3656 patients providing complete lower GI symptom data, 1551 (42.4%) met criteria for a functional bowel disorder. Diarrhoea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) patients were younger, and more were female, met criteria for anxiety, and reported somatisation-type behaviour, compared with functional diarrhoea. Only loose, mushy or watery stools were more common in functional diarrhoea. When mutual exclusivity was suspended, overlap occurred in 27.6%. Constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C) patients were younger, and more were female, had never married, reported anxiety type symptoms and exhibited somatisation-type behaviour. One in five CIC patients reported abdominal pain or discomfort. All constipation symptoms were more common in IBS-C. When the mutual exclusivity was suspended, overlap occurred in 18.1%. CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences in demographics between individuals with functional bowel disorders. Despite this, the Rome III classification system falls short of describing unique entities.

4 Article Validation of the Rome III criteria for the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome in secondary care. 2013

Ford, Alexander C / Bercik, Premysl / Morgan, David G / Bolino, Carolina / Pintos-Sanchez, Maria Ines / Moayyedi, Paul. ·Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK; Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. Electronic address: alexf12399@yahoo.com. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #23994201.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: There are few validation studies of existing diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We conducted a validation study of the Rome and Manning criteria in secondary care. METHODS: We collected complete symptom, colonoscopy, and histology data from 1848 consecutive adult patients with gastrointestinal symptoms at 2 hospitals in Hamilton, Ontario; the subjects then underwent colonoscopy. Assessors were blinded to symptom status. Individuals with normal colonoscopy and histopathology results, and no evidence of celiac disease, were classified as having no organic gastrointestinal disease. The reference standard used to define the presence of true IBS was lower abdominal pain or discomfort in association with a change in bowel habit and no organic gastrointestinal disease. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios, with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated for each diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: In identifying patients with IBS, sensitivities of the criteria ranged from 61.9% (Manning) to 95.8% (Rome I), and specificities from 70.6% (Rome I) to 81.8% (Manning). Positive likelihood ratios ranged from 3.19 (Rome II) to 3.39 (Manning), and negative likelihood ratios from 0.06 (Rome I) to 0.47 (Manning). The level of agreement between diagnostic criteria was greatest for Rome I and Rome II (κ = 0.95), and lowest for Manning and Rome III (κ = 0.59). CONCLUSIONS: Existing diagnostic criteria perform modestly in distinguishing IBS from organic disease. There appears to be little difference in terms of accuracy. More accurate ways of diagnosing IBS, avoiding the need for investigation, are required.