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Irritable Bowel Syndrome: HELP
Articles by Marjorie M. Walker
Based on 17 articles published since 2010
(Why 17 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. Walker wrote the following 17 articles about Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Emerging evidence that irritable bowel syndrome & functional dyspepsia are microbial diseases. 2019

Talley, Nicholas J / Walker, Marjorie M. ·Pro Vice-Chancellor, Global Research & Laureate Professor, Research & Innovation Division, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. · Anatomical Pathology, School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. ·Indian J Med Res · Pubmed #31411166.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Editorial: the overlap of atopy and functional gastrointestinal disorders in primary care--authors' reply. 2014

Jones, M P / Walker, M M / Ford, A C / Talley, N J. ·Psychology Department, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW, USA. mike.jones@mq.edu.au. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #25303378.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review The Alignment of Dietary Intake and Symptom-Reporting Capture Periods in Studies Assessing Associations between Food and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorder Symptoms: A Systematic Review. 2019

Duncanson, Kerith / Burrows, Tracy / Keely, Simon / Potter, Michael / Das, Gayatri / Walker, Marjorie / Talley, Nicholas J. ·School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. kerith.duncanson@newcastle.edu.au. · Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. kerith.duncanson@newcastle.edu.au. · Priority Research Centre, Digestive Health and Neurogastroenterology, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. kerith.duncanson@newcastle.edu.au. · School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. tracy.burrows@newcastle.edu.au. · Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. tracy.burrows@newcastle.edu.au. · Priority Research Centre, Digestive Health and Neurogastroenterology, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. simon.keely@newcastle.edu.au. · School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. simon.keely@newcastle.edu.au. · Priority Research Centre, Digestive Health and Neurogastroenterology, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. michael.potter@newcastle.edu.au. · Priority Research Centre, Digestive Health and Neurogastroenterology, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. gayatri.das@uon.edu.au. · Priority Research Centre, Digestive Health and Neurogastroenterology, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. marjorie.walker@newcastle.edu.au. · School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. marjorie.walker@newcastle.edu.au. · Priority Research Centre, Digestive Health and Neurogastroenterology, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. nicholas.talley@newcastle.edu.au. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #31661839.

ABSTRACT: Food ingestion is heavily implicated in inducing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional dyspepsia (FD), which affect over one-third of adults in developed countries. The primary aim of this paper was to assess the alignment of dietary assessment and symptom-reporting capture periods in diet-related studies on IBS or FD in adults. Secondary aims were to compare the degree of alignment, validity of symptom-reporting tools and reported significant associations between food ingestion and symptoms. A five-database systematic literature search resulted in 40 included studies, from which data were extracted and collated. The food/diet and symptom capture periods matched exactly in 60% (

4 Review What's in a name? 'Non-coeliac gluten or wheat sensitivity': controversies and mechanisms related to wheat and gluten causing gastrointestinal symptoms or disease. 2018

Potter, Michael D E / Walker, Marjorie M / Keely, Simon / Talley, Nicholas J. ·Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, New Lambton Heights, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. ·Gut · Pubmed #30061187.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Non-coeliac gluten or wheat sensitivity: emerging disease or misdiagnosis? 2017

Potter, Michael DE / Walker, Marjorie M / Talley, Nicholas J. ·University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW Michael.Potter@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. · University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #28987135.

ABSTRACT: Non-coeliac gluten or wheat sensitivity (NCG/WS) is a condition characterised by adverse gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms associated with the ingestion of gluten- or wheat-containing foods, in the absence of coeliac disease or wheat allergy. Up to one in 100 people in Australia may have coeliac disease but many more report adverse gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms after eating wheat products. In the absence of validated biomarkers, a diagnosis of NCG/WS can only be made by a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dietary crossover challenge with gluten, which is difficult to apply in clinical practice. Of people self-reporting gluten or wheat sensitivity, only a small proportion (16%) will have reproducible symptoms after a blinded gluten challenge of gluten versus placebo in a crossover dietary trial and fulfil the current consensus criteria for a diagnosis of NCG/WS. A wide range of symptoms are associated with NCG/WS, including gastrointestinal, neurological, psychiatric, rheumatological and dermatological complaints. The pathogenesis of NCG/WS is not well understood, but the innate immune system has been implicated, and there is overlap with coeliac disease and the functional gastrointestinal disorders (irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia). Identification of NCG/WS is important as gluten-free diets carry risks, are socially restricting and are costlier than regular diets.

6 Review Immune dysregulation in the functional gastrointestinal disorders. 2015

Keely, Simon / Walker, Marjorie M / Marks, Ellen / Talley, Nicholas J. ·School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy, University of Newcastle & Vaccine and Asthma (VIVA) Program, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. · School of Medicine & Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. ·Eur J Clin Invest · Pubmed #26444549.

ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal conditions may be broadly classified into two: organic and functional disease, with functional disorders accounting for the majority of patients with chronic gastrointestinal symptoms. Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) present with no obvious pathology or well-accepted biochemical mechanism and, as such, treatment strategies are limited and focus on symptoms rather than cure. Irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia are the most widely recognised FGIDs, and there is a growing body of evidence to suggest an underlying inflammatory phenotype in subsets with these conditions. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of immune involvement in FGIDs and the commonalities between the different manifestations of FGIDs and propose a new hypothesis, potentially defining an underlying immunopathological basis of these conditions.

7 Review Therapeutic strategies for functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome based on pathophysiology. 2015

Talley, Nicholas J / Holtmann, Gerald / Walker, Marjorie M. ·Global Research, University of Newcastle, HMRI Building, Room 3419, Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton, NSW, 2305, Australia, nicholas.talley@newcastle.edu.au. ·J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25917563.

ABSTRACT: Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common and distressing. They are so named because a defined pathophysiology in terms of structural or biochemical pathways is lacking. Traditionally FGIDs have been conceptualized as brain-gut disorders, with subgroups of patients demonstrating visceral hypersensitivity and motility abnormalities as well as psychological distress. However, it is becoming apparent that there are certain structural or biochemical gut alterations among subsets with the common FGIDs, most notably functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). For example, a sodium channel mutation has been identified in IBS that may account for 2 % of cases, and subtle intestinal inflammation has been observed in both IBS and FD. Other research has implicated early life events and stress, autoimmune disorders and atopy and infections, the gut microbiome and disordered mucosal immune activation in patients with IBS or FD. Understanding the origin of symptoms in FGIDs will allow therapy to be targeted at the pathophysiological changes, not at merely alleviating symptoms, and holds hope for eventual cure in some cases. For example, there are promising developments in manipulating the microbiome through diet, prebiotics and antibiotics in IBS, and testing and treating patients for Helicobacter pylori infection remains a mainstay of therapy in patients with dyspepsia and this infection. Locally acting drugs such as linaclotide have been an advance in treating the symptoms of constipation-predominant IBS, but do not alter the natural history of the disease. A role for a holistic approach to patients with FGIDs is warranted, as brain-to-gut and gut-to-brain pathways appear to be activated.

8 Article Incidence and prevalence of self-reported non-coeliac wheat sensitivity and gluten avoidance in Australia. 2020

Potter, Michael DE / Jones, Michael P / Walker, Marjorie M / Koloski, Natasha A / Keely, Simon / Holtmann, Gerald / Talley Ac, Nicholas J. ·University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW. · John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW. · Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD. · Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #31909482.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of self-reported non-coeliac wheat sensitivity (SR-NCWS) and factors associated with its onset and resolution; to describe the prevalence of factors associated with gluten avoidance. DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study; analysis of responses to self-administered validated questionnaires (Digestive Health and Wellbeing surveys, 2015 and 2018). SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: Subset of an adult population sample randomly selected in 2015 from the electoral rolls for the Newcastle and Gosford regions of New South Wales. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of SR-NCWS (2015, 2018) and incidence and resolution of SR-NCWS, each by demographic and medical factors; prevalence of gluten avoidance and reasons for gluten avoidance (2018). RESULTS: 1322 of 2185 eligible participants completed the 2018 survey (response rate, 60.5%). The prevalence of SR-NCWS was similar in 2015 (13.8%; 95% CI, 12.0-15.8%) and 2018 (13.9%; 95% CI, 12.1-15.9%); 69 of 1301 respondents (5.3%) reported developing new onset (incident) SR-NCWS between 2015 and 2018 (incidence, 1.8% per year). Incident SR-NCWS was significantly associated with a diagnosis of functional dyspepsia, and negatively associated with being male or older. Gluten avoidance was reported in 2018 by 24.2% of respondents (20.5% partial, 3.8% complete avoidance); general health was the most frequent reason for avoidance (168 of 316 avoiders, 53%). All 13 participants with coeliac disease, 56 of 138 with irritable bowel syndrome (41%), and 69 of 237 with functional dyspepsia (29%) avoided dietary gluten. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of SR-NCWS was similar in 2015 and 2018. Baseline (2015) and incident SR-NCWS (2018) were each associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. The number of people avoiding dietary gluten exceeds that of people with coeliac disease or SR-NCWS, and general health considerations and abdominal symptoms are the most frequently reported reasons for avoidance.

9 Article Immune Activation in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. 2019

Burns, Grace / Pryor, Jennifer / Holtmann, Gerald / Walker, Marjorie M / Talley, Nicholas J / Keely, Simon. ·Ms Burns is a PhD graduate student, Ms Pryor is an undergraduate research student. · Dr Walker is a professor of anatomical pathology. · Dr Talley is a laureate professor. · Dr Keely is an associate professor in the Priority Research Centre for Digestive Health and Neurogastroenterology in the Faculty of Health and Medicine at the University of Newcastle in Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia, as well as in the Hunter Medical Research Institute in New Lambton Heights, New South Wales, Australia. · Dr Holtmann is director of gastroenterology and hepatology at the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia and a professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Queensland in Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y) · Pubmed #31802978.

ABSTRACT: There is growing appreciation that functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome are heterogeneous conditions linked by subtle inflammation within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The literature suggests that while the symptoms of these diseases may manifest with similar clinical presentations, there are significant differences in triggers and disease severity among patients classified into the same subtype. It is hypothesized that the subtle inflammation observed in these patients is related to an imbalance in GI homeostasis. Disruption of the delicate homeostatic balance within the GI tract can result from any number or combination of factors, including dysbiosis, loss of barrier integrity, genetic predisposition, or immune responses to dietary or luminal antigens. This article discusses the interplay between the immune system, microbiota, and luminal environment in FGIDs. In addition, the article proposes emerging immune pathways, including those involving T-helper type 17 response and innate lymphoid cells, as potential regulators of the subtle inflammation characteristic of FGIDs that warrant investigation in future studies.

10 Article Evidence for Local and Systemic Immune Activation in Functional Dyspepsia and the Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review. 2019

Burns, Grace / Carroll, Georgia / Mathe, Andrea / Horvat, Jay / Foster, Paul / Walker, Marjorie M / Talley, Nicholas J / Keely, Simon. ·School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. · Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. · Priority Research Centre for Digestive Health and Neurogastroenterology, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. · School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #30839392.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Subtle histopathologic features such as eosinophilia and increased mast cells have been observed in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), including functional dyspepsia (FD) and the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms that drive recruitment of these cells to the gastrointestinal tract remain unexplained, largely due to the heterogeneity in phenotypes among patients diagnosed with such conditions. We aimed to systematically review the literature and collate the evidence for immune activation in FD and IBS, and where possible, detail the nature of activation. METHODS: Seven literature databases were searched using the keywords: 'functional gastrointestinal disorder', FGID, 'functional dyspepsia', 'non-ulcer dyspepsia', 'idiopathic dyspepsia', 'irritable bowel syndrome', IBS and 'immun*'. RESULTS: Fifty-one papers reporting discordant immune features met the selection criteria for this review. Changes in lymphocyte populations, including B and T lymphocyte numbers and activation status were reported in IBS and FD, in conjunction with duodenal eosinophilia in FD and increased colonic mast cells in IBS. Increases in circulating α4+β7+ gut-homing T cells appear to be linked to the pathophysiology of both FD and IBS. Studies in the area are complicated by poor phenotyping of patients into subgroups and the subtle nature of the immune activity involved in FD and IBS. CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in proportions of gut-homing T lymphocytes in both FD and IBS indicate that a loss of mucosal homeostasis may drive the symptoms of FD and IBS. There is indirect evidence that Th17 responses may play a role in FGIDs, however the evidence for a Th2 immune phenotype in FD and IBS is limited. Although immune involvement is evident, large, well-characterised patient cohorts are required to elucidate the immune mechanisms driving the development of FGIDs.

11 Article Wheat Intolerance and Chronic Gastrointestinal Symptoms in an Australian Population-based Study: Association Between Wheat Sensitivity, Celiac Disease and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. 2018

Potter, Michael D E / Walker, Marjorie M / Jones, Michael P / Koloski, Natasha A / Keely, Simon / Talley, Nicholas J. ·Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle HMRI Building, Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, NSW, Australia. Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Department of Gastroenterology, Princess Alexandria Hospital, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia. School of Medicine, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29915405.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Wheat avoidance in the absence of celiac disease (CD) is common but occurrence of concurrent functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in this group is uncertain. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of self-reported wheat or gluten sensitivity and doctor diagnosed CD in an Australian population, define the associated gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and FGIDs, and determine the relationship between self-reported wheat sensitivity, demographic and medical factors. METHODS: A total of 3542 people randomly selected from the Australian population returned a mail survey which contained questions on wheat avoidance, GI symptoms, demographic, medical, and lifestyle factors. We defined self-reported wheat sensitivity as people who reported gastrointestinal symptoms on ingestion of wheat based foods, but did not suffer from celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease or colorectal cancer. Functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were diagnosed by Rome III criteria. CD status was self-reported. RESULTS: The prevalence of self-reported wheat sensitivity in this cohort was 14.9% (95% CI 13.7-16.2). The prevalence of CD was 1.2% (95%CI 0.8-1.6). Doctor diagnosed CD was significantly associated with a diagnosis of FD (OR 3.35, 95%CI 1.72-6.52) and IBS (OR 2.28, 95%CI 1.08-4.81). Those with self-reported wheat sensitivity were more likely to report multiple abdominal symptoms (of the 18 assessed) than those without (3.9 symptoms with self-reported wheat sensitivity vs. 1.6 without, p = 0.0001). In a multivariate analysis, self-reported wheat sensitivity was independently associated with IBS (OR 3.55, 95%CI 2.71-4.65) and FD (1.48, 95%CI 1.13-1.94). CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported wheat sensitivity is common, with a prevalence of 14.9% in this cohort. There is a strong association between both celiac disease and self-reported wheat sensitivity, and chronic gastrointestinal symptoms, as well as a diagnosis of FD and IBS.

12 Article Identification of early environmental risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. 2015

Koloski, N A / Jones, M / Weltman, M / Kalantar, J / Bone, C / Gowryshankar, A / Walker, M M / Talley, N J. ·Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. · Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, NSW, Australia. ·Neurogastroenterol Motil · Pubmed #26202154.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of childhood environment including exposure to infection via siblings and pets in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and dyspepsia is relatively unknown. We assessed proxy measures of microbial exposure in early childhood to assess if these are associated with IBS and functional dyspepsia in later life. METHODS: Participants (n = 767, response rate = 53%) were a random population sample from Sydney, Australia who previously responded to a validated survey. IBS and functional dyspepsia were defined using Rome III criteria. Early environmental risk factors assessed included type of birth delivery, premature birth, breastfeeding, bedroom sharing, and pet exposure (the latter two then combined as early hygiene factors) up to 5 years of age. Post infectious IBS (PI-IBS) was assessed by development of IBS following gastroenteritis. KEY RESULTS: In this sample, in adult life 17% developed IBS (of which 20% had PI-IBS) and 12% functional dyspepsia. Development of IBS was associated with childhood factors-a shorter duration of breastfeeding (odds ratios [OR] = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.78-0.97, p = 0.01), sharing a bedroom (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.73-3.08, p = 0.01), exposure to a herbivore pet (OR = 1.65 (1.10, 2.48), p = 0.02), and hygiene factors (OR = 4.39; 95% CI: 1.89-10.21, p = 0.001). The sole factor associated with functional dyspepsia was exposure to a herbivore pet (1.79; 95% CI: 1.19-2.87, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: Childhood environment factors, particularly bedroom sharing and pet exposure, combined with subsequent risk of microbial exposure are a risk factor for IBS in later life. These associations however need confirmation to rule out any risk of a type I error.

13 Article Colonic spirochetosis is associated with colonic eosinophilia and irritable bowel syndrome in a general population in Sweden. 2015

Walker, Marjorie M / Talley, Nicholas J / Inganäs, Linn / Engstrand, Lars / Jones, Michael P / Nyhlin, Henry / Agréus, Lars / Kjellstrom, Lars / Öst, Åke / Andreasson, Anna. ·Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, 2308 NSW, Australia. Electronic address: marjorie.walker@newcastle.edu.au. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, 2308 NSW, Australia. · Center of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-141 83 Huddinge Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-141 83 Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-141 83 Stockholm, Sweden. · Psychology Department, Macquarie University, North Ryde, 2109 NSW, Australia. · Internal Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, SE-141 83 Huddinge, Sweden. · Center of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-141 83 Huddinge Stockholm, Sweden. · Internal Medicine, Aleris Sabbatsbergs Hospital, SE-113 24 Stockholm, Sweden. · Pathology, Aleris Medilab, SE-183 53 Täby, Sweden. · Center of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-141 83 Huddinge Stockholm, Sweden; Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. ·Hum Pathol · Pubmed #25540866.

ABSTRACT: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder defined by symptoms in the absence of overt pathology. Colonic spirochetosis (CS), defined by histologic observation of spirochetal strains of Brachyspira in colonic biopsies, is uncommon and considered of doubtful significance. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CS in the general population, identify subtle colon pathologies, and evaluate a link with symptoms of IBS. Colonoscopy was performed in 745 subjects (aged 19-70 years, mean age 51 years, 43% male) with biopsies (ileum and 4 colonic sites) from a random population sample, Stockholm, Sweden, who completed a validated questionnaire of gastrointestinal symptoms; IBS was identified by Rome III criteria. CS was identified by histology and immunohistochemistry. In a general population, 17 individuals (2.28%; 95% confidence interval, 1.2%-3.5%) were diagnosed as having CS by histology; 6 (35%) had IBS. CS was always present in the sigmoid colon, but only 14 rectal biopsies. Eosinophils were increased in colon biopsies in CS cases versus controls, in the transverse (P = .02), sigmoid colon (P = .001), and rectum (P = .0005) with subepithelial eosinophil clusters (P = .053). Lymphoid follicles (at any site) were present in 13 CS (P = .0003). There was a 3-fold increased risk of IBS in CS (odds ratio, 3.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-10.11; P = .015). Polyps and diverticular disease were similar in CS cases and controls. The prevalence of CS in a general population is 2% and associated with nonconstipating IBS. Colonic eosinophilia with lymphoid follicles may signify the presence of CS.

14 Article Increased prevalence of autoimmune diseases in functional gastrointestinal disorders: case-control study of 23471 primary care patients. 2014

Ford, A C / Talley, N J / Walker, M M / Jones, M P. ·Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK; Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #25131320.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that impaired mucosal defence mechanisms are implicated in the pathogenesis of the functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), allowing inappropriate immune activation. AIM: To test the hypothesis that an excess of autoimmune disorders among sufferers, using a large primary care database to examine this. METHODS: Cases were diagnosed with FGIDs - irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD), chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC), and multiple FGIDs. Controls were those without FGIDs. Prevalence of autoimmune disorders was compared between cases and controls using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: We included 23,471 patients (mean age 51.4 years, 66.1% female). Prevalence of autoimmune disorders was greater among all FGIDs, compared with controls without. In those with FD (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.12-1.63), CIC (OR 1.75; 95% CI 1.11-2.75), or multiple FGIDs (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.25-1.77) this was statistically significant after controlling for age and gender. Rheumatological autoimmune disorders were significantly more frequent in those with FD (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.15-1.80), CIC (OR 1.84; 95% CI 1.08-3.13), or multiple FGIDs (OR 1.53; 95% CI 1.24-1.88), after controlling for age and gender. However, endocrine autoimmune disorders were no more frequent in those with FGIDs, after controlling for age and gender. CONCLUSIONS: In a large sample of primary care patients, there was a significantly higher prevalence of autoimmune disorders among those with FD, CIC, or multiple FGIDs not explained by differences in age or gender. We were unable to control for concomitant drug use, which may partly explain this association.

15 Article The overlap of atopy and functional gastrointestinal disorders among 23,471 patients in primary care. 2014

Jones, M P / Walker, M M / Ford, A C / Talley, N J. ·Psychology Department, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW, USA. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #24961872.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Activation of the immune system has been demonstrated in atopy and functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Previous data from our group have suggested a connection between immune dysregulation, FGIDs and mood disorders. AIM: To investigate if these data translate to clinical practice and examine connections from the perspective of FGIDs to determine whether atopy and FGIDs are connected via mood disorders. METHODS: Evidence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD) and constipation was sought from the medical records of 30,000 primary care records over a minimum 5 year period. The same records yielded diagnoses of four atopic conditions (asthma, eczema, allergic rhinitis/hay fever and conjunctivitis). RESULTS: Atopic conditions were found in excess among all FGID groups considered when compared with controls. In the groups with IBS alone (OR = 1.43, 1.29-1.58), FD alone (OR = 1.41, 1.26-1.58) and those with multiple FGIDs (OR = 1.92, 1.75-2.12) there was elevated prevalence of asthma compared with controls without a FGID. Across disorders the excess was generally highest among patients diagnosed with multiple FGIDs (rhinitis/hay fever OR = 3.74, 3.32-4.20; conjunctivitis OR = 3.00, 2.49-3.62) and was only partly explained by a common association between both FGIDs and atopic conditions with mood disorders, although not for every atopic/FGID combination (rhinitis/hay fever OR = 2.60, 2.29-2.96, conjunctivitis OR = 2.34, 1.90-2.87). CONCLUSIONS: Irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia and constipation share an association with atopy that is only partly explained via a common connection with mood disorders. These data have important implications for understanding both the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders and development of new treatments.

16 Minor Zonulin in serum as a biomarker fails to identify the IBS, functional dyspepsia and non-coeliac wheat sensitivity. 2019

Talley, Nicholas J / Holtmann, Gerald J / Jones, Michael / Koloski, Natasha A / Walker, Marjorie M / Burns, Grace / Potter, Michael D E / Shah, Ayesha / Keely, Simon. ·Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Nicholas.Talley@newcastle.edu.au. · School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Ryde, New South Wales, Australia. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · Anatomical Pathology, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · School of Biomedical Science and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Gastrointestinal Research Group, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. ·Gut · Pubmed #31563879.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Minor Unique pathology of colonic spirochaetosis characterised by mucosal eosinophilia is linked to diarrhoea and IBS. 2017

Goodsall, Thomas M / Talley, Nicholas J / Rassam, Loui / Wood, Nicola K / Zala, Alkesh / Jones, Mike / Walker, Marjorie M. ·Medical and Interventional Services, John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Pathology North-Hunter, John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Medicine, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Ryde, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. ·Gut · Pubmed #27473415.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --