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Irritable Bowel Syndrome: HELP
Articles from Kansas
Based on 8 articles published since 2008
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These are the 8 published articles about Irritable Bowel Syndrome that originated from Kansas during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Ion channels, ion channel receptors, and visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome. 2016

Fuentes, I M / Christianson, J A. ·Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. · Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. jchristianson@kumc.edu. ·Neurogastroenterol Motil · Pubmed #27781369.

ABSTRACT: Ion channels are expressed throughout the gastrointestinal system and regulate nearly every aspect of digestion, including fluid secretion and absorption, motility, and visceral sensitivity. It is therefore not surprising that in the setting of functional bowel disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), ion channels are often altered in terms of expression level and function and are a target of pharmacological intervention. This is particularly true of their role in driving abdominal pain through visceral hypersensitivity (VH), which is the main reason IBS patients seek medical care. In the study by Scanzi et al., in the current issue of this journal, they provide evidence that the T-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca

2 Article Classification of pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders related to abdominal pain using Rome III vs. Rome IV criterions. 2018

Edwards, Trent / Friesen, Craig / Schurman, Jennifer V. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA. cfriesen@cmh.edu. · Division of Developmental and Behavioral Sciences, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA. ·BMC Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29549882.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The primary purpose of this study was to compare Rome III and IV evaluation criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD), and an overlap syndrome consisting of both IBS and FD by assessing the frequency of each diagnosis in a population of children with chronic abdominal pain. Frequencies of Rome IV FD subtypes of postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) were determined and FD/IBS overlap symptom associations were also assessed. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional retrospective chart review of 106 pediatric patients who had completed standardized medical histories as part of their evaluation for chronic abdominal pain. The patients ranged from eight to 17 years of age and reported having abdominal pain at least weekly for 8 weeks. Patients whose evaluation revealed gastrointestinal disease were excluded. The patients' diagnoses were determined by a single pediatric gastroenterologist utilizing the specific criteria for Rome III and IV, respectively. RESULTS: Patients were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with FD (84.9% vs. 52.8%), IBS (69.8% vs. 34%), and FD/IBS overlap (58.5% vs. 17.9%) by Rome IV criteria, as compared to Rome III criteria. With regard to Rome IV FD subtypes, 81.1% fulfilled criteria for PDS, 11.1% fulfilled criteria for EPS, 6.7% fulfilled criteria for both, and 1.1% did not fulfill criteria for either. Finally, we found an increased frequency of diarrhea and pain with eating in the overlap group compared to the non-overlap group of Rome III, while only an increased frequency of diarrhea was found in the overlap group compared to the non-overlap group of Rome IV. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that utilizing Rome IV criteria, as compared to Rome III, results in an increase in the diagnosis of FD, a two-fold increase in the diagnosis of IBS, and a three-fold increase in the diagnosis of FD/IBS overlap. Rome IV criteria appears to result in greater heterogeneity within diagnostic categories. It is important to determine whether Rome IV diagnoses are predictive of treatment response, and if so, whether assessing symptom variability within a diagnosis will enhance the ability to select patients for a particular treatment.

3 Article Examination of competing diagnostic models of functional gastrointestinal disorders related to pain in children. 2017

Schurman, J V / Karazsia, B T / Friesen, C A. ·Division of Developmental and Behavioral Sciences, Children's Mercy Kansas City, Kansas, MO, 64108, USA. · Department of Psychology, 930 College Mall, The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH, 44691, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children's Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA. ·Neurogastroenterol Motil · Pubmed #28656703.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There have been no empirical validations of the Rome III or Rome IV criteria in children. The aim of the current study was to examine whether symptoms naturally occur in a pattern consistent with Rome III and/or Rome IV pediatric criteria for functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 250 children, ages 8-17 years, presenting to an abdominal pain clinic with pain of at least 8 weeks duration. We evaluated patterns of gastrointestinal (GI) and non-gastrointestinal (non-GI) symptoms which had been collected in a standardized fashion as part of routine clinical care. Confirmatory factor analyses were used to compare pre-existing models of symptoms clusters, namely Rome III and Rome IV criteria for IBS and FD in children and adolescents. Factor intercorrelations also were examined to determine whether IBS symptoms and non-GI somatic complaints correlate uniquely with FD symptom clusters. KEY RESULTS: Both models demonstrated good fit with observed data [3-factor: χ CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: GI symptoms in children presenting for initial evaluation of chronic functional abdominal pain occur in a pattern consistent with Rome III and IV pediatric criteria. Rome III offers a more parsimonious model. The presence of FD symptoms is strongly, and uniquely, associated with non-GI symptoms.

4 Article Water Load Test in Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain or Obesity Compared with Nonobese Controls. 2017

Arrouk, Rami / Karpinski, Aryn / Lavenbarg, Teri / Belmont, John / McCallum, Richard W / Hyman, Paul. ·From the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, the College of Education, Health, and Human Services, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, and the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso. ·South Med J · Pubmed #28257540.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Satiety is the perception of satisfied fullness and represents a summation of neural and hormonal influences. Satiety can be assessed by drink tests, including water load. The objective of our study was to confirm the difference in water load volume between nonobese control children and children with functional dyspepsia (FD), children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and obese children. METHODS: A total of 158 children ages 6 to 13 years participated in the study. There were 43 children with FD, 25 with IBS, 44 obese children, and 46 nonobese age-matched control children. Subjects drank as much water as possible in 3 minutes or until their stomachs felt full. RESULTS: Children in the FD and IBS groups drank less water than did the nonobese controls; the obese children drank more water than did the nonobese controls. The water load test demonstrated high specificity but poor sensitivity in predicting children with FD. CONCLUSIONS: A water load test offers a simple, noninvasive research tool to measure satiety. Children with chronic abdominal pain drank less than nonobese control children; however, the water load test did not discriminate between FD and IBS. Obese children drank more water than the other groups, suggesting the possibility of an underlying abnormality in the perception of satiety.

5 Article Prevalence of overlap syndromes and symptoms in pediatric functional dyspepsia. 2016

Friesen, Craig A / Rosen, John M / Schurman, Jennifer V. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA. cfriesen@cmh.edu. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA. · Division of Developmental and Behavioral Sciences, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA. ·BMC Gastroenterol · Pubmed #27457769.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The purpose was to evaluate the overlap frequency of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and overactive bladder syndrome (OBS), as well as other gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms, in functional dyspepsia (FD). Additionally, we sought to determine whether adult Rome III FD subtypes were uniquely related to overlap syndromes or symptoms. METHODS: The study was a retrospective review of 100 consecutive pediatric patients, age 8-17 years, diagnosed with FD. All had completed a standardized medical history including gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms as well as specific symptoms related to GERD and OBS. The frequency of overlap with IBS, GERD, and OBS were determined for the whole group and for those fulfilling adult FD subtype criteria. Individual symptoms were also compared by FD subtype. RESULTS: Overlap IBS was present in 33 % of the FD patients. At least one GERD symptom was present in 74 % of patients with 41 % reporting heartburn. At least one OBS symptom was present in 44 % of patients with 29 % reporting urinary urgency. Other than pain, the most common reported gastrointestinal symptom was nausea (86 %). Systemic symptoms were common. Overlap syndromes/symptoms did not vary by FD subtype. Postprandial distress syndrome was associated with pain with eating, weight loss, and waking at night to have a stool. CONCLUSIONS: FD is a heterogeneous condition in children and adolescents with significant variability in the presence of gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal symptoms and overlap syndromes. Varying symptom profiles need to be accounted for and analyzed in studies involving subjects with FD.

6 Article Systemic exposure to menthol following administration of peppermint oil to paediatric patients. 2015

Kearns, Gregory L / Chumpitazi, Bruno Pedro / Abdel-Rahman, Susan M / Garg, Uttam / Shulman, Robert J. ·Departments of Pediatrics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, USA Departments of Pharmacology, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, USA Divisions of Pediatric Pharmacology, Medical Toxicology &Therapeutic Innovation, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA. · Departments of Pediatrics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, USA Divisions of Pediatric Pharmacology, Medical Toxicology &Therapeutic Innovation, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. · Departments of Pathology, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, USA Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA Children's Nutrition Research Center, Houston, Texas, USA. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #26270949.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Peppermint oil (PMO) has been used to treat abdominal ailments dating to ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Despite its increasing paediatric use, as in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) treatment, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of menthol in children given PMO has not been explored. DESIGN AND SETTING: Single-site, exploratory pilot study of menthol PK following a single 187 mg dose of PMO. Subjects with paediatric Rome II defined (IBS; n=6, male and female, 7-15 years of age) were enrolled. Blood samples were obtained before PMO administration and at 10 discrete time points over a 12 h postdose period. Menthol was quantitated from plasma using a validated gas chromatography mass spectrometry technique. Menthol PK parameters were determined using a standard non-compartmental approach. RESULTS: Following a dose of PMO, a substantial lag time (range 1-4 h) was seen in all subjects for the appearance of menthol which in turn, produced a delayed time of peak (Tmax=5.3 ± 2.4 h) plasma concentration (Cmax=698.2 ± 245.4 ng/mL). Tmax and Tlag were significantly more variable than the two exposure parameters; Cmax, mean residence time and total area under the curve (AUC=4039.7 ± 583.8 ng/mL × h) which had a coefficient of variation of <20%. CONCLUSIONS: Delayed appearance of menthol in plasma after oral PMO administration in children is likely a formulation-specific event which, in IBS, could increase intestinal residence time of the active ingredient. Our data also demonstrate the feasibility of using menthol PK in children with IBS to support definitive studies of PMO dose-effect relationships.

7 Article Atrial fibrillation ablation in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease or irritable bowel syndrome-the heart to gut connection! 2013

Reddy, Yeruva Madhu / Singh, Dhssraj / Nagarajan, Darbhamulla / Pillarisetti, Jayasree / Biria, Mazda / Boolani, Hemant / Emert, Martin / Chikkam, Vineela / Ryschon, Kay / Vacek, James / Bommana, Sudha / Atkins, Donita / Verma, Atul / Olyaee, Mojtaba / Dawn, Buddhadeb / Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of Kansas Hospital and Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. ·J Interv Card Electrophysiol · Pubmed #23736874.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: An association between atrial fibrillation (AF) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is increasingly being identified; yet the role of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) of AF has not been systematically evaluated in these patient populations. METHODS: We performed a prospective matched case-control study of AF patients with GERD and/or IBS who underwent RFA for AF in two centers in North America. AF patients with GERD and/or IBS (gastrointestinal [GI] group) were matched by age, gender, and type of AF at each of the centers with an equal number of AF patients without GERD or IBS (non-GI group). RESULTS: Sixty patients were included in the study with 30 in each group. Mean age of the population was 45 years with 14 (47 %) males and 21 (87 %) patients with paroxysmal AF in each group. More patients in the GI group had identifiable GI triggers for AF episodes. During RFA, more patients in the GI group had a "vagal response" compared to non-GI group (60 vs 13 %; p < 0.001). Left atrial scar as identified by electroanatomical mapping was more common in patients in the non-GI group compared to the GI group (57 vs 27 %; p = 0.018). At 1-year follow-up, 56 (93 %) of the patients were free from AF with no difference between both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Majority of AF patients with GERD and/or IBS have triggered AF and a positive vagal response during RFA. RFA is equally effective in this patient population when compared to those without GERD or IBS.

8 Article Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome: are there any predictors? 2010

Reddymasu, Savio C / Sostarich, Sandra / McCallum, Richard W. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA. ·BMC Gastroenterol · Pubmed #20175924.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which excessive levels of bacteria, mainly the colonic-type species are present in the small intestine. Recent data suggest that SIBO may contribute to the pathophysiology of Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. METHODS: Adults with IBS based on Rome II criteria who had predominance of bloating and flatulence underwent a glucose breath test (GBT) to determine the presence of SIBO. Breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes after ingestion of 50 g of glucose dissolved in 150 mL of water. Results of the glucose breath test, which measures hydrogen and methane levels in the breath, were considered positive for SIBO if 1) the hydrogen or methane peak was >20 ppm when the baseline was <10 ppm, or 2) the hydrogen or methane peak increased by 12 ppm when baseline was >or=10 ppm. RESULTS: Ninety-eight patients were identified who underwent a GBT (mean age, 49 y; 78% female). Thirty-five patients (36%) had a positive GBT result suggestive of SIBO. A positive GBT result was more likely in patients >55 years of age (odds ratio [OR], 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-9.0) and in females (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.1-14.5). Hydrogen was detected more frequently in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.4-45), and methane was the main gas detected in patients with constipation-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.3-44). There was no significant correlation between the presence of SIBO and the predominant bowel pattern or concurrent use of tegaserod, proton pump inhibitors, or opiate analgesics. CONCLUSIONS: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was present in a sizeable percentage of patients with IBS with predominance of bloating and flatulence. Older age and female sex were predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Identification of possible predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS could aid in the development of successful treatment plans.