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Irritable Bowel Syndrome: HELP
Articles from New England
Based on 167 articles published since 2008
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These are the 167 published articles about Irritable Bowel Syndrome that originated from New England during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7
1 Editorial Safety of Eluxadoline in Patients With IBS-D Without a Gallbladder. 2017

Cash, Brooks D / Lacy, Brian E / Schoenfeld, Philip S / Dove, Leonard S / Covington, Paul S. ·University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama, USA. · Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA. · University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Allergan plc, Parsippany, New Jersey, USA. · Furiex Pharmaceuticals, Allergan plc, Parsippany, New Jersey, USA. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28978951.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Editorial: latent class analysis to improve confidence in the diagnosis of IBS. 2017

Ballou, S / Lembo, A. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #28370041.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Irritable Bowel Syndrome: An Infectious Disease? 2017

Quigley, Eamonn M M / Lembo, Anthony J. ·Lynda K and David M Underwood Center for Digestive Disorders, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Houston Methodist Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: equigley@tmhs.org. · Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #28259791.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Editorial: ONO-2952 in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea. 2017

Nee, J / Lembo, A. ·Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center - Gastroenterology, Boston, MA, USA. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #28256084.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial A New Piece in the Puzzle of Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 2017

Bonilla, Silvana / Flores, Alejandro. ·Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Boston Children's Hospital,Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Boston Children's Hospital,Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: alejandro.flores@childrens.harvard.edu. ·J Pediatr · Pubmed #27788930.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Does Yoga Help Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome? 2016

Patel, Nihal / Lacy, Brian. ·Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #27552854.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial IBS with constipation, functional constipation, painful and non-painful constipation: e Pluribus…Plures? 2014

Cremonini, Filippo / Lembo, Anthony. ·Southern Nevada VA Healthcare System, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24896758.

ABSTRACT: IBS with constipation (IBS-C) and chronic constipation (CC) can be difficult to distinguish clinically. The Rome III criteria create mutual exclusion between IBS-C and CC, based on the presence of abdominal pain, which is a defining criterion for IBS-C. Previous surveys found that up to 45% of CC patients have abdominal pain and other IBS features. A Spanish general population study proposes a subclassification of patients with CC based on abdominal pain and other features of IBS. As the Rome criteria evolve, these and other observations provide the basis for further efforts in discerning key features of IBS-C and CC.

8 Editorial Should FODMAP withdrawal be tried in inflammatory bowel disease patients with irritable bowel syndrome? 2014

Schwender, Brian / Floch, Martin H. ·*Norwalk Medical Group, Norwalk †Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. ·J Clin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24705090.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Mast cells in irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis: function not numbers is what makes all the difference. 2014

Theoharides, Theoharis C. ·Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology and Pathobiology, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA, 02111, USA, theoharis.theoharides@tufts.edu. ·Dig Dis Sci · Pubmed #24445729.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Gluten and Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders in Children. 2018

Llanos-Chea, Alejandro / Fasano, Alessio. ·Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Massachusetts General Hospital, 114 16th Street (M/S 114-3503), Charlestown, Boston, MA 33131, USA. allanos-chea@mgh.harvard.edu. · Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 33131, USA. allanos-chea@mgh.harvard.edu. · Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA. allanos-chea@mgh.harvard.edu. · Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Massachusetts General Hospital, 114 16th Street (M/S 114-3503), Charlestown, Boston, MA 33131, USA. afasano@mgh.harvard.edu. · Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 33131, USA. afasano@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #30322070.

ABSTRACT: In children, functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common at all ages. Consumption of certain foods, particularly gluten, is frequently associated with the development and persistence of FGIDs and functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs) in adults and children. However, this association is not well defined. Even without a diagnosis of celiac disease (CD), some people avoid gluten or wheat in their diet since it has been shown to trigger mostly gastrointestinal symptoms in certain individuals, especially in children. The incidence of conditions such as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is increasing, particularly in children. On the other hand, CD is a chronic, autoimmune small intestinal enteropathy with symptoms that can sometimes be mimicked by FAPD. It is still unclear if pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more likely to have CD. Abdominal, pain-associated FGID in children with CD does not seem to improve on a gluten-free diet. The threshold for gluten tolerance in patients with NCGS is unknown and varies among subjects. Thus, it is challenging to clearly distinguish between gluten exclusion and improvement of symptoms related solely to functional disorders.

11 Review The Role of Prebiotics and Probiotics in Gastrointestinal Disease. 2018

Floch, Martin H. ·Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, 1089 LMP, New Haven, CT 06850, USA. Electronic address: martin.floch@yale.edu. ·Gastroenterol Clin North Am · Pubmed #29413011.

ABSTRACT: With the advent of the scientific realization that the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract was more than the cells that exist in the body, the full importance of prebiotics and probiotics has come forth. The importance has been stressed and is available in the new textbook entitled, "The Microbiota in Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology: Implication for Human Health, Prebiotics, Probiotics and Dysbiosis." There is enough evidence now published in the literature so that the scientific world now believes that prebiotics and probiotics are important in gastrointestinal disease.

12 Review Effects of Self-Management Interventions in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Systematic Review. 2018

Cong, Xiaomei / Perry, Mallory / Bernier, Katherine M / Young, Erin E / Starkweather, Angela. ·1 University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA. · 2 University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT, USA. ·West J Nurs Res · Pubmed #28854852.

ABSTRACT: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent and costly condition, with expenditures exceeding US$21 billion annually. As there is no known cure for IBS, treatment is focused on symptom self-management strategies. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the efficacy and overall effect of self-management interventions for patients with IBS. Of the 64 publications that were identified, 20 were included in the systematic review. Self-management interventions were found in diverse formats, including web-based, self-training booklets, individual and/or group interventions with health care providers, and cognitive-behavioral therapy or exercise-based interventions. Different symptom measures were used across the studies, whereas measurement of quality of life was more standardized. Overall, there is robust evidence supporting self-management interventions for improving short-term symptom management and improving quality of life, whereas longer term outcomes are variable. Further studies are needed to use standardized symptom measures and tailor interventions for pediatric populations, and tracking longer term outcomes.

13 Review Safety profiles of novel agent therapies in CLL. 2017

Ahn, Inhye E / Davids, Matthew S. ·Hematology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; and. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. ·Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program · Pubmed #29222278.

ABSTRACT: A 70-year-old man with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia has multiple comorbidities including atrial fibrillation (on warfarin for anticoagulation), irritable bowel syndrome, and chronic renal insufficiency. Two years ago, he received bendamustine and rituximab as first-line therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and achieved partial response, but now has relapsed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization cytogenetics reveals deletion 17p. Which novel agent would you recommend for this patient?

14 Review The Overlapping Area of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) and Wheat-Sensitive Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): An Update. 2017

Catassi, Carlo / Alaedini, Armin / Bojarski, Christian / Bonaz, Bruno / Bouma, Gerd / Carroccio, Antonio / Castillejo, Gemma / De Magistris, Laura / Dieterich, Walburga / Di Liberto, Diana / Elli, Luca / Fasano, Alessio / Hadjivassiliou, Marios / Kurien, Matthew / Lionetti, Elena / Mulder, Chris J / Rostami, Kamran / Sapone, Anna / Scherf, Katharina / Schuppan, Detlef / Trott, Nick / Volta, Umberto / Zevallos, Victor / Zopf, Yurdagül / Sanders, David S. ·Department of Pediatrics, Marche Polytechnic University, 60121 Ancona, Italy. c.catassi@univpm.it. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10027, USA. aa819@cumc.columbia.edu. · Medical Department, Division of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Charité, Campus Benjamin Franklin, 12203 Berlin, Germany. christian.bojarski@charite.de. · Department of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, CHU, 38043 Grenoble, France. bbonaz@chu-grenoble.fr. · Celiac Center Amsterdam, Department of Gastroenterology, VU University Medical Center, 1117 Amsterdam, The Netherlands. g.bouma@vumc.nl. · Department of Internal Medicine, "Giovanni Paolo II" Hospital, Sciacca (AG) and University of Palermo, 92019 Sciacca, Italy. acarroccio@hotmail.com. · Paediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Sant Joan de Reus University Hospital. IISPV, 43003 Tarragona, Spain. gcv@tinet.cat. · Department of Internal and Experimental Medicine Magrassi-Lanzara, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, 80131 Naples, Italy. laura.demagistris@unicampania.it. · Medical Clinic 1, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. walburga.dieterich@uk-erlangen.de. · Central Laboratory of Advanced Diagnosis and Biomedical Research (CLADIBIOR), University of Palermo, 90133 Palermo, Italy. diana.diliberto@unipa.it. · Center for the Prevention and Diagnosis of Celiac Disease, Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, 20122 Milan, Italy. lucelli@yahoo.com. · Center for Celiac Research and Treatment, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. AFASANO@mgh.harvard.edu. · Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield S10 2JF, UK. Marios.Hadjivassiliou@sth.nhs.uk. · Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, Department of Infection, Immunity & Cardiovascular Disease, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK. matthew.kurien@sth.nhs.uk. · Department of Pediatrics, Marche Polytechnic University, 60121 Ancona, Italy. mariaelenalionetti@gmail.com. · Celiac Center Amsterdam, Department of Gastroenterology, VU University Medical Center, 1117 Amsterdam, The Netherlands. cjmulder@vumc.nl. · Gastroenterology Unit, Milton Keynes University Hospital, Milton Keynes MK6 5LD, UK. krostami@hotmail.com. · Center for Celiac Research and Treatment, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. annasapone@yahoo.it. · German Research Centre for Food Chemistry, Leibniz Institute, Lise-Meitner-Straße 34, D-85354 Freising, Germany. Katharina.Scherf@lrz.tu-muenchen.de. · Institute of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55131 Mainz, Germany. detlef.schuppan@unimedizin-mainz.de. · Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, Department of Infection, Immunity & Cardiovascular Disease, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK. nick.trott@sth.nhs.uk. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, 40138 Bologna, Italy. umberto.volta@aosp.bo.it. · Institute of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55131 Mainz, Germany. zevallos@uni-mainz.de. · Medical Clinic 1, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. Yurdaguel.Zopf@uk-erlangen.de. · Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, Department of Infection, Immunity & Cardiovascular Disease, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK. david.sanders@sth.nhs.uk. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #29160841.

ABSTRACT: Gluten-related disorders have recently been reclassified with an emerging scientific literature supporting the concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). New research has specifically addressed prevalence, immune mechanisms, the recognition of non-immunoglobulin E (non-IgE) wheat allergy and overlap of NCGS with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms. This review article will provide clinicians with an update that directly impacts on the management of a subgroup of their IBS patients whose symptoms are triggered by wheat ingestion.

15 Review Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 2017

Ford, Alexander C / Lacy, Brian E / Talley, Nicholas J. ·From the Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Leeds, and the Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds, United Kingdom (A.C.F.) · the Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (B.E.L.) · the Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia (N.J.T.) · the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (N.J.T.) · and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (N.J.T.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #28657875.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Review Hot Topics in Primary Care: Role of the Microbiome in Disease: Implications for Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 2017

Lacy, Brian E. ·Professor of Medicine, Chief, Section of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA. ·J Fam Pract · Pubmed #28375407.

ABSTRACT: Dietary and some other treatments for IBS are supported by a growing body of evidence, much of which comes from programs such as the Human Microbiome Project and Human Gut Microbiome Initiative, which were intended to identify and characterize microorganisms found in association with both healthy and diseased humans. These programs used state-of-the-art technology to characterize the human microbiome from multiple body sites. This evidence indicates that the gut microbiome plays an important role in IBS and some other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders.

17 Review Rifaximin (Xifaxan) for Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 2017

Karuppiah, Sabesan / Pomianowski, Katarzyna. ·Eastern Connecticut Family Medicine Residency, Prospect Manchester Hospital, Manchester, CT, USA. ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #28290635.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review FODMAPs: food composition, defining cutoff values and international application. 2017

Varney, Jane / Barrett, Jacqueline / Scarlata, Kate / Catsos, Patsy / Gibson, Peter R / Muir, Jane G. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Central Clinical School, The Alfred Centre, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Kate Scarlata Nutrition Consulting, Medway, Massachusetts, USA. · GI Nutrition Inc, Portland, Maine, USA. ·J Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #28244665.

ABSTRACT: The low-FODMAP diet is a new dietary therapy for the management of irritable bowel syndrome that is gaining in popularity around the world. Developing the low-FODMAP diet required not only extensive food composition data but also the establishment of "cutoff values" to classify foods as low-FODMAP. These cutoff values relate to each particular FODMAP present in a food, including oligosaccharides (fructans and galacto-oligosaccharides), sugar polyols (mannitol and sorbitol), lactose, and fructose in excess of glucose. Cutoff values were derived by considering the FODMAP levels in typical serving sizes of foods that commonly trigger symptoms in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome, as well as foods that were generally well tolerated. The reliability of these FODMAP cutoff values has been tested in a number of dietary studies. The development of the techniques to quantify the FODMAP content of foods has greatly advanced our understanding of food composition. FODMAP composition is affected by food processing techniques and ingredient selection. In the USA, the use of high-fructose corn syrups may contribute to the higher FODMAP levels detected (via excess fructose) in some processed foods. Because food processing techniques and ingredients can vary between countries, more comprehensive food composition data are needed for this diet to be more easily implemented internationally.

19 Review The gut peptide neuropeptide Y and post-traumatic stress disorder. 2017

Rasmusson, Ann M. ·aNational Center for PTSD, Women's Health Science Division, Department of Veterans Affairs bVA Boston Healthcare System cBoston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes · Pubmed #27898588.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with which PTSD is highly comorbid. NPY is low in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of male combat veterans with PTSD and correlates negatively with sympathetic nervous system (SNS) hyperreactivity, PTSD symptoms and time to recovery. NPY regulation has not yet been evaluated in women with PTSD. RECENT FINDINGS: NPY levels in bowel tissue are low in IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D) versus IBS with constipation. The density of ghrelin containing cells of the gastric oxyntic mucosa is markedly increased in IBS-D. PTSD-related SNS hyperreactivity may interact with this substrate to increase ghrelin release, which activates receptors in the lumbosacral spinal cord and basolateral amygdala to increase colonic motility and amygdala hyperreactivity, respectively. Loss of function gene polymorphisms in adrenergic α2-autoreceptors and increased corticotropin-releasing hormone, as observed in PTSD, are also thought to contribute to IBS-D. SUMMARY: Knowledge of shared underlying NPY system-related neurobiological factors that contribute to the comorbidity of PTSD and gastrointestinal disorders may help guide research, development and prescription of targeted and more effective individualized therapeutic interventions.

20 Review New treatment options for irritable bowel syndrome with predominant diarrhea. 2017

Weber, H Christian. ·Boston University School of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes · Pubmed #27875419.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder with negative impact on quality of life and it represents a substantial economic burden on healthcare cost. The medical management of IBS remains largely symptomatic. This review provides an update related to the most recently published diagnostic Rome IV criteria for IBS and clinical trial data for novel treatment modalities in IBS targeting the peripheral opioid receptors of the enteric nervous system and the gut microbiota. RECENT FINDINGS: The new Rome IV criteria define functional gastrointestinal disorders as disorders of the gut-brain interaction. In addition to previously introduced pharmacological treatment modalities for IBS with constipation (IBS-C) with synthetic peptides and small molecules targeting gastrointestinal receptors and ion channels, the newly Food and Drug Administration-approved mixed peripheral opioid receptor agonist/antagonist eluxadoline and the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin demonstrate efficacy and safety in the treatment of IBS with predominant diarrhea (IBS-D). SUMMARY: Diagnostic criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders, including IBS, have been revised in Rome IV and are defined as gut-brain disorders. The mixed peripheral opioid receptor agonist/antagonist eluxadoline and the antibiotic rifaximin have been recently Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) with proven efficacy and acceptable side-effect profiles.

21 Review Mind-Body Interventions for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients in the Chinese Population: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2017

Wang, Weidong / Wang, Fang / Fan, Feng / Sedas, Ana Cristina / Wang, Jian. ·Guang'an Men Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, 5, Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing, 100053, China. · Guang'an Men Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, 5, Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing, 100053, China. vision_wf2009@hotmail.com. · Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. ·Int J Behav Med · Pubmed #27646279.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to identify and assess evidence related to the efficacy of mind-body interventions on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in the Chinese population. METHOD: Drawn from Chinese databases, nine RCTs and three Q-E studies were included in the systematic review. The methodological quality of RCTs was evaluated based on the following criteria: adequate sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, completeness of outcome data, selective reporting, and other potential biases. For continuous variables, the effect size (ES) was determined by calculating the standardized mean difference between groups. For dichotomous variables, the ES was determined by calculating the risk ratio (RR) between groups. Given the heterogeneity between the trials and the small number of studies included, both random effects and fixed effects models were used. The inverse variance method was used for pooling. Statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager version 5.0. RESULTS: The total number of papers identified was 710: 462 from English language databases and 248 from Chinese language databases. Twelve studies met our eligibility criteria. Among the studies selected, three were Q-E studies the rest RCTs. Two studies described the randomization process. None of the studies reported allocation concealment nor blinding. Seven studies reported no dropouts. One of the studies mentioned the total amount of dropouts; though the reason for dropping out was not referenced. The other four studies did not clearly report dropouts. With the exception of three studies, there was inadequate information to determine biased reporting for the majority; the level of risk for bias in these studies is unclear. Finally, six meta-analyses were performed. One was conducted with four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used cure rate as outcome measures to evaluate gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, which suggested that mind-body interventions were effective in improving GI symptoms (random effects model: RR = 1.08; 95 % CI 1.01 to 1.17; fixed effects model: RR = 1.07; 95 % CI 1.01 to 1.12). The remaining five were conducted in three RCTs, which suggested that mind-body interventions were effective in improving several aspects of quality of life, including interference with activity (random effects and fixed effects models: SMD = 0.64; 95 % CI 0.41 to 0.86), body image (random effects model: SMD = 0.36; 95 % CI 0.06 to 0.67; fixed effects model: SMD = 0.33; 95 % CI 0.11 to 0.55), health worry (random effects and fixed effects models: SMD = 0.67; 95 % CI 0.44 to 0.90), food avoidance (random effects and fixed effects models: SMD = 0.45; 95 % CI 0.23 to 0.68), and social reaction (random effects model: SMD = 0.79; 95 % CI 0.47 to 1.12; fixed effects model: SMD = 0.78; 95 % CI 0.55 to 1.01), as measured by Irritable Bowel Syndrome Quality of Life Questionnaire ( IBS-QOL). CONCLUSION: Mind-body interventions may have the potential to improve GI symptoms in Chinese patients with IBS. The improvement of GI symptoms was also accompanied with the improvement of various outcomes, including depression, anxiety, and quality of life, just to mention a few. However, the published studies generally had significant methodological limitations. Future clinical trials with rigorous research design are needed in this field. More studies focusing on the mind-body interventions originated in China, such as tai chi and qi gong should be encouraged.

22 Review Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis, etiology, and new treatment considerations. 2016

Lacy, Brian E / Moreau, Julie C. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire. ·J Am Assoc Nurse Pract · Pubmed #27436200.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To provide an overview of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), specifically the efficacy and tolerability of treatment options for diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D). DATA SOURCES: Research articles available via PubMed were reviewed. CONCLUSIONS: IBS is a chronic multifactorial disorder that has a negative impact on patient-related quality of life. Genetic factors, psychosociologic factors, alterations in the gut microbiota, and changes in immune, motor, and sensory responses to various stimuli all may be involved in the development of IBS. While pharmacologic therapies for IBS-D have historically been limited (e.g., alosetron), newer therapies (eluxadoline and rifaximin), both approved in the United States in 2015, may be considered for appropriate patients for the management of IBS-D. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Nurse practitioners play an important role in the diagnosis, care, and management of patients with IBS-D. The goals of therapy should be to reach a correct diagnosis before initiating therapy, provide reassurance to the patient, educate the patient on potential treatment options, improve IBS-D symptoms, minimize risk of harm with treatment, and maximize patient-related quality of life. The authors present a treatment algorithm to guide nurse practitioners on the management of patients with IBS-D.

23 Review Dietary Interventions and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review of the Evidence. 2016

Shah, Shawn L / Lacy, Brian E. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH, 03756, USA. Shawn.L.Shah@Hitchcock.org. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH, 03756, USA. ·Curr Gastroenterol Rep · Pubmed #27372289.

ABSTRACT: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the best studied of the functional gastrointestinal disorders. It is a highly prevalent disorder characterized by symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, and disordered bowel habits, which may include constipation, diarrhea, or both. IBS has a significant negative impact on patients, both financially and with regard to their quality-of-life. At present, there is no cure for IBS, and while there are a number of pharmacological therapies available to treat IBS symptoms, they are not uniformly effective. For this reason, many patients and providers are turning to dietary interventions in an attempt to ameliorate IBS symptoms. At first glance, this approach appears reasonable as dietary interventions are generally safe and side effects, including potential adverse reactions with medications, are rare. However, although dietary interventions for IBS are frequently recommended, there is a paucity of data to support their use. The goals of this article are to answer key questions about diets currently recommended for the treatment of IBS, using the best available data from the literature.

24 Review Pharmacologic Therapies in Gastrointestinal Diseases. 2016

Fox, Rena K / Muniraj, Thiruvengadam. ·Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, 1545 Divisadero St, Ste 307, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: rena.fox@ucsf.edu. · Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, 1080 LMP, New Haven, CT 06520-8019, USA. ·Med Clin North Am · Pubmed #27235617.

ABSTRACT: Several key areas in gastroenterology pharmacotherapy are rapidly evolving, including the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV), irritable bowel syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and peptic ulcer disease. HCV treatment has radically changed in the past 2 years and now most patients are treatment candidates and have a high likelihood of permanent cure. Pharmacotherapy is now first-line treatment for patients with moderate to severe symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the mainstay of therapy in gastric and duodenal ulcers and GERD, although long-term use carries the risk of several side effects that should be considered.

25 Review Emerging treatments in neurogastroenterology: eluxadoline - a new therapeutic option for diarrhea-predominant IBS. 2016

Lacy, B E. ·Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA. ·Neurogastroenterol Motil · Pubmed #26690872.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder worldwide. The global prevalence of IBS is estimated to be as high as 15%. For many patients, IBS is a chronic disorder which can significantly reduce quality of life. Just as important as the effects on any one individual, IBS also places a significant impact on the population as a whole with its negative effects on the health care system. Irritable bowel syndrome is categorized into one of three main categories: IBS with diarrhea, IBS with constipation, and IBS with mixed bowel habits. Patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) comprise a substantial proportion of the overall IBS population. A number of therapeutic options exist to treat the symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, and fecal urgency, including non-pharmacologic therapies such as dietary changes and probiotics, or pharmacologic therapies such as loperamide and alosetron. However, many patients have persistent symptoms despite these therapies. This unmet need led to the development of eluxadoline, a mu-opioid receptor agonist/delta-opioid receptor antagonist/kappa-receptor agonist. Approved by the FDA in May 2015, this medication shows promise in the treatment of diarrhea-predominant IBS for both men and women. PURPOSE: This monograph will briefly review the impact of IBS, discuss current treatments for IBS-D, and then focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy and safety of eluxadoline. Potential mechanisms related to rare events of acute pancreatitis or elevated liver tests will be discussed.

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