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Leukemia HELP
Based on 58,266 articles published since 2008
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These are the 58266 published articles about Leukemia that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
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1 Guideline Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. Krohem B-Cll 2017. 2018

Jakšić, Branimir / Pejša, Vlatko / Ostojić-Kolonić, Slobodanka / Kardum-Skelin, Ika / Bašić-Kinda, Sandra / Coha, Božena / Gverić-Krečak, Velka / Vrhovac, Radovan / Jakšić, Ozren / Aurer, Igor / Sinčić-Petričević, Jasminka / Načinović-Duletić, Antica / Nemet, Damir. ·Merkur University Hospital, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. · School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. · Dubrava University Hospital, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. · Zagreb University Hospital Center, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. · Dr Josip Benčević General Hospital, Slavonski Brod, Croatia. · Šibenik General Hospital, Šibenik, Croatia. · Osijek University Hospital Center, Faculty of Medicine, Josip Juraj University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia. ·Acta Clin Croat · Pubmed #30256032.

ABSTRACT: Recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) have led to change of approach in clinical practice. New treatments have been approved based on the results of randomized multicenter trials for first line and for salvage therapy, and the results of numerous ongoing clinical trials are permanently providing new answers and further refining of therapeutic strategies. This is paralleled by substantial increase in understanding the disease genetics due to major advances in the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology. We define current position of the Croatian Cooperative Group for Hematologic Disease on diagnosis and treatment of CLL in the transition from chemo-immunotherapy paradigm into a new one that is based on new diagnostic stratification and unprecedented therapeutic results of B-cell receptor inhibitors (BRI) and Bcl-2 antagonists. This is a rapidly evolving field as a great number of ongoing clinical trials con-stantly accumulate and provide new knowledge. We believe that novel therapy research including genomic diagnosis is likely to offer new options that will eventually lead to time limited therapies without chemotherapy and more effective clinical care for B-CLL based on individualized precision medicine.

2 Guideline Diagnosis and management of Aspergillus diseases: executive summary of the 2017 ESCMID-ECMM-ERS guideline. 2018

Ullmann, A J / Aguado, J M / Arikan-Akdagli, S / Denning, D W / Groll, A H / Lagrou, K / Lass-Flörl, C / Lewis, R E / Munoz, P / Verweij, P E / Warris, A / Ader, F / Akova, M / Arendrup, M C / Barnes, R A / Beigelman-Aubry, C / Blot, S / Bouza, E / Brüggemann, R J M / Buchheidt, D / Cadranel, J / Castagnola, E / Chakrabarti, A / Cuenca-Estrella, M / Dimopoulos, G / Fortun, J / Gangneux, J-P / Garbino, J / Heinz, W J / Herbrecht, R / Heussel, C P / Kibbler, C C / Klimko, N / Kullberg, B J / Lange, C / Lehrnbecher, T / Löffler, J / Lortholary, O / Maertens, J / Marchetti, O / Meis, J F / Pagano, L / Ribaud, P / Richardson, M / Roilides, E / Ruhnke, M / Sanguinetti, M / Sheppard, D C / Sinkó, J / Skiada, A / Vehreschild, M J G T / Viscoli, C / Cornely, O A. ·Department of Infectious Diseases, Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Infectious Diseases Unit, University Hospital Madrid, Madrid, Spain; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Medical Microbiology, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · The National Aspergillosis Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Mycology Reference Centre Manchester, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Manchester, UK; The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology, Centre for Bone Marrow Transplantation, University Children's Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Microbiology and Immunology, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Institute of Hygiene, Microbiology and Social Medicine, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Infectious Diseases Clinic, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain; CIBER Enfermedades Respiratorias - CIBERES (CB06/06/0058), Madrid, Spain; Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Medical Microbiology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Centre of Expertise in Mycology Radboudumc/CWZ, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Nijmegen, Netherlands; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · MRC Centre for Medical Mycology, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; Inserm 1111, French International Centre for Infectious Diseases Research (CIRI), Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department Microbiological Surveillance and Research, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Department of Internal Medicine, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Burns, Trauma and Critical Care Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Radboud Centre for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Centre, Centre of Expertise in Mycology Radboudumc/CWZ, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Nijmegen, Netherlands; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · Medical Clinic III, University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Pneumology, University Hospital of Tenon and Sorbonne, University of Paris, Paris, France; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Infectious Diseases Unit, Istituto Giannina Gaslini Children's Hospital, Genoa, Italy; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · Department of Medical Microbiology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Critical Care Medicine, Attikon University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Infectious Diseases Service, Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Univ Rennes, CHU Rennes, Inserm, Irset (Institut de Recherche en santé, environnement et travail) - UMR_S 1085, Rennes, France; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Division of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Thoracic Clinic, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Centre for Medical Microbiology, University College London, London, UK; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Clinical Mycology, Allergy and Immunology, North Western State Medical University, St Petersburg, Russia; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Radboud Centre for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Centre, Centre of Expertise in Mycology Radboudumc/CWZ, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Nijmegen, Netherlands; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · International Health and Infectious Diseases, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany; Clinical Infectious Diseases, Research Centre Borstel, Leibniz Center for Medicine & Biosciences, Borstel, Germany; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), Tuberculosis Unit, Hamburg-Lübeck-Borstel-Riems Site, Lübeck, Germany; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Division of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Children's Hospital, University of Paris, Paris, France; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Infectious Diseases Service, Department of Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland; Department of Medicine, Ensemble Hospitalier de la Côte, Morges, Switzerland; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, Centre of Expertise in Mycology Radboudumc/CWZ, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Nijmegen, Netherlands; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Quality Unit, Pôle Prébloc, Saint-Louis and Lariboisière Hospital Group, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · The National Aspergillosis Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Mycology Reference Centre Manchester, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Manchester, UK; The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Infectious Diseases Unit, 3rd Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Aristotle University School of Health Sciences, Thessaloniki, Greece; Hippokration General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology and Oncology, Paracelsus Hospital, Osnabrück, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Institute of Microbiology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Szent István and Szent László Hospital, Budapest, Hungary; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · First Department of Medicine, Laiko Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department I of Internal Medicine, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Centre for Integrated Oncology, Cologne-Bonn, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF) partner site Bonn-Cologne, Cologne, Germany; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Ospedale Policlinico San Martino and University of Genova (DISSAL), Genova, Italy; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · First Department of Medicine, Laiko Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF) partner site Bonn-Cologne, Cologne, Germany; CECAD Cluster of Excellence, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Clinical Trials Center Cologne, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM); ESCMID European Study Group for Infections in Compromised Hosts (ESGICH). Electronic address: Oliver.cornely@uk-koeln.de. ·Clin Microbiol Infect · Pubmed #29544767.

ABSTRACT: The European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, the European Confederation of Medical Mycology and the European Respiratory Society Joint Clinical Guidelines focus on diagnosis and management of aspergillosis. Of the numerous recommendations, a few are summarized here. Chest computed tomography as well as bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patients with suspicion of pulmonary invasive aspergillosis (IA) are strongly recommended. For diagnosis, direct microscopy, preferably using optical brighteners, histopathology and culture are strongly recommended. Serum and BAL galactomannan measures are recommended as markers for the diagnosis of IA. PCR should be considered in conjunction with other diagnostic tests. Pathogen identification to species complex level is strongly recommended for all clinically relevant Aspergillus isolates; antifungal susceptibility testing should be performed in patients with invasive disease in regions with resistance found in contemporary surveillance programmes. Isavuconazole and voriconazole are the preferred agents for first-line treatment of pulmonary IA, whereas liposomal amphotericin B is moderately supported. Combinations of antifungals as primary treatment options are not recommended. Therapeutic drug monitoring is strongly recommended for patients receiving posaconazole suspension or any form of voriconazole for IA treatment, and in refractory disease, where a personalized approach considering reversal of predisposing factors, switching drug class and surgical intervention is also strongly recommended. Primary prophylaxis with posaconazole is strongly recommended in patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome receiving induction chemotherapy. Secondary prophylaxis is strongly recommended in high-risk patients. We strongly recommend treatment duration based on clinical improvement, degree of immunosuppression and response on imaging.

3 Guideline ERIC recommendations for TP53 mutation analysis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia-update on methodological approaches and results interpretation. 2018

Malcikova, J / Tausch, E / Rossi, D / Sutton, L A / Soussi, T / Zenz, T / Kater, A P / Niemann, C U / Gonzalez, D / Davi, F / Gonzalez Diaz, M / Moreno, C / Gaidano, G / Stamatopoulos, K / Rosenquist, R / Stilgenbauer, S / Ghia, P / Pospisilova, S / Anonymous4931090. ·Department of Internal Medicine - Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Brno and Medical Faculty, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany. · Hematology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Institute of Oncology Research, Bellinzona, Switzerland. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France. · INSERM, U1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France. · Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Cancer Center Karolinska, Stockholm, Sweden. · Division of Hematology, University Hospital Zürich, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Department of Hematology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK. · Department of Hematology, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtière, AP-HP, Sorbonne Universités-UPMC University, Paris, France. · Centro de Investigación del Cancer and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Cáncer (CIBERONC), University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Department of Haematology, Hospital de la Santa Creu I Sant Pau, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Division of Haematology, Department of Translational Medicine, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy. · Institute of Applied Biosciences, CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Division of Experimental Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. ghia.paolo@hsr.it. · Department of Internal Medicine - Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Brno and Medical Faculty, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. pospisilova.sarka@fnbrno.cz. · Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. pospisilova.sarka@fnbrno.cz. ·Leukemia · Pubmed #29467486.

ABSTRACT: In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), TP53 gene defects, due to deletion of the 17p13 locus and/or mutation(s) within the TP53 gene, are associated with resistance to chemoimmunotherapy and a particularly dismal clinical outcome. On these grounds, analysis of TP53 aberrations has been incorporated into routine clinical diagnostics to improve patient stratification and optimize therapeutic decisions. The predictive implications of TP53 aberrations have increasing significance in the era of novel targeted therapies, i.e., inhibitors of B-cell receptor (BcR) signaling and anti-apoptotic BCL2 family members, owing to their efficacy in patients with TP53 defects. In this report, the TP53 Network of the European Research Initiative on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (ERIC) presents updated recommendations on the methodological approaches for TP53 mutation analysis. Moreover, it provides guidance to ensure that the analysis is performed in a timely manner for all patients requiring treatment and that the data is interpreted and reported in a consistent, standardized, and accurate way. Since next-generation sequencing technologies are gaining prominence within diagnostic laboratories, this report also offers advice and recommendations for the interpretation of TP53 mutation data generated by this methodology.

4 Guideline Primary prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in patients with haematological malignancies: 2017 update of the recommendations of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society for Haematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO). 2018

Mellinghoff, Sibylle C / Panse, Jens / Alakel, Nael / Behre, Gerhard / Buchheidt, Dieter / Christopeit, Maximilian / Hasenkamp, Justin / Kiehl, Michael / Koldehoff, Michael / Krause, Stefan W / Lehners, Nicola / von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie / Löhnert, Annika Y / Maschmeyer, Georg / Teschner, Daniel / Ullmann, Andrew J / Penack, Olaf / Ruhnke, Markus / Mayer, Karin / Ostermann, Helmut / Wolf, Hans-H / Cornely, Oliver A. ·Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. sibylle.mellinghoff@uk-koeln.de. · Department I of Internal Medicine, German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), University Hospital of Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. sibylle.mellinghoff@uk-koeln.de. · Department of Oncology, Haematology, Haemostaseology and Stem Cell Transplantation, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany. · Department I of Internal Medicine, Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Division of Haematology and Oncology, Leipzig University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine-Haematology and Oncology, Mannheim University Hospital, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinic for Haematology and Medical Oncology with Department for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medicine Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany. · Department I for Internal Medicine, Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder), Frankfurt (Oder), Germany. · Department of Bone Marrow Transplantation, West German Cancer Centre, University Hospital of Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany. · Department V for Internal Medicine, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine V, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital of Jena, Jena, Germany. · Department I of Internal Medicine, German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), University Hospital of Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. · Department of Haematology, Oncology and Palliative Care, Klinikum Ernst von Bergmann, Potsdam, Germany. · Department of Haematology, Medical Oncology, and Pneumology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany. · Department II of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany. · Department for Haematology, Oncology and Tumour immunology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Haematology and Oncology, Paracelsus-Kliniken Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany. · Department III of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · Department of Haematology and Oncology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department IV of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Halle, Halle, Germany. · Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. · Clinical Trials Centre Cologne (ZKS Köln), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. ·Ann Hematol · Pubmed #29218389.

ABSTRACT: Immunocompromised patients are at high risk of invasive fungal infections (IFI), in particular those with haematological malignancies undergoing remission-induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and recipients of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). Despite the development of new treatment options in the past decades, IFI remains a concern due to substantial morbidity and mortality in these patient populations. In addition, the increasing use of new immune modulating drugs in cancer therapy has opened an entirely new spectrum of at risk periods. Since the last edition of antifungal prophylaxis recommendations of the German Society for Haematology and Medical Oncology in 2014, seven clinical trials regarding antifungal prophylaxis in patients with haematological malignancies have been published, comprising 1227 patients. This update assesses the impact of this additional evidence and effective revisions. Our key recommendations are the following: prophylaxis should be performed with posaconazole delayed release tablets during remission induction chemotherapy for AML and MDS (AI). Posaconazole iv can be used when the oral route is contraindicated or not feasible. Intravenous liposomal amphotericin B did not significantly decrease IFI rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) patients during induction chemotherapy, and there is poor evidence to recommend it for prophylaxis in these patients (CI). Despite substantial risk of IFI, we cannot provide a stronger recommendation for these patients. There is poor evidence regarding voriconazole prophylaxis in patients with neutropenia (CII). Therapeutic drug monitoring TDM should be performed within 2 to 5 days of initiating voriconazole prophylaxis and should be repeated in case of suspicious adverse events or of dose changes of interacting drugs (BIItu). General TDM during posaconazole prophylaxis is not recommended (CIItu), but may be helpful in cases of clinical failure such as breakthrough IFI for verification of compliance or absorption.

5 Guideline [Preventative and therapeutic relapse strategies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Guidelines from the Francophone society of bone marrow transplantation and cellular therapy (SFGM-TC)]. 2017

Yafour, Nabil / Beckerich, Florence / Bulabois, Claude Eric / Chevallier, Patrice / Daguindau, Étienne / Dumesnil, Cécile / Guillaume, Thierry / Huynh, Anne / Levrat, Stavroula Masouridi / Menard, Anne-Lise / Michallet, Mauricette / Pautas, Cécile / Poiré, Xavier / Ravinet, Aurelie / Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim / Bazarbachi, Ali. ·Établissement hospitalier et universitaire 1(er) Novembre 1954, service d'hématologie et de thérapie cellulaire, BP 4166, 31000 Ibn Rochd, Oran, Algérie; Université d'Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, faculté de médecine, Oran, Algérie. · Hôpital Henri-Mondor, service d'hématologie et de thérapie cellulaire, boulevard Maréchal-de-Lattre-de-Tassigny, 94000 Créteil, France. · Centre hospitalier universitaire, service d'hématologie clinique, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, France. · CHU de Nantes, service d'hématologie clinique, Hôtel-Dieu, place Alexis-Ricordeau, 44035 Nantes, France. · CHRU de Besançon, service d'hématologie, 3, boulevard Fleming, 25000 Besancon, France. · CHU de Rouen, service d'hémato-oncologie pédiatrique, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen cedex, France. · IUCT-Oncopole, service d'hématologie et de greffe de cellules souches hématopoïétiques, 1, rue Irène-Joliot-Curie, 31059 Toulouse cedex, France. · Division of hematology, department of medical specialties, Geneva university hospitals, 4, rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1205 Geneva, Suisse. · Centre Henri-Becquerel, service d'hématologie clinique, rue d'Amiens, CS 11516, 76038 Rouen cedex 1, France. · Centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, service d'hématologie clinique, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite cedex, France. · Universitaires Saint-Luc, section of hematology cliniques, 1200 Brussels, Belgique. · CHU Clermont-Ferrand, service de thérapie cellulaire et d'hématologie clinique adulte, 63100 Clermont-Ferrand, France; Université Clermont-Auvergne, EA7453 et CIC-501, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · CHRU de Lille, université de Lille 2, département de maladie du sang, LIRIC Inserm U995, 59000 Lille, France. Electronic address: ibrahim.yakoubagha@chru-lille.fr. · American university of Beirut, medical center, P.O. Box 113-6044 Beirut, Liban. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #29179894.

ABSTRACT: Disease relapse remains the first cause of mortality of hematological malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). The risk of recurrence is elevated in patients with high-risk cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities, as well as when allo-HCT is performed in patients with refractory disease or with persistent molecular or radiological (PET-CT scan) residual disease. Within the frame of the 7th annual workshops of the francophone society for bone marrow transplantation and cellular therapy, the working group reviewed the literature in order to elaborate unified guidelines for the prevention and treatment of relapse after allo-HCT. For high risk AML and MDS, a post transplant maintenance strategy is possible, using hypomethylating agents or TKI anti-FLT3 when the target is present. For Philadelphia positive ALL, there was a consensus for the use of post-transplant TKI maintenance. For lymphomas, there are no strong data on the use of post-transplant maintenance, and hence a preemptive strategy is recommended based on modulation of immunosuppression, close follow-up of donor chimerism, and donor lymphocytes infusion. For multiple myeloma, even though the indication of allo-HCT is controversial, our recommendation is post transplant maintenance using bortezomib, due to its a good toxicity profile without increasing the risk of GVHD.

6 Guideline [Allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation for indolent lymphomas: Guidelines from the Francophone Society Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)]. 2017

Gauthier, Jordan / Chantepie, Sylvain / Bouabdallah, Krimo / Jost, Edgar / Nguyen, Stéphanie / Gac, Anne-Claire / Damaj, Gandhi / Duléry, Rémy / Michallet, Mauricette / Delage, Jérémy / Lewalle, Philippe / Morschhauser, Franck / Salles, Gilles / Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim / Cornillon, Jérôme. ·CHRU de Lille, pôle spécialités médicales et gérontologie, service des maladies du sang, secteur allogreffe de cellules souches hématopoïétiques, 59037 Lille, France; Université de Lille, UFR médecine, 59000 Lille, France. · AP-HP, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, service d'hématologie, 75013 Paris, France. · CHU de Caen, service d'hématologie, 14033 Caen, France. · Universitätsklinikum Aachen, Klinik für Onkologie, Hämatologie und Stammzelltransplantation, Aachen, Allemagne. · CHU Haut-Lévêque, service d'hématologie, 33600 Pessac, France. · AP-HP, hôpital Saint-Antoine, service d'hématologie, 75012 Paris, France. · CHU de Lyon, service d'hématologie, 69310 Pierre-Bénite, France. · CHU de Montpellier, service d'hématologie, 34295 Montpellier, France. · Université libre de Bruxelles, institut Jules-Bordet, service d'hématologie, Bruxelles, Belgique. · CHRU de Lille, pôle spécialités médicales et gérontologie, service des maladies du sang, secteur allogreffe de cellules souches hématopoïétiques, 59037 Lille, France; CHU de Lille, université de Lille2, LIRIC Inserm U995, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département d'hématologie clinique, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France. Electronic address: jerome.cornillon@icloire.fr. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #29173973.

ABSTRACT: Despite great improvements in the outcome of patients with lymphoma, some may still relapse or present with primary refractory disease. In these situations, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is a potentially curative option, this is true particularly the case of relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation. Recently, novel agents such as anti-PD1 and BTK inhibitors have started to challenge the use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed or refractory lymphoma. During the 2016 annual workshop of the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC), we performed a comprehensive review of the literature published in the last 10 years and established guidelines to clarify the indications and transplant modalities in this setting. This paper specifically reports on our conclusions regarding indolent lymphomas, mainly follicular lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

7 Guideline Hairy Cell Leukemia, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2017

Wierda, William G / Byrd, John C / Abramson, Jeremy S / Bhat, Seema / Bociek, Greg / Brander, Danielle / Brown, Jennifer / Chanan-Khan, Asher / Coutre, Steve E / Davis, Randall S / Fletcher, Christopher D / Hill, Brian / Kahl, Brad S / Kamdar, Manali / Kaplan, Lawrence D / Khan, Nadia / Kipps, Thomas J / Lancet, Jeffrey / Ma, Shuo / Malek, Sami / Mosse, Claudio / Shadman, Mazyar / Siddiqi, Tanya / Stephens, Deborah / Wagner, Nina / Zelenetz, Andrew D / Dwyer, Mary A / Sundar, Hema. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #29118233.

ABSTRACT: Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare type of indolent B-cell leukemia, characterized by symptoms of fatigue and weakness, organomegaly, pancytopenia, and recurrent opportunistic infections. Classic HCL should be considered a distinct clinical entity separate from HCLvariant (HCLv), which is associated with a more aggressive disease course and may not respond to standard HCL therapies. Somatic hypermutation in the

8 Guideline JSH guideline for tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues-lukemia: 4. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). 2017

Usui, Noriko. ·Department of Transfusion Medicine/Clinical Oncology and Hematology, The Jikei University Daisan Hospital, Komae, Tokyo, 201-8601, Japan. usuin@jikei.ac.jp. ·Int J Hematol · Pubmed #28936634.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline Appendix 4: Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: eUpdate published online 27 June 2017 (www.esmo.org/Guidelines/Haematological-Malignancies). 2017

Anonymous4960918. · ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28881925.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Chronic myeloid leukaemia: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. 2017

Hochhaus, A / Saussele, S / Rosti, G / Mahon, F-X / Janssen, J J W M / Hjorth-Hansen, H / Richter, J / Buske, C / Anonymous4860918. ·Klinik für Innere Medizin II, Hämatologie/Onkologie, Universitätsklinikum Jena, Jena. · III. Medizinische Klinik, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Fakultät für Klinische Medizin Mannheim der Universität Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Institute of Haematology and Medical Oncology Lorenzo ed Ariosto Seràgnoli, Bologna University School of Medicine, Bologna, Italy. · CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Hematology, St Olavs Hospital and Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway. · Department of Hematology, Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · CCC Ulm, Institut für Experimentelle Tumorforschung, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28881915.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline Recommendations for cerebrospinal fluid examination in acute leukemia. 2017

Girard, Sandrine / Fenneteau, Odile / Mestrallet, Fanélie / Troussard, Xavier / Lesesve, Jean-François. ·Service d'hématologie biologique, Centre de biologie et pathologie Est, LBMMS, Hospices civils de Lyon, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie, AP-HP Robert Debré, Paris, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie, CHU Côte de Nacre, Caen, France. · Service d'hématologie biologique, CHU de Nancy, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #28853417.

ABSTRACT: Cytological identification of blasts in cerebrospinal fluid in acute leukemia, lymphoid or myeloid, in adult and child, at diagnosis or during follow up lead to the diagnosis of leukemic meningitidis. Suitable CNS therapy based on a defined "CNS status" following an international standardized classification, lead to decrease cerebrospinal relapses. Established in 1993, this classification allows to treat patients based on their CNS status. Based on the red blood cells count, nucleated cells count and presence of blasts, it requires a standard technical procedure that guarantees the comparability of results coming from different medical laboratory. To improve the quality of cerebrospinal fluid analysis, in acute leukemias, preanalytical guidelines (turn around time), analytical guidelines (cytocentrifugation, adding serum protein, speed and duration of cytocentrifugation) and postanalytical guidelines (duration of conservation) are set by the Groupe francophone d'hématologie cellulaire.

12 Guideline Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 3.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2017

O'Donnell, Margaret R / Tallman, Martin S / Abboud, Camille N / Altman, Jessica K / Appelbaum, Frederick R / Arber, Daniel A / Bhatt, Vijaya / Bixby, Dale / Blum, William / Coutre, Steven E / De Lima, Marcos / Fathi, Amir T / Fiorella, Melanie / Foran, James M / Gore, Steven D / Hall, Aric C / Kropf, Patricia / Lancet, Jeffrey / Maness, Lori J / Marcucci, Guido / Martin, Michael G / Moore, Joseph O / Olin, Rebecca / Peker, Deniz / Pollyea, Daniel A / Pratz, Keith / Ravandi, Farhad / Shami, Paul J / Stone, Richard M / Strickland, Stephen A / Wang, Eunice S / Wieduwilt, Matthew / Gregory, Kristina / Ogba, Ndiya. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #28687581.

ABSTRACT: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia among adults and accounts for the largest number of annual deaths due to leukemias in the United States. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for AML focuses on management and provides recommendations on the workup, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options for younger (age <60 years) and older (age ≥60 years) adult patients.

13 Guideline Recommendations on surveillance and management of biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (BMMRD) syndrome: a consensus statement by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. 2017

Durno, Carol / Boland, C Richard / Cohen, Shlomi / Dominitz, Jason A / Giardiello, Frank M / Johnson, David A / Kaltenbach, Tonya / Levin, T R / Lieberman, David / Robertson, Douglas J / Rex, Douglas K. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Zane Cohen Center, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: carol.durno@sickkids.ca. · Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology), University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. Electronic address: crichardboland@gmail.com. · Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit of Dana-Dwek Children's Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington; University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. · Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Walnut Creek, California. · Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · VA Medical Center, White River Junction, Vermont; Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire. · Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #28363411.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Version 1.2017. 2017

Wierda, William G / Zelenetz, Andrew D / Gordon, Leo I / Abramson, Jeremy S / Advani, Ranjana H / Andreadis, C Babis / Bartlett, Nancy / Byrd, John C / Caimi, Paolo / Fayad, Luis E / Fisher, Richard I / Glenn, Martha J / Habermann, Thomas M / Harris, Nancy Lee / Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco / Hoppe, Richard T / Horwitz, Steven M / Kaminski, Mark S / Kelsey, Christopher R / Kim, Youn H / Krivacic, Susan / LaCasce, Ann S / Martin, Michael G / Nademanee, Auayporn / Porcu, Pierluigi / Press, Oliver / Rabinovitch, Rachel / Reddy, Nishitha / Reid, Erin / Roberts, Kenneth / Saad, Ayman A / Snyder, Erin D / Sokol, Lubomir / Swinnen, Lode J / Vose, Julie M / Yahalom, Joachim / Dwyer, Mary A / Sundar, Hema. ·The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center · Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center · Stanford Cancer Institute · UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center · Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine · The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute · Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute · Fox Chase Cancer Center · Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah · Mayo Clinic Cancer Center · Roswell Park Cancer Institute · University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center · Duke Cancer Institute · Consultant · Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center · St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center · City of Hope National Medical Center · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance · University of Colorado Cancer Center · Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center · UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center · Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital · University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center · Moffitt Cancer Center · The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins · Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center · National Comprehensive Cancer Network ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #28275031.

ABSTRACT: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are different manifestations of the same disease and managed in much the same way. The advent of novel CD20 monoclonal antibodies led to the development of effective chemoimmunotherapy regimens. More recently, small molecule inhibitors targeting kinases involved in a number of critical signaling pathways and a small molecule inhibitor of the BCL-2 family of proteins have demonstrated activity for the treatment of patients with CLL/SLL. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight important updates to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for CLL/SLL for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed/refractory CLL/SLL.

15 Guideline Update of the Grupo Español de Leucemia Linfocítica Crónica clinical guidelines of the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. 2017

García-Marco, José A / Delgado, Julio / Hernández-Rivas, José A / Ramírez Payer, Ángel / Loscertales Pueyo, Javier / Jarque, Isidro / Abrisqueta, Pau / Giraldo, Pilar / Martínez, Rafael / Yáñez, Lucrecia / Terol, Mª José / González, Marcos / Bosch, Francesc / Anonymous6990897. ·Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Majadahonda, Madrid, España. Electronic address: jagarciam@aehh.org. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Clínic i Provincial, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario Infanta Leonor, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Clínico Universitario-Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Salamanca (IBSAL), Salamanca, España. ·Med Clin (Barc) · Pubmed #28236475.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The broad therapeutic arsenal and the biological heterogeneity of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) makes it difficult to standardize treatment for CLL patients with specific clinical settings in routine clinical practice. These considerations prompted us to elaborate the present consensus document, which constitutes an update of the previous version published in 2013, mainly focusing on novel treatment strategies that have been developed over last 5 years, namely B-cell receptor inhibitors (ibrutinib and idelalisib), anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (ofatumumab and obinutuzumab), and Bcl-2 inhibitors (venetoclax). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A group of experts from the Spanish Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Group reviewed all published literature from January 2010 to January 2016, in order to provide recommendations based on clinical evidence. For those areas without strong scientific evidence, the panel of experts established consensus criteria based on their clinical experience. RESULTS: The project has resulted in several practical recommendations that will facilitate the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with CLL. CONCLUSIONS: There are many controversial issues in the management of CLL with no appropriate studies for making consensus recommendations.

16 Guideline Initial Diagnostic Workup of Acute Leukemia: Guideline From the College of American Pathologists and the American Society of Hematology. 2017

Arber, Daniel A / Borowitz, Michael J / Cessna, Melissa / Etzell, Joan / Foucar, Kathryn / Hasserjian, Robert P / Rizzo, J Douglas / Theil, Karl / Wang, Sa A / Smith, Anthony T / Rumble, R Bryan / Thomas, Nicole E / Vardiman, James W. · ·Arch Pathol Lab Med · Pubmed #28225303.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: - A complete diagnosis of acute leukemia requires knowledge of clinical information combined with morphologic evaluation, immunophenotyping and karyotype analysis, and often, molecular genetic testing. Although many aspects of the workup for acute leukemia are well accepted, few guidelines have addressed the different aspects of the diagnostic evaluation of samples from patients suspected to have acute leukemia. OBJECTIVE: - To develop a guideline for treating physicians and pathologists involved in the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of new acute leukemia samples, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage. DESIGN: - The College of American Pathologists and the American Society of Hematology convened a panel of experts in hematology and hematopathology to develop recommendations. A systematic evidence review was conducted to address 6 key questions. Recommendations were derived from strength of evidence, feedback received during the public comment period, and expert panel consensus. RESULTS: - Twenty-seven guideline statements were established, which ranged from recommendations on what clinical and laboratory information should be available as part of the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of acute leukemia samples to what types of testing should be performed routinely, with recommendations on where such testing should be performed and how the results should be reported. CONCLUSIONS: - The guideline provides a framework for the multiple steps, including laboratory testing, in the evaluation of acute leukemia samples. Some aspects of the guideline, especially molecular genetic testing in acute leukemia, are rapidly changing with new supportive literature, which will require on-going updates for the guideline to remain relevant.

17 Guideline ECIL-6 guidelines for the treatment of invasive candidiasis, aspergillosis and mucormycosis in leukemia and hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. 2017

Tissot, Frederic / Agrawal, Samir / Pagano, Livio / Petrikkos, Georgios / Groll, Andreas H / Skiada, Anna / Lass-Flörl, Cornelia / Calandra, Thierry / Viscoli, Claudio / Herbrecht, Raoul. ·Infectious Diseases Service, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Switzerland frederic.tissot@chuv.ch. · Division of Haemato-Oncology, St Bartholomew's Hospital and Blizard Institute, Queen Mary University, London, UK. · Hematology, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Roma, Italy. · School of Medicine, European University Cyprus, Engomi, Cyprus. · Infectious Disease Research Program, Center for Bone Marrow Transplantation and Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University Children's Hospital, Münster, Germany. · 1st Department of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece. · Division of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. · Infectious Diseases Service, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Switzerland. · University of Genova (DISSAL), Infectious Disease Division, IRCCS San Martino-IST, Genova, Italy. · Oncology and Hematology, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg and Université de Strasbourg, France. ·Haematologica · Pubmed #28011902.

ABSTRACT: The European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL) provides recommendations for diagnostic strategies and prophylactic, pre-emptive or targeted therapy strategies for various types of infection in patients with hematologic malignancies or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. Meetings are held every two years since 2005 and evidence-based recommendations are elaborated after evaluation of the literature and discussion among specialists of nearly all European countries. In this manuscript, the ECIL group presents the 2015-update of the recommendations for the targeted treatment of invasive candidiasis, aspergillosis and mucormycosis. Current data now allow a very strong recommendation in favor of echinocandins for first-line therapy of candidemia irrespective of the underlying predisposing factors. Anidulafungin has been given the same grading as the other echinocandins for hemato-oncological patients. The beneficial role of catheter removal in candidemia is strengthened.

18 Guideline Rituximab in Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia: A Practice Guideline. 2017

Prica, A / Baldassarre, F / Hicks, L K / Imrie, K / Kouroukis, T / Cheung, M / Anonymous18690884. ·Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Program in Evidence-based Care, Cancer Care Ontario, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: baldasf@mcmaster.ca. · St. Michael Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. ·Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) · Pubmed #27746042.

ABSTRACT: Rituximab is the first monoclonal antibody to be approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration in cancer. Its role in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), has evolved significantly. We aimed to systematically review and update the literature on rituximab in lymphoma and CLL, and provide evidence-based consensus guidelines for its rational use. Validated methodology from the Cancer Care Ontario Program in Evidence-based Care was used. A comprehensive literature search was completed by a methodologist from the Hematology Disease Site Group of Cancer Care Ontario. Data were extracted from randomised controlled trials of rituximab-containing chemotherapy regimens for patients with lymphoma or CLL. Fifty-six primary randomised controlled trials were retrievable and met all inclusion criteria. Clinically important benefits in progression-free survival or overall survival were seen in the following settings: (i) addition of rituximab to combination chemotherapy for initial treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma and HIV-related lymphoma with CD4 count ≥50/mm

19 Guideline Brazilian guidelines on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia. 2017

Silla, Lucia / Dulley, Frederico / Saboya, Rosaura / Kerbauy, Fabio / de Moraes Arantes, Adriano / Pezzi, Annelise / Gross, Luisa Grave / Paton, Eduardo / Hamerschlak, Nelson. ·Cellular Therapy Program HCPA, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Hospital Inglês, São Paulo, Brazil. · Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Hospital Albert Einstein e UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil. · Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Hospital Araújo Jorge, Goiãnia, Brazil. · Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, Barretos, Brazil. ·Eur J Haematol · Pubmed #27621140.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION/OBJECTIVES: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) accounts for 90% of all cases of acute leukemia in adults. In Brazil, the mortality from myeloid leukemia is 1.74/100 000 men and 1.37/100 000 women. Our aim was to review and update guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation on indications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for the treatment AML. CONCLUSIONS: (i) Allo-HSCT is recommended for high-risk AML (IA); (ii) allo-HSCT is recommended for AML of intermediate risk (IA); (iii) allo-HSCT is recommended for AML relapsed/refractory (C4); (iv) auto-HSCT is recommended for AML after 1 consolidation (C4); (v) auto-HSCT is recommended for AML in CR1 (higher than QT in the Brazilian experience) (C4); (vi) auto-HSCT is accepted for AML M3 in second molecular complete remission (2B); (vii) peripheral blood instead of Bone Marrow HSC for advanced disease (2A); (viii) recommended conditioning protocols: Bu-Cy/Bu-Mel, Bu-Flu, TBI-Cy. In umbilical cord HSCT, consider ATG-based protocols (2A); (ix) allogeneic HSCT for the treatment of AML can be used in patients between 60 and 80 yr with good performance status and the absence of significant comorbidities (C4).

20 Guideline [Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Guidelines from the Francophone society of marrow transplantation and cellular therapy (SFGM-TC)]. 2016

Nguyen, Stéphanie / Chalandon, Yves / Lemarie, Claude / Simon, Sophie / Masson, Dominique / Dhedin, Nathalie / Suarez, Felipe / Renaud, Barbara / Charbonnier, Amandine / Yafour, Nabil / François, Sylvie / Duléry, Rémy / Blaise, Didier / Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim / Rubio, Marie-Thérèse. ·Groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, service d'hématologie, 83-89, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. Electronic address: stephanie.nguyen-quoc@aphp.fr. · Hôpitaux universitaire Genève (HUG), faculté de médecine, service d'hématologie, rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Genève 4, Suisse. · Centre de thérapie cellulaire, institut Paoli-Calmettes, 232, boulevard de Ste-Marguerite, 13009 Marseille, France; Centre d'investigations cliniques en biothérapie, CBT-1409, 13009 Marseille, France. · EFS Alpes Méditerranée, laboratoire d'histocompatibilité, 149, boulevard Baille, 13001 Marseille, France. · EFS Rhône Alpes Grenoble, laboratoire d'histocompatibilité, 29, avenue Maquis-du-Grésivaudan, 38701 La Tronche, France. · Hôpital Saint-Louis, unité hématologie adolescents jeunes adultes, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75010 Paris, France. · Hôpital universitaire Necker-Enfants malades, AP-HP, service d'hématologie adulte, 149, rue de Sèvres, 75743 Paris cedex 15, France; Université Paris Descartes, institut Imagine, Paris Sorbonne Cité, Inserm U1163, CNRS ERL 8254, 75015 Paris, France. · CHU St.-Eloi, coordination de la greffe, 80, avenue Augustin-Fliche, 34090 Montpellier, France. · CHU groupe hospitalier Sud, hématologie clinique, D408, 80054 Amiens, France. · Établissement hospitalier et universitaire 1(er)-Novembre-1954, service d'hématologie et de thérapie cellulaire, BP 4166, 31000 Ibn Rochd, Oran, Algérie; Université d'Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, faculté de médecine, Oran, Algérie. · CHU d'Angers, maladies du sang, rue Larrey, 49000 Angers, France. · Hôpital Saint-Antoine, service d'hématologie clinique et thérapie cellulaire, 184, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Antoine, 75012 Paris, France; Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, UMRs 938 Inserm, 75006 Paris, France. · Institut Paoli-Calmette, unité de greffe, 232, boulevard de Sainte-Marguerite, 13009 Marseille, France. · CHU de Lille, maladies du sang, hématologie, 2, avenue Oscar-Lambret, 59000 Lille, France; Faculté de médecine, université Lille 2, LIRIC, Inserm U995, place Verdun, 59045 Lille, France. · Hôpital Brabois, service d'hématologie et de médecine interne, rue du Morvan, 54500 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy, France; CHRU Nancy, université de Lorraine, CNRS UMR 7365, 54500 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #27842860.

ABSTRACT: Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is being increasingly used due to improvement of the transplantation procedures allowing a reduction of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) and of transplant-related mortality (TRM). Such improvements have been particularly observed after administration of T-replete HSCT graft associated to an in vivo T cell depletion by the administration of high-doses of cyclophosphamide (HD-Cy) after transplantation. Here, we have analyzed the results of haplo-identical T replete HSC transplants, in particular, when performed with post-transplant HD-Cy in order to provide recommendations for the clinical practice. Criteria of choice for a haploidentical donor by priority order are absence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and to prioritize: CMV seronegative recipient/donor couples, ABO matching in case of deserythrocytation, male donor for a male recipient, the youngest donor. There is no clear argument in favor of the use of bone marrow versus peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) after non myeloablative conditioning regimen, while after ablative conditioning PBSC seem to be associated with higher risks of GVHD without obvious impact on survival. Results of haploidentical HSCT, confirmed by several groups, are interesting in lymphomas (in particular Hodgkin disease) and for acute leukemia. Outcomes of patients rely on age, disease status at transplant and conditioning intensity. At equivalent disease risk, results of haploidentical HSCT seem comparable to those of HLA matched HSCT, raising the question of the classification of such transplants as alternatives. In all cases, we recommend to include patients in prospective clinical trials.

21 Guideline Cytogenetics in the management of children and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH). 2016

Baranger, Laurence / Cuccuini, Wendy / Lefebvre, Christine / Luquet, Isabelle / Perot, Christine / Radford, Isabelle / Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina. ·Laboratoire de génétique, IBS-CHRU, Angers, France. · Laboratoire central d'hématologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique onco-hématologique, Institut de biologie et de pathologie, CHU Grenoble, Grenoble, France. · Génétique des hémopathies. Laboratoire d'hématologie, IUCT-O, Toulouse, France. · Unité de cytogénétique onco-hématologique, Laboratoire d'hématologie, Hôpital Saint-Antoine, APHP, Paris, France. · Unité de cytogénétique hématologique, Service d'histo-embryologie et de cytogénétique, Hôpital Necker-enfants malades, Paris, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique onco-hématologique, Hôpital Timone enfants, APHM, Marseille, France; Inserm U1104, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #27707671.

ABSTRACT: Cytogenetic analyses (karyotype and, if necessary, appropriate complementary FISH analyses) are mandatory at diagnosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as their results are taken into account in therapeutic protocols due to their diagnostic and prognostic values. In some cases, karyotype can be completed by other techniques (RT-PCR, RQ-PCR, DNA content, SNP-array, MLPA…) that can be equally or more informative than FISH. Here, we have tempted to establish guidelines concerning karyotype and FISH analyses according to the most recent data of the litterature which is reviewed here, completing the 2008 WHO classification with the recent new cytogenomic entities such as Ph-like ALL and indicating possible therapeutic implications.

22 Guideline Cytogenetics in the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH). 2016

Nguyen-Khac, Florence / Borie, Claire / Callet-Bauchu, Evelyne / Eclache, Virginie / Struski, Stéphanie. ·Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, UPMC Paris 6, Inserm UMRS1138, Paris, France. · Secteur cytogénétique onco-hématologique, Laboratoire d'hématologie, Hôpital Paul Brousse, Villejuif, France. · Laboratoire de biologie moléculaire et de cytogénétique des hémopathies, Service d'hématologie biologique - CBPAS, Groupement Hospitalier Sud-Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pierre-Bénite, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie et de cytogénétique, Hôpital Avicenne APHP, Bobigny, France. · Institut universitaire du cancer Toulouse-Oncopole, Laboratoire d'hématologie/Plateau technique hématologie-oncologie, Toulouse, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #27628190.

ABSTRACT: Acquired recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities are frequent in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). They can be associated with good or poor prognostic factors, and also with gene mutations. Chromosomal abnormalities could be clonal or sub-clonal. Assessing the TP53 status (deletion/mutation) is currently mandatory before treating patients. The search for 11q deletion (ATM gene) is also recommended. Finally, the prognostic value of other chromosomal abnormalities including complex karyotype is still debated.

23 Guideline Cytogenetics in the management of acute myeloid leukemia: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH). 2016

Luquet, Isabelle / Bidet, Audrey / Cuccuini, Wendy / Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina / Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle / Terré, Christine. ·Laboratoire d'hématologie, Génétique des hémopathies, IUCT-O, Toulouse, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie-cytogénétique, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, CHU de Bordeaux, Pessac, France. · Laboratoire central d'hématologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · Département de génétique, Hôpital Timone, APHM, Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique et biologie moléculaire, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique, Centre de transfusion sanguine, Le Chesnay, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #27545007.

ABSTRACT: The karyotype is critical for the evaluation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis. Cytogenetic abnormalities detected in AML are one of the most powerful independent prognostic factors. It impacts on the choice of treatment in clinical trials. All chromosomes can be targeted, common chromosomal abnormalities are recurrent and may be associated with a cytological well-defined type. In 40% of the cases, the karyotype is normal and must be associated with molecular biology studies that can refine the prognosis. The usefulness of the karyotype is more limited during the follow-up of the patient due to its limited sensitivity, but it is still useful in the clinical management of relapse. Since 2001, the WHO (World Health Organization) classification of hematological malignancies integrates cytogenetic data in the classification of AML. Karyotype is therefore mandatory in the diagnosis of AML.

24 Guideline Cytogenetics in the management of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH). 2016

Bilhou-Nabéra, Chrystèle / Bidet, Audrey / Eclache, Virginie / Lippert, Eric / Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle. ·Laboratoire d'hématologie, Unité de cytogénétique onco-hématologique, Hôpital Saint-Antoine, AP-HP, Paris, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie-cytogénétique, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, CHU de Bordeaux, Pessac, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie et de cytogénétique, Hôpital Avicenne, AP-HP, Bobigny, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie biologique, CHRU de Brest & Equipe Ecla, Inserm U1078, Université de Bretagne occidentale, Brest, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique et biologie moléculaire, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #27477946.

ABSTRACT: The recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in the molecular characterization of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Beside a better understanding of pathophysiology, these abnormalities often constitute very useful diagnostic markers in diseases where exclusion of reactive states used to be the strongest argument. However, conventional and molecular cytogenetics keep a major interest in MPN, either as a second line exploration, in cases where no molecular marker is available, for differential diagnosis or as a proof of clonality or in first line for cases with hyperleukocytosis, for differential diagnosis (CML), to evidence druggable targets (ABL1, RET, PDGFR…) or as a prognosis marker. In this article, we will review the interest of cytogenetic techniques in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

25 Guideline Cytogenetics in the management of "chronic myeloid leukemia": an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH). 2016

Roche-Lestienne, Catherine / Boudry-Labis, Elise / Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle. ·Institut de génétique médicale, CHU Lille, Lille, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique hématologique et moléculaire, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #27477825.

ABSTRACT: Cytogenetic evaluation is one the most important criteria for diagnosis and response to treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia, and recent baseline prognostic factors including particular additional clonal cytogenetic abnormalities have been established. The French cytogenetic group in hematology GFCH proposes here an updating of recommendations for cytogenetic assessment of CML in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

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