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Liver Abscess HELP
Based on 1,528 articles published since 2008
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These are the 1528 published articles about Liver Abscess that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Chapter 2-5-4. Anaerobic infections (individual fields): intraperitoneal infections (acute peritonitis, hepatobiliary infections, etc.). 2011

Anonymous2740699 / Anonymous2750699. · ·J Infect Chemother · Pubmed #21728099.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Fever in returned travellers presenting in the United Kingdom: recommendations for investigation and initial management. 2009

Johnston, Victoria / Stockley, Jane M / Dockrell, David / Warrell, David / Bailey, Robin / Pasvol, Geoffrey / Klein, John / Ustianowski, Andrew / Jones, Michael / Beeching, Nicholas J / Brown, Michael / Chapman, Ann L N / Sanderson, Frances / Whitty, Christopher J M / Anonymous4530633. ·Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Mortimer Market Centre, Capper Street, London, UK. victoria.johnston@lshtm.ac.uk ·J Infect · Pubmed #19595360.

ABSTRACT: International travel is increasing. Most physicians and general practitioners will encounter returned travellers with fever and the majority of travel-related infection is associated with travel to the tropics. In those returning from the tropics malaria must always be excluded, and HIV considered, from all settings. Common causes of non-malarial fever include from Africa rickettsial diseases, amoebic liver abscess and Katayama syndrome; from South and South East Asia, enteric fever and arboviral infection; from the Middle East, brucellosis and from the Horn of Africa visceral leishmaniasis. Other rare but important diseases from particular geographical areas include leptospirosis, trypanosomiasis and viral haemorrhagic fever. North and South America, Europe and Australia also have infections which are geographically concentrated. Empirical treatment may have to be started based on epidemiological probability of infection whilst waiting for results to return. The evidence base for much of the management of tropical infections is limited. These recommendations provide a pragmatic approach to the initial diagnosis and management of fever in returned travellers, based on evidence where it is available and on consensus of expert opinion where it is not. With early diagnosis and treatment the majority of patients with a potentially fatal infection related to travel will make a rapid and full recovery.

3 Editorial Editorial: is proton pump inhibitor use associated with worse outcomes in patients with liver abscesses? 2018

Tabibian, J H / Lindor, K D. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, USA. · Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #29574873.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Editorial: is proton pump inhibitor use associated with worse outcomes in patients with liver abscesses? Authors' reply. 2018

Bettinger, D / Thimme, R / Boettler, T. ·Department of Medicine II, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Center University of Freiburg, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Berta-Ottenstein-Programme, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #29574867.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Are our endoscopy patients at risk for pyogenic liver abscess? 2017

Cerwenka, Herwig / Schemmer, Peter. ·Herwig Cerwenka, Peter Schemmer, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28852305.

ABSTRACT: This is an editorial comment on a recent publication reporting an increased rate of pyogenic liver abscesses (PLAs) after upper gastrointestinal panendoscopy. Its aim is to critically highlight the findings, limitations and potential clinical implications of this study. Issues of the mucosal barrier, the microbial flora, administration of antibiotics and underlying diseases are discussed. The probability of PLAs after endoscopies is not exactly known and the length of the "incubation period" remains unclear, but a possible causality should already suffice to make us think how to avoid them. Especially in patients with risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease, liver cirrhosis, biliary tract infection, and malignancies, the potential risk for PLAs should be considered. Unnecessary insufflation during endoscopy (causing mucosal stretching and microscopic tears) as well as mucosal damage (by direct abrasion with the scope) should be avoided in order to limit the invasiveness of the procedure as much as possible. And, in everyday routine, it should be kept in mind that in patients after endoscopy, especially in those with a breach of the mucosal barrier and significant comorbidities, PLAs can potentially develop and require timely administration of antibiotics as well as further diagnostic and therapeutic steps.

6 Editorial EUS-Guided Drainage of Liver Abscesses: Ultra Uncertain or Sound Practice? 2016

Petrone, Maria Chiara / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio. · ·Dig Dis Sci · Pubmed #26482824.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Photo quiz: A 50-year-old with a 2-day history of right upper quadrant tenderness and septicemia caused by a Gram-negative organism. 2014

Vaughan, Leroy B / Forbes, Betty A. ·Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Richmond, Virginia, USA. · Department of Pathology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Richmond, Virginia, USA baforbes@vcu.edu. ·J Clin Microbiol · Pubmed #24855661.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Hepatobiliary cancer and pyogenic liver abscess: when poking the skunk is not enough: invited commentary on Chen, et al. Am J Surg 2013;205:52-7. 2013

Behrns, Kevin E. · ·Am J Surg · Pubmed #23375754.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Pyogenic liver abscess in the elderly: what we have learned? 2012

Lin, Yi-Tsung / Fung, Chang-Phone. · ·J Chin Med Assoc · Pubmed #22541139.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Ultrasound diagnosis of liver masses in children. 2012

Lai, Ming-Wei. · ·Pediatr Neonatol · Pubmed #22503252.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial [Treatment of liver abscesses: new evidence of the usefulness of hospital at home]. 2010

Regalado de Los Cobos, José / Cía Ruiz, Juan Miguel. · ·Med Clin (Barc) · Pubmed #20226478.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial The function of wzy_K1 (magA), the serotype K1 polymerase gene in Klebsiella pneumoniae cps gene cluster. 2010

Fang, Chi-Tai / Lai, Shau-Yan / Yi, Wen-Ching / Hsueh, Po-Ren / Liu, Kao-Lang. · ·J Infect Dis · Pubmed #20225957.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Pyogenic liver abscess associated with septic pulmonary embolism. 2008

Lin, Jung-Chung / Chang, Feng-Yee. · ·J Chin Med Assoc · Pubmed #19114323.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Pyogenic liver abscess--predicting failure to improve outcome. 2008

Chung, Y F A. · ·Neth J Med · Pubmed #18490794.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Review Transient increase of CA 19-9 serum concentrations in a liver transplant recipient with cystic fibrosis and hepatic abscess: a case report and brief literature review. 2019

Denis, Jérôme A / Mazzola, Alessandra / Nguyen, Guillaume / Lacorte, Jean-Marc / Brochet, Christine / Larsen, Annette K / Conti, Filoména. ·Sorbonne Universities, University Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France; Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Endocrine and Oncological Biochemistry, Paris, France; INSERM U938, Centre de recherche de Saint-Antoine, Cancer Biology and therapeutics, Paris, France. Electronic address: jerome.denis@aphp.fr. · Sorbonne Universities, University Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France; Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Medical Unit of Hepatic Transplantation, Department of Hepato-Gastro-Enterology, 75013 Paris, France. · Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Endocrine and Oncological Biochemistry, Paris, France. · Sorbonne Universities, University Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France; Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Endocrine and Oncological Biochemistry, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR S U1166, ICAN, Paris, France. · Sorbonne Universities, University Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France; INSERM U938, Centre de recherche de Saint-Antoine, Cancer Biology and therapeutics, Paris, France. · Sorbonne Universities, University Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France; Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Medical Unit of Hepatic Transplantation, Department of Hepato-Gastro-Enterology, 75013 Paris, France; INSERM U938, Centre de recherche de Saint-Antoine, Fibro-inflammatory diseases of metabolic and biliary origin of the liver, Paris, France. ·Clin Biochem · Pubmed #30342018.

ABSTRACT: CA 19-9 (carbohydrate antigen 19-9) is a tumor marker widely used for surveillance of patients with pancreatic cancer. However, even high levels of CA 19-9 may not necessarily be cancer-associated thereby complicating the diagnosis. This case report highlights a transient increase of CA 19-9 in a triple transplanted patient with cystic fibrosis and continuous immunosuppression for 20 years who was under antibiotics. This case emphasizes the need for a balanced interpretation of biological results, especially in cases where many confounding factors are present such as diabetes, chronic renal failure, cystic fibrosis and infections. This case also provides an opportunity to formulate a number of recommendations for the interpretation of tumor marker results in order to avoid long and costly further investigations.

16 Review Abdominal etiologies of pleural effusion. 2019

Karki, Apurwa / Riley, Leonard / Mehta, Hiren J / Ataya, Ali. ·Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Rd, M452, PO Box 100225, Gainesville, FL 32610, United States. · Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Rd, M452, PO Box 100225, Gainesville, FL 32610, United States. Electronic address: aliataya@gmail.com. ·Dis Mon · Pubmed #30274930.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review Persistent febrile illnesses in Nepal: A systematic review. 2018

Koirala, Kanika Deshpande / Chappuis, François / Verdonck, Kristien / Rijal, Suman / Boelaert, Marleen. ·Department of Medicine, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Science, Dharan, Nepal; Epidemiology and Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium; Institute of Global Health, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Institute of Global Health, University of Geneva; Division of Tropical & Humanitarian Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. · Epidemiology and Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium. · Department of Medicine, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Science, Dharan, Nepal. ·Indian J Med Res · Pubmed #30666001.

ABSTRACT: Background & objectives: Although febrile illnesses are a frequent cause of consultation and hospitalization in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), research has mainly focused on acute febrile illnesses (AFIs). In contrast, there are limited data on the causes of persistent febrile illnesses (PFIs) in LMIC. Lack of clarity on the differential diagnosis of PFIs in the rural tropics leads to the absence of diagnostic guidance tools. Methods: In this study, a review of the potential causes of persistent fever defined as fever of more than seven days was done in Nepal, with a focus on nine pathogen-specific conditions. The current knowledge on their burden, distribution and diagnosis was summarized. Results: Limited data were found on the incidence and public health burden of leptospirosis, murine typhus and brucellosis due to the absence of diagnostic tools outside reference laboratories and the overlap of signs and symptoms with other febrile conditions. The incidence of malaria and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was found to be decreasing in Nepal, with some changes of the geographical areas at risk. Interpretation & conclusions: This review indicates a need for more research on the causes of PFIs in Nepal and in the region and for the development of clinical guidance tailored to current local epidemiology. Guidance tools should include specific clinical features (e.g. eschar), results of rapid diagnostic tests (e.g. malaria, VL), appropriate indications for more sophisticated tests (e.g. abdominal ultrasound, polymerase chain reaction) and recommendations for adequate use of empirical treatment.

18 Review Pyogenic Liver Abscess of Biliary Origin: The Existing Problems and Their Strategies. 2018

Shi, Shao-Hua / Zhai, Zheng-Long / Zheng, Shu-Sen. ·Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Zhejiang University, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China. · Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-Organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China. ·Semin Liver Dis · Pubmed #30041279.

ABSTRACT: Pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) of biliary origin in Southeast Asia mainly occurs in patients with intrahepatic bile duct stone (IBDS) and extrahepatic bile duct stone (EBDS), bilioenteric anastomosis, or biliary stent. IBDS, as an endemic to Southeast Asia, remains a frequent etiology of acute cholangitis and PLA. PLA related to IBDS is characterized by high incidences of PLA recurrence and death related to infection, and difficulties in diagnosis of concomitant cholangicarcinoma. PLA of biliary origin is more likely caused by

19 Review Infectious Complications in Patients With Chronic Granulomatous Disease. 2018

Bennett, Nicholas / Maglione, Paul J / Wright, Benjamin L / Zerbe, Christa. ·Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford. · Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale. · Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona. · The National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland. ·J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc · Pubmed #29746678.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Review Liver abscess caused by Clostridium haemolyticum infection after transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma: A case report. 2018

Son, Dong-Jun / Hong, Ji-Yun / Kim, Ki-Hyun / Jeong, Young-Hoon / Myung, Dae-Seong / Cho, Sung-Bum / Lee, Wan-Sik / Kang, Yang-Jun / Kim, Jin-Woong / Joo, Young-Eun. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School. · Department of Radiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #29742715.

ABSTRACT: RATIONALE: Liver abscesses caused by Clostridium species infection are extremely rare. PATIENT CONCERNS: The authors report the first case of a liver abscess due to Clostridium haemolyticum, which occurred after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma, in a 76-year-old woman who presented with right upper quadrant pain and fever. DIAGNOSES: Computed tomography of the abdomen after the second TACE showed an air-filled abscess around a compact, lipiodolized lesion in the right hepatic lobe. Pus culture showed the growth of C haemolyticum. INTERVENTIONS: Broad-spectrum antibiotics, including piperacillin/tazobactam and metronidazole, were administered, and a percutaneous 10-French pigtail catheter for pus drainage and culture was inserted in the liver abscess. OUTCOMES: Despite administering intensive treatments, she presented with rapid deterioration in mental status, liver function, and infection markers. She was transferred to the local hospital for palliative conservative treatment. LESSONS: Clostridia infections, including those involving C haemolyticum, are extremely rare, but should be considered as one of the causative organisms of liver abscess formation after TACE because of its rapid and fatal clinical course.

21 Review A case of liver abscess co-infected with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Escherichia coli and review of the literature. 2018

Yamazaki, Tomoo / Joshita, Satoru / Kasuga, Eriko / Horiuchi, Kazuki / Sugiura, Ayumi / Fujimori, Naoyuki / Komatsu, Michiharu / Umemura, Takeji / Matsumoto, Akihiro / Tanaka, Eiji. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: ymzktm6@shinshu-u.ac.jp. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan; Research Center for Next Generation Medicine, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: joshita@shinshu-u.ac.jp. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Shinshu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: erika@shinshu-u.ac.jp. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Shinshu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: hori9000@shinshu-u.ac.jp. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: a19860530@gmail.com. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: naoyuki.fuji@gmail.com. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: komichi@shinshu-u.ac.jp. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan; Research Center for Next Generation Medicine, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: tumemura@shinshu-u.ac.jp. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: amatsumo@shinshu-u.ac.jp. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan. Electronic address: etanaka@shinshu-u.ac.jp. ·J Infect Chemother · Pubmed #29249641.

ABSTRACT: A 73-year-old woman was admitted with consciousness disturbance following a fever. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large liver abscess with which the presence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Escherichia coli was confirmed by thorough blood and abscess content culture. Empiric meropenem treatment was switched to cefoperazone/sulbactam, followed by ampicillin/sulbactam based on susceptibility testing. Desulfovibrio desulfuricans is a common bacterium that rarely causes liver abscess and may be overlooked during co-infection due to overgrowth of the accompanying bacteria. Clinicians should bear Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in mind and select the appropriate antibiotics according to susceptibility testing when anaerobic bacteria are detected in a liver abscess.

22 Review Successful transcatheter arterial antimicrobial and steroid therapy for refractory liver abscess in chronic granulomatous disease: A case report and review of literature. 2018

Kitano, Taito / Nishikawa, Yuki / Sueyoshi, Satoru / Horikawa, Noriko / Nakagawa, Hiroyuki / Yoshida, Sayaka. ·Nara Prefecture General Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Nara, Japan; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Master of Public Health Program, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: taito.kitano.0110@gmail.com. · Nara Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Kashihara, Japan. · Nara Prefecture General Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nara, Japan. · Nara Prefecture General Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Nara, Japan. ·J Infect Chemother · Pubmed #29132925.

ABSTRACT: Hepatic abscess in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is very refractory and frequently requires multiple surgeries with frequent morbidities. Although surgical interventions are often required, patients are often not able to have surgery for various reasons. We present the case of a 21-year-old man with recurrent hepatic abscess in CGD. We could not provide surgical interventions due to the lack of a fluid cavity and the patient's refusal, and therefore we administered transcatheter arterial antimicrobial and steroid therapy. He did not have any exacerbation for more than 18 months after the final transcatheter treatment. This is the first reported case of successful transcatheter arterial antimicrobial and steroid therapy for refractory hepatic abscess in CGD. Although the patient's burden and medical cost were not inconsequential, this case shows that the transcatheter arterial antimicrobial and steroid therapy may be a treatment option for patients who are not candidates for surgical interventions.

23 Review A Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess presenting with myasthenia and tea-colored urine: A case report and review of 77 cases of bacterial rhabdomyolysis. 2017

Deng, Lihua / Jia, Rong / Li, Wei / Xue, Qian / Liu, Jie / Miao, Yide / Wang, Jingtong. ·Department of Geriatrics, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, P. R. China. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #29390582.

ABSTRACT: RATIONALE: Rhabdomyolysis is a well-known syndrome in clinical practice, although rhabdomyolysis caused by a liver abscess is rarely reported and the patient may lack symptoms that are associated with a primary site of infection. Early recognition of this possibility is needed to avoid diagnostic delay and facilitate treatment. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with a Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) pyogenic liver abscess who presented with myasthenia and tea-colored urine and also review the 77 reported cases of bacterial rhabdomyolysis. PATIENT CONCERNS: The patient was 71 years old and presenting with a 7-day history of myasthenia and a 3-day history of tea-colored urine, but without fever or abdominal pain. DIAGNOSES: Laboratory testing in our case revealed rhabdomyolysis, and blood culture revealed KP. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic enclosed mass, and computed tomography (CT) revealed an enclosed low-density mass (8.3 × 6.6 × 6.1 cm). The main diagnoses were a pyogenic liver abscess with rhabdomyolysis. INTERVENTIONS: Empirically intravenous piperacillin-sulbactam and intravenous potassium treatment, as well as fluid infusions and other supportive treatments were provided after admission. After the diagnosis was confirmed and susceptibility test results were available, we adjusted the antibiotics to cefoperazone and sulbactam, which were maintained for 6 weeks. OUTCOMES: The patient's symptoms relieved and the abnormal laboratory parameters corrected. Follow-up abdominal ultrasonography at 24 months after her discharge revealed that the abscess had disappeared. LESSONS: Early recognition and careful consideration of the underlying cause of rhabdomyolysis are critical to improving the patient's prognosis. Thus, physicians should carefully consider the underlying cause in elderly patients who present with rhabdomyolysis, as they may lack symptoms of a primary infection.

24 Review Unusual synchronous liver and brain abscesses infected by rare Aerococcus viridians in a patient with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on FDG PET/CT: A case report and literature review. 2017

Chen, Donghe / Dong, Mengjie / Zhao, Kui / Sun, Fang / Wang, Huatao / Liu, Zhengfeng. ·aThe First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ZhejiangbKey Laboratory of Precision Diagnosis and Treatment for Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Tumor of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, China. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #29245306.

ABSTRACT: RATIONALE: Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) complicated with multiple organ abscesses is an uncommon manifestation. Because of the low incidence of the disease, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography (F-FDG PET/CT) imaging studies for PAVMs complicated with multiple organ abscesses are scarce. PATIENT CONCERNS: We report a case of a 54-year-old man presenting with PAVMs complicated with synchronous multiple organ abscesses founded by F-FDG PET/CT. F-FDG PET/CT revealed tortuous stripes and mass opacities with no significant FDG uptake in the left upper lung lobe. However, hypermetabolic lesions located in the anterior inferior segment of right hepatic lobe [with maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 10.7], and in the right basal ganglia with SUVmax of 14.1 were found by F-FDG PET/CT. DIAGNOSES: A diagnosis of synchronous liver and brain abscesses infected by rare Aerococcus viridans was determined by tissue culture. INTERVENTIONS: Vancomycin was provided intravenously, and oral linezolidate tablets were prescribed for anti-inflammatory treatment for 1 month. Liver and head magnetic resonance imaging was performed during the follow-up. OUTCOMES: The lesion in the right basal ganglia was reduced, and the lesion in the right liver had disappeared, indicating the lesions were abscesses. LESSONS: The present case indicated that the possibility of abscesses should be considered with patients with PAVMs, and whole-body F-FDG PET/CT is suggested to identify possible accompanying abscesses in multiple organs for PAVMs patients.

25 Review Antimicrobial Resistance of Hypervirulent 2017

Lee, Chang-Ro / Lee, Jung Hun / Park, Kwang Seung / Jeon, Jeong Ho / Kim, Young Bae / Cha, Chang-Jun / Jeong, Byeong Chul / Lee, Sang Hee. ·National Leading Research Laboratory of Drug Resistance Proteomics, Department of Biological Sciences, Myongji University, Yongin, South Korea. · Biotechnology Program, North Shore Community College, Danvers, MA, United States. · Department of Systems Biotechnology, College of Biotechnology and Natural Resources, Chung-Ang University, Anseong, South Korea. ·Front Cell Infect Microbiol · Pubmed #29209595.

ABSTRACT:

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