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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus HELP
Based on 16,468 articles published since 2007
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These are the 16468 published articles about Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic that originated from Worldwide during 2007-2017.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

2 Guideline Vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and management of major chronic diseases not related to mineral homeostasis in adults: research for evidence and a scientific statement from the European society for clinical and economic aspects of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis (ESCEO). 2017

Cianferotti, Luisella / Bertoldo, Francesco / Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A / Bruyere, Olivier / Cooper, Cyrus / Cutolo, Maurizio / Kanis, John A / Kaufman, Jean-Marc / Reginster, Jean-Yves / Rizzoli, Rene / Brandi, Maria Luisa. ·Bone Metabolic Diseases Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University Hospital of Florence and University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Liege, CHU Sart Tilman, Liege, 4000, Belgium. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hants, UK. · Research Laboratory and Academic Division of Clinical Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Genoa, Italy. · Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK.; Institute for Health and Aging, Catholic University of Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Department of Endocrinology and Unit for Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Diseases, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, CHU Sart-Tilman, Liège, Belgium. · Service of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland. · Bone Metabolic Diseases Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University Hospital of Florence and University of Florence, Florence, Italy. marialuisa.brandi@unifi.it. ·Endocrine · Pubmed #28390010.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Optimal vitamin D status promotes skeletal health and is recommended with specific treatment in individuals at high risk for fragility fractures. A growing body of literature has provided indirect and some direct evidence for possible extraskeletal vitamin D-related effects. PURPOSE AND METHODS: Members of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis have reviewed the main evidence for possible proven benefits of vitamin D supplementation in adults at risk of or with overt chronic extra-skeletal diseases, providing recommendations and guidelines for future studies in this field. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Robust mechanistic evidence is available from in vitro studies and in vivo animal studies, usually employing cholecalciferol, calcidiol or calcitriol in pharmacologic rather than physiologic doses. Although many cross-sectional and prospective association studies in humans have shown that low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (i.e., <50 nmol/L) are consistently associated with chronic diseases, further strengthened by a dose-response relationship, several meta-analyses of clinical trials have shown contradictory results. Overall, large randomized controlled trials with sufficient doses of vitamin D are missing, and available small to moderate-size trials often included people with baseline levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50 nmol/L, did not simultaneously assess multiple outcomes, and did not report overall safety (e.g., falls). Thus, no recommendations can be made to date for the use of vitamin D supplementation in general, parental compounds, or non-hypercalcemic vitamin D analogs in the prevention and treatment of extra-skeletal chronic diseases. Moreover, attainment of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels well above the threshold desired for bone health cannot be recommended based on current evidence, since safety has yet to be confirmed. Finally, the promising findings from mechanistic studies, large cohort studies, and small clinical trials obtained for autoimmune diseases (including type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus), cardiovascular disorders, and overall reduction in mortality require further confirmation.

3 Guideline EULAR recommendations for women's health and the management of family planning, assisted reproduction, pregnancy and menopause in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and/or antiphospholipid syndrome. 2017

Andreoli, L / Bertsias, G K / Agmon-Levin, N / Brown, S / Cervera, R / Costedoat-Chalumeau, N / Doria, A / Fischer-Betz, R / Forger, F / Moraes-Fontes, M F / Khamashta, M / King, J / Lojacono, A / Marchiori, F / Meroni, P L / Mosca, M / Motta, M / Ostensen, M / Pamfil, C / Raio, L / Schneider, M / Svenungsson, E / Tektonidou, M / Yavuz, S / Boumpas, D / Tincani, A. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.; Unit of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy. · Department of Rheumatology, Clinical Immunology and Allergy, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion, Greece. · The Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.; The Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel. · Royal National Hospital For Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · AP-HP, Hôpital Cochin, Centre de référence maladies auto-immunes et systémiques rares, Paris, France.; Université Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Italy. · Policlinic of Rheumatology, Hiller Research Unit, University Clinic Duesseldorf, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergology, University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Unidade de Doenças Auto-imunes-Serviço Medicina Interna 7.2, Hospital Curry Cabral/Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Central, NEDAI/SPMI, Lisboa, Portugal. · Lupus Research Unit, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas Hospital, London, UK.; Department of Rheumatology, Dubai Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. · EULAR PARE Patient Research Partner, London, UK. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.; Unit of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy. · EULAR PARE Patient Research Partner, Rome, Italy. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Neonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy. · Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Pregnancy and Rheumatic Diseases, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital of Bern, Inselspital, Switzerland. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Rheumatology Unit, Joint Academic Rheumatology Programme, 1st Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine Athens, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Rheumatology, Istanbul Bilim University, Istanbul Florence Nightingale Hospital, Esentepe-Istanbul, Turkey. · 4th Department of Internal Medicine, 'Attikon' University Hospital, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.; Joint Academic Rheumatology Program, National and Kapodestrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27457513.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Develop recommendations for women's health issues and family planning in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and/or antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). METHODS: Systematic review of evidence followed by modified Delphi method to compile questions, elicit expert opinions and reach consensus. RESULTS: Family planning should be discussed as early as possible after diagnosis. Most women can have successful pregnancies and measures can be taken to reduce the risks of adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Risk stratification includes disease activity, autoantibody profile, previous vascular and pregnancy morbidity, hypertension and the use of drugs (emphasis on benefits from hydroxychloroquine and antiplatelets/anticoagulants). Hormonal contraception and menopause replacement therapy can be used in patients with stable/inactive disease and low risk of thrombosis. Fertility preservation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues should be considered prior to the use of alkylating agents. Assisted reproduction techniques can be safely used in patients with stable/inactive disease; patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies/APS should receive anticoagulation and/or low-dose aspirin. Assessment of disease activity, renal function and serological markers is important for diagnosing disease flares and monitoring for obstetrical adverse outcomes. Fetal monitoring includes Doppler ultrasonography and fetal biometry, particularly in the third trimester, to screen for placental insufficiency and small for gestational age fetuses. Screening for gynaecological malignancies is similar to the general population, with increased vigilance for cervical premalignant lesions if exposed to immunosuppressive drugs. Human papillomavirus immunisation can be used in women with stable/inactive disease. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations for women's health issues in SLE and/or APS were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus.

4 Guideline [Clinical practice guidelines for systemic lupus erythematosus: Recommendations for general clinical management]. 2016

Trujillo-Martín, María M / Rúa-Figueroa Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo / Ruíz-Irastorza, Guillermo / Pego-Reigosa, José María / Sabio Sánchez, José Mario / Serrano-Aguilar, Pedro / Anonymous771215. ·Fundación Canaria de Investigación Sanitaria (FUNCANIS), La laguna, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España; Red de Investigación en Servicios de Salud en Enfermedades Crónicas (REDISSEC), Madrid, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canarias Dr. Negrín, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, España. Electronic address: matrumar4@gmail.com. · Unidad de Investigación de Enfermedades Autoinmunes, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Universitario Cruces, Barakaldo, Vizcaya, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Meixoeiro, Vigo, España; IRIDIS (Investigation in Rheumatology and Immuno-Mediated Diseases) Group, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica (IBI) de Vigo, Pontevedra y Ourense, España. · Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Virgen de Las Nieves, Granada, España. · Red de Investigación en Servicios de Salud en Enfermedades Crónicas (REDISSEC), Madrid, España; Servicio de Evaluación y Planificación (SESCS), Servicio Canario de la Salud, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España. · ·Med Clin (Barc) · Pubmed #26975887.

ABSTRACT: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex rheumatic multisystemic disease of autoimmune origin with significant potential morbidity and mortality. It is one of the most common autoimmune diseases with an estimated prevalence of 20-150 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. The clinical spectrum of SLE is wide and variable both in clinical manifestations and severity. This prompted the Spanish Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality to promote and fund the development of a clinical practice guideline (CPG) for the clinical care of SLE patients within the Programme of CPG in the National Health System which coordinates GuiaSalud. This CPG is is intended as the reference tool in the Spanish National Health System in order to support the comprehensive clinical management of people with SLE by all health professionals involved, regardless of specialty and level of care, helping to standardize and improve the quality of clinical decisions in our context in order to improve the health outcomes of the people affected. The purpose of this document is to present and discuss the rationale of the recommendations on the general management of SLE, specifically, clinical follow-up, general therapeutic approach, healthy lifestyles, photoprotection, and training programmes for patients. These recommendations are based on the best available scientific evidence, on discussion and the consensus of expert groups.

5 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases of the Mexican College of Rheumatology. Part II. 2015

Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel / Barrera Cruz, Antonio / Cabral Castañeda, Antonio Rafael / Jara Quezada, Luis Javier / Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro / Álvarez Nemegyei, José / Fraga Mouret, Antonio / Orozco Alcalá, Javier / Salazar Páramo, Mario / Cruz Reyes, Claudia Verónica / Andrade Ortega, Lilia / Vera Lastra, Olga Lidia / Mendoza Pinto, Claudia / Sánchez González, Antonio / Cruz Cruz, Polita Del Rocío / Morales Hernández, Sara / Portela Hernández, Margarita / Pérez Cristóbal, Mario / Medina García, Gabriela / Hernández Romero, Noé / Velarde Ochoa, María Del Carmen / Navarro Zarza, José Eduardo / Portillo Díaz, Verónica / Vargas Guerrero, Angélica / Goycochea Robles, María Victoria / García Figueroa, José Luis / Barreira Mercado, Eduardo / Amigo Castañeda, Mary Carmen. ·Departamento de Reumatología, Hospital de Especialidades Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret, CMN La Raza, IMSS, UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. Electronic address: miansaavsa@gmail.com. · División de Excelencia Clínica, Área de Desarrollo de Guías de Práctica Clínica, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Ciencias Médicas F, Departamento de Inmunología y Reumatología, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Dirección de Educación e Investigación, Hospital de Especialidades Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret, CMN La Raza, IMSS, UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. · División de Medicina Interna, Hospital Central Sur de Pemex, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Escuela de Medicina, Universidad Anáhuac-Mayab, Mérida, Yucatán, México. · Dirección de Educación e Investigación, Secretaría de Salud del Distrito Federal, UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Clínica de Reumatología, Escuela de Medicina, Universidad de Guadalajara. Guadalajara, Jalisco, México. · División de Investigación en Salud, UMAE, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente, IMSS, Centro Universitario Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Guadalajara. Guadalajara, Jalisco, México. · Departamento de Reumatología, Hospital de Especialidades Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret, CMN La Raza, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Reumatología, Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE. UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Especialidades, CMN La Raza, IMSS, UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Unidad de Investigación Enfermedades Autoinmunes Sistémicas, Hospital General Regional No. 36-CIBIOR, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Unidad de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla, México. · División de Atención Ginecoobstétrica y Perinatal de la Dirección de Prestaciones Médicas del IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Perinatología, Hospital Gineco-Obstetricia No. 3 Dr. Víctor Manuel Espinosa de los Reyes Sánchez. UMAE, CMN La Raza, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Reumatología, Hospital de Especialidades, CMN Siglo XXI, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Hospital de Especialidades, CMN La Raza, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatales. Hospital Gineco-Obstetricia No. 3 Dr. Víctor Manuel Espinosa de los Reyes Sánchez. UMAE, CMN La Raza, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Reumatología e Inmunología Clínica, Hospital General de Zona No. 46, IMSS, Villahermosa, Tabasco, México. · Hospital General de Chilpancingo Dr. Raymundo Abarca Alarcón, Chilpancingo, Guerrero, México. · Departamento de Medicina Interna, UMAE HGO 4, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Reumatología, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica, Hospital Regional Dr. Carlos Mcgregor Sánchez Navarro, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Villahermosa, Tabasco, México. · Reumatología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro y Universidad del Valle de México. Querétaro, Qro., México. · Reumatología, Centro Médico ABC, México, Distrito Federal, México. ·Reumatol Clin · Pubmed #25683368.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is associated with several maternal and fetal complications. The development of clinical practice guidelines with the best available scientific evidence may help standardize the care of these patients. OBJECTIVES: To provide recommendations regarding prenatal care, treatment, and a more effective monitoring of pregnancy in women with lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). METHODOLOGY: Nominal panels were formed for consensus, systematic search of information, development of clinical questions, processing and staging of recommendations, internal validation by peers and external validation of the final document. The quality criteria of the AGREE II instrument were followed. RESULTS: The panels answered 37 questions related to maternal and fetal care in lupus erythematosus, RA and APS, as well as for use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations were discussed and integrated into a final manuscript. Finally, the corresponding algorithms were developed. In this second part, the recommendations for pregnant women with RA, APS and the use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation are presented. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the Mexican clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with RA and APS integrate the best available evidence for the treatment and follow-up of patients with these conditions.

6 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases of the Mexican College of Rheumatology. Part I. 2015

Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel / Barrera Cruz, Antonio / Cabral Castañeda, Antonio Rafael / Jara Quezada, Luis Javier / Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro / Álvarez Nemegyei, José / Fraga Mouret, Antonio / Orozco Alcalá, Javier / Salazar Páramo, Mario / Cruz Reyes, Claudia Verónica / Andrade Ortega, Lilia / Vera Lastra, Olga Lidia / Mendoza Pinto, Claudia / Sánchez González, Antonio / Cruz Cruz, Polita Del Rocío / Morales Hernández, Sara / Portela Hernández, Margarita / Pérez Cristóbal, Mario / Medina García, Gabriela / Hernández Romero, Noé / Velarde Ochoa, María Del Carmen / Navarro Zarza, José Eduardo / Portillo Díaz, Verónica / Vargas Guerrero, Angélica / Goycochea Robles, María Victoria / García Figueroa, José Luis / Barreira Mercado, Eduardo / Amigo Castañeda, Mary Carmen. ·Departamento de Reumatología, Hospital de Especialidades Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret, CMN La Raza, IMSS; UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. Electronic address: miansaavsa@gmail.com. · División de Excelencia Clínica, Área de Desarrollo de Guías de Práctica Clínica, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Ciencias Médicas F, Departamento de Inmunología y Reumatología, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Dirección de Educación e Investigación, Hospital de Especialidades Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret, CMN La Raza, IMSS, UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. · División de Medicina Interna, Hospital Central Sur de Pemex, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Escuela de Medicina, Universidad Anáhuac-Mayab, Mérida, Yucatán, México. · Dirección de Educación e Investigación, Secretaría de Salud del Distrito Federal, UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Clínica de Reumatología, Escuela de Medicina, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México. · División de Investigación en Salud, UMAE, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente, IMSS, Centro Universitario Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México. · Departamento de Reumatología, Hospital de Especialidades Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret, CMN La Raza, IMSS; UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Reumatología, Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE, Reumatología, UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Especialidades, CMN La Raza, IMSS, UNAM, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Unidad de Investigación Enfermedades Autoinmunes Sistémicas, Hospital General Regional n.(o) 36-CIBIOR, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Unidad de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla, México. · División de Atención Ginecobstétrica y Perinatal de la Dirección de Prestaciones Médicas del IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Perinatología, Hospital Gineco-Obstetricia n.(o)3 Dr. Víctor Manuel Espinosa de los Reyes Sánchez, UMAE, CMN La Raza, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Reumatología, Hospital de Especialidades, CMN Siglo XXI, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Hospital de Especialidades, CMN La Raza, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatales, Hospital Gineco-Obstetricia n.(o) 3 Dr. Víctor Manuel Espinosa de los Reyes Sánchez, UMAE, CMN La Raza, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Reumatología e Inmunología Clínica, Hospital General de Zona No. 46, IMSS, Villahermosa, Tabasco, México. · Hospital General de Chilpancingo Dr. Raymundo Abarca Alarcón, Chilpancingo, Guerrero, México. · Departamento de Medicina Interna, UMAE HGO 4, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Departamento de Reumatología, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Unidad de investigación en Epidemiología Clínica, Hospital Regional Dr. Carlos Mcgregor Sánchez Navarro, IMSS, México, Distrito Federal, México. · Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Villahermosa, Tabasco, México. · Reumatología de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro y Universidad del Del Valle de México, Querétaro, Qro., México. · Reumatología, Centro Médico ABC, México, Distrito Federal, México. ·Reumatol Clin · Pubmed #25639457.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is associated with several maternal and fetal complications. The development of clinical practice guidelines with the best available scientific evidence may help standardize the care of these patients. OBJECTIVES: To provide recommendations regarding prenatal care, treatment, and a more effective monitoring of pregnancy in women with lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). METHODOLOGY: Nominal panels were formed for consensus, systematic search of information, development of clinical questions, processing and grading of recommendations, internal validation by peers, and external validation of the final document. The quality criteria of the AGREE II instrument were followed. RESULTS: The various panels answered the 37 questions related to maternal and fetal care in SLE, RA, and APS, as well as to the use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations were discussed and integrated into a final manuscript. Finally, the corresponding algorithms were developed. We present the recommendations for pregnant women with SLE in this first part. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the Mexican clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with SLE integrate the best available evidence for the treatment and follow-up of patients with these conditions.

7 Guideline [Consensus of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology for the diagnosis, management and treatment of lupus nephritis]. 2015

Klumb, Evandro Mendes / Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida / Lanna, Cristina Costa Duarte / Sato, Emilia Inoue / Borba, Eduardo Ferreira / Brenol, João Carlos Tavares / de Albuquerque, Elisa Martins das Neves / Monticielo, Odirlei Andre / Costallat, Lilian Tereza Lavras / Latorre, Luiz Carlos / Sauma, Maria de Fátima Lobato da Cunha / Bonfá, Eloisa Silva Dutra de Oliveira / Ribeiro, Francinne Machado. ·Disciplina de Reumatologia, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. Electronic address: klumb@uol.com.br. · Departamento de Pediatria, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil. · Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil. · Disciplina de Reumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil. · Disciplina de Reumatologia da Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, SP, Brasil. · Departamento de Medicina Interna, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. · Disciplina de Reumatologia, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. · Disciplina de Reumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. · Disciplina de Reumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brasil. · Serviço de Reumatologia, Hospital de Heliópolis, São Paulo, SP, Brasil. · Disciplina de Reumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Pará, Belém, PA, Brasil. ·Rev Bras Reumatol · Pubmed #25595733.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop recommendations for the diagnosis, management and treatment of lupus nephritis in Brazil. METHOD: Extensive literature review with a selection of papers based on the strength of scientific evidence and opinion of the Commission on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus members, Brazilian Society of Rheumatology. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: 1) Renal biopsy should be performed whenever possible and if this procedure is indicated; and, when the procedure is not possible, the treatment should be guided with the inference of histologic class. 2) Ideally, measures and precautions should be implemented before starting treatment, with emphasis on attention to the risk of infection. 3) Risks and benefits of treatment should be shared with the patient and his/her family. 4) The use of hydroxychloroquine (preferably) or chloroquine diphosphate is recommended for all patients (unless contraindicated) during induction and maintenance phases. 5) The evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment should be made with objective criteria of response (complete remission/partial remission/refractoriness). 6) ACE inhibitors and/or ARBs are recommended as antiproteinuric agents for all patients (unless contraindicated). 7) The identification of clinical and/or laboratory signs suggestive of proliferative or membranous glomerulonephritis should indicate an immediate implementation of specific therapy, including steroids and an immunosuppressive agent, even though histological confirmation is not possible. 8) Immunosuppressives must be used during at least 36 months, but these medications can be kept for longer periods. Its discontinuation should only be done when the patient achieve and maintain a sustained and complete remission. 9) Lupus nephritis should be considered as refractory when a full or partial remission is not achieved after 12 months of an appropriate treatment, when a new renal biopsy should be considered to assist in identifying the cause of refractoriness and in the therapeutic decision.

8 Guideline Treat-to-target in systemic lupus erythematosus: recommendations from an international task force. 2014

van Vollenhoven, Ronald F / Mosca, Marta / Bertsias, George / Isenberg, David / Kuhn, Annegret / Lerstrøm, Kirsten / Aringer, Martin / Bootsma, Hendrika / Boumpas, Dimitrios / Bruce, Ian N / Cervera, Ricard / Clarke, Ann / Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie / Czirják, László / Derksen, Ronald / Dörner, Thomas / Gordon, Caroline / Graninger, Winfried / Houssiau, Frédéric / Inanc, Murat / Jacobsen, Søren / Jayne, David / Jedryka-Goral, Anna / Levitsky, Adrian / Levy, Roger / Mariette, Xavier / Morand, Eric / Navarra, Sandra / Neumann, Irmgard / Rahman, Anisur / Rovensky, Jozef / Smolen, Josef / Vasconcelos, Carlos / Voskuyl, Alexandre / Voss, Anne / Zakharova, Helena / Zoma, Asad / Schneider, Matthias. ·Department of Medicine, Unit for Clinical Therapy Research, Inflammatory Diseases, Stockholm, Sweden, Karolinska Institutet, , Stockholm, Sweden. · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #24739325.

ABSTRACT: The principle of treating-to-target has been successfully applied to many diseases outside rheumatology and more recently to rheumatoid arthritis. Identifying appropriate therapeutic targets and pursuing these systematically has led to improved care for patients with these diseases and useful guidance for healthcare providers and administrators. Thus, an initiative to evaluate possible therapeutic targets and develop treat-to-target guidance was believed to be highly appropriate in the management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients as well. Specialists in rheumatology, nephrology, dermatology, internal medicine and clinical immunology, and a patient representative, contributed to this initiative. The majority convened on three occasions in 2012-2013. Twelve topics of critical importance were identified and a systematic literature review was performed. The results were condensed and reformulated as recommendations, discussed, modified and voted upon. The finalised bullet points were analysed for degree of agreement among the task force. The Oxford Centre level of evidence (LoE, corresponding to the research questions) and grade of recommendation (GoR) were determined for each recommendation. The 12 systematic literature searches and their summaries led to 11 recommendations. Prominent features of these recommendations are targeting remission, preventing damage and improving quality of life. LoE and GoR of the recommendations were variable but agreement was >0.9 in each case. An extensive research agenda was identified, and four overarching principles were also agreed upon. Treat-to-target-in-SLE (T2T/SLE) recommendations were developed by a large task force of multispecialty experts and a patient representative. It is anticipated that 'treating-to-target' can and will be applicable to the care of patients with SLE.

9 Guideline Overview of lupus nephritis management guidelines and perspective from Asia. 2013

Mok, Chi Chiu / Yap, Desmond Y H / Navarra, Sandra V / Liu, Zhi-Hong / Zhao, Ming-Hui / Lu, Liangjing / Takeuchi, Tsutomu / Avihingsanon, Yingyos / Yu, Xue-Qing / Lapid, Elizabeth A / Lugue-Lizardo, Lenrore R / Sumethkul, Vasant / Shen, Nan / Chen, Shun-le / Chan, Tak Mao / Anonymous3270780. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Tuen Mun Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #24382275.

ABSTRACT: Lupus nephritis (LN) is a common and important manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Evidence suggests higher rates of lupus renal involvement in Asian populations, and maybe more severe nephritis, compared with other racial or ethnic groups. The management of LN has evolved considerably over the past three decades, based on observations from clinical studies that investigated different immunosuppressive agents including corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolic acid, calcineurin inhibitors and novel biologic therapies. This is accompanied by improvements in both the short-term treatment response rate and long-term renal function preservation. Treatment guidelines for LN have recently been issued by rheumatology and nephrology communities in U.S.A. and Europe. In view of the racial difference in disease manifestation and response to therapy, and the substantial disease burden in Asia, a panel of 15 nephrologists and rheumatologists from different Asian regions with extensive experience in lupus nephritis - the Steering Group for the Asian Lupus Nephritis Network (ALNN) - met and discussed the management of lupus nephritis in Asian patients. The group has also reviewed and deliberated on the recently published recommendations from other parts of the world. This manuscript summarizes the discussions by the group and presents consensus views on the clinical management and treatment of adult Asian patients with LN, taking into account both the available evidence and expert opinion in areas where evidence remains to be sought.

10 Guideline SER consensus statement on the use of biologic therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus. 2013

Calvo-Alén, Jaime / Silva-Fernández, Lucía / Úcar-Angulo, Eduardo / Pego-Reigosa, José María / Olivé, Alejandro / Martínez-Fernández, Carmen / Martínez-Taboada, Víctor / Luis Marenco, José / Loza, Estíbaliz / López-Longo, Javier / Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús / Galindo-Izquierdo, María / Fernández-Nebro, Antonio / Cuadrado, María José / Aguirre-Zamorano, María Ángeles / Zea-Mendoza, Antonio / Rúa-Figueroa, Iñigo / Anonymous5070764. ·Sección de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Sierrallana, Torrelavega, Cantabria, Spain. · ·Reumatol Clin · Pubmed #23871156.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide a reference to rheumatologists and other physicians involved in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are using, or about to use biologic therapies. METHODS: Recommendations were developed following a nominal group methodology and based on systematic reviews. The level of evidence and degree of recommendation were classified according to a model proposed by the Center for Evidence Based Medicine at Oxford. The level of agreement was established through a Delphi technique. RESULTS: We have produced recommendations on the use of belimumab, the only biological agent with approved indications for SLE, and other biological agents without an indication for SLE. The objective of treatment is to achieve a complete clinical response, taken as the absence of perceived or evident disease activity. Nuances regarding the use of biologic therapies in SLE were reviewed as well, such as the evaluation that should be performed prior to administration and the follow up of patients undergoing these therapies. CONCLUSIONS: We present the SER recommendations for the use of biological therapies in patients with SLE.

11 Guideline [Statement on the use of mycophenolate mofetil for systemic lupus erythematosus]. 2013

Aringer, M / Fischer-Betz, R / Hiepe, F / Anonymous2041318 / Anonymous2051318. ·Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik III, Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus an der Technischen Universität Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307, Dresden, Deutschland. martin.aringer@uniklinikum-dresden.de · ·Z Rheumatol · Pubmed #23756593.

ABSTRACT: Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is among the few immunosuppressive drugs with sufficient data from controlled studies on the therapy of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the light of results from recently published randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of MMF in the treatment of lupus nephritis, it has become necessary to revise the statement of the Germany Society of Rheumatology on the use of MMF for SLE. In the induction therapy of lupus nephritis MMF has been shown to be equivalent in effectiveness to i.v. cyclophosphamide and superior to azathioprine in the maintenance phase. Cyclophosphamide is inferior to MMF and probably also to azathioprine as maintenance therapy and should therefore, not be considered for this purpose and also because of its toxicity. For other organ manifestations MMF also constitutes an alternative when approved immunosuppressants are not able to control the disease and glucocorticoids cannot be reduced to 7.5 mg prednisolone daily equivalents or less.

12 Guideline [Recommendations on the use of belimumab in systemic lupus erythematosus. GEAS-SEMI Clinical Practice Guide]. 2013

Ramos-Casals, M / Ruiz-Irastorza, G / Jiménez-Alonso, J / Khamashta, M A / Anonymous7990745. ·Servicio de Enfermedades Autoinmunes, Laboratorio de Enfermedades Autoinmunes Josep Font, IDIBAPS, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, España. mramos@clinic.ub.es · ·Rev Clin Esp (Barc) · Pubmed #23266125.

ABSTRACT: Biological therapies are based on the administration of various types of synthetic molecules related to the immune response. Their use has spread in recent years to the field of systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Until 2011, these diseases were not included in the therapeutic indications approved by international regulatory agencies. Therefore, the use of biological therapies was restricted to clinical trials and to compassionate use for cases refractory to standard treatments (off-label use), which require the approval of the Health Ministry. In 2011, belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to the soluble form of the protein human B lymphocyte stimulator BlyS, was approved for use in patients with SLE. Because the clinical information on the use of this new drug in patients with SLE has only been obtained from the results of randomized trials, the Study Group of Autoimmune Diseases (GEAS) of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has developed therapeutic guidelines. These guidelines are based on the current scientific evidence on the use of belimumab in SLE patients in the clinical practice.

13 Guideline Joint European League Against Rheumatism and European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (EULAR/ERA-EDTA) recommendations for the management of adult and paediatric lupus nephritis. 2012

Bertsias, George K / Tektonidou, Maria / Amoura, Zahir / Aringer, Martin / Bajema, Ingeborg / Berden, Jo H M / Boletis, John / Cervera, Ricard / Dörner, Thomas / Doria, Andrea / Ferrario, Franco / Floege, Jürgen / Houssiau, Frederic A / Ioannidis, John P A / Isenberg, David A / Kallenberg, Cees G M / Lightstone, Liz / Marks, Stephen D / Martini, Alberto / Moroni, Gabriela / Neumann, Irmgard / Praga, Manuel / Schneider, Matthias / Starra, Argyre / Tesar, Vladimir / Vasconcelos, Carlos / van Vollenhoven, Ronald F / Zakharova, Helena / Haubitz, Marion / Gordon, Caroline / Jayne, David / Boumpas, Dimitrios T / Anonymous1400733. ·Department of Medicine, Rheumatology, Clinical Immunology and Allergy, University of Crete, Iraklion, Greece. · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #22851469.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To develop recommendations for the management of adult and paediatric lupus nephritis (LN). METHODS: The available evidence was systematically reviewed using the PubMed database. A modified Delphi method was used to compile questions, elicit expert opinions and reach consensus. RESULTS: Immunosuppressive treatment should be guided by renal biopsy, and aiming for complete renal response (proteinuria <0.5 g/24 h with normal or near-normal renal function). Hydroxychloroquine is recommended for all patients with LN. Because of a more favourable efficacy/toxicity ratio, as initial treatment for patients with class III-IV(A) or (A/C) (±V) LN according to the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society 2003 classification, mycophenolic acid (MPA) or low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (CY) in combination with glucocorticoids is recommended. In patients with adverse clinical or histological features, CY can be prescribed at higher doses, while azathioprine is an alternative for milder cases. For pure class V LN with nephrotic-range proteinuria, MPA in combination with oral glucocorticoids is recommended as initial treatment. In patients improving after initial treatment, subsequent immunosuppression with MPA or azathioprine is recommended for at least 3 years; in such cases, initial treatment with MPA should be followed by MPA. For MPA or CY failures, switching to the other agent, or to rituximab, is the suggested course of action. In anticipation of pregnancy, patients should be switched to appropriate medications without reducing the intensity of treatment. There is no evidence to suggest that management of LN should differ in children versus adults. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations for the management of LN were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus.

14 Guideline American College of Rheumatology guidelines for screening, treatment, and management of lupus nephritis. 2012

Hahn, Bevra H / McMahon, Maureen A / Wilkinson, Alan / Wallace, W Dean / Daikh, David I / Fitzgerald, John D / Karpouzas, George A / Merrill, Joan T / Wallace, Daniel J / Yazdany, Jinoos / Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind / Singh, Karandeep / Khalighi, Mazdak / Choi, Soo-In / Gogia, Maneesh / Kafaja, Suzanne / Kamgar, Mohammad / Lau, Christine / Martin, William J / Parikh, Sefali / Peng, Justin / Rastogi, Anjay / Chen, Weiling / Grossman, Jennifer M / Anonymous2790725. ·School of Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles, CA 90095-1670, USA. bhahn@mednet.ucla.edu · ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #22556106.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline [Diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis]. 2012

Ruiz-Irastorza, G / Espinosa, G / Frutos, M A / Jiménez Alonso, J / Praga, M / Pallarés, L / Rivera, F / Robles Marhuenda, Á / Segarra, A / Quereda, C / Anonymous2340719 / Anonymous2350719. ·Unidad de Investigación de Enfermedades Autoinmunes, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Universitario Cruces, UPV/EHU, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, España. r.irastorza@euskaltel.net · ·Rev Clin Esp · Pubmed #22361331.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline Diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis. Consensus document from the systemic auto-immune disease group (GEAS) of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) and Spanish Society of Nephrology (S.E.N.). 2012

Ruiz Irastorza, Guillermo / Espinosa, Gerard / Frutos, Miguel A / Jiménez Alonso, Juan / Praga, Manuel / Pallarés, Lucio / Rivera, Francisco / Robles Marhuenda, Angel / Segarra, Alfons / Quereda, Carlos / Anonymous1640717 / Anonymous1650717. ·Unidad de Investigación de Enfermedades Autoinmunes, Servicio de Medicina Interna. Hospital Universitario Cruces, UPV/EHU, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain. r.irastorza@euskaltel.net · ·Nefrologia · Pubmed #22293933.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report. 2012

Aringer, M / Burkhardt, H / Burmester, G R / Fischer-Betz, R / Fleck, M / Graninger, W / Hiepe, F / Jacobi, A M / Kötter, I / Lakomek, H J / Lorenz, H M / Manger, B / Schett, G / Schmidt, R E / Schneider, M / Schulze-Koops, H / Smolen, J S / Specker, C / Stoll, T / Strangfeld, A / Tony, H P / Villiger, P M / Voll, R / Witte, T / Dörner, T. ·Rheumatology, Medicine III, University Medical Center TU Dresden, Germany. martin.aringer@uniklinikum-dresden.de · ·Lupus · Pubmed #22072024.

ABSTRACT: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence.

18 Guideline [SGI-PS-CMA evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus]. 2011

Anonymous5890710 / Anonymous5900710 / Anonymous5910710. · ·Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #22088179.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline [Evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of common renal diseases in children (for trial) (VI): guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis]. 2010

Anonymous6410679. · ·Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #21092530.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for monitoring patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in clinical practice and in observational studies. 2010

Mosca, M / Tani, C / Aringer, M / Bombardieri, S / Boumpas, D / Brey, R / Cervera, R / Doria, A / Jayne, D / Khamashta, M A / Kuhn, A / Gordon, C / Petri, M / Rekvig, O P / Schneider, M / Sherer, Y / Shoenfeld, Y / Smolen, J S / Talarico, R / Tincani, A / van Vollenhoven, R F / Ward, M M / Werth, V P / Carmona, L. ·Correspondence to Dr Marta Mosca, University of Pisa, via Roma 67, Ospedale S. Chiara, Pisa, 56126, Italy. marta.mosca@int.med.unipi.it · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #19892750.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To develop recommendations for monitoring patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in clinical practice and observational studies and to develop a standardised core set of variables to monitor SLE. METHODS: We followed the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) standardised procedures for guideline development. The following techniques were applied: nominal groups, Delphi surveys for prioritisation, small group discussion, systematic literature review and two Delphi rounds to obtain agreement. The panel included rheumatologists, internists, dermatologists, a nephrologist and an expert related to national research agencies. The level of evidence and grading of recommendations were determined according to the Levels of Evidence and Grades of Recommendations of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. RESULTS: A total of 10 recommendations have been developed, covering the following aspects: patient assessment, cardiovascular risk factors, other risk factors (osteoporosis, cancer), infection risk (screening, vaccination, monitoring), frequency of assessments, laboratory tests, mucocutaneous involvement, kidney monitoring, neuropsychological manifestations and ophthalmology assessment. A 'core set' of minimal variables for the assessment and monitoring of patients with SLE in clinical practice was developed that included some of the recommendations. In addition to the recommendations, indications for specific organ assessments that were viewed as part of good clinical practice were discussed and included in the flow chart. CONCLUSIONS: A set of recommendations for monitoring patients with SLE in routine clinical practice has been developed. The use of a standardised core set to monitor patients with SLE should facilitate clinical practice, as well as the quality control of care for patients with SLE, and the collection and comparison of data in observational studies.

21 Guideline EULAR points to consider for conducting clinical trials in systemic lupus erythematosus: literature based evidence for the selection of endpoints. 2009

Bertsias, G K / Ioannidis, J P A / Boletis, J / Bombardieri, S / Cervera, R / Dostal, C / Font, J / Gilboe, I M / Houssiau, F / Huizinga, T / Isenberg, D / Kallenberg, C G M / Khamashta, M / Piette, J C / Schneider, M / Smolen, J / Sturfelt, G / Tincani, A / van Vollenhoven, R / Boumpas, D T / Gordon, C. ·Internal Medicine, and Rheumatology, Clinical Immunology and Allergy, University of Crete School of Medicine, Heraklion, Greece. · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #18434449.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess available evidence on the use of end-points (outcome measures) in clinical trials in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), as a part of the development of evidence-based recommendations for points to consider in clinical trials in SLE. METHODS: The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Task Force on SLE comprised 19 specialists, a clinical epidemiologist and a research fellow. Key questions addressing the evidence for clinical trial end-points in SLE were compiled using the Delphi technique. A systematic search of the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases was performed using McMaster/Hedges clinical query strategies and an array of relevant terms. Evidence was categorised based on sample size and type of design, and the categories of available evidence were identified for each recommendation. The strength of recommendation was assessed based on the category of available evidence and agreement on the statements was measured across the 19 specialists. RESULTS: Eight questions were generated regarding end-points for clinical trials. The evidence to support each proposition was evaluated. The literature review revealed that most outcome measures used in phase 2/3 trials in SLE have not been formally validated in clinical trials, although some indirect validation has been undertaken. CONCLUSION: This systematic literature review forms the evidence base considered in the development of the EULAR recommendations for end-points in clinical trials in SLE.

22 Guideline EULAR points to consider for conducting clinical trials in systemic lupus erythematosus. 2009

Gordon, C / Bertsias, G / Ioannidis, J P A / Boletis, J / Bombardieri, S / Cervera, R / Dostál, C / Font, J / Gilboe, I-M / Houssiau, F / Huizinga, T W J / Isenberg, D / Kallenberg, C G M / Khamashta, M A / Piette, J-C / Schneider, M / Smolen, J S / Sturfelt, G / Tincani, A / Van Vollenhoven, R / Boumpas, D T. ·Rheumatology Research Group, Division of Immunity and Infection, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. p.c.gordon@bham.ac.uk · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #18388158.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex multi-organ disease, characterised by relapses and remissions. DESIGN: ng a high-quality randomised controlled trial poses many challenges. We have developed evidenced-based recommendations for points to consider in conducting clinical trials in patients with SLE. METHODS: The EULAR Task Force on SLE comprised 19 specialists and a clinical epidemiologist. Initially, the evidence for clinical trial end-points in SLE was evaluated and this has been reported separately. A consensus approach was developed by the SLE Task Force in formulating recommendations for points to consider when conducting clinical trials in SLE. RESULTS: The literature review revealed that most outcome measures used in phase 2/3 trials in SLE have not actually been validated in clinical trials, although other forms of validation have been undertaken. The final recommendations for points to consider for conducting clinical trials in SLE address the following areas: study design, eligibility criteria, outcome measures including adverse events, concomitant therapies for SLE and its complications. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations for points to consider when conducting clinical trials in SLE were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus. The recommendations should be disseminated, implemented and then reviewed in detail and revised using an evidence-based approach in about 5 years, by which time there will be further evidence to consider from current clinical trials.

23 Guideline Rituximab (MabThera) therapy and safety management. Clinical tool guide. 2008

Pham, Thao / Fautrel, Bruno / Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric / Goupille, Philippe / Hachulla, Eric / Masson, Charles / Morel, Jacques / Mouthon, Luc / Saraux, Alain / Schaeverbeke, Thierry / Wendling, Daniel / Mariette, Xavier / Sibilia, ? / Anonymous760606. · ·Joint Bone Spine · Pubmed #18708020.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline EULAR recommendations for the management of systemic lupus erythematosus. Report of a Task Force of the EULAR Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics. 2008

Bertsias, G / Ioannidis, J P A / Boletis, J / Bombardieri, S / Cervera, R / Dostal, C / Font, J / Gilboe, I M / Houssiau, F / Huizinga, T / Isenberg, D / Kallenberg, C G M / Khamashta, M / Piette, J C / Schneider, M / Smolen, J / Sturfelt, G / Tincani, A / van Vollenhoven, R / Gordon, C / Boumpas, D T / Anonymous2570568. ·Department of Internal Medicine, University of Crete School of Medicine, 71003, Heraklion, Greece. · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #17504841.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease with variable presentations, course and prognosis. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations addressing the major issues in the management of SLE. METHODS: The EULAR Task Force on SLE comprised 19 specialists and a clinical epidemiologist. Key questions for the management of SLE were compiled using the Delphi technique. A systematic search of PubMed and Cochrane Library Reports was performed using McMaster/Hedges clinical queries' strategies for questions related to the diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and treatment of SLE. For neuropsychiatric, pregnancy and antiphospholipid syndrome questions, the search was conducted using an array of relevant terms. Evidence was categorised based on sample size and type of design, and the categories of available evidence were identified for each recommendation. The strength of recommendation was assessed based on the category of available evidence, and agreement on the statements was measured across the 19 specialists. RESULTS: Twelve questions were generated regarding the prognosis, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of SLE, including neuropsychiatric SLE, pregnancy, the antiphospholipid syndrome and lupus nephritis. The evidence to support each proposition was evaluated and scored. After discussion and votes, the final recommendations were presented using brief statements. The average agreement among experts was 8.8 out of 10. CONCLUSION: Recommendations for the management of SLE were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus with high level of agreement among the experts.

25 Guideline [Interdisciplinary consensus to management of lupus nephritis in Germany]. 2007

de Groot, K. ·Medizinische Klinik III, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Starkenburgring 66, 63069, Offenbach/Main, Germany. kirsten@de-groot.de ·Z Rheumatol · Pubmed #17965864.

ABSTRACT: In October 2006 a German ad hoc committee consisting of rheumatologists and nephrologists developed a consensus statement on the current practice in the management of lupus nephritis. The published results are summarized.

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