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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: HELP
Articles by Lazaros I. Sakkas
Based on 7 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, L. Sakkas wrote the following 7 articles about Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review From microbiome to infectome in autoimmunity. 2017

Bogdanos, Dimitrios P / Sakkas, Lazaros I. ·Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Biopolis, Larissa, Greece. ·Curr Opin Rheumatol · Pubmed #28394824.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The current review discusses the pros and cons of the microbiome studies conducted in search of the association between microbiota and autoimmunity. RECENT FINDINGS: We focus on the role of infectome and autoinfectome as a bridge to link the findings of microbiome studies with those emerging from investigations of the role of specific viruses and antiviral responses as triggers of autoimmunity (through various mechanisms such as molecular mimicry). The 'usual suspects', such as herpetoviruses and Escherichia coli, are thoroughly discussed in light of the data emerged by the microbiome studies, using as examples specific autoimmune rheumatic diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases. SUMMARY: We conclude that the studies of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal, and urinary tract microbiome are informative but can only be useful if further explored from the infectome perspective. This means that the plethora of bacteria associated with autoimmune diseases from microbiome studies can be and must be tested experimentally. If certain bacteria are associated directly or indirectly with autoimmune diseases, specific immunological mechanisms must be identified.

2 Review The autoimmunity-oral microbiome connection. 2017

Nikitakis, N G / Papaioannou, W / Sakkas, L I / Kousvelari, E. ·Department of Oral Pathology and Medicine, Dental School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Dental School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece. ·Oral Dis · Pubmed #27717092.

ABSTRACT: To date, there is a major effort in deciphering the role of complex microbial communities, especially the oral and gut microbiomes, in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Increasing evidence indicates a key role for the oral microbiome in autoimmune diseases. In this review article, we discuss links of the oral microbiota to a group of autoimmune diseases, that is, Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Crohn's disease (CD), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We particularly focus on factors that affect the balance between the immune system and the composition of microbiota leading to dysbiosis, loss of tolerance and subsequent autoimmune disease progression and maintenance.

3 Review Tuberculous pyomyositis: a re-emerging entity of many faces. 2016

Simopoulou, Theodora / Varna, Areti / Dailiana, Zoe / Katsiari, Christina / Alexiou, Ioannis / Basdekis, Georgios / Malizos, Konstantinos N / Sakkas, Lazaros I. ·Department of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, 41 110, Greece. · Department of Orthropaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Trauma, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, 41 110, Greece. · Department of Orthropaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Trauma, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, 41 110, Greece. lsakkas@med.uth.gr. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #24609759.

ABSTRACT: Tuberculosis (TB) has become a global concern due to its increasing incidence, particularly in immunocompromised patients, closely following the migratory patterns of populations. TB pyomyositis is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation of TB. Its clinical presentation varies and requires a high degree of suspicion for early diagnosis. We present three patients diagnosed with TB pyomyositis: a 46-year-old man with dermatomyositis (DM) and hepatitis B who presented with fever, muscle weakness, and an abscess at the right proximal arm; a 71-year-old immunocompetent male, with a past medical history of tuberculous lymphadenopathy in childhood, who presented with a 2-month history of fever and pain at the right thigh, and a 44-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) on prednisone and methotrexate who presented with skin eruption at her thighs mimicking lupus panniculitis. In all three patients, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified as the causative agent. The lack of specific signs, the false negative tuberculin skin test in some cases, and the unfamiliarity of many clinicians with this entity can cause diagnostic delays. Prompt diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion especially in immunocompromised patients with fever.

4 Review Infectomics and autoinfectomics: a tool to study infectious-induced autoimmunity. 2015

Bogdanos, D P / Smyk, D S / Rigopoulou, E I / Sakkas, L I / Shoenfeld, Y. ·Institute of Liver Studies, King's College London School of Medicine at King's College Hospital, London, UK Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece bogdanos@med.uth.gr. · Institute of Liver Studies, King's College London School of Medicine at King's College Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece. · The Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer, Israel. ·Lupus · Pubmed #25801879.

ABSTRACT: The exposome represents all exogenous and endogenous environmental exposures that begin at preconception and carry on throughout life, while the microbiome reflects the microbial component of the exposome. We recently introduced the concept of infectome and autoinfectome as a means of studying the totality of infections throughout life that participate in the induction as well as the progression of autoimmune diseases in an affected individual. The investigation of the autoinfectome could help us understand why some patients develop more than one autoimmune disease, a phenomenon also known as mosaic of autoimmunity. It could also explain the infectious and autoantibody burden of various autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The close interplay between infections and the immune system should be studied over time, long before the onset of autoaggression and autoimmunity. Tracking down each individual's exposure to infectious agents (as defined by the autoinfectome) would be important for the establishment of a causative link between infection and autoimmunity.

5 Review Tracing environmental markers of autoimmunity: introducing the infectome. 2013

Bogdanos, Dimitrios P / Smyk, Daniel S / Invernizzi, Pietro / Rigopoulou, Eirini I / Blank, Miri / Sakkas, Lazaros / Pouria, Shideh / Shoenfeld, Yehuda. ·Division of Transplantation Immunology and Mucosal Biology, Institute of Liver Studies, King's College London School of Medicine at King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill Campus, London, SE5 9RS, UK. dimitrios.bogdanos@kcl.ac.uk ·Immunol Res · Pubmed #23592050.

ABSTRACT: We recently introduced the concept of the infectome as a means of studying all infectious factors which contribute to the development of autoimmune disease. It forms the infectious part of the exposome, which collates all environmental factors contributing to the development of disease and studies the sum total of burden which leads to the loss of adaptive mechanisms in the body. These studies complement genome-wide association studies, which establish the genetic predisposition to disease. The infectome is a component which spans the whole life and may begin at the earliest stages right up to the time when the first symptoms manifest, and may thus contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmunity at the prodromal/asymptomatic stages. We provide practical examples and research tools as to how we can investigate disease-specific infectomes, using laboratory approaches employed from projects studying the "immunome" and "microbiome". It is envisioned that an understanding of the infectome and the environmental factors that affect it will allow for earlier patient-specific intervention by clinicians, through the possible treatment of infectious agents as well as other compounding factors, and hence slowing or preventing disease development.

6 Article Clinical and financial burden of active lupus in Greece: a nationwide study. 2016

Bertsias, G / Karampli, E / Sidiropoulos, P / Gergianaki, I / Drosos, A / Sakkas, L / Garyfallos, A / Tzioufas, A / Vassilopoulos, D / Tsalapaki, C / Sfikakis, P / Panopoulos, S / Athanasakis, K / Perna, A / Psomali, D / Kyriopoulos, J / Boumpas, D. ·Rheumatology, Clinical Immunology and Allergy, University of Crete School of Medicine, Heraklion, Greece. · Department of Health Economics, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. · Department of Medicine/Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece. · Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Pathophysiology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece Joint Rheumatology Programme, Faculty of Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Second Department of Medicine, Hippokration General Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece Joint Rheumatology Programme, Faculty of Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Second Department of Medicine, Hippokration General Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Joint Rheumatology Programme, Faculty of Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece First Department of Propaedeutic/Internal Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Laiko General Hospital, Athens, Greece. · First Department of Propaedeutic/Internal Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Laiko General Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Global Specialty Pharma Franchise, GlaxoSmithKline, London, UK. · GlaxoSmithKline, Athens, Greece. · Joint Rheumatology Programme, Faculty of Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece Fourth Department of Medicine, Attikon University Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece boumpasd@med.uoc.gr. ·Lupus · Pubmed #27055520.

ABSTRACT: Analyses of the medical and economic burden of chronic disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are valuable for clinical and health policy decisions. We performed a chart-based review of 215 adult SLE patients with active autoantibody-positive disease at the predefined ratio of 30% severe (involvement of major organs requiring treatment) and 70% non-severe, followed at seven hospital centres in Greece. We reviewed 318 patients consecutively registered over three months (sub-study). Disease activity, organ damage, flares and healthcare resource utilization were recorded. Costs were assessed from the third-party payer perspective. Severe SLE patients had chronic active disease more frequently (22.4% vs 4.7%), higher average SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) (10.5 vs 6.1) and systemic lupus international collaborating clinics (SLICC) damage index (1.1 vs 0.6) than non-severe patients. The mean annual direct medical cost was €3741 for severe vs €1225 for non-severe patients. Severe flares, active renal disease and organ damage were independent cost predictors. In the sub-study, 19% of unselected patients were classified as severe SLE, and 30% of them had chronic active disease. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate the significant clinical and financial burden of Greek SLE patients with active major organ disease. Among them, 30% display chronic activity, in spite of standard care, which represents a significant unmet medical need.

7 Article The prevalence of rheumatic diseases in central Greece: a population survey. 2010

Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis / Zinzaras, Elias / Alexiou, Ioannis / Papathanasiou, Aphrodite A / Davas, Evangelos / Koutroumpas, Athanasios / Barouta, Georgia / Sakkas, Lazaros I. ·Department of Rheumatology and Biomathematics, Thessaly University School of Medicine and Hospital, Larissa 41 110, Greece. ·BMC Musculoskelet Disord · Pubmed #20504294.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Rheumatic diseases are a major health and financial burden for societies. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases may change over time, and therefore, we sought to estimate the prevalence of rheumatic diseases in an adult population of central Greece. METHODS: In this prospective cross-sectional population survey, a random sample of adult population was drawn from poll catalogues of a region in central Greece. A postal questionnaire was sent to 3,528 people for the presence of any rheumatic disease. All positive cases were further confirmed by clinical examination using the American College of Rheumatoloy criteria. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for rheumatic diseases. RESULTS: The response rate was 48.3% (1,705 answers). Four hundred and twenty individuals (24.6%) had a rheumatic disease. The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis was 0.58% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32-0.87), of psoriatic arthritis was 0.35% (95% CI, 0.33-1.13), of ankylosing spondylitis was 0.29% (95% CI, 0.28-0.94), of primary Sjögren's syndrome was 0.23% (95% CI, 0.22-0.75) and of systemic lupus erythematosus was 0.11% (95% CI, 0.11-0.37). One individual had systemic sclerosis (prevalence, 0.058%), 1 individual had dermatomyositis (prevalence, 0.058%; 95% CI, 0.05-0.18), 2 individuals had vasculitis (prevalence 0.11%; 95% CI, 0.11-0.37), 81 individuals had gout (prevalence, 4.75%; 95% CI, 4.41-5.13), and 304 individuals had osteoarthritis (OA) (prevalence 17.82%; 95% CI, 16.50-19.34). Gout was associated with male gender, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension, and OA was associated with age, female gender, and hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Rheumatic diseases are common in central Greece, affecting nearly a quarter of adult population. OA and gout are the most common joint disorders.