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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Christopher J. Anker
Based on 7 articles published since 2009
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Christopher Anker wrote the following 7 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Melanoma, version 4.2014. 2014

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole R / Ho, Maria / Anonymous5170793. ·From 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 4University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 5The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 6UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; 7UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 8Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 9St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 10University of Colorado Cancer Center; 11Aim at Melanoma; 12Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 13Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 14Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 15Moffitt Cancer Center; 16The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 17Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 18Fox Chase Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Duke Cancer Institute; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 23City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 24University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and 25National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812131.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the management of patients with melanoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Dabrafenib and trametinib, either as monotherapy (category 1) or combination therapy, have been added as systemic options for patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma harboring BRAF V600 mutations. Controversy continues regarding the value of adjuvant radiation for patients at high risk of nodal relapse. This is reflected in the category 2B designation to consider adjuvant radiation following lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma with clinically positive nodes or recurrent disease.

2 Guideline Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4310755. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584343.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with melanoma. This NCCN Guidelines Insights report highlights notable recent updates. Foremost of these is the exciting addition of the novel agents ipilimumab and vemurafenib for treatment of advanced melanoma. The NCCN panel also included imatinib as a treatment for KIT-mutated tumors and pegylated interferon alfa-2b as an option for adjuvant therapy. Also important are revisions to the initial stratification of early-stage lesions based on the risk of sentinel lymph node metastases, and revised recommendations on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for low-risk groups. Finally, the NCCN panel reached clinical consensus on clarifying the role of imaging in the workup of patients with melanoma.

3 Guideline Melanoma. 2012

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Anonymous590720. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #22393197.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Local control after stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases in patients with melanoma with and without BRAF mutation and treatment. 2015

Ly, David / Bagshaw, Hilary P / Anker, Christopher J / Tward, Jonathan D / Grossmann, Kenneth F / Jensen, Randy L / Shrieve, Dennis C. ·Department of Radiation Oncology and. · Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Vermont Cancer Center, Burlington, Vermont. · Division of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, and. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and. ·J Neurosurg · Pubmed #25768829.

ABSTRACT: OBJECT: BRAF inhibitors improve progression-free and overall survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. Brain metastases are common, and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been used, resulting in excellent local control. Because BRAF inhibitors are associated with intracranial responses, the authors hypothesized that BRAF inhibitors would improve local control in patients with melanoma who are receiving SRS for brain metastases. METHODS: The authors retrospectively identified patients with metastatic melanoma who had been tested for BRAF mutation and treated with SRS for brain metastases. Patients with previous resection, multiple brain metastases, or multiple courses of SRS were eligible. SRS was delivered in a single fraction to a median dose of 2000 cGy. Patients with a BRAF mutation were treated with a BRAF inhibitor on the basis of physician preference. RESULTS: The authors identified 52 patients who were treated in 82 treatment sessions for 185 brain metastases and 13 tumor beds. At a median follow-up of 10.5 months, the 1-year local control rate was 69.2%. At 1 year, the local control rate for brain metastases in patients with BRAF mutation with BRAF treatment was 85.0%, and the local control rate for brain metastases in those without BRAF treatment was 51.5% (p = 0.0077). The rates of distant brain failure, freedom from whole-brain radiation, and overall survival were not different on the basis of BRAF mutation status or inhibitor therapy. The number of new intratumoral hemorrhages after SRS was increased significantly in patients with BRAF treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with BRAF inhibitors was associated with improved local control after SRS in patients with melanoma and brain metastases. An increased number of intratumoral hemorrhages was associated with BRAF inhibitor therapy.

5 Article Patterns of failure and predictors of outcome in cutaneous malignant melanoma of the scalp. 2014

Terakedis, Breanne E / Anker, Christopher J / Leachman, Sancy A / Andtbacka, Robert H I / Bowen, Glen M / Sause, William T / Grossmann, Kenneth F / Bowles, Tawnya L / Noyes, R Dirk / Hitchcock, Ying J / Boucher, Kenneth M / Shrieve, Dennis C. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. Electronic address: chris.anker@hci.utah.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Center for Health and Healing, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah. · Department of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Department of Surgery, Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah. · Department of Oncological Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #24373782.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with melanoma of the scalp may have higher failure (recurrence) rates than melanoma of other body sites. OBJECTIVE: We sought to characterize survival and patterns of failure for patients with scalp melanoma. METHODS: Between 1998 and 2010, 250 nonmetastatic patients underwent wide local excision of a primary scalp melanoma. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to evaluate overall survival, scalp control, regional neck control, distant metastases-free survival, and disease-free survival. RESULTS: Five-year overall survival was 86%, 57%, and 45% for stages I, II, and III, respectively, and 5-year scalp control rates were 92%, 75%, and 63%, respectively. Five-year distant metastases-free survival for these stages were 92%, 65%, and 45%, respectively. Of the 74 patients who recurred, the site of first recurrence included distant disease in 47%, although 31% recurred in the scalp alone. LIMITATIONS: This is a retrospective review. CONCLUSION: Distant metastases-free survival and overall survival for stage II and III patients with scalp melanoma are poor, and stage III patients experience relatively high rates of scalp failure suggesting that these patients may benefit from additional adjuvant systemic and local therapy. Further research is needed to characterize the environmental, microenvironmental, and genetic causes of the increased aggressiveness of scalp melanoma and to identify more effective treatment and surveillance methods.

6 Article Severe liver and skin toxicity after radiation and vemurafenib in metastatic melanoma. 2013

Anker, Christopher J / Ribas, Antoni / Grossmann, Allie H / Chen, Xinjian / Narra, Krishna K / Akerley, Wallace / Andtbacka, Robert H I / Noyes, Robert Dirk / Shrieve, Dennis C / Grossmann, Kenneth F. ·Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #23650406.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Sentinel lymph node biopsy for melanoma in pregnant women. 2013

Andtbacka, Robert H I / Donaldson, Matthew R / Bowles, Tawnya L / Bowen, Glen M / Grossmann, Kenneth / Khong, Hung / Grossman, Douglas / Anker, Christopher / Florell, Scott R / Bowen, Anneli / Duffy, Keith L / Leachman, Sancy A / Noyes, R Dirk. ·Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology Program, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah and Intermountain Health Care, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. robert.andtbacka@hci.utah.edu ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #23054111.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The incidence of melanoma is rising in young women of childbearing age. Melanoma diagnosed during pregnancy presents unique challenges. This study was conducted to determine the effect of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for melanoma on maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnant women. METHODS: A prospective melanoma database was retrospectively queried for women diagnosed with melanoma during or immediately before pregnancy as well as SLNB in pregnant women. The outcomes of SLNB for the mothers and fetuses were evaluated. RESULTS: Fifteen pregnant women underwent wide local excision (WLE) and SLNB for melanoma from 1997 to 2012. The median gestational age was 20 weeks. More than half of the women noticed changes in the primary melanoma lesion during the pregnancy. The median Breslow thickness was 1.00 mm. Lymphatic mapping and SLNB were performed with some combination of radiocolloid or vital blue dye without adverse effects. Three patients had micrometastatic disease and underwent a completion lymphadenectomy. Sixteen children were born at a median gestational age of 39 weeks. The median 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores were 8 and 9, respectively. At a median follow-up of 54.4, months none of the patients had experienced recurrence, and all children were healthy and free of melanoma. CONCLUSIONS: In this series of pregnant women with melanoma, SLNB was performed safely during pregnancy without adverse effects to the mothers and fetuses. We recommend that clinicians explain the risks and benefits of the SLNB procedure to pregnant women so an informed decision can be made about the procedure.