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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Giuseppe Argenziano
Based on 145 articles published since 2009
(Why 145 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, G. Argenziano wrote the following 145 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6
1 Guideline Spitz/Reed nevi: proposal of management recommendations by the Dermoscopy Study Group of the Italian Society of Dermatology (SIDeMaST). 2014

Broganelli, P / Titli, S / Lallas, A / Alaibac M Annetta, A / Battarra, V / Brunetti, B / Castagno, I / Cavicchini, S / Ferrari, A / Ghigliotti, G / Landi, C / Manganoni, A / Moscarella, E / Pellacani, G / Pizzichetta, M A / Rosina, P / Rubegni, P / Satta, R / Scalvenzi, M / Stanganelli, I / Stinco, G / Zalaudek, I / Zampieri, P / Argenziano, G / Anonymous1410806. ·Department of Oncology and Hematology, Section of Dermatology, City of Health and Science Hospital of Turin, Turin, Italy - paolobroganelli@inwind.it. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25213387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial The user-generated web-based Dermoscopy Image Archive of the International Dermoscopy Society: a contribution to e-learning and exchange of knowledge. 2011

Niederkorn, A / Gabler, G / Argenziano, G / Muir, J / Zalaudek, I / Soyer, H P / Hofmann-Wellenhof, R. · ·Dermatology · Pubmed #21389684.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review It is finally time for adjuvant therapy in melanoma. 2018

Napolitano, S / Brancaccio, G / Argenziano, G / Martinelli, E / Morgillo, F / Ciardiello, F / Troiani, T. ·Oncologia Medica, Dipartimento di Internistica Clinica e Sperimentale "F. Magrassi", Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Via S. Pansini 5, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Dermatologia e Venerologia, Dipartimento di salute mentale e fisica e medicina riabilitativa, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Via S. Pansini 5, Napoli 80131, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Dipartimento di Internistica Clinica e Sperimentale "F. Magrassi", Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Via S. Pansini 5, Napoli 80131, Italy. Electronic address: teresa.troiani@unicampania.it. ·Cancer Treat Rev · Pubmed #29957365.

ABSTRACT: Although melanoma is amenable to early detection, there has been no decline in the mortality rate of this disease and the prognosis of patients with high-risk primary melanoma or with macroscopic nodal involvement remains poor. The best option for patients with higher-risk melanoma is to receive effective adjuvant therapy in order to reduce their chances of recurrence. Multiple systemic therapeutic agents have been tested as adjuvant therapy for melanoma with durable benefits seen only with interferon- to date. More recently ipilimumab at the high dose of 10 mg/kg has shown a significant improvement in terms of Relapse free survival and Overall survival for stage III melanoma patients but at a significant cost in terms of immune-related toxicities. More recently, novel treatment options have emerged. The results from the latest trials with immunotherapy (PD-1 inhibitors) and molecular targeted therapy (BRAF inhibitor + MEK inhibitor) have revolutionized the management of adjuvant treatment for melanoma. As the results from these trials will mature in the next years, a change in the landscape of adjuvant treatment for melanoma is expected, resulting in new challenges in treatment decisions such as optimizing patients' selection through predictive and prognostic biomarkers, and management of treatment related adverse events, in particular immune related toxicities.

4 Review A meta-analysis of nevus-associated melanoma: Prevalence and practical implications. 2017

Pampena, Riccardo / Kyrgidis, Athanassios / Lallas, Aimilios / Moscarella, Elvira / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Longo, Caterina. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, First Medical Department, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS), Reggio Emilia, Italy. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Dermatology Unit, University of Campania, Naples, Italy. · Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, First Medical Department, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS), Reggio Emilia, Italy; Dermatology Unit, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. Electronic address: longo.caterina@gmail.com. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28864306.

ABSTRACT: The reported prevalence of nevus-associated melanoma varies substantially. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the incidence and prevalence of this disease; we also performed subanalyses considering age, tumor thickness, and nevus-type classification. In 38 observational cohort and case-control studies, 29.1% of melanomas likely arose from a preexisting nevus and 70.9% de novo. Any given melanoma was 64% less likely to be nevus-associated than de novo (risk ratio 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29-0.44; P < .001; I

5 Review Dermoscopy of Malignant Skin Tumours: What's New? 2017

Russo, Teresa / Piccolo, Vincenzo / Lallas, Aimilios / Giacomel, Jason / Moscarella, Elvira / Alfano, Roberto / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology Unit, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #28486238.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy represents a new and effective tool that assists dermatologists in improving the accuracy of clinical diagnosis in onco-dermatology. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the latest and important dermoscopic progress and observations in this ever-evolving field of dermatology.

6 Review Dermoscopy pathology correlation in melanoma. 2017

Russo, Teresa / Piccolo, Vincenzo / Ferrara, Gerardo / Agozzino, Marina / Alfano, Roberto / Longo, Caterina / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Anatomical Pathology Unit, Gaetano Rummo General Hospital, Benevento, Italy. · Department of Anesthesiology, Surgery and Emergency, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. ·J Dermatol · Pubmed #28447355.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy is a widely used technique whose role in the clinical (and preoperative) diagnosis of melanocytic and non-melanocytic skin lesions has been well established in recent years. The aim of this paper is to clarify the correlations between the "local" dermoscopic findings in melanoma and the underlying histology, in order to help clinicians in routine practice.

7 Review MELTUMP: how to manage these lesions in the clinical routine. 2017

Piccolo, Vincenzo / Moscarella, Elvira / Lallas, Aimilios / Alfano, Roberto / Ferrara, Gerardo / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology Unit, L. Vanvitelli University, Naples, Italy - piccolo.vincenzo@gmail.com. · Dermatology Unit, L. Vanvitelli University, Naples, Italy. · Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova Institute for Research and Care, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Anesthesiology, Surgery and Emergency, L. Vanvitelli University, Naples, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, General Hospital of Macerata, Macerata, Italy. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28195450.

ABSTRACT: Although most melanocytic lesions can be diagnosed by histopathologists as benign or malignant with high confidence, a subset of morphologically ambiguous lesions does exist and still represents a significant problem for pathologists. These lesions have been defined as MELTUMP, i.e. melanocytic tumors of uncertain malignant potential. MELTUMP could be considered as a large cauldron in which melanocytic lesions with equivocal morphologic features fall into, including most benign lesions and a minority of melanomas, unfortunately recognizable only a posteriori for their unfavorable outcome. As a consequence of the lack of uniformity in the biologic behavior of melanocytic lesions belonging to the heterogeneous subset of MELTUMP, confusion and lack of agreement in the management of these difficult lesions is increasingly growing up. As most MELTUMP have a favorable prognosis we recommend a conservative approach, avoiding over treatment for this group of lesions.

8 Review Melanoma: clinical and dermoscopic diagnosis. 2017

Brancaccio, Gabriella / Russo, Teresa / Lallas, Aimilios / Moscarella, Elvira / Agozzino, Marina / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology Unit, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy - russo.teresa87@gmail.com. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28121084.

ABSTRACT: Missing the diagnosis of a melanoma is the worst dermatologist nightmare, especially when melanomas have a non-alarming clinical appearance and imitate a completely benign lesion. The use of dermoscopy has provided an effective tool to facilitate the differential diagnosis and to increasingly allow an early diagnosis of melanoma. The aim of this article was to summarize the most recent and important clinical and dermoscopic pearls to recognize melanoma at the earliest stages of its development.

9 Review Update on dermoscopy of Spitz/Reed naevi and management guidelines by the International Dermoscopy Society. 2017

Lallas, A / Apalla, Z / Ioannides, D / Lazaridou, E / Kyrgidis, A / Broganelli, P / Alfano, R / Zalaudek, I / Argenziano, G / Anonymous4790894. ·First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · City of Health and Science University, Turin, Italy. · Department of Anaesthesiology, Surgery and Emergency Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Unit, Medical University of Graz, Austria. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #28118479.

ABSTRACT: Spitzoid lesions represent a challenging and controversial group of tumours, in terms of clinical recognition, biological behaviour and management strategies. Although Spitz naevi are considered benign tumours, their clinical and dermoscopic morphological overlap with spitzoid melanoma renders the management of spitzoid lesions particularly difficult. The controversy deepens because of the existence of tumours that cannot be safely histopathologically diagnosed as naevi or melanomas (atypical Spitz tumours). The dual objective of the present study was to provide an updated classification on dermoscopy of Spitz naevi, and management recommendations of spitzoid-looking lesions based on a consensus among experts in the field. After a detailed search of the literature for eligible studies, a data synthesis was performed from 15 studies on dermoscopy of Spitz naevi. Dermoscopically, Spitz naevi are typified by three main patterns: starburst pattern (51%), a pattern of regularly distributed dotted vessels (19%) and globular pattern with reticular depigmentation (17%). A consensus-based algorithm for the management of spitzoid lesions is proposed. According to it, dermoscopically asymmetric lesions with spitzoid features (both flat/raised and nodular) should be excised to rule out melanoma. Dermoscopically symmetric spitzoid nodules should also be excised or closely monitored, irrespective of age, to rule out atypical Spitz tumours. Dermoscopically symmetric, flat spitzoid lesions should be managed according to the age of the patient. Finally, the histopathological diagnosis of atypical Spitz tumour should warrant wide excision but not a sentinel lymph-node biopsy.

10 Review Regression in cutaneous melanoma: a comprehensive review from diagnosis to prognosis. 2016

Ribero, S / Moscarella, E / Ferrara, G / Piana, S / Argenziano, G / Longo, C. ·Medical Sciences Department, Section of Dermatology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Department off Twin research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, UK. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale ASMN-IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Pathology Unit, Gaetano Rummo Hospital, Benevento, Italy. · Pathology Unit, Arcispedale ASMN-IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27401335.

ABSTRACT: Histological regression in primary cutaneous melanoma occurs in 10-35% of cases. Although a large body of literature exists to suggest that histological regression serves very little purpose in predicting biologic behaviour with melanoma, recognizing the presence of regression at clinical and histological ground may still retain some value in grading melanoma aggressiveness. In the current review, a comprehensive overview of the main aspects of regression will be provided. Histologically, many classifications have been reported so far, but all of them only agreed on the presence of an infiltrate of lymphocytes admixed with pigment-laden macrophages underlying an atrophic epidermis with flattened rete ridges. Upon dermoscopy, regression is also named Blue White Scar-like areas and could be variably admixed with granularity or peppering. Almost fully regressed lesions represent a main diagnostic issue in dermoscopy, and thus, confocal microscopy can be of help to identify whether the tumour is melanocytic or not. The clinical utility of regression as a prognostic factor has been challenged recently. Nowadays, evidences showed that it is less likely associated to SLN metastases.

11 Review Contemporary and potential future molecular diagnosis of melanoma. 2016

Gandolfi, G / Dallaglio, K / Longo, C / Moscarella, E / Lallas, A / Alfano, R / Argenziano, G / Ciarrocchi, A. ·a Laboratory of Translational Research , Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova-IRCCS , Reggio Emilia , Italy. · b Skin Cancer Unit , Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova-IRCCS , Reggio Emilia , Italy. · c Surgery and Emergency Unit , Second University of Naples , Naples , Italy. · d Dermatology Unit , Second University of Naples , Naples , Italy. ·Expert Rev Mol Diagn · Pubmed #27348706.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The increasing incidence of cutaneous melanoma and the still limited effective treatments available for this disease represent a major health problem and a great challenge for research. The raise of the "omics" era and the development of new techniques to explore phenotypic heterogeneity are helping to decipher the mechanisms at the basis of melanoma heterogeneity. AREAS COVERED: We reviewed the most recent publications about the biology of cutaneous melanoma, to provide an overview of the most recent insights into the complexity of this tumor and their potential impact in the clinical settings. Expert commentary: Starting from the first attempts to provide a molecular classification of melanoma, it has been evident that this tumor represents a widely heterogeneous disease. This complexity and the multivariate nature of melanoma represent a major obstacle in developing the best management strategies for patients.

12 Review Dermoscopy of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. 2015

Babino, G / Lallas, A / Longo, C / Moscarella, E / Alfano, R / Argenziano, G. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy - g.argenziano@gmail.com. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26184795.

ABSTRACT: Skin cancer is a major health problem because of its high incidence in white populations, as well as its related potential morbidity and mortality. Dermoscopy is a noninvasive tool that allows the identification of specific morphological features in different skin tumors, improving significantly the early diagnosis of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). This tool has also gained increased interest in the management of NMSC therapy and in the post-treatment follow-up. In this article, we provide a review of the dermoscopic patterns and criteria for the diagnosis of melanoma and NMSC described until now in the literature.

13 Review Reflectance confocal microscopy in the diagnosis of solitary pink skin tumours: review of diagnostic clues. 2015

Longo, C / Moscarella, E / Argenziano, G / Lallas, A / Raucci, M / Pellacani, G / Scope, A. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, 42100, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #25640416.

ABSTRACT: Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a noninvasive tool that can be helpful in the diagnosis of nonpigmented skin tumours. As RCM enables visualization of architectural and cytological structures at near-histological resolution, it can improve the diagnostic accuracy of dermoscopically equivocal solitary pink neoplasms. For management decisions, it is important to identify specific morphological clues that allow bedside classification of nonpigmented skin neoplasms into benign vs. malignant and melanocytic vs. nonmelanocytic. More specifically, the presence of a nested melanocytic proliferation at the dermoepidermal junction or dermis level permits the clinician to ascribe a given lesion as melanocytic; the identification of basaloid bright tumour islands is a key RCM feature for the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma; and the presence of disarrayed epidermis along with small demarcated papillae is suggestive for the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. The present review offers a comprehensive description of the main RCM diagnostic clues for solitary pink neoplasms that direct clinicians to the correct diagnosis and that may serve as groundwork for future prospective studies.

14 Review [Dermoscopy of nails]. 2014

Haenssle, H A / Brehmer, F / Zalaudek, I / Hofmann-Wellenhof, R / Kreusch, J / Stolz, W / Argenziano, G / Blum, A. ·Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen, Georg-August Universität, Robert-Koch Str. 40, 37075, Göttingen, Deutschland, h.haenssle@med.uni-goettingen.de. ·Hautarzt · Pubmed #24668319.

ABSTRACT: Pigmented and nonpigmented nail abnormalities often represent a challenge for clinicians because many, and sometimes potentially life-threatening differential diagnoses must be taken into consideration. Although many details of nail diseases can already be assessed with the naked eye, dermoscopy opens up a second microscopic level of inspection, which can be very useful for the diagnostic process. In the last 20 years dermoscopy has made rapid progress in the further development of criteria for the early recognition of melanoma. In addition, the use of dermoscopy has been extended to the examination of cutaneous adnexa, such as hairs (trichoscopy) and nails (onychoscopy). Many, sometimes highly specific criteria for the dermoscopic assessment of nail diseases have been described in a series of recently published articles. This review article provides important diagnostic aids for a well-founded dermoscopic assessment of nail diseases.

15 Review Blue lesions. 2013

Longo, Caterina / Scope, Alon / Lallas, Aimilios / Zalaudek, Iris / Moscarella, Elvira / Gardini, Stefano / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Pellacani, Giovanni. ·Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova-IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy. Electronic address: longo.caterina@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075551.

ABSTRACT: Blue color is found in a wide range of malignant and benign melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions and in lesions that result from penetration of exogenous materials, such as radiation or amalgam tattoo or traumatic penetration of particles. Discriminating between different diagnostic entities that display blue color relies on careful patient examination and lesion assessment. Dermoscopically, the extent, distribution, and patterns created by blue color can help diagnose lesions with specificity and differentiate between benign and malignant entities. This article provides an overview of the main diagnoses whereby blue color can be found, providing simple management rules for these lesions.

16 Review Spitz nevus, Spitz tumor, and spitzoid melanoma: a comprehensive clinicopathologic overview. 2013

Ferrara, Gerardo / Gianotti, Raffaele / Cavicchini, Stefano / Salviato, Tiziana / Zalaudek, Iris / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Anatomic Pathology Unit, Department of Oncology, 'Gaetano Rummo' General Hospital, Via dell'Angelo 1, Benevento I-82100, Italy. Electronic address: gerardo.ferrara@libero.it. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075547.

ABSTRACT: Spitz nevus can clinically present either in the classical (reddish pink) or the pigmented (brownish black) variant. Dermoscopy demonstrates that the pigmented variant is much more common than the classical variant; however, none of these show dermoscopic patterns clearly distinguishable from melanoma. Even histopathologically, a clear-cut differentiation between benign and malignant spitzoid neoplasms is often difficult, so that intermediate diagnostic categories (atypical Spitz nevus and Spitz tumor) are admitted. Because of these difficulties in clinical and histopathologic evaluation, surgical excision is recommended for clinically atypical spitzoid lesions of childhood and for all spitzoid lesions of adulthood.

17 Review Problematic lesions in the elderly. 2013

Zalaudek, Iris / Lallas, Aimilios / Longo, Caterina / Moscarella, Elvira / Tiodorovic-Zivkovic, Danica / Ricci, Cinzia / Albertini, Giuseppe / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico-IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy; Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 8, Graz 8036, Austria. Electronic address: iris.zalaudek@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075544.

ABSTRACT: As the population continues to age, clinicians and dermatologists are increasingly faced with geriatric patients presenting with a range of dermatologic manifestations, including benign and malignant skin tumors. Knowledge of epidemiologic and morphologic features, including dermoscopy of common and benign melanocytic and nonmelanocytic skin tumors, provides the basis for a better understanding and management of problematic skin tumors in this age group. This article provides an overview of common and problematic skin lesions in elderly patients and addresses epidemiologic, clinical, and dermoscopic clues that aid the differential diagnosis and management of challenging skin lesions.

18 Review Problematic lesions in children. 2013

Moscarella, Elvira / Piccolo, Vincenzo / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Lallas, Aimilios / Longo, Caterina / Castagnetti, Fabio / Pizzigoni, Stefania / Zalaudek, Iris. ·Skin Cancer Unit, First Medical Department, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento, 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy. Electronic address: elvira.moscarella@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075543.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma in childhood is rare, and appears more commonly either in association with a preexisting (congenital) nevus, or with spitzoid features than de novo. Thus, problematic melanocytic lesions in children are essentially represented by congenital nevi and Spitz nevi that can be regarded as melanoma precursors and melanoma simulators, respectively. As a consequence, clinical and dermoscopic features of melanoma in children differ from those in an adult population. Herein we describe common clinical and dermoscopic features of problematic lesions in children, focusing on congenital and Spitz/Reed nevi, and including other problematic lesions, such as atypical, blue, acral, and scalp nevi.

19 Review A clinico-dermoscopic approach for skin cancer screening: recommendations involving a survey of the International Dermoscopy Society. 2013

Argenziano, Giuseppe / Giacomel, Jason / Zalaudek, Iris / Blum, Andreas / Braun, Ralph P / Cabo, Horacio / Halpern, Allan / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Malvehy, Josep / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Menzies, Scott / Moscarella, Elvira / Pellacani, Giovanni / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold / Saida, Toshiaki / Seidenari, Stefania / Soyer, H Peter / Stolz, Wilhelm / Thomas, Luc / Kittler, Harald. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy. Electronic address: g.argenziano@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075542.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy is useful for skin cancer screening, but a detailed approach is required that integrates this tool into a rational clinical work flow. To investigate clinician perceptions and behavior in approaching patients with skin tumors, a survey was launched by electronic mail through the International Dermoscopy Society. After 4 months, the responses were analyzed and significant findings calculated. Considering the current approach of study participants in examining patients for skin cancer, an up-to-date system of triage is presented in this review, which aims to promote an improved diagnostic accuracy and more timely management of skin malignancy.

20 Review Early diagnosis of melanoma: what is the impact of dermoscopy? 2012

Argenziano, Giuseppe / Albertini, Giuseppe / Castagnetti, Fabio / De Pace, Barbara / Di Lernia, Vito / Longo, Caterina / Pellacani, Giovanni / Piana, Simonetta / Ricci, Cinzia / Zalaudek, Iris. ·Dermatology Unit, Medical Department, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy. g.argenziano@gmail.com ·Dermatol Ther · Pubmed #23046019.

ABSTRACT: There are three possible explanations for the improved melanoma recognition when a clinician uses dermoscopy: first, the presence of early dermoscopy signs that become visible in melanoma much before the appearance of the classical clinical features; second, an increased attitude of clinicians to check more closely clinically banal-looking lesions; and third, an improved attitude of clinicians to monitor their patients. In this review, the light and the dark sides of melanoma screening are briefly discussed, including the need to find better strategies to decrease the number of unnecessary excision of benign lesions on one hand, and to finally decrease melanoma mortality rates on the other.

21 Review New directions in dermatopathology: in vivo confocal microscopy in clinical practice. 2012

Longo, Caterina / Zalaudek, Iris / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Pellacani, Giovanni. ·Dermatology and Skin Care Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova-IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, 42100 Reggio Emilia, Italy. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #23021059.

ABSTRACT: In vivo confocal microscopy represents a new device that generates a virtual skin biopsy at cytologic resolution. This article describes the most relevant confocal findings and their histopathologic correlates in skin oncology and inflammatory diseases. The light and dark of confocal microscopy are briefly discussed in relation with its clinical applications.

22 Review Improving triage and management of patients with skin cancer: challenges and considerations for the future. 2012

Argenziano, Giuseppe / Giacomel, Jason / Abramavicus, Alexandre / Pellacani, Giovanni / Longo, Caterina / De Pace, Barbara / Albertini, Giuseppe / Cristofolini, Mario / Zalaudek, Iris. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia, Italy. g.argenziano@gmail.com ·Expert Rev Anticancer Ther · Pubmed #22594896.

ABSTRACT: Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in humans, thus representing a major health concern. Because of the increasing attention to skin cancer prevention, there has been a growing workload for dermatology clinics, with patients referred from primary care requiring assessment of suspicious skin tumors. This places a strain on limited specialist resources and can create a paradoxical situation wherein an early diagnosis becomes increasingly difficult for those patients who actually do suffer from skin cancer. The aim of these recommendations is to propose an updated, rational system of triage, involving improved accuracy of diagnosis and more timely management of skin cancer by both general practitioners and dermatologists.

23 Review Update on melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Annual Skin Cancer Conference 2011, Hamilton Island, Australia, 5–6 August 2011. 2011

Zalaudek, Iris / Whiteman, David / Rosendahl, Cliff / Menzies, Scott W / Green, Adèle C / Hersey, Peter / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. iris.zalaudek@meduni-graz.at ·Expert Rev Anticancer Ther · Pubmed #22117149.

ABSTRACT: In this article, we will summarize some of the highlights of the third annual conference on skin cancer, with special emphasis on the the recent advances regarding melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment. Topics were particularly addressed to a newly developing medical branch in Australia, namely that of Primary Care Skin Cancer Practitioners, and focused on strategies to improve primary and secondary prevention and early detection of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer using dermoscopy. Controversies related to skin cancer screening programs and recent progresses for treating advanced melanoma were additionally discussed. Yet, besides its scientific goals, the conference aimed also to encourage research originating in primary care and relevant to primary care.

24 Review How to diagnose nonpigmented skin tumors: a review of vascular structures seen with dermoscopy: part II. Nonmelanocytic skin tumors. 2010

Zalaudek, Iris / Kreusch, Jürgen / Giacomel, Jason / Ferrara, Gerardo / Catricalà, Caterina / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Division of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. iris.zalaudek@meduni-graz.at ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #20708470.

ABSTRACT: Nonmelanoma skin cancer refers to a broad class of tumors, including actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma, and as a group these are the most frequent cancers occurring in light skinned humans. In contrast to the rarity of amelanotic melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer commonly lacks pigmentation. Although these tumors rarely cause death related to metastases, they commonly destroy underlying tissues and should be removed at the earliest possible stage. Dermoscopy improves the clinical diagnosis of nonpigmented skin tumors by allowing the visualization of specific vascular structures that are usually not visible to the naked eye. Dermoscopic vascular patterns of several nonmelanocytic nonpigmented skin tumors, such as sebaceous hyperplasia, seborrheic keratosis, clear cell acanthoma, Bowen disease, or nodular cystic basal cell carcinoma are highly specific, allowing a ready diagnosis in most cases. Others, such as actinic keratosis, pyogenic granuloma, or uncommon adnexal tumors, may be difficult to differentiate even with the aid of dermoscopy. For this reason, general guidelines have been established to assist in making the most appropriate management decision. In the second part of this review of dermoscopic vascular structures of nonpigmented skin tumors, the dermoscopic patterns associated with benign and malignant nonmelanocytic skin tumors and recommendations for the management of these tumors will be discussed.

25 Review How to diagnose nonpigmented skin tumors: a review of vascular structures seen with dermoscopy: part I. Melanocytic skin tumors. 2010

Zalaudek, Iris / Kreusch, Jürgen / Giacomel, Jason / Ferrara, Gerardo / Catricalà, Caterina / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Division of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. iris.zalaudek@medunigraz.at ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #20708469.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy is a noninvasive tool that can be helpful in the diagnosis of nonpigmented skin tumors. This is because dermoscopy permits the visualization of key vascular structures that are usually not visible to the naked eye. Much work has concentrated on the identification of specific morphologic types of vessels that allow a classification into melanocytic versus nonmelanocytic and benign versus malignant nonpigmented skin tumors. Among a broad spectrum of different types of vascular patterns, six main morphologies can be identified. These are comma-like, dotted, linear-irregular, hairpin, glomerular, and arborizing vessels. With some exceptions, comma, dotted, and linear irregular vessels are associated with melanocytic tumors, while the latter three vascular types are generally indicative of keratinocytic tumors. Aside from vascular morphology, the architectural arrangement of vessels within the tumor and the presence of additional dermoscopic clues are equally important for the diagnosis. This article provides a general overview of the dermoscopic evaluation of nonpigmented skin tumors and is divided into two parts. Part I discusses the dermoscopic vascular patterns of benign and malignant melanocytic skin tumors. Part II discusses the dermoscopic vascular patterns of benign and malignant nonmelanocytic nonpigmented skin tumors. In each part, additional special management guidelines for melanocytic and nonmelanocytic nonpigmented skin tumors, respectively, will be discussed.

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