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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Renato Marchiori Bakos
Based on 11 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, R. Bakos wrote the following 11 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Brazilian guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of primary cutaneous melanoma - Part II. 2016

Castro, Luiz Guilherme Martins / Bakos, Renato Marchiori / Duprat Neto, João Pedreira / Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques / Di Giacomo, Thais Helena Bello / Serpa, Sérgio Schrader / Messina, Maria Cristina de Lorenzo / Loureiro, Walter Refkalefsky / Macarenco, Ricardo Silvestre e Silva / Stolf, Hamilton Ometto / Gontijo, Gabriel. ·Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, SP, Brazil. · Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. · Departamento de Câncer de Pele, A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. · Universidade Estácio de Sá, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. · Universidade Estadual do Pará, Belém, PA, Brazil. · Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho", Botucatu, SP, Brazil. ·An Bras Dermatol · Pubmed #26982779.

ABSTRACT: The last Brazilian guidelines on melanoma were published in 2002. Development in diagnosis and treatment made updating necessary. The coordinators elaborated ten clinical questions, based on PICO system. A Medline search, according to specific MeSH terms for each of the 10 questions was performed and articles selected were classified from A to D according to level of scientific evidence. Based on the results, recommendations were defined and classified according to scientific strength. The present Guidelines were divided in two parts for editorial and publication reasons. In this second part, the following clinical questions were answered: 1) which patients with primary cutaneous melanoma benefit from sentinel lymph node biopsy? 2) Follow-up with body mapping is indicated for which patients? 3) Is preventive excision of acral nevi beneficious to patients? 4) Is preventive excision of giant congenital nevi beneficious to patients? 5) How should stages 0 and I primary cutaneous melanoma patients be followed?

2 Guideline Guidelines of the Brazilian Dermatology Society for diagnosis, treatment and follow up of primary cutaneous melanoma--Part I. 2015

Castro, Luiz Guilherme Martins / Messina, Maria Cristina / Loureiro, Walter / Macarenco, Ricardo Silvestre / Duprat Neto, João Pedreira / Di Giacomo, Thais Helena Bello / Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques / Bakos, Renato Marchiori / Serpa, Sérgio Schrader / Stolf, Hamilton Ometto / Gontijo, Gabriel. ·Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Universidade Estadual do Pará, Belém, SP, Brazil. · Departamento de Câncer de Pele, A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. · Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. · Universidade Estácio de Sá, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. · Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP, Brazil. ·An Bras Dermatol · Pubmed #26734867.

ABSTRACT: The last Brazilian guidelines on melanoma were published in 2002. Development in diagnosis and treatment made updating necessary. The coordinators elaborated ten clinical questions, based on PICO system. A Medline search, according to specific MeSH terms for each of the 10 questions was performed and articles selected were classified from A to D according to level of scientific evidence. Based on the results, recommendations were defined and classified according to scientific strength. The present Guidelines were divided in two parts for editorial and publication reasons. In the first part, the following clinical questions were answered: 1) The use of dermoscopy for diagnosis of primary cutaneous melanoma brings benefits for patients when compared with clinical examination? 2) Does dermoscopy favor diagnosis of nail apparatus melanoma? 3) Is there a prognostic difference when incisional or excisional biopsies are used? 4) Does revision by a pathologist trained in melanoma contribute to diagnosis and treatment of primary cutaneous melanoma? What margins should be used to treat lentigo maligna melanoma and melanoma in situ?

3 Article Polymorphisms in CYP19A1 and NFKB1 genes are associated with cutaneous melanoma risk in southern Brazilian patients. 2016

Escobar, Gabriela F / Arraes, Jose Aroldo A / Bakos, Lucio / Ashton-Prolla, Patricia / Giugliani, Roberto / Callegari-Jacques, Sidia Maria / Santos, Sidney / Bakos, Renato M. ·aDepartment of Dermatology, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA) bDepartment of Genetics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Experimental Research Center and Medical Genetics Service, HCPA cPostgraduate Program in Medical Sciences dDepartment of Statistics, UFRGS, Porto Alegre eLaboratory of Human and Medical Genetics, Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Belém, Brazil. ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #27145040.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin cancers and its etiology is complex. Recent discoveries related to genetic risk factors are helping us to understand melanoma pathogenesis better. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has a critical role in immunity, inflammation, and tumor growth. The 94ins/del ATTG (rs28362491) polymorphism located in the NFKB1 gene has been associated to various cancers and the ATTG2/ATTG2 genotype was correlated to melanoma risk in Sweden. The CYP19A1 gene encodes the enzyme aromatase, which is active in malignant melanoma tissue. In addition, the CYP19A1 TCT insertion/deletion variant in intron 4 (rs11575899) has been associated with an increased incidence of cancer, albeit with conflicting results. The goal of this study was to investigate possible associations between these two gene variants and melanoma. METHODS: In this case-control study, we evaluated 117 cutaneous melanoma patients and 116 controls from southern Brazil. Genotyping of rs28362491 and rs11575899 was carried out by means of PCR amplification and capillary electrophoresis. Logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) of melanoma, according to genotypes. RESULTS: We identified an association between the ATTG2/ATTG2 and melanoma [OR=1.78; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-3.00; P=0.03]. In addition, there was a dose effect: for each ins allele in the genotype, the risk for melanoma increased (OR=1.51; 95% CI: 1.08-2.11; P=0.017). As regards the CYP19A1 variant, genotype 11 (del/del) was more frequent in patients than in controls (OR=1.85; 95% CI 1.06-3.22; P=0.03). CONCLUSION: The NFKB1 ATTG2/ATTG2 and CYP19A1 del/del genotypes are significantly associated with melanoma and could be genetic markers of melanoma susceptibility in southern Brazilian population.

4 Article Characterization of individuals at high risk of developing melanoma in Latin America: bases for genetic counseling in melanoma. 2016

Puig, Susana / Potrony, Miriam / Cuellar, Francisco / Puig-Butille, Joan Anton / Carrera, Cristina / Aguilera, Paula / Nagore, Eduardo / Garcia-Casado, Zaida / Requena, Celia / Kumar, Rajiv / Landman, Gilles / Costa Soares de Sá, Bianca / Gargantini Rezze, Gisele / Facure, Luciana / de Avila, Alexandre Leon Ribeiro / Achatz, Maria Isabel / Carraro, Dirce Maria / Duprat Neto, João Pedreira / Grazziotin, Thais C / Bonamigo, Renan R / Rey, Maria Carolina W / Balestrini, Claudia / Morales, Enrique / Molgo, Montserrat / Bakos, Renato Marchiori / Ashton-Prolla, Patricia / Giugliani, Roberto / Larre Borges, Alejandra / Barquet, Virginia / Pérez, Javiera / Martínez, Miguel / Cabo, Horacio / Cohen Sabban, Emilia / Latorre, Clara / Carlos-Ortega, Blanca / Salas-Alanis, Julio C / Gonzalez, Roger / Olazaran, Zulema / Malvehy, Josep / Badenas, Celia. ·Melanoma Unit, Dermatology Department, Hospital Clínic & IDIBAPS (Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer), Barcelona, Spain. · Centro Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Barcelona, Spain. · Departament de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT), Ciudad de México, México. · Melanoma Unit, Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Department, Hospital Clínic & IDIBAPS (Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Dermatology, Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia, Spain. · Universidad Católica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain. · Molecular Biology Unit, Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia, Spain. · Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. · Escola Paulista de Medicina - UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil. · International Research Center, AC Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, Brazil. · Dermatology Department and Post-Graduation Program of Pathology, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Dr. Sótero del Río, Santiago de Chile, Chile. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Santiago, Chile. · Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago de Chile, Chile. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Unidad de Lesiones Pigmentadas, Cátedra de Dermatología, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay. · Instituto de Investigaciones Medicas "A Lanari," Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Consultorio Dermatológico Drs. Cohen Sabban y Cabo, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Hospital Especialidades Centro Medico Nacional La Raza, Mexico, DF, Mexico. · Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Escuela de Medicina Universidad de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico. · Departamento de Introducción a la Clínica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Mexico. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario "Dr. José Eleuterio González," Monterrey, Mexico. ·Genet Med · Pubmed #26681309.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: CDKN2A is the main high-risk melanoma-susceptibility gene, but it has been poorly assessed in Latin America. We sought to analyze CDKN2A and MC1R in patients from Latin America with familial and sporadic multiple primary melanoma (SMP) and compare the data with those for patients from Spain to establish bases for melanoma genetic counseling in Latin America. METHODS: CDKN2A and MC1R were sequenced in 186 Latin American patients from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Uruguay, and in 904 Spanish patients. Clinical and phenotypic data were obtained. RESULTS: Overall, 24 and 14% of melanoma-prone families in Latin America and Spain, respectively, had mutations in CDKN2A. Latin American families had CDKN2A mutations more frequently (P = 0.014) than Spanish ones. Of patients with SMP, 10% of those from Latin America and 8.5% of those from Spain had mutations in CDKN2A (P = 0.623). The most recurrent CDKN2A mutations were c.-34G>T and p.G101W. Latin American patients had fairer hair (P = 0.016) and skin (P < 0.001) and a higher prevalence of MC1R variants (P = 0.003) compared with Spanish patients. CONCLUSION: The inclusion criteria for genetic counseling of melanoma in Latin America may be the same criteria used in Spain, as suggested in areas with low to medium incidence, SMP with at least two melanomas, or families with at least two cases among first- or second-degree relatives.Genet Med 18 7, 727-736.

5 Article Correlation between Breslow thickness and Technetium-99m-sestamibi uptake in cutaneous melanoma. 2013

Masiero, Nathália / Costa, Manuela Martins / Masiero, Paulo Ricardo / Rosa, Luciana / Bakos, Renato / Cartell, Andre / Migliavacca, Alceu / Bakos, Lucio. ·Department of Dermatology. ·Eur J Dermatol · Pubmed #23816542.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Technetium-99m-sestamibi (MIBI) is a radiopharmaceutical that has well-known tumor-seeking properties. We evaluated the correlation between Breslow thickness and MIBI uptake by cutaneous melanoma (CM). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with suspicious melanocytic lesions received intravenous injections of 740-1,110 Mbq of MIBI. Using a gamma probe, the number of radioactive counts in the skin was considered to determinate the MIBI uptake intensity. SPECT imaging of the lesion site and respective lymph node region was obtained. RESULTS: There was a strong positive correlation between MIBI uptake intensity and Breslow thickness (rs = 0.74, P = 0.003). There was a statistically significant difference (P <0.001) between lesions with Breslow thickness <1 mm (MIBI uptake intensity = 1.23 ± 0.28 radioactive counts) and Breslow thickness >1 mm (MIBI uptake intensity = 2.32 ± 0.32 radioactive counts). DISCUSSION: The possibility of correlating MIBI uptake intensity with Breslow categories may facilitate surgical procedures, reducing morbidity and costs.

6 Article Accuracy in melanoma detection: a 10-year multicenter survey. 2012

Argenziano, Giuseppe / Cerroni, Lorenzo / Zalaudek, Iris / Staibano, Stefania / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Arpaia, Nicola / Bakos, Renato Marchiori / Balme, Brigitte / Bandic, Jadran / Bandelloni, Roberto / Brunasso, Alexandra M G / Cabo, Horacio / Calcara, David A / Carlos-Ortega, Blanca / Carvalho, Ana Carolina / Casas, Gabriel / Dong, Huiting / Ferrara, Gerardo / Filotico, Raffaele / Gómez, Guillermo / Halpern, Allan / Ilardi, Gennaro / Ishiko, Akira / Kandiloglu, Gulsen / Kawasaki, Hiroshi / Kobayashi, Ken / Koga, Hiroshi / Kovalyshyn, Ivanka / Langford, David / Liu, Xin / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Mascolo, Massimo / Massone, Cesare / Mazzoni, Laura / Menzies, Scott / Minagawa, Akane / Nugnes, Loredana / Ozdemir, Fezal / Pellacani, Giovanni / Seidenari, Stefania / Siamas, Katherine / Stanganelli, Ignazio / Stoecker, William V / Tanaka, Masaru / Thomas, Luc / Tschandl, Philipp / Kittler, Harald. ·Dermatology Unit, Medical Department, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Viale Risorgimento 80 - 42100 Reggio Emilia, Italy. g.argenziano@gmail.com ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #21982636.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Early excision is the only strategy to reduce melanoma mortality, but unnecessary excision of benign lesions increases morbidity and healthcare costs. OBJECTIVE: To assess accuracy in melanoma detection based on number-needed-to-excise (NNE) values over a 10-year period. METHODS: Information was retrieved on all histopathologically confirmed cutaneous melanomas or melanocytic nevi that were excised between 1998 and 2007 at participating clinics. NNE values were calculated by dividing the total number of excised lesions by the number of melanomas. Analyses included changes in NNE over time, differences in NNE between specialized clinical settings (SCS) versus non-specialized clinical settings (NSCS), and patient factors influencing NNE. RESULTS: The participating clinics contributed a total of 300,215 cases, including 17,172 melanomas and 283,043 melanocytic nevi. The overall NNE values achieved in SCS and NSCS in the 10-year period were 8.7 and 29.4, respectively. The NNE improved over time in SCS (from 12.8 to 6.8), but appeared unchanged in NSCS. Most of the effect on NNE in SCS was due to a greater number of excised melanomas. Higher NNE values were observed in patients younger than 40 years and for lesions located on the trunk. LIMITATIONS: No data concerning the use of dermatoscopy and digital monitoring procedures were collected from the participating centers. CONCLUSION: Over the 10-year study period, accuracy in melanoma detection improved only in specialized clinics maybe because of a larger use of new diagnostic techniques such as dermatoscopy.

7 Article The CDKN2A p.A148T variant is associated with cutaneous melanoma in Southern Brazil. 2011

Bakos, Renato M / Besch, Robert / Zoratto, Gabriela G / Godinho, Janaína M / Mazzotti, Nicolle G / Ruzicka, Thomas / Bakos, Lucio / Santos, Sidney E / Ashton-Prolla, Patricia / Berking, Carola / Giugliani, Roberto. ·Dermatology Service, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), Brazil. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #21895773.

ABSTRACT: Several germline mutations and sequence variants in cancer predisposition genes have been described. Among these, the CDKN2A p.A148T variant appears to be frequent in patients with melanoma, at least in certain ethnic groups. In this case-control study, we evaluated 127 patients with cutaneous melanoma and 128 controls from Southern Brazil, the region with the highest melanoma incidence rates in the country. Using PCR-RFLP, we demonstrate that CDKN2A p.A148T variant was significantly more frequent in patients with melanoma than in controls (12.6% vs 3.9%; P=0.009). There was no association between presence of the polymorphism and tumor thickness, site of the primary tumor, melanoma subtype, age at diagnosis, quantitative and qualitative number of nevi. Patients with a positive family of history for other cancers were particularly prone to carry the CDKN2A p.A148T allele. All patients with p.A148T-positive melanoma reported European ancestry, especially German, and this was confirmed using a panel of ancestry-informative INDELs. Our data suggest that CDKN2A p.A148T is a melanoma susceptibility allele in Southern Brazil and is particularly common in patients with melanoma of predominantly European ancestry.

8 Article Predictors of quality of life in patients with skin melanoma at the dermatology department of the Porto Alegre Teaching Hospital. 2011

Barbato, Mariana Tremel / Bakos, Lucio / Bakos, Renato Marchiori / Prieb, Rita / Andrade, Cláudia Dickel de. ·Dermatology Department, Teaching Hospital, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. maribarbato@yahoo.com.br ·An Bras Dermatol · Pubmed #21603807.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUNDS: Some symptoms present in melanoma patients are directly related to psychological stress, which emphasizes the need to evaluate quality of life (QoL) in these patients at all the stages of their disease. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate quality of life in a sample of patients diagnosed with melanoma, using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) questionnaire. METHODS: A descriptive, cross sectional study was conducted between July and December, 2006 with all patients with skin melanoma receiving follow-up care at the Department of Dermatology of the Porto Alegre Teaching Hospital, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. RESULTS: Sixty patients were included in the study. Mean age was 55.6 years. Poor education level (primary school or less) was associated with a poorer FACT-G score. Patients with a family history of the disease had higher QoL scores in 3 of the 4 categories evaluated: physical, emotional and functional wellbeing (p<0.01). QoL scores were higher in married patients (82.42) compared to single patients (70.28) (p<0.01). Patients with metastases had lower scores in the functional wellbeing category and this difference was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Factors related to the tumor, as well as gender, age and employment status, were not found to be predictive of quality of life in this sample. Quality of life scores were lower in the functional wellbeing domain in patients with metastases. Married patients are able to count on greater comfort and emotional support to help them deal with the diagnosis of melanoma. Patients with a family history of melanoma had significantly higher quality of life scores, while those with poor education levels had lower scores.

9 Article [A rare case of local relapsing oral melanoma]. 2010

Gauwerky, Katharina J / Ehrenfeld, Michael / Bakos, Renato M / Volkenandt, Matthias / Ruzicka, Thomas / Berking, Carola. ·Klinik und Poliklinik für Dermatologie und Allergologie, LMU München. ·J Dtsch Dermatol Ges · Pubmed #20163505.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma of the oral mucosa is an extremely rare tumor. At the time of diagnosis most melanomas are in an advanced stage because of few clinical signs. Therefore the prognosis of melanoma of the oral mucosa is often very poor. We present a 48-year-old patient with melanoma of the oral mucosa first diagnosed 22 years ago. Over 20 years several wide excisions were necessary because of multiple local relapses. Eventually, the patient died from brain metastases.

10 Article Nestin and SOX9 and SOX10 transcription factors are coexpressed in melanoma. 2010

Bakos, Renato M / Maier, Tanja / Besch, Robert / Mestel, Dominik S / Ruzicka, Thomas / Sturm, Richard A / Berking, Carola. ·Department of Dermatology, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, Germany. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #19845757.

ABSTRACT: Nestin is an intermediate filament expressed in proliferating neural progenitor cells and has been considered as a stem cell marker. Nestin is also found in melanoma and we recently demonstrated that its expression in melanoma cell lines is regulated by the transcription factors SOX9 and SOX10, but not BRN2. In this study, the expression levels of nestin, BRN2, SOX9 and SOX10 were analysed in tissues of melanoma (n = 78) and melanocytic nevi (n = 26) by immunohistochemistry. All proteins were highly expressed in primary and metastatic melanomas and, apart from BRN2, showed much lower levels in melanocytic nevi. Significant coexpression of nestin with SOX9 and SOX10 was found in primary melanoma confirming our in vitro data. Correlation analysis with clinicopathological data revealed that nestin was significantly associated with presence of ulceration in primary tumors and SOX9 with more advanced stage of disease. Our data reveal that SOX9 and SOX10 are highly expressed in melanoma and seem to have a regulatory role in nestin expression. The association with ulceration and advanced-stage tumors, respectively, suggests that nestin and SOX9 may be negative prognostic markers in melanoma.

11 Article European ancestry and cutaneous melanoma in Southern Brazil. 2009

Bakos, L / Masiero, N C M S / Bakos, R M / Burttet, R M / Wagner, M B / Benzano, D. ·Departments of Dermatology and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. lbakos@portweb.com.br ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #19207653.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Similar to other countries, incidence and mortality rates for cutaneous melanoma (CM) are increasing in Brazil. Resulting from centuries of ethnic mixture, the skin of the Brazilian population presents all phototypes, being progressively lighter following the increase of the latitude toward the South, where the highest incidence of melanoma is observed. Studies from the United States and Argentina in whites suggest that European ancestry could represent an important risk factor for CM in those regions. METHODS: Questionnaires from a case-control study involving 119 melanoma patients and 177 controls were reviewed for age, gender, phototype, sun exposure, photoprotection and ancestry. The patients reported the countries of ancestry of their grandparents. Data were tabulated and converted into scores that would reflect the proportion of ancestry for each country in individuals. RESULTS: Patients with German and Italian ancestry presented higher risk for CM [odds ratio (OR), 3.5; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.8-6.7 and OR, 9.7; 95% CI, 3.9-24.2, respectively]. Conversely, Brazilian indigenous ancestry showed a protective effect for the development of the disease, with an OR of 0.16 (95% CI, 0.04-0.7). CONCLUSIONS: Some European ancestries, especially German and Italian, seem to be associated to a higher risk of CM in this sample from Southern Brazil. On the other hand, Brazilian indigenous ancestry presented as a protection factor against developing the tumour.