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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Christophe Bedane
Based on 15 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, C. Bédane wrote the following 15 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline [Locoregional treatments of brain metastases for patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma: French national guidelines]. 2014

Lubrano, V / Derrey, S / Truc, G / Mirabel, X / Thariat, J / Cupissol, D / Sassolas, B / Combemale, P / Modiano, P / Bedane, C / Dygai-Cochet, I / Lamant, L / Mourrégot, A / Rougé Bugat, M-È / Siegrist, S / Tiffet, O / Mazeau-Woynar, V / Verdoni, L / Planchamp, F / Leccia, M-T / Anonymous610807. ·Service de neurochirurgie, hôpital de Rangueil, CHU de Toulouse, 1, avenue du Professeur-Jean-Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Département de radiothérapie, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Département de radiothérapie-curiethérapie, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille, France. · Pôle de radiothérapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Service d'oncologie médicale, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, parc Euromédecine, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Cavale-Blanche, boulevard Tanguy-Prigent, 29609 Brest, France. · Unité onco-dermatologie, centre Léon Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, boulevard de Belfort, BP 387, 59020 Lille, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoges, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, hôpital Purpan, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Service de chirurgie oncologique, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, parc Euromédecine, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Cabinet médical, 59, rue de la Providence, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Cabinet médical, 3, rue Saint-Sigisbert, 57050 le Ban-Saint-Martin, France. · Service de chirurgie générale et thoracique, centre hospitalier universitaire, 42055 Saint-Étienne, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. Electronic address: recommandations@institutcancer.fr. · Clinique de dermatolo-vénéréologie, photobiologie et allergologie, pôle pluridisciplinaire de médecine, hôpital Michallon, 38043 Grenoble, France. ·Neurochirurgie · Pubmed #25241016.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The management of metastatic cutaneous melanoma is changing, marked by innovative therapies. However, their respective use and place in the therapeutic strategy continue to be debated by healthcare professionals. OBJECTIVE: The French national cancer institute has led a national clinical practice guideline project since 2008. It has carried out a review of these modalities of treatment and established recommendations. METHODS: The clinical practice guidelines development process is based on systematic literature review and critical appraisal by experts. The recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. RESULTS: This article presents the results of bibliographic search, the conclusions of the literature and the recommendations concerning locoregional treatments of brain metastases for patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

2 Guideline [Management of patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma: French national guidelines. French National Cancer Institute]. 2014

Leccia, M-T / Planchamp, F / Sassolas, B / Combemale, P / Modiano, P / Bedane, C / Cupissol, D / Derrey, S / Dygai-Cochet, I / Lamant, L / Lubrano, V / Mirabel, X / Mourrégot, A / Rougé Bugat, M-E / Siegrist, S / Thariat, J / Tiffet, O / Truc, G / Verdoni, L / Mazeau-Woynar, V. ·Pôle pluridisciplinaire de médecine, clinique de dermatolo-vénéréologie, photobiologie et allergologie, hôpital Michallon, 38043 Grenoble, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. Electronic address: recommandations@institutcancer.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Cavale Blanche, boulevard Tanguy-Prigent, 29609 Brest, France. · Unité onco-dermatologie, centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, boulevard de Belfort, BP 387, 59020 Lille, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoges, France. · Service d'oncologie médicale, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, parc Euromédecine, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, hôpital Purpan, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Service de neurochirurgie, hôpital de Rangueil, 1, avenue du Professeur-Jean-Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Département de radiothérapie-curiethérapie, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille, France. · Service de chirurgie oncologique, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, parc Euromédecine, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Cabinet médical, 59, rue de la Providence, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Cabinet médical, 3, rue Saint-Sigisbert, 57050 Le Ban-Saint-Martin, France. · Pôle de radiothérapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Service de chirurgie générale et thoracique, centre hospitalier universitaire de Saint-Étienne, 42055 Saint-Étienne, France. · Département de radiothérapie, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #24507205.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent years have seen the emergence of new molecules for the treatment of patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma, with significant benefits in terms of survival and the opening of new therapeutic perspectives. In addition, many techniques are currently being developed for locoregional treatment of metastatic sites. Management of metastatic melanoma is thus fast-changing and is marked by innovative therapeutic approaches. However, the availability of these new treatments has prompted debate among healthcare professionals concerning their use and their place in therapeutic strategy. AIMS: Since 2008, the French National Cancer Institute (INCa) has been leading a project to define and diffuse national clinical practice guidelines. It has performed a review of these treatment methods, which it aims to circulate, and it is seeking to develop recommendations in order to allow nationwide implementation of innovative approaches while promoting good use thereof. METHODS: The clinical practice guidelines development process is based on systematic literature review and critical appraisal by experts within a multidisciplinary working group, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. The recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. RESULTS: This article presents the national recommendations for first- and second-line systemic treatment and for locoregional treatment of metastatic sites in patients presenting metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

3 Guideline [Loco-regional treatments of the metastatic sites for patients with pauci-metastatic cutaneous melanoma (without brain metastasis): French national guidelines]. 2014

Sassolas, Bruno / Mourrégot, Anne / Thariat, Juliette / Tiffet, Olivier / Dygai-Cochet, Inna / Mirabel, Xavier / Truc, Gilles / Cupissol, Didier / Modiano, Philippe / Combemale, Patrick / Bedane, Christophe / Derrey, Stéphane / Lamant, Laurence / Lubrano, Vincent / Siegrist, Sophie / Rougé-Bugat, Marie-Ève / Mazeau-Woynar, Valérie / Verdoni, Laëtitia / Planchamp, François / Leccia, Marie-Thérèse. ·Hôpital Cavale Blanche, boulevard Tanguy-Prigent, 29609 Brest, France. · Institut du Cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, parc Euromédecine, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Centre hospitalier universitaire de Saint-Étienne, 42055 Saint-Étienne, France. · Centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille, France. · Hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, boulevard de Belfort, BP 387, 59020 Lille, France. · Centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laënnec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Hôpital Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoge, France. · Hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Hôpital Purpan, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Hôpital de Rangueil, 1, avenue du Professeur-Jean-Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Cabinet médical, 3, rue Saint-Sigisbert, 57050Le Ban-Saint-Martin, France. · Cabinet médical, 59, rue de la Providence, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Hôpital Michallon, 38043 Grenoble, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #24369290.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The last years are marked by the emergence of new molecules for the treatment of metastatic cutaneous melanoma with a significant benefit on the survival. Besides, some techniques are in development for the loco-regional treatment of the metastatic sites, bringing new therapeutic perspectives. However, their respective use and place in the therapeutic strategy are debated by healthcare professionals. OBJECTIVE: The French National Cancer Institute leads a national clinical practice guidelines project since 2008. It realized a review of these modalities of treatment and developed recommendations. METHODS: The clinical practice guidelines development process is based on systematic literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary expert workgroup. The recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. RESULTS: This article presents recommendations for loco-regional treatments of the pulmonary, bone, cutaneous, hepatic and digestive metastatic sites for patients with pauci-metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

4 Clinical Trial STAT3 Mediates Nilotinib Response in KIT-Altered Melanoma: A Phase II Multicenter Trial of the French Skin Cancer Network. 2018

Delyon, Julie / Chevret, Sylvie / Jouary, Thomas / Dalac, Sophie / Dalle, Stephane / Guillot, Bernard / Arnault, Jean-Philippe / Avril, Marie-Françoise / Bedane, Christophe / Bens, Guido / Pham-Ledard, Anne / Mansard, Sandrine / Grange, Florent / Machet, Laurent / Meyer, Nicolas / Legoupil, Delphine / Saiag, Philippe / Idir, Zakia / Renault, Victor / Deleuze, Jean-François / Hindie, Elif / Battistella, Maxime / Dumaz, Nicolas / Mourah, Samia / Lebbe, Celeste / Anonymous631101. ·Service de Dermatologie, and CIC (Centre d'Investigations Cliniques), AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR-976, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. Electronic address: julie.delyon@aphp.fr. · Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Service de Biostatistique et Information Médicale, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · Unité Onco-dermatologie, Hôpital François Mitterrand, Pau, France. · Service de Dermatologie, CHU Dijon Bourgogne, Dijon, France. · Cancer Research Center of Lyon, INSERM U1052, CNRS UMR5286, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Institut de Cancérologie des Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France. · Montpellier University Hospital, Montpellier, France. · Service de Dermatologie, CHU Amiens-Picardie, Amiens, France. · Service de Dermatologie, AP-HP, Hôpital Cochin, Paris, France; Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Unité d'oncologie thoracique et cutanée, Hopital Dupuytren, Limoges, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Centre hospitalier régional d'Orléans, Orléans, France. · Dermatology Department, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Dermatology Department, CHU de Clermont Ferrand, Clermont Ferrand, France. · Dermatology Department, Reims University Hospital, Reims, France. · Department of Dermatology, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire (CHRU) de Tours, Tours, France; Inserm U930, University Francois Rabelais de Tours, Tours, France. · Dermatologie, Institut Universitaire du Cancer et CHU de Toulouse, Toulouse, France; Inserm UMR 1037, CRCT, Toulouse, France. · Dermatology Department, University Hospital of Brest, Brest, France. · Université de Versailles St-Quentin, EA 4340, Boulogne-Billancourt, France; Service de Dermatologie Générale et Oncologique, AP-HP, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · AP-HP, Département de la Recherche Clinique et du Développement, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · Laboratory for Bioinformatics, CEPH-Fondation Jean Dausset, Paris, France. · Centre National de Génotypage, CEA, Evry, France; CEPH-Fondation Jean Dausset, Paris, France. · Service de Médecine Nucléaire, CHU de Bordeaux, LabEx TRAIL, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR_S1165, Paris, France; Pathology department, Hopital Saint-Louis, AP-HP, Paris, France. · INSERM, UMR-976, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · INSERM, UMR-976, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Laboratoire de Pharmacologie Biologique, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · Service de Dermatologie, and CIC (Centre d'Investigations Cliniques), AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR-976, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28843487.

ABSTRACT: Mutated oncogenic KIT is a therapeutic target in melanoma. We conducted a multicenter phase II trial on the KIT inhibitor nilotinib in patients with unresectable melanoma harboring KIT alteration. The primary endpoint was the response rate (complete response or partial response following Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria) at 6 months. Pharmacodynamic studies using KIT sequencing, qPCR array, and immunostaining of downstream KIT effectors were performed during treatment. Twenty-five patients were included and received 400 mg oral nilotinib twice daily. At 6 months, nilotinib induced tumor response in four patients. The best overall response rate was 20% and the disease control rate was 56%, limited to patients harboring exon 11 or 13 mutations. Four patients exhibited durable response, including three persisting (3.6 and 2.8 years for two patients with stage IIIC and 2.5 years for one with IVM1b melanoma). A reduction in signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 phosphorylation and its effectors (BCL-2, MCL-1) in tumors during follow-up was significantly associated with clinical response. In the KIT-mutated melanoma cell line M230, nilotinib reduced STAT3 signaling and STAT inhibitors were as efficient as KIT inhibitors in reducing cell proliferation. Our study evidences a significant association between STAT3 inhibition and response to nilotinib, and provides a rationale for future research assessing STAT inhibitors in KIT-mutated melanoma.

5 Clinical Trial Treatment patterns and outcomes in patients with advanced melanoma in France. 2013

Bedane, Christophe / Leccia, Marie-Thérèse / Sassolas, Bruno / Bregman, Bruno / Lebbé, Céleste / Anonymous4020762. ·Hôpital Dupuytren, CHU de Limoges , Limoges , France. ·Curr Med Res Opin · Pubmed #23808961.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Melanoma is associated with high mortality and poor response to standard chemotherapy. In order to benchmark benefits of recently introduced treatments, outcome with standard chemotherapy in everyday practice should be documented. OBJECTIVES: To document treatment pathways in patients with advanced melanoma, to compare clinical outcomes between treatment lines, and to measure associated healthcare resource utilisation in terms of hospital visits and adverse event management. METHODS: An observational, longitudinal survey of patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma in France evaluated 278 patients with ≥ 2 months follow-up. Data were collected retrospectively for 2-3 years following the index consultation. Treatment history was documented and outcomes determined for each treatment line. Complete and partial response rates were compared between treatment lines. Overall and progression-free survival were determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Health resource utilisation was documented hospitalisations, hospice stays, emergency room visits, outpatient visits and adverse event management. RESULTS: In total, 271 patients (97.5%) received first-line therapy, 161 (57.9%) second-line therapy and 85 (30.6%) third-line therapy. The most frequent first-line therapy strategies were systemic treatment alone (46.5%) or in combination with surgery (22.9%). The most frequently used chemotherapy was dacarbazine monotherapy (62.3% of chemotherapy). Median duration of first-line systemic therapy was 11.9 (IQR: 6.6-24.0) weeks. First-line therapy was discontinued in 190 patients (68.3%), principally due to disease progression (150 patients). Median overall survival was 17.1 (95% CI: 14.6-20.1) months since diagnosis, 9.5 (95% CI: 6.7-12.8) months since initiation of first-line therapy and 5.3 (95% CI: 3.7-7.2) months since initiation of second-line therapy. Median progression-free survival time was 2.8 (95% CI: 2.5-3.3) months. Ninety-six patients (40.2%) received medication to manage adverse events and 131 patients (47.1%) required hospitalisation (mean: 3.1 hospitalisations; mean duration: 27 days). STUDY LIMITATIONS: The retrospective data collection precludes ascertainment of medical information and completion of missing data. CONCLUSIONS: Existing therapies provide limited survival benefit to patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma. New more effective treatment options are needed.

6 Clinical Trial Temozolomide and cisplatin combination in naive patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma: results of a phase II multicenter trial. 2010

Wierzbicka-Hainaut, Ewa / Sassolas, Bruno / Mourey, Laurent / Guillot, Bernard / Bedane, Christophe / Guillet, Gerard / Tourani, Jean Marc. ·Departments of Dermatology, CHU de Poitiers, Institut Claudius Rigaud, Toulouse, France. e.wierzbicka@chu-poitiers.fr ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #20075758.

ABSTRACT: Temozolomide (TMZ) is a second-generation alkylating agent that has recently shown some efficacy in stage IV melanoma. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy and safety of combination therapy with TMZ and cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with metastatic melanoma. Chemo-naive patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma were included in a phase II study of combined therapy with TMZ (200 mg/m/day), days 1-5, and CDDP (75 mg/m/day) on day 1. The treatment was given every 28 days, for up to six cycles. The primary endpoint was the overall response rate and the secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, probability of survival, and tolerance. Thirty patients were enrolled into this study. Median age was 59 years. A total of 126 cycles were administered. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicity was observed in 14 patients (46.6%) and clinical toxicity in seven patients (23.3%). No complete response was observed among the 30 included patients. Five patients (16.7%) achieved a partial response. An additional six patients (20%) showed disease stabilization and 17 patients (56.6%) revealed progressive disease. Median survival and median response duration were 8 and 7.2 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survivals were 36.7 and 13.3%. One- and 2-year progression-free survivals were 13.3 and 3.3%. Our results suggest that concurrent adjunction of CDDP to TMZ regimen increases toxicity according to this schedule and does not improve the outcome of stage IV melanoma. The objective response rate is close to response rates observed with single-agent chemotherapy.

7 Clinical Trial Temozolomide associated with PEG-interferon in patients with metastatic melanoma: a multicenter prospective phase I/II study. 2008

Guillot, Bernard / Khamari, Amir / Cupissol, Didier / Delaunay, Michele / Bedane, Christophe / Dreno, Brigitte / Picot, Marie Christine / Dereure, Olivier. ·Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Eloi, University of Montpellier I, Montpellier, France. b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #18337651.

ABSTRACT: Metastatic melanoma treatment remains disappointing, and a combined approach by chemotherapy and immunotherapy might increase the response rates through a synergistic action. Accordingly, a clinical trial using oral temozolomide (TMZ) and subcutaneous PEG-interferon alpha-2b (PEG) in patients with metastatic melanoma was designed to determine the maximal tolerated dosage of both drugs and the antitumoral response. A multicenter, prospective, phase I/II study was conducted in 31 metastatic melanoma patients, without cerebral metastasis. Dose escalation was performed according to the modified continual reassessment method scale and resulted in four cohorts of patients: TMZ 150 mg/m2 5 days/week each 4 weeks and PEG 0.5 microg/kg/week - TMZ 150 mg/m2 5 days/week and PEG 1.0 microg/kg/week - TMZ 200 mg/m2 5 days/week and PEG 0.5 microg/kg/week - TMZ 200 mg/m2 5 days/week and PEG 1.0 microg/kg/week. Patients received a maximum of six cycles. Thirty-three patients were enrolled in this study: one in the first dose level, one in the second one, 18 in the third one and 11 in the fourth one. At level 4, four of 11 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity and four nondose-limiting toxicity; toxicity was mainly hematologic (grade IV thrombocytopenia). An objective response was observed in five patients (two complete response and three partial response) receiving level 3 or 4 of treatment. The disease remained stable in three patients, and six of 31 patients were alive 24 months after enrollment. The association of oral TMZ with subcutaneous PEG in metastatic melanoma displayed an unacceptable hematological toxicity with the dosages of 200 mg/m2 5 days/week and 1 microg/week, respectively. At a lower level, this treatment was effective and deserves further investigations to define its indications in metastatic melanoma patients.

8 Article Adoptive Cell Therapy with Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Advanced Melanoma Patients. 2018

Saint-Jean, Mélanie / Knol, Anne-Chantal / Volteau, Christelle / Quéreux, Gaëlle / Peuvrel, Lucie / Brocard, Anabelle / Pandolfino, Marie-Christine / Saiagh, Soraya / Nguyen, Jean-Michel / Bedane, Christophe / Basset-Seguin, Nicole / Khammari, Amir / Dréno, Brigitte. ·Dermato-cancerology Department, CHU Nantes, Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes, France. · CIC1413, CRCINA INSERM U1232, CHU Nantes, Place Alexis Ricordeau, Nantes, France. · Research Leading Department, CHU Nantes, Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes, France. · Cell and Gene Therapy Unit, CHU Nantes, Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes, France. · SEME, CIC1413, CRCINA INSERM U1232, CHU Nantes, Place Alexis Ricordeau, Nantes, France. · Dermatology Department, University Hospital, 2 avenue Martin Luther King, 87042 Limoges Cedex, France. · Dermatology Department, Saint-Louis Hospital, 1 avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris Cedex 10, France. ·J Immunol Res · Pubmed #29750176.

ABSTRACT: Immunotherapy for melanoma includes adoptive cell therapy with autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). This monocenter retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this treatment of patients with advanced melanoma. All advanced melanoma patients treated with TILs using the same TIL expansion methodology and same treatment interleukin-2 (IL-2) regimen between 2009 and 2012 were included. After sterile intralesional excision of a cutaneous or subcutaneous metastasis, TILs were produced according to a previously described method and then infused into the patient who also received a complementary subcutaneous IL-2 regimen. Nine women and 1 man were treated for unresectable stage IIIC (

9 Article Real-world treatment patterns and clinical outcomes in advanced cutaneous melanoma patients in France. 2018

Sassolas, B / Leccia, M T / Godard, C / Benmahamed, L / Flinois, A / Levy-Bachelot, L / Bédane, C. ·Hôpital Morvan, CHU de Brest, Brest, France. · Hôpital Michallon, CHU de Grenoble, Grenoble, France. · MSD France, Courbevoie, France. · Kantar Health, Paris, France. · Hôpital Dupuytren, CHU de Limoges, Limoges, France. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28960564.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since 2011, the management of advanced melanoma has radically changed with the availability of new therapies (immunotherapy and BRAF-targeted therapy) and with BRAF testing. OBJECTIVES: Following the introduction of these new therapies, the objectives of this AMEL study were to describe treatment patterns and evaluate overall survival (OS) among unresectable stage III/IV melanoma patients, in a real-life setting in France. METHODS: The AMEL study is a multicentre retrospective record review study. Thirty-three physicians working in 33 unique treatment centres participated in the study. Two hundred and sixty-four patients diagnosed between 1 January 2012 and 31 October 2012 with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma were included in the study. RESULTS: 94.7% of the patients received a first-line antitumour drug treatment, 62.5% a second-line treatment while 26.9% received a third-line treatment with no significant differences between patients with a BRAF mutation (50.4%) and BRAF wild type (47.0%). First-line treatment differs according to the BRAF status: 74.8% of patients with a BRAF mutation received a BRAF inhibitor while 79.3% of the BRAF wild-type patients were treated with conventional chemotherapy. In second line and over, the treatment patterns were more heterogeneous, depending on the BRAF mutation, the treatment received previously, the speed of progression of the disease and the availability of immunotherapy at the time the treatment was initiated. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the BRAF mutation status, the median OS of patients was 16 months (95% CI = 14-18). Compared to a similar study conducted in 2007 (MELODY), a gain of 4 months is observed. The gain seems to be higher for patients with a BRAF mutation (18 months) than for those without a BRAF mutation (14 months). The OS of patients who sequentially received both a BRAF inhibitor and ipilimumab (28 months) highlights the benefit of this treatment sequence.

10 Article Ipilimumab in melanoma patients with brain metastasis: a retro-spective multicentre evaluation of thirty-eight patients. 2014

Konstantinou, Maria-Polina / Dutriaux, Caroline / Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline / Mortier, Laurent / Bedane, Christophe / Girard, Céline / Thellier, Sophie / Jouary, Thomas / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Richard, Marie-Aleth / Templier, Caroline / Sakji, Lilia / Guillot, Bernard / Paul, Carle / Meyer, Nicolas. ·Department of Dermatology, Toulouse III University and Larrey Hospital, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9, France. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #23824275.

ABSTRACT: Treatment with ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that antagonizes cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), results in improved survival of patients with stage IIIc-IV melanoma. However, there is a lack of data on the efficacy of ipilimumab in patients with brain metastases. To evaluate the efficacy of ipilimumab for the treatment of brain metastasis in melanoma, a multicentre, retrospective analysis of 38 patients with brain metastases in melanoma, treated with ipilimumab in the context of the French Expanded Access Program, was performed. Three patients had a 3 partial response, 5 stable disease, 15 disease progression and 15 patients died during the induction phase due to disease progression. Median overall survival was 101 days (range 54-154). The brain metastases control rate was 16% (6/38). Ipilimumab may be effective in a few patients with central nervous system metastasis. However, patients with brain metastases and a low life expectancy may not benefit sufficiently from treatment with ipilimumab.

11 Article Treatment patterns and outcomes among patients diagnosed with unresectable stage III or IV melanoma in Europe: a retrospective, longitudinal survey (MELODY study). 2012

Lebbe, C / Lorigan, P / Ascierto, P / Testori, A / Bédane, C / Middleton, M / van Baardewijk, M / Konto, C / Dueymes, A / Maio, M. ·Department of Dermatology, APHP U976, Paris 7 Diderot University, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. celeste.lebbe@sls.aphp.fr ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #22742880.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: MELanoma treatment patterns and Outcomes among patients with unresectable stage III or stage IV Disease: a retrospective longitudinal surveY (MELODY), the first multicountry, observational survey in patients with advanced melanoma, aimed to quantify the impact of existing treatment strategies by capturing information on treatment patterns and clinical outcomes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients attending a participating site between 1st July 2005 and 30th June 2006 with ≥2 months follow-up were eligible. Data were retrieved retrospectively from advanced melanoma diagnosis until 1st May 2008. Treatment data were collected by line of therapy and response and progression-free survival data by line of systemic treatment. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for all treated patients. RESULTS: Among all patients screened, 776 were eligible for this analysis. Median OS from the date of advanced disease diagnosis was 16.4 months. After excluding patients diagnosed prior to 1st July 2005 to account for any bias resulting from patient selection, the 12-month survival rate and median OS from the start date of second-line treatment was 28.8% and 6.8 months, respectively. Survival was lower in patients with brain metastases, elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels and more advanced disease. Rates of complete/partial tumour response were 15% and 7% in patients treated with first- and second-line systemic therapy, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite receiving first- and second-line treatment, most patients with advanced melanoma have short survival times and poor prognoses, reinforcing the need for new treatments.

12 Article Economic impact of healthcare resource utilisation patterns among patients diagnosed with advanced melanoma in the United Kingdom, Italy, and France: results from a retrospective, longitudinal survey (MELODY study). 2012

Johnston, K / Levy, A R / Lorigan, P / Maio, M / Lebbe, C / Middleton, M / Testori, A / Bédane, C / Konto, C / Dueymes, A / Sbarigia, U / van Baardewijk, M. ·Oxford Outcomes, Vancouver, Canada. Karissa.johnston@oxfordoutcomes.com ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #22480965.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe patterns of healthcare resource utilisation and associated costs for patients with advanced melanoma in the United Kingdom (UK), Italy, and France. METHODS: For patients receiving systemic treatment, or supportive care, data describing hospitalisations, hospice care, and outpatient visits were retrieved retrospectively from advanced disease diagnosis as part of a multicountry observational study. Costs were estimated by multiplying utilisation level by unit cost. In an exploratory analysis, costs were compared between individuals who died within one year of initiating first-line treatment (short-term survivors) and those with ≥ 1 year follow-up (long-term survivors). RESULTS: Hospitalisation costs were highest in France (€6262 per-person compared with €3225 in the UK and €2486 in Italy), reflecting higher rates of hospitalisation. In contrast, outpatient costs were highest in the UK (€782 per-person, compared with €115 in France and €72 in Italy), reflecting the highest rate and frequency of outpatient visits and the highest cost per visit. Hospitalisation rates were consistently higher during supportive care compared with systemic therapy. Roughly one-third of patients entered clinical trials and were not included in the analysis. In exploratory analysis, total costs were generally higher for long-term survivors, but monthly per-patient costs were generally lower for long-term survivors, consistent with a hypothesis that resource utilisation and costs do not necessarily increase proportionally with extended survival. CONCLUSION: Total costs associated with resource utilisation for advanced melanoma patients varied across countries. Overall cost differences were due to differences in frequency and intensity of utilisation patterns and variation in unit costs of health resources.

13 Article [Historic malignant tumour: 27 observations]. 2012

Sparsa, A / Doffoel-Hantz, V / Durox, H / Gaston, J / Delage-Core, M / Bédane, C / Labrousse, F / Sannajust, J P / Bonnetblanc, J-M. ·Service de dermatologie et vénéréologie, CHU Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoges, France. antoine.petit@sls.aphp.fr ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #22401683.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: When used in the French medical literature to describe a pathological state, the word "historic" normally refers to tumours of startling appearance because of their size. It is difficult to understand how a patient can allow such tumours to continue to grow. We attempt to define this concept. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two dermatologists carried out a retrospective, independent and comparative selection of photographs taken between 1978 and 2008 of malignant cutaneous tumours of unusual size given the histological diagnosis. Socio-professional, demographic, clinical, histological psychological data, and details of treatment history and progress were collected. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients (11 M, 16 F) of mean age 74 years (34-99 years) presented a "historic" tumour. Twelve patients lived in rural regions. Five patients were company executives. The average duration of development of the "historic" tumours was 4.5 years (6-420 months). The tumours were classed histologically as epidermoid carcinomas (nine) and melanomas (seven). The mean size was 13 cm (6-30 cm). Psychiatric problems, membership of sects or dementia were noted for 13 patients. Treatment consisted of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or, less frequently, surgery. Eighteen patients died on average 13 months after diagnosis. DISCUSSION: "Historic" malignant tumour (also described in the literature as "giant" tumour) is a real-life fact. No studies have been made of a series of such patients. Despite histological diagnosis, the size was associated with slow tumoral progress and/or late treatment, chiefly accounted for by psychiatric disorders. Socio-professional data indicate that "historic" tumours are equally common in urban and rural areas.

14 Article High prevalence and risk factors of thromboembolism in stage IV melanoma. 2011

Sparsa, A / Durox, H / Doffoel-Hantz, V / Munyangango, E-M / Bédane, C / Cendras, J / Gantois, C / Boulinguez, S / Bonnetblanc, J-M. ·Department of Dermatology of University Hospital, DUPUYTREN, Limoges, France. a.sparsa@free.fr ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #20629849.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer are at a high risk of thromboembolism (TE), which contributes to morbidity and mortality. Several case reports of thromboembolic events have been reported in patients with melanoma in the literature. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in stage IV melanoma and determine risk factors, outcomes associated with the development of VTE and the number of haemorrhagic complications in patients under anti-coagulant treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, we included all consecutive patients with stage IV melanoma among 290 patients followed-up in the department of Dermatology each year between January 2005 and 31 December 2007. The diagnosis of VTE was confirmed by venous ultrasound, pulmonary perfusion-ventilation technetium scan and angiography. The primary outcome was to evaluate the number of TE diagnosed in stage IV melanoma patients. The secondary outcomes were to study the influence of TE on survival, its prevalence according to metastatic sites and to evaluate the number of haemorrhagic complications. RESULTS: Twenty-four VTE events were found [25.2% (CI: 16.5-34)]. Eighteen VTE were deep venous thrombosis in lower limbs associated with pulmonary embolism (PE) in 50% of cases. Twenty-five percent were asymptomatic and were revealed in the pulmonary scan performed for follow-up. Eight percent of VTE events revealed stage IV melanoma. Seventeen patients developed thrombosis at home after stopping heparin prophylaxis. Seven thrombotic events occurred during oral anti-coagulant therapy. CONCLUSION: We found as high a prevalence of VTE in stage IV melanoma as in lung and gastrointestinal cancers. All patients suffered thrombotic events when they were treated with chemotherapy and at home when they stopped heparin prophylaxis. Therefore, heparin prophylaxis should be maintained at home.

15 Article Blue light is phototoxic for B16F10 murine melanoma and bovine endothelial cell lines by direct cytocidal effect. 2010

Sparsa, Agnes / Faucher, Karine / Sol, Vincent / Durox, Helene / Boulinguez, Serge / Doffoel-Hantz, Valerie / Calliste, Claude-Alain / Cook-Moreau, Jeanne / Krausz, Pierre / Sturtz, Franck G / Bedane, Christophe / Jauberteau-Marchan, Marie-Odile / Ratinaud, Marie-Helene / Bonnetblanc, Jean-Marie. ·Département de Dermatologie, CHRU Dupuytren, 2, Avenue Martin Luther King, 87042 Limoges, France. a.sparsa@free.fr ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #20150629.

ABSTRACT: MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two cell lines and irradiation with blue light were used. Cell mortality and a possible mechanism of action were investigated. RESULTS: Exposure of B16F10 melanoma and bovine endothelial cells to blue light (wavelength 450 nm, 10 J/cm(2) from a Waldman lamp) induced a rapid and large reduction in viability followed by the death of virtually all the irradiated cells within 24 h. These results led us to expose a patient with haemorrhagic cutaneous melanoma metastasis to blue light. Irradiation led to an immediate arrest of haemorrhage, an inhibition of tumour growth and extensive tumour necrosis 24h after irradiation. CONCLUSION: Exposure to blue light may offer new approaches to the treatment of superficial skin carcinomas in humans.