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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Rafia Bhore
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Rafia Bhore wrote the following 4 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Nivolumab Plus Ipilimumab in Patients With Advanced Melanoma: Updated Survival, Response, and Safety Data in a Phase I Dose-Escalation Study. 2018

Callahan, Margaret K / Kluger, Harriet / Postow, Michael A / Segal, Neil H / Lesokhin, Alexander / Atkins, Michael B / Kirkwood, John M / Krishnan, Suba / Bhore, Rafia / Horak, Christine / Wolchok, Jedd D / Sznol, Mario. ·Margaret K. Callahan, Michael A. Postow, Neil H. Segal, Alexander Lesokhin, and Jedd D. Wolchok, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY · Harriet Kluger and Mario Sznol, Yale University School of Medicine and Smilow Cancer Center, and Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT · Michael B. Atkins, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC · John M. Kirkwood, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA · and Suba Krishnan, Rafia Bhore, and Christine Horak, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29040030.

ABSTRACT: Purpose The clinical activity observed in a phase I dose-escalation study of concurrent therapy with nivolumab (NIVO) and ipilimumab (IPI) in patients with previously treated or untreated advanced melanoma led to subsequent clinical development, including randomized trials. Here, we report long-term follow-up data from study CA209-004, including 3-year overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods Concurrent cohorts 1, 2, 2a, and 3 received escalating doses of NIVO plus IPI once every 3 weeks for four doses, followed by NIVO once every 3 weeks for four doses, then NIVO plus IPI once every 12 weeks for eight doses. An expansion cohort (cohort 8) received concurrent NIVO 1 mg/kg plus IPI 3 mg/kg once every 3 weeks for four doses, followed by NIVO 3 mg/kg once every 2 weeks, which is the dose and schedule used in phase II and III studies and now approved for patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma. Results Among all concurrent cohorts (N = 94) at a follow-up of 30.3 to 55.0 months, the 3-year OS rate was 63% and median OS had not been reached. Objective response rate by modified WHO criteria was 42%, and median duration of response was 22.3 months. Incidence of grade 3 and 4 treatment-related adverse events was 59%. The most common grade 3 and 4 treatment-related adverse events were increases in lipase (15%), alanine aminotransferase (12%), and aspartate aminotransferase (11%). One treatment-related death (1.1%) occurred in a patient who had multiorgan failure 70 days after the last dose of NIVO plus IPI. Conclusion This is the longest follow-up for NIVO plus IPI combination therapy in patients with advanced melanoma. The 3-year OS rate of 63% is the highest observed for this patient population and provides additional evidence for the durable clinical activity of immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of advanced melanoma.

2 Clinical Trial Overall Survival with Combined Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma. 2017

Wolchok, Jedd D / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Gonzalez, Rene / Rutkowski, Piotr / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Cowey, C Lance / Lao, Christopher D / Wagstaff, John / Schadendorf, Dirk / Ferrucci, Pier F / Smylie, Michael / Dummer, Reinhard / Hill, Andrew / Hogg, David / Haanen, John / Carlino, Matteo S / Bechter, Oliver / Maio, Michele / Marquez-Rodas, Ivan / Guidoboni, Massimo / McArthur, Grant / Lebbé, Celeste / Ascierto, Paolo A / Long, Georgina V / Cebon, Jonathan / Sosman, Jeffrey / Postow, Michael A / Callahan, Margaret K / Walker, Dana / Rollin, Linda / Bhore, Rafia / Hodi, F Stephen / Larkin, James. ·From the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York (J.D.W., M.A.P., M.K.C.) · Oncology Institute of Veneto Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS), Padua (V.C.-S.), European Institute of Oncology, Milan (P.F.F.), Center for Immuno-Oncology, University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena (M.M.), the Immunotherapy and Somatic Cell Therapy Unit, IRCCS Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola (M.G.), and Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Pascale, Naples (P.A.A.) - all in Italy · University of Colorado, Denver (R.G.) · Maria Sklodowska-Curie Institute-Oncology Center, Warsaw, Poland (P.R.) · Aix-Marseille University, Hôpital de la Timone, Marseille (J.-J.G.), and Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Dermatology and Centres d'Investigation Clinique, INSERM Unité 976, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Université Paris Diderot, Paris (C.L.) - both in France · Texas Oncology-Baylor Cancer Center, Dallas (C.L.C.) · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (C.D.L.) · the College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea (J.W.), and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (J.L.) - both in the United Kingdom · the Department of Dermatology, University of Essen, Essen, and the German Cancer Consortium, Heidelberg - both in Germany (D.S.) · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (M.S.), and Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (D.H.) - both in Canada · Universitäts Spital, Zurich, Switzerland (R.D.) · Tasman Oncology Research, Southport Gold Coast, QLD (A.H.), Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney (M.S.C.), and Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, and Royal North Shore and Mater Hospitals (G.V.L.), Sydney, and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (G.M.) and the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, University of Melbourne (J.C.), Melbourne, VIC - all in Australia · Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (J.H.) · University Hospitals Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium (O.B.) · General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (I.M.-R.) · Northwestern University, Chicago (J.S.) · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ (D.W., L.R., R.B.) · and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (F.S.H.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #28889792.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nivolumab combined with ipilimumab resulted in longer progression-free survival and a higher objective response rate than ipilimumab alone in a phase 3 trial involving patients with advanced melanoma. We now report 3-year overall survival outcomes in this trial. METHODS: We randomly assigned, in a 1:1:1 ratio, patients with previously untreated advanced melanoma to receive nivolumab at a dose of 1 mg per kilogram of body weight plus ipilimumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for four doses, followed by nivolumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks; nivolumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks plus placebo; or ipilimumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for four doses plus placebo, until progression, the occurrence of unacceptable toxic effects, or withdrawal of consent. Randomization was stratified according to programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) status, BRAF mutation status, and metastasis stage. The two primary end points were progression-free survival and overall survival in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and in the nivolumab group versus the ipilimumab group. RESULTS: At a minimum follow-up of 36 months, the median overall survival had not been reached in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and was 37.6 months in the nivolumab group, as compared with 19.9 months in the ipilimumab group (hazard ratio for death with nivolumab plus ipilimumab vs. ipilimumab, 0.55 [P<0.001]; hazard ratio for death with nivolumab vs. ipilimumab, 0.65 [P<0.001]). The overall survival rate at 3 years was 58% in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and 52% in the nivolumab group, as compared with 34% in the ipilimumab group. The safety profile was unchanged from the initial report. Treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 59% of the patients in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group, in 21% of those in the nivolumab group, and in 28% of those in the ipilimumab group. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with advanced melanoma, significantly longer overall survival occurred with combination therapy with nivolumab plus ipilimumab or with nivolumab alone than with ipilimumab alone. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb and others; CheckMate 067 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01844505 .).

3 Article Pooled Analysis Safety Profile of Nivolumab and Ipilimumab Combination Therapy in Patients With Advanced Melanoma. 2017

Sznol, Mario / Ferrucci, Pier Francesco / Hogg, David / Atkins, Michael B / Wolter, Pascal / Guidoboni, Massimo / Lebbé, Celeste / Kirkwood, John M / Schachter, Jacob / Daniels, Gregory A / Hassel, Jessica / Cebon, Jonathan / Gerritsen, Winald / Atkinson, Victoria / Thomas, Luc / McCaffrey, John / Power, Derek / Walker, Dana / Bhore, Rafia / Jiang, Joel / Hodi, F Stephen / Wolchok, Jedd D. ·Mario Sznol, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, New Haven, CT · Pier Francesco Ferrucci, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan · Massimo Guidoboni, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola, Italy · David Hogg, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada · Michael B. Atkins, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC · Pascal Wolter, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium · Celeste Lebbé, Université Paris Diderot, Paris · Luc Thomas, Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Pierre-Bénite, France · John M. Kirkwood, Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA · Jacob Schachter, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel · Gregory A. Daniels, University of California San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA · Jessica Hassel, University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany · Jonathan Cebon, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Heidelberg, Victoria · Winald Gerritsen, University of Queensland, St Lucia · Victoria Atkinson, Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation, Greenslopes · Victoria Atkinson, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia · Winald Gerritsen, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands · John McCaffrey, Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group, Dublin · Derek Power, Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group, Cork, Ireland · Dana Walker, Rafia Bhore, and Joel Jiang, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ · F. Stephen Hodi, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA · and Jedd D. Wolchok, Parker Institute and Ludwig Center at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28915085.

ABSTRACT: Purpose The addition of nivolumab (anti-programmed death-1 antibody) to ipilimumab (anti-cytotoxic T-cell lymphocyte-associated 4 antibody) in patients with advanced melanoma improves antitumor response and progression-free survival but with a higher frequency of adverse events (AEs). This cross-melanoma study describes the safety profile of the approved nivolumab plus ipilimumab regimen. Methods This retrospective safety review on data from three trials (phase I, II, and III) included patients with advanced melanoma who received at least one dose of nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks × 4 and then nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity while following established guidelines for AE management. Analyses were of all treatment-related AEs, select (immune-related) AEs, time to onset and resolution, and use of immune-modulating agents and their effects on outcome. Results Among 448 patients, median duration of follow-up was 13.2 months. Treatment-related grade 3/4 AEs occurred in 55.5% of patients; 35.7% had treatment-related AEs that led to discontinuation. The most frequent treatment-related select AEs of any grade were skin (64.3%) and GI (46.7%) and of grade 3/4, hepatic (17.0%) and GI (16.3%); 30.1% developed a grade 2 to 4 select AE in more than one organ category. Median time to onset of grade 3/4 treatment-related select AEs ranged from 3.1 (skin) to 16.3 (renal) weeks, and with the exclusion of endocrine AEs, median time to resolution from onset ranged from 1.9 (renal) to 4.5 (pulmonary) weeks, with resolution rates between 79% and 100% while using immune-modulating agents. Four (< 1%) on-study deaths were attributed to therapy. Conclusion Frequency of grade 3/4 treatment-related AEs was higher with nivolumab plus ipilimumab and occurred earlier than historical experience with either agent alone, but resolution rates were similar.

4 Article Efficacy and Safety Outcomes in Patients With Advanced Melanoma Who Discontinued Treatment With Nivolumab and Ipilimumab Because of Adverse Events: A Pooled Analysis of Randomized Phase II and III Trials. 2017

Schadendorf, Dirk / Wolchok, Jedd D / Hodi, F Stephen / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Gonzalez, Rene / Rutkowski, Piotr / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Cowey, C Lance / Lao, Christopher D / Chesney, Jason / Robert, Caroline / Grossmann, Kenneth / McDermott, David / Walker, Dana / Bhore, Rafia / Larkin, James / Postow, Michael A. ·Dirk Schadendorf, University Hospital Essen and the German Cancer Consortium, Essen, Germany · Jedd D. Wolchok and Michael A. Postow, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center · Michael A. Postow, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY · F. Stephen Hodi, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute · David McDermott, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA · Vanna Chiarion-Sileni, Istituto Oncologico Veneto, Veneto, Italy · Rene Gonzalez, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO · Piotr Rutkowski, Maria Skłodowska Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland · Jean-Jacques Grob, Aix-Marseille Université, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille Timone, Marseille · Caroline Robert, Gustave Roussy and Université Paris-Sud, Paris, France · C. Lance Cowey, Texas Oncology-Baylor Cancer Center, Dallas, TX · Christopher D. Lao, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI · Jason Chesney, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY · Kenneth Grossmann, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT · Dana Walker and Rafia Bhore, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ · and James Larkin, Royal Marsden Hospital, London, United Kingdom. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28841387.

ABSTRACT: Purpose Approximately 40% of patients with advanced melanoma who received nivolumab combined with ipilimumab in clinical trials discontinued treatment because of adverse events (AEs). We conducted a retrospective analysis to assess the efficacy and safety of nivolumab plus ipilimumab in patients who discontinued treatment because of AEs. Methods Data were pooled from phase II and III trials of patients who received nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg, every 3 weeks for four doses, followed by nivolumab monotherapy 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks (N = 409). Efficacy was assessed in all randomly assigned patients who discontinued because of AEs during the induction phase (n = 96) and in those who did not discontinue because of AEs (n = 233). Safety was assessed in treated patients who discontinued because of AEs (n = 176) at any time and in those who did not discontinue because of AEs (n = 231). Results At a minimum follow-up of 18 months, median progression-free survival was 8.4 months for patients who discontinued treatment because of AEs during the induction phase and 10.8 months for patients who did not discontinue because of AEs ( P = .97). Median overall survival had not been reached in either group ( P = .23). The objective response rate was 58.3% for patients who discontinued because of AEs during the induction phase and 50.2% for patients who did not discontinue. The vast majority of grade 3 or 4 AEs occurred during the induction phase, with most resolving after appropriate management. Conclusion Efficacy outcomes seemed similar between patients who discontinued nivolumab plus ipilimumab treatment because of AEs during the induction phase and those who did not discontinue because of AEs. Therefore, even after discontinuation, many patients may continue to derive benefit from combination therapy.